I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Howick Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Monday, 19 October 2020

6:00pm

Howick Local Board Meeting Room
Pakuranga Library Complex
7 Aylesbury Street
Pakuranga

And via Skype for Business

Either a recording or written summary of the meeting will be uploaded to the Auckland Council website.

 

Howick Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Adele White

 

Deputy Chairperson

John Spiller

 

Members

Katrina Bungard

 

 

Bo Burns

 

 

David Collings

 

 

Bruce Kendall

 

 

Mike Turinsky

 

 

Bob Wichman

 

 

Peter Young, JP

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Vanessa Phillips

Democracy Advisor

 

14 October 2020

 

Contact Telephone: 021 891 378

Email: vanessa.phillips@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Mangemangeroa Environmental Educational Facility (MEEF) update to the Howick Local Board                                                                                             5

8.2     Howick Youth Council update to the Howick Local Board                             6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                    9

12        Governing Body Member update                                                                               11

13        Howick Local Grants Round One and Multiboard Grants Round One 2020/2021 grant allocations                                                                                                          13

14        Auckland Transport October 2020 monthly update to Howick Local Board        29

15        Ara Tai Reserve - Bucklands Beach Yacht Club (BBYC) car park lease exploration                                                                                                                                       39

16        Support for the next phase of the Howick Leisure Centre project                        47

17        Submissions and feedback on the draft Howick Local Board Plan 2020             57

18        Adoption of the Howick Local Board Plan 2020                                                      73

19        Resource Recovery Network Strategy update                                                         81

20        Landowner approval for Marist Eastern Rugby Club shipping containers at Barry Curtis Park                                                                                                                  101

21        Local board views on plan change to enable rainwater tank installation for the Auckland region                                                                                                         111

22        Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) six-monthly update to Howick Local Board 1 July to 31 December 2019                                115

23        Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) six-monthly update to Howick Local Board 1 January to 30 June 2020                                   123

24        Workshop records                                                                                                     141

25        Governance forward work calendar                                                                        151  

26        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Howick Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Monday, 21 September 2020, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Howick Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Mangemangeroa Environmental Educational Facility (MEEF) update to the Howick Local Board

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Rebecca Robinson, Chair of the Mangemangeroa Environmental Educational Facility Trust will be in attendance to provide the board with an update on the progress of the project.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from the Mangemangeroa Environmental Educational Facility Trust and thank Rebecca Robinson for her presentation.

 

 

 

8.2       Howick Youth Council update to the Howick Local Board

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Members of the Howick Youth Council will be in attendance to provide the board an update on the youth council’s activities, their response to the pandemic in addition to their plans for the year ahead.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from the Howick Youth Council and thank them for their attendance.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2020/14574

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This item gives the local board chairperson an opportunity to update the local board on any announcements and note the chairperson’s written report.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing the local board chairperson with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the chairperson’s verbal update and written report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 

Governing Body Member update

File No.: CP2020/14575

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Howick Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the local board on regional matters.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing the Howick Ward Councillors with an opportunity to update the local board on regional matters they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal reports from Cr Paul Young and Cr Sharon Stewart QSM.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 

Howick Local Grants Round One and Multiboard Grants Round One 2020/2021 grant allocations

File No.: CP2020/07596

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Howick Local Board with information on applications in Howick Local Grants Round One 2020/2021 and Multiboard Grants Round One 2020/2021; to enable a decision to fund, part fund or decline each application.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Howick Local Grants Round One 2020/2021 (Attachment B), and Multiboard Grants Round One 2020/2021 (Attachment C).

3.       The Howick Local Board adopted the Howick Local Board Community Grants Programme 2020/2021 on 18 May 2020 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $644,779 for the 2020/2021 financial year. There will be a total of three local grant, two multiboard and two quick response rounds in the 2020/2021 financial year.

5.       Forty-nine applications were received for Howick Local Grants Round One 2020/2021 requesting a total of $399,620.03. An additional three multiboard applications were received through Multiboard Grants Round One 2020/2021 requesting a total of $10,616.50.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in Howick Local Grants Round One 2020/2021 listed in the following table:

Table One: Howick Local Grants Round One 2020/2021 grant applications

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2107-108

Libretto Productions Limited trading as Children's Musical Theatre Studio

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire, lighting, sound, and costume costs for the "Wizard of Oz" musical theatre production in the local board area

$6215.78

Eligible

LG2107-116

Uxbridge Community Projects Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards overhead exhibition lighting in the Uxbridge concourse area

$3334.89

Eligible

LG2107-141

Pakuranga Choral Society Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards costs associated with holding the Pakuranga Choral Society concert, including fees for soloists, organists, pianist, conductor, venue hire and advertising costs

$4000.00

Eligible

LG2107-143

Howick Brass Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards stage, lighting and sound costs for Carols by Candle Light

$10,907.75

Eligible

LG2107-156

Harlequin Music Theatre Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards exterior cleaning costs for the Harlequin Music Theatre, including the roof, graffiti removal and cleaning of gutters

$3007.00

Eligible

LG2107-106

Independent Living Charitable Trust

Community

Toward costs for "Senior Connection Day" in Howick and Pakuranga

$3000.00

Eligible

LG2107-107

Dance Therapy NZ

Community

Towards, venue hire, marketing, facilitation, coordination, supervision, client support and liaison, equipment and administration for the "STARS" programme in the local board area

$8000.00

Eligible

LG2107-110

Blue Light Ventures Incorporated

Community

Towards costs for seven young people from the local board area to attend a week long life skills camp

$3043.60

Eligible

LG2107-111

The University of Auckland

Community

Towards venue hire costs for student-led speech therapy for free speech therapy in the community

$3166.50

Ineligible as the university is a public entity and excluded under the Grants Policy

LG2107-113

Pakuranga and Howick Budgeting Service

Community

Towards communications, technology and website maintenance costs for the Pakuranga and Howick Budgeting Service

$5000.00

Eligible

LG2107-115

The Toy Library Howick and Pakuranga Incorporated Society

Community

Towards rental costs "The Toy Library Howick and Pakuranga"

$3799.48

Eligible

LG2107-117

PHAB Association (Auckland) Incorporated

Community

Toward a contribution to youth worker wages for PHAB

$3000.00

Eligible

LG2107-120

Auckland Seniors Support And Caring Group Incorporated

Community

Towards a series of festivals including venue hire, food, drink, performance costs, groceries, administration and tutor fees from 1 November 2020 to 31 May 2021

$5000.00

Eligible

LG2107-121

St Luke's of Flat Bush Ecclesiastical Goods Trust trading as St Luke’s Catholic Community Church

Community

Towards costs of the church and community facilities community lounge, courtyard, meeting room, kitchen, bathrooms and audio-visual and landscaping and parking

$20,000.00

Eligible

LG2107-122

CNSST Foundation, formerly known as Chinese New Settlers Services Trust

Community

Towards classroom rental and contracted teachers costs of their "Unite Against COVID19 CNSST Education and Wellbeing Programme"

$15,000.00

Eligible

LG2107-123

No 40 (Howick) Squadron Air Training Corps

Community

Towards costs for aviation and bush craft training, maps, notebooks and covers, recruiting signage, coffee and urn

$3723.75

Eligible

LG2107-124

Howick Village Business Association

Community

Towards installation costs for flags promoting the Howick Village

$3009.00

Eligible

LG2107-125

Combined Probus Club of Botany Downs

Community

Towards venue hire costs for the Probus Club of Botany Downs

$1000.00

Ineligible

LG2107-126

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the Howick area share of the annual costs

$5000.00

Eligible

LG2107-127

South East Auckland Senior Citizens' Association Incorporated

Community

Towards transportation and accommodation costs to visit the Waitangi Treaty Grounds, Museum of Waitangi and Cape Reinga

$9000.00

Eligible

LG2107-129

The Burn Support Group Charitable Trust

Community

Towards transport costs to the annual children's burn camp

$2282.00

Ineligible

LG2107-130

Highland Park Community Creche Incorporated

Community

Towards six months rent in the Howick and Pakuranga Community Houses from 1 October 2020 to 31 March 2021

$9100.00

Eligible

LG2107-131

Howick Tourism Incorporated trading as East Auckland Tourism

Community

Towards website development including itinerary development and information on COVID19 recovery

$11,000.00

Eligible

LG2107-133

Sense Data Limited

Community

Towards advertising, promotion and monthly website hosting costs for the Shop Howick initiative

$5000.00

Eligible

LG2107-135

Howick Photographic Society

Community

Towards high visibility jackets and education and training of photographers

$3750.00

Eligible

LG2107-137

Combined Probus Club of Ormiston

Community

Towards bus hire costs for four trips for the group over 12 months

$3200.00

Eligible

LG2107-138

Pakuranga-rahihi Playcentre under the umbrella of Playcentre Aotearoa

Community

Towards drop down covers for the front decking

$5783.72

Eligible

LG2107-144

VetNet NZ Limited

Community

Towards costs associated with the VetNet NZ leadership and education programme, including advertising, website and application, materials, telecommunications and administration costs

$5000.00

Eligible

LG2107-147

Roopa Aur Aap Charitable Trust

Community

Towards costs to deliver the “Voice Against Elder Abuse” programme, including facilitators travel reimbursement, audio visual equipment hireage, attendees transport, facilitator charges, counsellor and materials

$3170.00

Eligible

LG2107-153

Te Tuhi Contemporary Art Trust

Community

Towards cafe trainer wages, including manager, front of house, food preparation and cooking and baking

$12,000.00

Eligible

LG2107-154

Khadija Leadership Network Trust

Community

Towards editor, writer, website developer and project management costs

$5000.00

Eligible

LG2107-151

The Friends Of Mangemangeroa Society Incorporated

Environment

Towards the purchase of traps and trapping materials and plant protectors

$3173.66

Eligible

LG2107-101

Howick Village Business Association

Events

Towards costs for traffic management for the Howick Village Christmas Fair 2020

$4279.00

Eligible

LG2107-105

The Howick Childrens Charitable Trust

Events

Toward the Howick Santa Parade costs

$30,264.30

Eligible

LG2107-128

Pakuranga Athletic Club

Events

Towards promotional and running costs associated with the Dick Quax Memorial Meet 2020

$9970.00

Eligible

LG2107-103

Howick and Pakuranga Chess Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Toward costs of the Howick Christmas Special Chess Tournament

$3100.00

Eligible

LG2107-112

Auckland Table Tennis Association

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire and development coaching for afterschool junior level programming

$8000.00

Eligible

LG2107-118

New Zealand Love Dance Association Incorporated.

Sport and recreation

Towards rent, trainers wages and choreography costs for the "Healthy Dance Programme"

$8460.00

Eligible

LG2107-132

Howick Squash Club

Sport and recreation

Towards professional and assistant coaching fees

$3000.00

Eligible

LG2107-134

Howick-Pakuranga Cricket Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards a new security and monitoring system, including design, manufacture, installation and commissioning costs

$17,541.00

Eligible

LG2107-136

Howick Sailing Club

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase and installation of windows, glass and doors for the Howick Sailing Club clubhouse

$24,838.60

Eligible

LG2107-139

Bucklands Beach Association Football Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards costs to lease the Howick Pakuranga Cricket Club facilities during the 2021 football season

$25,000.00

Eligible

LG2107-142

Howick Gymnastic Club

Sport and recreation

Towards a fan purchase and installation

$13,000.00

Eligible

LG2107-145

South Auckland Pickleball Club

Sport and recreation

Towards paddles, balls and court hire fees for the pickleball club

$1000.00

Ineligible

LG2107-146

Pakuranga United Rugby Club (Incorporated)

Sport and recreation

Towards operational and set up costs to run the World School Sevens Aotearoa event

$25,000.00

Eligible

LG2107-148

Fencibles United Association Football Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards junior annual prize giving trophies and awards

$4500.00

Eligible

LG2107-149

John Walker Find Your Field of Dreams Foundation

Sport and recreation

Towards swimming lesson costs as a component of the delivery of the Community Swim Programme

$25,000.00

Eligible

LG2107-155

Auckland Badminton Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire, equipment and feather shuttles for the East Auckland Badminton Programmes

$10,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$399,620.03

 

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in Multiboard Grants Round One 2020/2021 listed in the following table:   

Table Two: Multiboard Grants Round One 2020/2021 grant applications

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2021-146

Loopy Tunes Preschool Music

Community

Towards Loopy Tunes Preschool Music programme, including performance fees, venue hire (for four venues), travel costs (car hire, petrol and airfares), accommodation, button badges, catered food, administration and advertising costs and donations to a local marae

$3616.50

Eligible

MB2021-150

The Kids for Kids Charitable Trust

Community

Towards venue hire and production costs for the Kids Youth Choir performance at the Vodafone Events Centre

$4000.00

Eligible

MB2021-114

Auckland Softball Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards operating expenses for the Auckland Softball Association

$3000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$10,616.50

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme. The local board grants programme sets out:

·   local board priorities

·   lower priorities for funding

·   exclusions

·   grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·   any additional accountability requirements.

8.       The Howick Local Board adopted the Howick Local Board Community Grants Programme 2020/2021 on 18 May 2020 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

9.       The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio and community networks

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the Howick Local Board Plan 2017. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

11.     As outlined in the Howick Grants Programme 2020/2021, staff have also assessed each application according to which applications demonstrate a clear commitment to one or more of the following objectives in support of the recovery from COVID-19:

a)  strengthens business resilience and economic benefits

b)  produces local benefits, caters for local participation and increased visitors to the area

c)  show collaboration, the pooling of resources and benefits to multiple community groups and audiences

d)  encourages and fosters increased resilience, connectedness and wellbeing in our communities and environment.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

14.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Howick Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

16.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

19.     The Howick Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $644,779 for the 2020/2021 financial year.

20.     There will be a total of three local grant, two multiboard and two quick response rounds in the 2020/2021 financial year.

21.     Forty-nine applications were received for Howick Local Grants Round One 2020/2021 requesting a total of $399,620.03. An additional three multiboard applications were received through Multiboard Grants Round One 2020/2021 requesting a total of $10,616.50.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

22.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

23.     Following the Howick Local Board allocation of funding for the Local Grants Round One 2020/2021 and Mulitboard Grants Round One 2020/2021, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Howick Local Board Grant Programme 2020/2021

25

b

Howick Local Grants Round One 2020/2021 grant applications  (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Howick Multiboard Grants Round One 2020/2021 grant applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mary Kienholz - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 


 


 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 

Auckland Transport October 2020 monthly update to Howick Local Board

File No.: CP2020/14576

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Howick Local Board on transport related matters in their local board area, including the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) and the Community Safety Fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an opportunity to highlight Auckland Transport (AT) activities in the Howick Local Board area and contains information about the following:

a)  the wider context involving a summary of the strategic projects delivered in the Howick Local Board area and about Auckland Transport’s response to COVID-19

b)  an update on the Community Safety Fund (CSF)

c)  updates on local transport projects in the Howick Local Board area.

3.       A decision is not required this month.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport October 2020 monthly update report.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. Auckland Transport reports monthly to local boards, as set out in the Local Board Engagement Plan. 

5.       Monthly reporting acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities.

6.       Auckland Transport is currently delivering three key strategic projects in the Howick Local Board area and these are discussed within this report.

7.       Recently, the strategic environment has changed because of the impacts of COVID-19 pandemic. Information on Auckland Transport’s response is provided below.

Auckland Transport’s response to COVID-19

8.       Auckland Transport’s role throughout the COVID 19 pandemic is maintaining essential public transport services, road networks and infrastructure development throughout New Zealand’s response. This ensures that essential workers can move easily around the network and that the infrastructure programme is maintained.

9.       On 12 August 2020, Auckland moved to Alert Level 3 which saw Auckland Transport responding in a similar approach taken during the first lockdown. At Alert Level 3, Auckland Transport continued work on most projects, although work on some projects slowed down by the requirement to work in ‘bubbles. Work continues on planning and design work for projects.

10.     On 30 August 2020, Auckland moved to Alert Level 2.5 and then on 23 September 2020 moved to Alert Level 2. A move to Alert Level 1 appears to be imminent.

11.     During this most recent change in Alert Levels, it became mandatory for passengers on public transport to wear facemasks.  This is over and above the measure already in place that includes:

a)  separated seating to enable social distancing

b)  Additional cleaning and disinfecting of buses, trains and stations

c)  encouraging people to travel at off peak time to limit the amount of people on trains

d)  the utilisation of apps to allow people to plan their journeys and to minimise the amount of people on services.

12.     An additional learning has been identified with the AT HOP cards. Using registered cards on public transport also enables the ability to contact trace.

Airport to Botany – Rapid Transport Network (RTN)

13.     Auckland Council’s long-term goal for public transport is to have rapid transit networks region wide with services that run at least every 15 minutes and more frequently during peak hours. Some examples of RTNs are the rail network and the Northern Busway. Auckland Transport’s role is delivering this vision. The Airport to Botany – Rapid Transport Network (RTN) projects aim is to create a RTN linking the Airport and Botany.

14.     The project continues to progress and a public summary report for the second round of public consultation for the Southwest Gateway Programme / Airport to Botany RTN which took place from November to December 2019 is now available.

15.     In addition to outlining feedback from engagement, the public summary report also discusses the next steps for the project. Auckland Transport expects the final second stage of the business case will be submitted to the Auckland Transport and Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency board’s in late 2020 and endorsement will be sought to progress the projects into the next phase of development.

16.     Construction of the Puhinui Station Interchange and SH20B Early Improvements are underway. The improvements planned along Puhinui Road and Lambie Drive, Manukau are due to commence construction in late September 2020.

17.     The project team continues to engage with key stakeholders, the community and affected property owners and occupiers, with further consultation once the second stage of the business case have been endorsed. Feedback received during future engagement will be used to refine the design of the recommended options.

18.     Howick Local Board will be briefed in an upcoming workshop on the projects current progress.

Future Connect project

19.       Future Connect is Auckland Transport’s long-term plan for Auckland’s future transport system. The project intends to map Auckland’s Strategic Networks, defined as the most critical links of our current and future transport system. This work will cover the most important corridors, routes, intersections and public transport hubs in Auckland, identifying critical problems, opportunities and areas to explore in further detail.

20.       The project will ultimately create a 30-year vision for all transport modes such as: public transport, general traffic, freight, cycle and walking that will integrate this projects operations. This project will help inform the development of the Regional Land Transport Plan (Auckland Transport’s 10-year investment programme), and will guide future planning and investment

21.     Auckland Transport discussed Future Connect with Local Board Chairs at the 14 September 2020 Chairs Forum.

22.     In October and November 2020, the project team will be available to talk to interested Local Board Transport representatives. This will be an opportunity to provide a more detailed project overview, answer questions, seek local knowledge and an opportunity for alignment with Local Board Plans.

AMETI - Eastern Busway

23.     The AMETI - Eastern Busway is New Zealand’s first urban busway. The $1.4 billion busway will provide congestion free, bus only lanes for commuters from Botany to Panmure. In September 2020, the project team briefed the Howick Local Board on progress.

24.     Auckland Transport advises that a major closure is planned over Labour weekend in October 2020 at the intersection of Pakuranga Road and Ti Rakau Drive, Pakuranga that will cause three to four days of re-routing. It will have a large impact over this holiday period and overall will cause the least amount of disruption to road users. Auckland Transport believes this approach outweighs the alternative approach of long running intermittent closures

25.     Auckland Transport are working closely with Pakuranga Plaza management to ensure access and continuity of business over the holiday period in addition to a public communications campaign that will start in mid-October 2020.

26.     The steel frame that supports the new bridge over the Tāmaki River continues to move into location. The photos below show the frame moving across the river (the bright blue structure on the left) will support new lanes that will increase the routes capacity.

Figure One: Photos of Tāmaki Bridge

27.     To date, two of the four bridge spans have been launched across the Tāmaki River. The girders for the third span are completed and the eastern pier columns (that the bridge will rest on) are also completed. However, the spans on the western side are still under construction and as the bridge rolls across it will come to rest on these new columns.

28.     in recent weeks the following other work should be noted:

a)  In September 2020, the intersection at Basin View Lane, Lagoon Drive and Domain Road, Panmure were completed and re-opened

b)  the YMCA Lagoon Stadium's new entrance at 44 Domain Road, Panmure opened, and access from Lagoon Drive, Panmure closed.

29.     Auckland Transport discussed the formation of the new project alliance through local board reporting advising planning is progressing well on the next stages of the project.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

30.     This section of the report contains information about local projects, issues and initiatives. It provides summaries of the detailed advice and analysis provided to the local board during workshops and briefings.

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

31.     The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. Projects must also:

a)  be safe

b)  not impede network efficiency

c)  be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks may be considered if they support a transport outcome).

32.     The fund allows local boards to build transport focused local improvements in their areas.

33.     Auckland Transport assessed the financial impacts realised from the Emergency Budget 2020/2021 and provided advice to Howick Local Board on re-structuring their LBTCF programmes to meet the reduction in funding from the budget.

34.     Howick Local Board has been allocated approximately $2 million in funding. A workshop was held with the board and Auckland Transport on 3 September 2020 and a new programme of work was confirmed at their September 2020 meeting.

35.     The table below summarises the proposed programme.

Table One: Howick Local Board Transport Capital Fund Work Progamme

Project

Estimated cost to complete

2020/2021 Budget

2021/2022 Budget

Howick Village Centre Plan

$550,000

$185,000

$365,000

Howick Walking and Cycling Network Plan – Cascades Pathway

$570,000

$100,000

$470,000

Point View Drive Electronic Warning Signs

$83,000

$83,000

 

Information Plinth at Half Moon Bay Ferry Terminal

$37,000

$37,000

 

BUDGET

$406,971

$838,589

36.     Auckland Transport will provide the following LBTCF summary report on progress of LBTCF projects monthly. This table will provide an up to date summary of progress.


 

Table Two: Local Board Transport Capital Fund summary

General overview

Project

Current Status

Discussion

Howick Village Centre Plan

 

A project to develop detailed plans for upgrading the Howick Village Centre

Howick Walking and Cycling Network Plan – Cascades Pathway

 

Delivery of a key route in the Howick Walking and Cycling Network Plan

Point View Drive Electronic Warning Signs

 

Installing electronic speed warning signs on Point View Drive to reduce speeds

Information Plinth at Half Moon Bay Ferry Terminal

 

Building an information plinth at the Half Moon Bay Ferry Terminal so arriving visitors can orientate themselves and access local attractions more easily

Note: Project activity is by RAG status (red, amber, green) which measures the progress of the project:

Red – A major issue has been identified that needs to be resolved

Orange – An issue has been identified that may need to be resolved

Green – Project progressing ‘on time’ and on budget

Detailed project progress report

Howick Village Centre Plan

Auckland Transport has appointed a project manager and is actively participating in the Howick Village Centre Plan Steering Group.

Howick Walking and Cycling Network Plan – Cascades Pathway

Auckland Council is leading this project and Auckland Transport will organise the transfer of LBTCF to Community Facilities as soon as possible.

Point View Drive Electronic Warning Signs

Planning documents shared with the local board showed possible locations for the signs and work on delivering this will begin soon.

Half Moon Bay Information Plinth

Auckland Transport staff have not started work on this project yet.

Flatbush School Road Pedestrian Bridge

37.     This project started as a Community Safety Fund project. The Community Safety Fund planned to deliver a total of $20 million distributed across all 21 local boards for road safety initiatives identified by local boards and ward councilors.

38.     The Community Safety Fund is not included in the Emergency Budget 2020/2021 therefore, Auckland Transport is funding construction of a pedestrian bridge to allow safer pedestrian use of Flatbush School Road.

39.     Completion of the pedestrian bridge is planned for either December 2020 or January 2021. Completion of this bridge will allow removal of the current local traffic controls in place that enable pedestrians to cross safely.

New bus shelter in Howick Village

40.     After advocacy from the local board, Auckland Transport has decided to construct a new bus shelter outside The Good Home / Prospect of Howick, on Picton Street, Howick. Damage to the original bus shelter from a bus connecting with it as it was pulling away from the kerb was difficult to replace without this occurring again with Auckland Transport’s existing range of shelters. This resulted in the damaged shelter being removed and not replaced.

41.     Recently, new cantilevered shelters have been designed that will be able to be installed without a danger of being damaged by buses pulling away from the kerb. Below is a picture of the new shelter under construction, By the October meeting the shelter should be installed.

Figure Two: New cantilevered bus shelter

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

42.     Auckland Transport engages closely with the council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Auckland Council’s priorities.

43.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

44.     Auckland Transport continues to liaise and work with Community Facilities to deliver sections of the Howick Walking and Cycling Network Plan and will coordinate use of LBTCF funding to deliver this project.

45.     Auckland Transport assessed impacts of the Emergency Budget 2020/021 and is working with Community Facilities to provide quality advice and discuss impacts from the reduced budget with the board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Auckland Transport consultations

46.     Over the last reporting period, Auckland Transport liaised with the local board on two local projects, a summary is included as Attachment A.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

47.     There are no specific impacts on Māori for this reporting period. Auckland Transport is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Treaty of Waitangi) and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori. Our Maori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     Receiving this report has no direct financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     The proposed decision to receive the report has no risks. Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for all of its projects.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

50.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board next month.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of consultation sent to Howick Local Board

37

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ben Stallworthy – Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 

Ara Tai Reserve - Bucklands Beach Yacht Club (BBYC) car park lease exploration

File No.: CP2020/11839

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve exploration of a lease over approximately 88 car parks at Ara Tai Reserve for Bucklands Beach Yacht Club’s (BBYC) exclusive use.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       BBYC has a longstanding request to be provided with exclusive use over car park spaces at Ara Tai Reserve.

3.       The local board support the provision of a commercial lease over approximately 88 car parks for BBYC’s exclusive use at Ara Tai Reserve (Attachment A).

4.       A commercial lease with flexible options to renew will enable the local board to respond to changes in car park demand over time. The commercial rent will fund car park asset depreciation and maintenance costs and ensure the wider car park continues to be maintained to agreed service levels.

5.       Ara Tai Reserve comprises four land parcels held under the Reserves Act (1977) (See Attachment B). Their current reserve status does not support commuter parking and must be classified to ‘local purpose community facilities and parking reserve’ to facilitate a lease to BBYC over a portion of the car park and allow for commuter parking over the remainder.

6.       It is recommended that the board provides $10,000 under the Community Response Fund to formally assess the opportunity and to fund the classification of all relevant reserve land parcels as part of this process so that parking for the club, as well as the wider commuting public is enabled under the Reserves Act (1977). It is also recommended that BBYC meets all of the costs associated with establishing a lease.

7.       If supported, Community Facilities will prepare a lease in consultation with BBYC and workshop the lease conditions with the board prior to seeking formal approval at a business meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve the exploration of a commercial lease in consultation with BBYC over approximately 88 car parks at Ara Tai Reserve.

b)      allocate $10,000 under the Community Response Fund towards the assessment of the commercial opportunity and classification of the relevant land parcels to ‘local purpose community facilities and parking reserve’ to enable commuter and club parking under the Reserves Act (1977).

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Ara Tai Reserve is held under the Reserves Act (1977) and provides car parking predominantly for commuting by ferry, fishing and sailing.

9.       At workshops held in May and September 2020, the local board provided support for the provision of a lease over approximately 88 car parks for BBYC’s exclusive use at Ara Tai Reserve (Attachment A).

10.     Board members also expressed a desire that the car parks currently utilised as dinghy storage space would have to be accommodated by BBYC within their leased area. The most practical footprint for this option is shown in attachment A but noting that variations on this are possible.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Reserve classification

11.     Ara Tai Reserve comprises four land parcels held under the Reserves Act (1977) (see Attachment B). Their current reserve status does not support commuter parking and must be classified to facilitate a lease to BBYC over a portion of the car park.

12.     Land parcels identified as A and B make up the majority of the car parking space and are held as unclassified community facilities and recreation reserve respectively.

13.     Land parcels C and D are also community facilities reserve and provide a small amount of car parking provision with most of the space forming concrete hardstand and vegetated reserve.         

14.     To support provision of a lease to BBYC over a portion of the car park, the relevant reserve area must be classified to ‘local purpose community facilities and parking reserve’. It would also be timely as part of this process to classify all remaining parts of the reserve so that commuter parking is enabled under the Reserves Act (1977).

Lease principles

15.     The 2018 and 2020 Ara Tai car park survey findings indicate that commuter parking occurs in the area being considered for leasing. This includes early morning car parking outside of the club’s operating hours. Misleading signage incorrectly indicates the club has enforcement powers over this general area and that non-member vehicles will be towed. It is not however clear if the current commuter parking occurring in this area is predominantly being undertaken by club members.

16.     Club use of the car park, including for commuter purposes, increases visitation to the reserve, resulting in extra wear and tear on council owned and managed infrastructure. Because of this and the fact that extensive exclusive parking is not normally provided as part of a community lease, it is recommended that the lease make a provision for a commercial component.

17.     It is proposed that the commercial rent be determined by considering the commercial value of the land, asset maintenance as well as depreciation costs.

18.     Granting a lease with flexible options to renew, ensures that medium to long term changes in demand, either for parking or recreation, can be considered and responded to by the local board. 

19.     The recommendation that maintenance and renewals responsibilities for the proposed lease area, at least for the asphalt seal and any below ground services, remain with Auckland Council is made on the basis that the area forms part of a much larger car park and ensures the asset continues to be maintained to agreed service levels.

Dinghy storage

20.     There are two dinghy storage areas on the reserve. One area (Attachment A yellow box) is adjacent to the area proposed for lease and covers the equivalent of approximately 22 car park spaces. It is used for the storage of the BBYC’s sailing dinghies and contributes to their ability to provide valuable learn-to-sail experiences. It is proposed that the club’s storage requirements are considered as part of this lease negotiation process so that the club’s use of reserve land for both parking and dinghy storage is formalised.

21.     The other boat storage area is located in the north western corner of the reserve (Attachment A red box) beside the public boat ramps. Because this space is thought to be used by both club members and the general public, and because of its strategically important location directly beside the boat ramps, it is not proposed that this area be included in an agreement that would give exclusive use to BBYC.

Lease development process

22.     If supported, the following process will be applied to grant a new lease and classify the reserve land parcels:

·   conduct mana whenua engagement

·   publicly notify intention to enter into a new lease

·   seek formal local board approval via a business report for reserve classification and lease grant

·   report to the Minister of Conservation to sign gazette notice for reserve classification

·   lease executed by Auckland Council, Minister for Conservation and Leaseholder.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     There are no climate change implications from the recommendations made in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     Community Facilities support provision of a commercial lease to BBYC that funds the maintenance and renewal of the leased car park area while continuing to control maintenance and renewals planning and delivery to ensure service levels at the reserve remain consistent.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     The local board provided support at workshops held in May and October 2020 for the provision of a lease over approximately 88 car parks at Ara Tai Reserve. The lease footprint is to include the car parks currently utilised as dinghy storage space.

26.     The local board also supported preparation of a lease with a commercial rent to cover asset depreciation and maintenance costs with a term of no more than ten years.

27.     Providing a lease to BBYC over the car park area will contribute to the delivery of the following local board plan outcomes:

·   Outcome 1: We are proud of our area and participate in our community to make Howick a great place to live, work and play

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     Parks and heritage are of fundamental importance to mana whenua, their culture and traditions. The recommendations made in this report provide benefits to Iwi and the wider community by providing continued support for BBYC’s social and education programmes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     It is recommended that BBYC meet all costs associated with establishing a lease including commercial valuation.

30.     The board has sufficient operating budget under the Community Response Fund to allocate $10,000 towards reserve classification.

31.     As the proposal is currently to classify all the relevant parcels under the same classification, staff do not foresee the need for a survey, but additional board funding may be sought in this regard if required.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     Allocation of $10,000 under the Community Response Fund for reserve classification to enable preparation of a lease for BBYC over the car park is a step towards providing for a wider range of users.

33.     Granting a lease, with flexible options to renew, ensures that the local board retains control and can respond to changes in car parking demand. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     In consultation with BBYC, Community Facilities will prepare and workshop with the local board a draft lease prior to seeking formal approval at a business meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Proposed lease footprint and dinghy storage areas

43

b

Ara Tai Reserve land parcels

45

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Steve Owens - Parks and Places Specialist

Authorisers

Fiona Johnson – Acting General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 

Support for the next phase of the Howick Leisure Centre project

File No.: CP2020/14677

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Findings Report – Review of indoor active recreation services/facilities in Howick and Pakuranga.

2.       To endorse the proposed next phase of the Howick Leisure Centre project and approve $15,000 of local board Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operating expenditure to develop a bulk and location assessment.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Howick Leisure Centre (HLC) is an aging facility with ongoing condition issues.

4.       Staff undertook a comprehensive review of the indoor active recreation needs and services in Howick and Pakuranga to inform the local board of options for recreation services in Howick.

5.       The review found that gaps exist in the provision of indoor active recreation services for Asian migrants, older people in general and particularly for Asian older people across the Howick and Pakuranga area, regarding activities such as; social dancing, badminton, table tennis, futsal, casual active recreation opportunities and group fitness classes.

6.       To meet the current and future community needs for indoor active recreation services, additional space is required:

·   large-fit-for-purpose group fitness rooms

·   a full-size indoor court

·   large multi-use activity space.

7.       The HLC is at capacity and unable to address the current gaps in services. 

8.       The structure, condition, layout and use of the HLC makes it difficult to modify the forty-four year old building to address the increasing demand and long-term indoor active recreation needs of the Howick and Pakuranga community.

9.       Staff identified four options for Howick recreation services:

·   Option A – status quo / compliance requirements only

·   Option B – full renewal of HLC

·   Option C – full renewal and extension of HLC

·   Option D – sell the HLC site and build to relocate services to Lloyd Elsmore Park.

10.     Staff assessed Option D as having the highest potential to directly address the current and future indoor active recreation needs of the Howick and Pakuranga community.

11.     Further investigation is required to test the viability of Option D, proposed as the next phase of this project for the 2020/2021 financial year.

12.     The next step to assess the viability of Option D is to create a bulk and location assessment of an area in Lloyd Elsmore Park that could provide the space required to meet the current and future indoor active recreation needs of the community.   

13.     This report recommends endorsement of the next phase of the Howick Leisure Centre project and requests funding of $15,000 for the costs to develop a bulk and location assessment.  

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the Findings Report – Review of indoor active recreation services/facilities in Howick and Pakuranga.

b)      endorse the proposed next phase of the Howick Leisure Centre project to assess the viability of Option D – sell the Howick Leisure Centre site and build to relocate services in Lloyd Elsmore Park.

c)      approve $15,000 from the Howick Local Board Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operating expenditure budget to develop a bulk and location assessment.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

14.     Howick Leisure Centre (HLC) is in need of repairs costing more than the renewals budget available. 

15.     The facility is forty-four years old, has on-going water tightness issues, experiences flooding on site, and requires significant repairs/replacements due to the age of the building. These issues are hindering the effective delivery of the council’s indoor active recreation services for the Howick and Pakuranga community.

16.     The poor condition of the HLC facility created an opportunity to undertake a strategic review of the indoor active recreation needs in the Howick and Pakuranga area to determine how the HLC and other council facilities are, or can, address those needs both now and in the future (approved on 2019/2020 Service Strategy and Integration work programme resolution number HW/2019/126).

17.     The purpose of this review was to:

·   confirm current and anticipated future indoor active recreation service requirements

·   assist the local board with investment decisions relating to the future of Howick Leisure Centre services/facility.

We completed a comprehensive review of indoor recreation services in Howick and Pakuranga

18.     While Howick Leisure Centre was the focus of this review, there are four other leisure facilities providing indoor active recreation services that have also been considered given their close proximity (within five kilometres) to HLC. These are:

·   Lloyd Elsmore Park Pool and Leisure Centre

·   Pakuranga Leisure Centre

·   Pakuranga Community Hall

·   Marina Fitness.

19.     To understand the breadth of council’s indoor active recreation provision, we reviewed the services, programmes and customer satisfaction data from the five leisure facilities. We also did research to identify any unmet or anticipated need for indoor active recreation services by engaging with the general public.

20.     Staff presented the key findings from the review and the emergent long-term options for the future of Howick Leisure Centre at workshops with the local board on 30 April 2020 and 24 September 2020.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

21.     The Findings Report – Review of indoor active recreation services/facilities in Howick and Pakuranga summaries the approach and key findings (refer Attachment A).

Key findings from our review

22.     The HLC is a well-utilised facility with a positive reputation as a core provider of indoor active recreation services (along with other council and non-council facilities offering complementary services to the community). We found:

·      gaps exist in accessing indoor active recreation services for Asian migrants, older people in general and particularly for Asian older people

·      the service gaps include social dancing, badminton, table tennis, futsal, casual active recreation opportunities and group fitness classes

·      to meet current and future community need, additional space is required:

o  large fit-for-purpose group fitness rooms

o  a full-size indoor court

o  large multi-use activity space.

Current capacity and configuration of HLC limits the ability to deliver more

23.     The HLC is at capacity and unable to address the current gaps in services.

24.     The small, narrow-shaped group fitness room located upstairs in the HLC facility does not meet the requirements as a venue for the majority of group fitness activities and classes.

25.     The structure, condition, layout and use of the HLC makes it difficult to modify the forty-four year old building to address the increasing demand and long-term indoor active recreation needs of the community.

Constraints with the site prohibits extensive expansion of HLC

26.     There is little opportunity to expand the current HLC facility due to the constraints of the site, in particular the narrow shape and size, the location of the community owned buildings on the property (with associated carpark requirements) and being prone to flooding.

27.     While the site offers some opportunity for expansion it is not possible to accommodate all the service requirements. 

Four options identified for the future of HLC services/facility

28.     Staff presented four long-term options for the future of HLC services/facility to the local board at a workshop on 30 April 2020. 

29.     The table below identifies each option, what is involved to implement that option, and the additional indoor active recreation space it could provide beyond what is currently provided.


 

Table One: Options identified for the future of Howick Leisure Centre services/facility

Option

What is involved

Additional space

Option A – status quo / compliance requirements only

·    undertaking the current renewals programme of short-term critical works per health and safety requirements only.

no additional space provided

Option B – full renewal of the HLC facility

·    full renewal of the HLC facility as per a building assessment report 

·    full remediation to address flood issues on the property.

no additional space provided

Option C – full renewal and extend the HLC facility

·    full renewal of the HLC facility as per a building assessment report

·    extending the facility footprint at the front of the building for additional space provision

·    the number of carparks will be reduced from what is currently on site

·    full remediation to address flood issues on the property

·    at least partial closure of the facility for nine months to a year.

two new large group fitness rooms

 

Option D – sell the HLC site and build to relocate services to Lloyd Elsmore Park

 

·    selling the HLC property and building new on Lloyd Elsmore Park (LEP) to relocate current HLC services and provide additional indoor recreation spaces

·    new build potentially as an extension and upgrade to the Lloyd Elsmore Park Pool and Leisure Centre facility  

·    five community leased buildings at the back of the HLC property can probably be retained

·    using the revenue from the sale of the HLC site towards the new build

·    investigating partnership opportunities with the LEP multi-sport hub community group and individual sport clubs.

·    two new large group fitness rooms

·    one additional new full-size court

·    a large multi-use activity space.

Assessment of options

30.     We identified principles to develop and assess the long-term options for the future of Howick recreation services. These principles are:

·   contributes towards future-proofing assets

·   aligns with council and sector policies, plans and strategies

·   responds to the needs of community (e.g. service gaps and additional space required)

·   minimal disruption of current recreation services during implementation

·   value for investment related to improved community outcomes.

31.     The table below compares each option against the five principles.  The options were workshopped with the board on 30 April 2020.  

Table Two: Comparison of each option against principles

Options

Contributes towards future-proofing assets

Aligns with the council and sector policies, plans and strategies

Responds to the needs of community (e.g. service gaps and additional space required)

Minimal disruption of current recreation services during implementation

Value for investment related to improved community outcomes

Option A – status quo / compliance requirements only

·   no additional space

X

X

X

/

X

Option B – full renewal of the HLC facility

·   no additional space

X

/

X

X

/

Option C – full renewal and extend the HLC facility

·   two new large group fitness rooms

/

/

/

X

/

Option D – sell the HLC site and build to relocate services to Lloyd Elsmore Park

·   two (or more) new large group fitness rooms

·   an additional full-size court

·   a large multi-use activity space.

ü

ü

ü

ü

?

Key:  X = No   / = Partially  ü= Yes  ? = uncertain at this time

32.     Since the April 2020 workshop, staff have considered the impact of COVID-19 and the council’s Emergency Budget 2020/2021 and determined there is a significant funding challenge for all options. Prior to COVID-19, that challenge was limited to Options C and D only.

33.     The challenge means there is now a greater need for innovation and exploring partnership opportunities. 

Recommend pursuing Option D – Sell the HLC site and build to relocate services to LEP

34.     Staff have assessed the four long-term options for the provision of Howick recreation services and recommend investigating Option D further to determine the practical and financial viability of this option.

35.     Option D has the highest potential to address the current and future indoor active recreation needs of the Howick and Pakuranga community.

36.     Staff propose further consideration of:

·      Partnerships: investigate key stakeholder requirements for recreation space to identify opportunities for partnership/collaboration

·      Resources: research potential capital revenue and develop a proposed funding plan for the implementation of Option D

·      Design: create a bulk and location assessment for the area of Lloyd Elsmore Park that could provide the additional indoor active recreation spaces required to meet current and future community need.

37.     This work will assess the viability of implementing Option D and will be reported to the local board in their quarter four report of the 2020/2021 financial year.

38.     A summary of the next steps of the project is in the diagram below (note that the diagram refers to the bulk and location assessment as an Integrated Spatial Plan).

Diagram One: Summary of next steps of the project

    

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

39.     The next phase of this project has no direct climate impact. 

40.     The development of a bulk and location assessment will include consideration of climate impacts that will make best use of the land, and space as multi-purpose, with minimal impact on the environment.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

41.     The review of indoor active recreation services in Howick and Pakuranga involved input and specialist advice from across the council family, including Community Facilities, Active Recreation, Local Board Services, Community Places, Panuku Development Auckland and Service Strategy and Integration.

42.     If support is received from the local board, representatives from the same departments will contribute to the next phase of the project. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Local impacts

43.     The expected demographic changes in the area have been considered and will inform future service design to recognise the different indoor active recreation needs of the community.

44.     The proposed next phase of this project is a direct response to address the current gaps in council’s recreation services (particularly for Asians, older people in general and Asian older people) as well as to address the future indoor active recreation needs of the wider community (based on growth predictions).

Community partnerships opportunities

45.     For many years, a local community group comprising of the Howick Gymnastics Club, the Pakuranga Tennis Club, and the Pakuranga Bowling Club have been planning to build a multi-sport hub facility on the current grounds of the bowling club at Lloyd Elsmore Park (LEP).  This property is in close proximity to Auckland Council’s Lloyd Elsmore Park Pool & Leisure Centre.

46.     An opportunity exists to investigate the potential for service provision alignment between council and the LEP multi-sport hub group to integrate spaces of a new build for significant cost savings. 

47.     Project staff met with the LEP multi-sport hub group on two occasions. At a 31 August 2020 meeting, positive feedback was received in support of the proposed next phase of the project (including exploring opportunities to partner/collaborate).

48.     Pakuranga Netball Association have also expressed an interest in the proposed next phase of this project to potentially align their need for covered courts with the service and space requirements of a new additional indoor court.    

Local board views

49.     Driven by the ongoing costs of repairs to HLC, the Howick Local Board provided the following direction in a June 2019 workshop:

·      Community Facilities to carry out short-term critical capital works within available renewal budget (prioritising health and safety items) to enable the centre to remain operational

·      Service Strategy and Integration to investigate the indoor active recreation needs/services in Howick and Pakuranga to develop options for the long-term future of Howick Leisure Centre services/facility.

50.     At a workshop on 30 April 2020 staff presented the key findings from the investigation and the emergent long-term options for the future of Howick Leisure Centre. The board were unable to provide direction to staff regarding their preferred option due to the uncertainty around the impact of COVID-19.

51.     Further workshops with the local board were postponed due to COVID-19 restrictions and the shift in focus that required prioritisation of work regarding the council’s 2020/2021 Emergency Budget.

52.     A memo was sent to the board on 20 July 2020 signaling a September 2020 workshop to provide advice on the implications of council’s budget on project outcomes.

53.     Prior to the 24 September 2020 workshop, staff provided a tour of the Howick Leisure Centre for interested local board members as a way to gain insight into the facility’s current condition and operations.

54.     This report summarises the 24 September 2020 workshop with the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

55.     In the 2018 census, approximately five per cent of people living in the Howick Local Board area identified as Māori. 

56.     The proposed next phase of this project will have no specific impact on Māori, however a new build has the potential to contribute to Māori outcomes through provision of additional services and place-making opportunities.

57.     Recreational services contribute to social outcomes under three directions in the Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau 2017:

Diagram Two: Directions in the Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau 2017

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

58.     The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent financial impacts for Auckland Council resulted in the adoption of the Emergency Budget 2020/2021 with reduced financial capacity.

59.     While Option D is likely to deliver the greatest outcomes for the community, it is also likely to cost the most out of the four options. Although this is a significant challenge under council’s current financial environment, Option D has a wider range of funding opportunities than the other three options identified for the future of Howick recreation services.

60.     Funding opportunities that could be explored under the proposed next phase of the project include; the sale of the HLC site and direct service reinvestment, the council’s Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund, redirection of renewals budget, third party investment funding, and public-private investment partnerships.


 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

61.     The following table outlines the risks and mitigation associated with the recommendation for pursuing Option D – sell the HLC site and relocate services to Lloyd Elsmore Park.

Table Three: Risks and mitigations

Risk and impact

Level (related to project outcomes)

Mitigation

If there is another level 2 or higher lockdown period for the COVID-19 pandemic, then the timeframe for this project may be impacted

Low

· designing adaptable and flexible methods of communication so work can continue to progress if face-to-face collaboration is limited

If community group stakeholders choose not to collaborate / partner with council, then there may be no additional indoor active recreation services or spaces provided for the Howick and Pakuranga community

Medium

· establishing common community outcome goals with key stakeholders

· regular communication with stakeholders

If council staff are unable to undertake work for developing an Integrated Spatial Plan, then SS&I staff may not be able to provide the board with practical advice regarding the future of HLC services/facility as planned

Medium

· verifying the availability of council’s design team once approval is received from the local board

· if council’s design team are unavailable, then procuring the work to an independent contractor (although not optimal)

If little or no capital revenue sources can be identified as part of the Resources workstream, then this could impact on the value of the Integrated Spatial Plan as a future planning resource

High

· monitoring dependencies throughout this next phase of this project

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

62.     If support is received from the local board on the next phase of this project, work will commence.

63.     Staff expect to report back to the local board on the outcome of the assessment and provide support to the local board on a decision regarding the future of Howick recreation services in May 2021.  


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Findings Report - Review of indoor active recreation services/facilities in Howick and Pakuranga (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kimberly Rees - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Service Strategy and Integration

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 

Submissions and feedback on the draft Howick Local Board Plan 2020

File No.: CP2020/14814

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an overview of feedback and submissions received from public consultation on the draft Howick Local Board Plan 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires that each local board complete a local board plan for adoption by 31 October of the year following an election and uses the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with its communities.

3.       In June 2020, the local board approved a draft Howick Local Board Plan 2020 for public consultation. The consultation period ran from 13 July to 13 August 2020.

4.       A total of 543 pieces of feedback was received, including 161 submissions through the online survey tool and 369 hard copy submissions.

5.       Staff have prepared a report (Attachment A) summarising the results of the consultation.

6.       All feedback will be available on the Auckland Council website at https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/howickplan

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive submissions and feedback on the draft Howick Local Board Plan 2020.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires that each local board must:

a)  adopt its local board plan by 31 October of the year following an election

b)  use the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

8.       On 15 June 2020, Howick Local Board approved the release of a draft Howick Local Board Plan 2020 for public consultation.

9.       The key features of the draft Howick Local Board Plan 2020 were:

a)  a new focus on supporting the community to recover from the impacts of COVID-19

b)  increased emphasis on building relationships with Māori.

10.     The outcomes of the draft local board plan were:

i)   People in our communities feel safe, engaged and connected

ii)  Well-planned public spaced that support active, healthy and sustainable lifestyles

iii) Heritage, local arts and cultural diversity are valued

iv) Our natural environment is protected, restored and enhanced

v)  A prosperous local economy supporting business growth and opportunity

vi) Effective and accessible transport choices.

11.     In addition to understanding the needs and aspirations of the community, feedback was sought on how the local board can support the community and local businesses in recovering from the impact of COVID-19.

How we consulted

12.     The consultation was held between 13 July and 13 August 2020. A range of engagement activities were undertaken to encourage the public to have their say, with a focus on these digital and online platforms:

·   public submissions: these were hard copy and online collected via email, post, libraries, service centres, local board offices, People’s Panel and the online survey tool akhaveyoursay/lovelocal

·   Have Your Say: face-to-face and Skype for Business enabled engagement events (spoken interaction) were held on 23 July and 6 August 2020

·   social media: no comments were received on the Howick Local Board Facebook page. 

13.     The following community partners held events:

·   Bhatiya Samaj

14.     In response, the local board received the following feedback:

·   161 submissions through the online survey tool

·   369 hard copy submissions

·   13 other pieces of feedback.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Summary of consultation feedback

15.     The results and analysis of the public consultation will form the basis for the development of the final local board plan.

16.     Staff have prepared a report (Attachment A) summarising the results of the consultation. The key messages of the report are described below.

17.     Eighty-two per cent responded positively to the direction of the plan, while just five per cent responded negatively. The remaining 12 per cent were unsure.

18.     Community events that bring people together (43 per cent), improvements to play facilities in parks (37 per cent) and local initiatives that reduce and divert waste (36 per cent) were the highest priority key initiatives.

19.     The highest priority local transport projects were: initiatives from the Howick Walking and Cycling Network Plan (63 per cent), pedestrian improvements to The Parade, Bucklands Beach (48 per cent), a better walkway between Half Moon Bay ferry terminal and the coastal walkway (42 per cent) and streetscape and pedestrian improvements in Howick Village (42 per cent).

20.     Submitters made suggestions for local transport projects. Requests related to public transport improvements, as well as footpath, footbridge, pedestrian crossing, walkway and cycle lane requests.

Impact of COVID-19

21.     Fifty-nine per cent felt the plan would help the community recover from the impact of COVID-19, while eight per cent did not. The remaining 33 per cent were unsure.

22.     Promoting Howick as a ‘destination’, support for ‘buy local’, and events that bring people together and attract visitors to the area were key suggestions to promote recovery.

Publishing the results of public consultation

23.     To conclude this phase of the local board plan development, staff recommend that the local board receive the submissions and feedback for consideration.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.     Receiving the submissions and feedback has a neutral climate impact. The submissions are available online to reduce the printing of hard copies. 

25.     The draft Howick Local Board Plan 2020 reflected the impacts of predicted climate change. It considered such impacts as increasing temperatures, rising sea levels and changing rainfall patterns on the local board area.

26.     The climate impact of any initiatives the Howick Local Board chooses to progress will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements and project management processes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     Staff will work closely with the local board in the development of the final plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     The Howick Local Board has considered all submissions and feedback to the draft Howick Local Board Plan 2020 and will adopt the final local board plan as a separate agenda item at this meeting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     The draft Howick Local Board Plan 2020 was developed with consideration given to existing feedback from mana whenua and mataawaka. This included seeking their views and values in January 2020.

30.     The following events were held with mana whenua through the Māori input into Local Board Decision-making programme:

·   A southern local boards hui with mana whenua held on 30 January 2020 at Ngāti Otara Marae Kohanga Reo, 100 Otara Road, Otara. The following iwi participated in the hui: Ngāti Tamaoho, Ngāti Whanaunga, Te Ahiwaru Waiohua and Ngāti Whātua.

·   Another southern local boards hui with mana whenua. Mana whenua rōpū sharing priorities plans and aspirations with local boards held on 14 July 2020 at the Manukau Civic Building, Manukau. The following iwi participated in the hui: Ngāti Tamaoho, Ngāti Whanaunga and Te Akitai.

31.     Verbal feedback was received from all participating mana whenua iwi at the above hui’s.

32.     Six submissions were received from those identifying as Māori.

33.     No written submissions were received from mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     There are no financial implications associated with receiving the submissions and feedback.

35.     Budget to implement initiatives and projects is confirmed through the annual plan budgeting process.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     There is a risk relating to managing public expectations. The process of consultation is likely to have raised expectations as to the inclusion of the communities’ priorities and aspirations, while the full social and economic effects of COVID-19 are still being determined.

37.     The local board will consider all submissions and feedback before making changes to the draft Howick Local Board Plan 2020.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     The submissions and feedback are available on the Auckland Council website.

39.     The Howick Local Board will adopt the Howick Local Board Plan 2020 as a separate agenda item on this meeting agenda.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Submission analysis summary

61

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lucy Stallworthy - Local Board Engagement Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 

Adoption of the Howick Local Board Plan 2020

File No.: CP2020/14812

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the final Howick Local Board Plan 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires that each local board complete a local board plan for adoption every three years and uses the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

3.       The consultation period for the SCP ran from 13 July to 13 August 2020.

4.       The local board has considered all submissions and feedback received from the consultation period. Substantive changes and minor edits for clarification are proposed.

5.       The Howick Local Board Plan 2020, which includes the proposed changes, is attached to this report as Attachment A.

6.       Pending adoption of the plan photographs, maps and other design features will be added for final publication.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      adopt the Howick Local Board Plan 2020 as set out in Attachment A of the agenda report.

b)      delegate authority to the Chairperson and/or other nominated member(s) of the Howick Local Board to approve any minor edits that may be necessary to the Howick Local Board Plan 2020 prior to publication.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 states that each local board must:

a)  adopt their local board plan by 31 October of the year following an election

b)  use the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

8.       Local board plans are strategic documents developed every three years. They set a direction for local boards and reflect community priorities and preferences. They provide a guide for local board activity, funding and investment decisions. They also influence local board input into regional strategies and plans, including annual budgets.

9.       The plans inform the development of the council’s 10-year budget. They also form the basis for development of the annual local board agreement for the following three financial years and subsequent work programmes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Consideration of submissions and feedback

10.     The Howick Local Board has considered the submissions and feedback received.

11.     Public feedback on the draft plan was very positive. The majority of submitters (82 per cent) responded positively to the direction of the plan, while just five per cent responded negatively. The remaining 12 per cent were unsure.

12.     With regards to submitters views on a COVID-19 recovery, 59 per cent felt the plan would help the community recover from the impact of COVID-19, while eight per cent did not. The remaining 33 per cent were unsure.

13.     The key feedback points, analysis and subsequent proposed changes to the outcome chapters are outlined in Table One below.

Table One: Substantive changes to the draft Howick Local Board Plan 2020

Key point of feedback

Analysis

Proposed change

Outcome 1:

Reword key initiative from:

Strengthen relationships with mana whenua and mataawaka, to increase input into decision-making and Māori civic participation at a local level;

To:

Strengthen relationships with mana whenua and mataawaka in order to increase Maori input into decision-making and support participation in local government

The proposed rewording of the initiative provides better clarity with regards to what the board wishes to achieve

Change key initiative from:

Strengthen relationships with mana whenua and mataawaka, to increase input into decision-making and Māori civic participation at a local level;

To:

Strengthen relationships with mana whenua and mataawaka in order to increase Maori input into decision-making and support participation in local government

Outcome 1:

Consider new objective or update existing objective ‘People are safe with access to services to support their wellbeing'…. To also refer to community recovery from COVID/build resilience in response to COVID challenge

 

Addition or change to objectives was not supported, but the intent of the proposal was acknowledged, and a draft initiative was amended to reflect this

Change key initiative from:

Target local board grant funding to community initiatives and programmes that promote safety, connectedness, and well-being in the Howick Local Board area

To:

Target local board grant funding to community initiatives and programmes that promote safety, connectedness, well-being and COVID-19 recovery in the Howick Local Board area.

Outcome 2:

Smokefree Auckland - Advocate for smoke-free budget to be maintained, signage at local board events and smokefree clauses in new leases (including vaping)

 

The requested changes can form part of discussions with regards to future events within the local board’s work programme, however, an addition is to be made acknowledging the council’s smokefree policy in the preceding text for Outcome 2

Add the following text to Outcome 2:

We will also continue to support council’s smokefree policy initiatives.

Outcome 4:

Add in key initiative re ongoing funding for Tāmaki Estuary Forum and advocacy to the GB for regional funding for integrated catchment management plan for Tāmaki Estuary. Advocate for funding for pollution prevention and enforcement

 

The Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum (TEEF) is already currently provided funding by the local board and other pollution prevention/control work is operationally funded by the council. However, an addition is to be made acknowledging TEEF in the preceding text for Outcome 4

Add the following text to Outcome 4:

and we continue to provide support for the Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum.

Outcome 6:

Proposed update:

Advocate to Auckland Transport for feeder bus services and/or innovative 'on demand' services, or mini-buses that will enable the community to access the existing network and travel to key sites, including new services between Howick and the Manukau SuperClinic, Middlemore Hospital; and more bus services to serve the areas of Flat Bush, Mission Heights and the Murphys Road area.

 

The local board accepted the intent of the proposed changes

Change key initiative from:

“Advocate for feeder services that will enable the community to access the existing bus/ferry network”

To:

Advocate to Auckland Transport for feeder bus services or other innovative 'on demand' services, that will enable the community to access the existing network and travel to key sites.

And

Add an additional key initiative:

Advocate to Auckland Transport for more bus services to serve the areas of Flat Bush, Mission Heights and the Murphys Road area, Cockle Bay, Farm Cove and Bucklands Beach.

Outcome 6:

Advocate for funding to upgrade rural roads to urban standards - consider also referring to narrow bridges.

 

The local board accepted the intent of the proposed changes

Change key initiative from:

“Advocate for funding to upgrade rural roads to urban standards in response to growth of the urban area (e.g. Chapel Road and Murphys Road)”

To:

Advocate to Auckland Transport for funding to upgrade rural roads to urban standards, including widening narrow bridges, in response to growth of the urban area (e.g. Chapel Road and Murphys Road)

Outcome 6:

Implement projects from the Howick Walking and Cycling Network Plan - add in 'places of sport and recreation' and change 'Highbrook' to 'Highbrook business precinct'.   If a project is funded by the Local Board Transport Capital Fund it would be good to amend this to reflect that i.e first project to implement will be the.....

 

·  the proposal was partially accepted in terms of the addition of “places of sport and recreation”

·  the use of “Highbrook” implies an area wider than the proposed “Highbrook business precinct”

·  the local board will prioritise projects funded by the Local Board Transport Capital Fund throughout this electoral term.

Change key initiative rom:

Implement projects from the Howick Walking and Cycling Network Plan that increase connectivity to schools, AMETI Eastern Busway, Half Moon Bay Ferry, and Highbrook

To:

Implement projects from the Howick Walking and Cycling Network Plan that increase connectivity to schools, places of sport and recreation, AMETI Eastern Busway, Half Moon Bay Ferry, and Highbrook.

Outcome 6:

Challenges - need to refer to the Emergency Budget 2020/2021, the reduction in Local Board Transport Capital Fund in the 2020/2021 financial year and uncertain funding for the remaining two years - limited ability to plan and deliver projects from the Howick Walking and Cycling Network Plan and Howick Village Centre Plan

The intent of the proposal was accepted by the local board and an additional bullet point under the heading “Challenges” was added to the text of Outcome 6

Inclusion of an additional bullet point under “Challenges”

The reduction in the allocation of funding via the Local Board Transport Capital Fund, as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic, will limit the ability to plan and deliver projects.

Outcome 6:

Change 'advocate to maintain funding' to' advocate to Auckland Transport to build/construct' - keep it simple

 

The local board accepted the intent of the proposed changes

Change key initiative from:

Advocate to Auckland Transport to maintain funding for:

·  widening of the Smales Roadd and Allens Road intersection

·  Stancombe Road connector in Flat Bush

·  the Mill Road upgrade

To:

Advocate to Auckland Transport to maintain funding and commence construction for the following:

·  widening of the Smales Road and Allens Road intersection

·  Stancombe Road connector in Flat Bush

·  the Mill Road upgrade

Outcome 6:

Advocate for continued planning for an east-west connection between the Airport, Onehunga, Otahuhu, Mt Wellington and through to East Tāmaki.

 

The local board accepted the intent of the proposed changes

Change key initiative from:

Advocate for continued planning for an east-west connection between Onehunga, Otahuhu, Sylvia Park and Panmure.”

To:

Advocate for continued planning for an east-west connection between Onehunga, Otahuhu, Sylvia Park, Panmure and through to East Tamaki.

14.     Other minor changes to the plan includes:

·   change references to Howick to Howick Local Board area

·   advocacy items were amended to include the target of the advocacy, e.g. Advocate to the Governing Body

·   amendments for clarity of Outcome text and procedural text following a peer review.

Changes to the Howick Local Board Plan 2020

15.     Staff recommend adopting the Howick Local Board Plan 2020 (Attachment A) which incorporates the proposed substantive changes to the outcome chapters as described in Table One and the other minor changes listed.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     The draft Howick Local Board Plan 2020 reflected the impacts of predicted climate change. It considered such impacts as increasing temperatures, rising sea levels and changing rainfall patterns on the local board area.

17.     The climate impact of any initiatives the Howick Local Board chooses to progress will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements and project management processes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The adoption of the Howick Local Board Plan 2020 will inform the development of the council’s 10-year budget. It will also form the basis for the development of the following three years’ work programmes.

19.     Planning and operational areas of the council have taken part in the development and review of the draft and final plans.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The local board’s views have informed the development of the final Howick Local Board Plan 2020. Workshops were held on 10 and 24 September 2020 to discuss and consider feedback and agree any changes.

21.     In developing the plan, the Howick Local Board considered:

·   advice from mana whenua and mataawaka

·   what is already known about our communities and what is important to them

·   submissions received via online forms, hardcopy forms, emails and post

·   feedback provided at engagement events and online through Facebook

·   regional strategies and policies

·   staff advice.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     In developing the plan, the Howick Local Board:

·   considered views and advice expressed by mana whenua and mataawaka at:

o a southern local boards hui with mana whenua held on 30 January 2020 at Ngati Otara Marae Kohanga Reo, 100 Otara Road, Otara. The following iwi participated in the hui: Ngāti Tamaoho, Ngāti Whanaunga, Te Ahiwaru Waiohua and Ngāti Whātua

o Another southern local boards hui with mana whenua where mana whenua rōpū shared their priorities, plans and aspirations with local boards held on 14 July 2020 at the Manukau Civic Building. The following iwi participated in the hui: Ngāti Tamaoho, Ngāti Whanaunga and Te Akitai.

·   considered existing feedback from Māori with an interest in the local board area

·   reviewed submissions received.

23.     The Howick Local Board Plan 2020 promotes outcomes or issues of importance to Māori by considering the following initiatives:

·   strengthening relationships with mana whenua and mataawaka, in order to increase Māori input into decision-making and support participation in local government

·   working together with mana whenua and mataawaka to identify and progress joint aspirations and priorities in our area

·   incorporating Māori culture, language, art and stories into the design of public spaces

·   supporting the Tūpuna Maunga Authority to protect and enhance Ohuiarangi / Pigeon Mountain

·   supporting Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki in its management of Te Naupata / Musick Point.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     Budget to implement initiatives and projects is confirmed through the annual plan budgeting process. The local board plan informs this process.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     There is a minor reputational risk associated with the adoption of the final Howick Local Board Plan 2020. The process of consultation is likely to have raised expectations of the local board being able to achieve particular initiatives. As a result of the economic impact of COVID-19 and the council’s significantly reduced budget, it may no longer be possible to achieve all the priorities and aspirations that were identified in the draft plan.

26.     This will be mitigated by clear communication of decision-making processes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Staff recommend that responsibility for approving any minor edits following adoption are delegated to the Chairperson and/or other nominated member(s) of the Howick Local Board.

28.     Photographs, maps and other design features will be added to the plan for final publication. This will be an online digital document that will be available in early 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Howick Local Board Plan 2020 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ian Milnes - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 

Resource Recovery Network Strategy update

File No.: CP2020/14839

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for local boards to give formal feedback on the Resource Recovery Network Strategy update (Attachment A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Resource Recovery Network Strategy, which was approved in October 2014, is being refreshed. This will respond to the updated Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan. It will also reflect the current global context including changes to global recycling markets and the impacts of COVID-19.

3.       Key features of the strategy refresh include:

·   expanding the current strategy from 12 community recycling centres in total to 23 facilities by 2031, including nine additional community recycling centres and two resource recovery parks (capital expenditure to be funded through the central government waste levy)

·   seeking additional funding for ongoing operational support for community recycling centres beyond their current five-year contracts to enable continued service provision (to be funded through the waste targeted rate).

4.       The aim of the network is to maximise diversion of waste from landfill, contribute to creating a circular economy, achieve wider social and economic benefits and deliver local green jobs. The network helps to drive the aspiration of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan to achieve a zero waste Auckland by 2040.

5.       The Resource Recovery Network of nine community recycling centres has provided 80 local jobs. The network diverted 5,213 tonnes of materials from landfill in 2019/2020.

6.       Central government funding has boosted the development of existing sites in the Resource Recovery Network. The revised Resource Recovery Network Strategy will build on this funding and enable greater accessibility for residents and businesses.

7.       A number of local boards have provided support for the Resource Recovery Network through the funding of scoping and feasibility studies, assistance with identifying suitable sites and support for local initiatives such as education outreach.

8.       Staff presented the key points of the strategy refresh to the Waste Political Advisory Group and local boards in September and October 2020. Formal feedback from local boards will be included in a report to Environment and Climate Change Committee seeking adoption of the updated Resource Recovery Network Strategy in November 2020.

9.       Approximately $8.6 million spread over 10 years is proposed to fund new and existing sites. This funding will be sought through the Long-term Plan 2020-2031 process.

10.     An additional $28 million for the new resource recovery facilities, spread over ten years, is proposed to be funded through the budget allocated to Auckland Council from the central government waste levy.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the Resource Recovery Network Strategy update (Attachment A of the agenda report).

b)      note that local board feedback will be included in a report to Environment and Climate Change Committee in November 2020 seeking adoption of the updated Resource Recovery Network Strategy.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     The Resource Recovery Network is one of the nine priority actions in Te Mahere Whakahaere me te Whakaiti Tukunga Para i Tāmaki Makaurau – Auckland Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018.

12.     The network was initially identified as a key initiative under the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2012 and has been developing across the region since that time.

13.     The purpose of the Resource Recovery Network is ‘to maximise the diversion of reusable and recyclable materials from landfill and, in the process, generate multiple environmental, social, cultural and economic benefits for Auckland’. The network helps to drive the aspiration of the plan to achieve a zero waste Auckland by 2040, taking care of people and the environment and turning waste into resources.

14.     A 10-year strategy for the Resource Recovery Network was adopted in 2014 (resolution REG/2014/121). This strategy enabled the establishment of 12 community recycling centres across the Auckland region by 2024, funded by a combination of waste levy funding and targeted rates.

15.     Community recycling centres provide communities with a ‘one stop shop’ for people to drop off unwanted goods and recyclables. The focus is on reuse, repair, repurposing and upcycling resources, as well as providing low cost retail goods to the community. 

Progress of the Resource Recovery Network

16.     As of September 2020, nine community recycling centres have been established. These centres are located in Waiuku, Helensville, Henderson, Wellsford, Warkworth, Aotea / Great Barrier, Devonport, Waiheke and Whangaparaoa. Community recycling centres are also under development in Western Springs and Onehunga.

17.     Across the nine existing sites, 80 local full-time and part-time jobs have been created. In the 2019/2020 financial year, 5,213 tonnes of materials were diverted from landfill for reuse or recovery.

18.     The development of the Resource Recovery Network in Auckland has been further boosted by central government Waste Minimisation Fund and shovel-ready funding, including:

·   $2.3 million from the Waste Minimisation Fund was provided to support development of a Community Recycling Centre in Onehunga

·   $10.6 million in shovel-ready funding for infrastructure development for the existing Devonport, Waiheke, Helensville, Warkworth, Wellsford and Western Springs community recycling centres as well as the Waitākere Waste Transfer Station/ Resource Recovery Park.

19.     The recent central government shovel-ready investment will fast track the improvement of existing community recycling centres through developing fit for purpose infrastructure. It will expand employment by increasing the volume of materials and the number of related activities they can undertake to work towards zero waste.

Strategic context

20.     COVID-19 continues to put pressure on international recycling markets, as countries restrict import and export activity through their borders. In addition to this, China implemented its National Sword policy in January 2018, which sets tight contamination limits on imported recyclable materials, including paper and plastics. As a result, global commodity prices for these products have dropped significantly as there is an oversupply to other existing markets.

21.     Several strategic changes have occurred since the initial Resource Recovery Network was approved in 2014. These include the adoption of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028, the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan 2020.

22.     These strategic changes draw focus to the significance of the Resource Recovery Network, which is identified as a priority action in the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan and is also an action in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan. The revised Resource Recovery Network Strategy will also feed into the Long-Term Plan 2021-2031 which is currently being developed for adoption in June 2021.

23.     The opportunities for community recycling centres to divert waste from landfill, generate income and create local jobs are expected to increase significantly over the next few years as government policy changes come into effect. These include the increase in the waste levy, a container return scheme currently under consideration by the government, and the 2019 Climate Change response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Act.

24.     An overview of the revised strategy was presented to the Waste Political Advisory Group on 1 September 2020. The Waste Political Advisory Group indicated its support for the draft strategy refresh.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Key features of the refreshed Resource Recovery Network Strategy

25.     The refreshed Resource Recovery Network Strategy provides a pathway for futureproofing and scaling up the network. In developing the strategy, the priorities, budgets and method of delivery from the original 2014 strategy have been reassessed.

26.     The refreshed strategy focuses on five key areas:

·   increasing the number of sites from 12 to 21 community recycling centres to provide more equitable access to all Aucklanders and establishing two commercially focused resource recovery parks, bringing the total number of sites to 23 by 2031

·   supporting existing sites and operators to thrive

·   strengthening and enabling the network

·   developing a fit for purpose operating and governance model

·   fostering financial sustainability.

27.     Overall, the review has suggested that the strategy approved in 2014 is still valid. Two key changes have been identified that will require additional budget to enable the network to reach its full potential. These key changes are outlined below. Further detail is provided in the draft Resource Recovery Network Strategy update (Attachment A).

Increasing the number of resource recovery facilities

28.     One of the key changes in the updated strategy is an increase in the number of sites planned. The original strategy proposed 12 community recycling centres. The updated strategy proposes an expanded network with an additional nine community recycling centres and two resource recovery parks. This will bring the total number of sites up to 23, including:

·   twenty-one community recycling centres that are strategically located across Auckland. They will be connected with their local communities, providing trusted places to take unwanted goods as well as fostering local innovation and resilience.

·   two resource recovery parks, which are larger-scale facilities that focus mainly on diverting commercial waste from landfill back into the circular economy, while also accepting and diverting domestic waste. One of these will be the upgrade of Waitākere Transfer Station to a resource recovery park and the second will be in south Auckland.

29.     Staff anticipate that an appropriate site will be found in south Auckland for a resource recovery parks. A resource recovery park in the south could provide an opportunity for economic transformation led by Māori or Pacifika businesses, social enterprises and local businesses. Studies have found that recycling results in around 10 times more jobs compared to sending materials to landfill.

30.     The location of facilities will be determined by the availability of suitable sites, opportunities for joint ventures or partnerships, local board feedback, location of existing facilities and accessibility for Auckland residents and businesses. Centres will be equitably spread across the region, depending on the availability of appropriate sites.

31.     Increasing the number of sites will enable greater accessibility for residents and businesses to maximise diversion from landfill and deliver further local green jobs.

Ongoing operational funding

32.     Another key change in the updated strategy is the provision of ongoing operational funding for existing community recycling centres.

33.     When the strategy was originally created in 2014, it was expected that the centres would become self-funding by the end of their initial five-year contract period. Revenue would be generated from income from gate fees, the sale of reusable and recyclable materials, and other services that the centres provide.

34.     This intention was reflected by a reducing management fee from the council over the course of the centres’ five-year contracts. However, although sites that have come to the end of their contracts have significantly reduced their management fee from the council, they are not in a position to be completely self-funding.

35.     This has been caused by a combination of factors, including sites not being developed as quickly as anticipated and the impacts of COVID-19. China’s National Sword restrictions on global recycling have also presented a challenge due to reduced revenue from recycling commodities such as paper, cardboard and plastics.

36.     To ensure the on-going viability and impact of the existing sites, an ongoing site management fee from council will be required beyond the initial five years. This will be negotiated on a site by site basis and will be reassessed as the increase in the waste levy and introduction of product stewardship schemes come into force. 

37.     No additional operational funding is planned for resource recovery parks, which should operate as commercial ventures and be self-funding.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     The expanded Resource Recovery Network is part of Action E6 in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan (manage our resources to deliver a zero waste, circular economy).

39.     The Auckland Zero Waste Programme as part of Auckland’s Climate Plan estimates that this programme will reduce emissions by 39,650 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalents per year by 2030.

40.     Resource recovery facilities also provide zero waste learning opportunities which will have impacts on residents’ purchasing decisions, with resulting climate impacts.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

41.     Waste Solutions staff have worked closely with the Community Empowerment Unit and The Southern Initiative who have provided support the development of the community recycling centres. The Southern Initiative have also advocated for a resource recovery park in south Auckland as a contribution to the economic transformation for the south.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

42.     Several local boards have provided support and funding to enable the Resource Recovery Network through their local board work programmes. This has included funding for a range of initiatives from feasibility studies, local capacity building and waste minimisation and learning.

43.     Local boards have also provided feedback through the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 development process. A number of boards supported the establishment of community recycling centres in their area, with Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Manurewa, Ōtara-Papatoetoe and Papakura stating the establishment of a southern community recycling centre should be a priority.

44.     Staff will engage with local boards on individual sites in their local areas as new facilities are investigated and developed.

45.     Staff attended workshops with local boards between 15 September and 14 October 2020 to present on the key points of the strategy refresh.

46.     This report presents the draft Resource Recovery Network Strategy and seeks formal feedback from the local board ahead of Environment and Climate Change Committee adoption of the strategy in November 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

47.     Mana whenua and matāwaka were engaged in the development of the 2018 Waste Management and Minimisation Plan and identified priority actions for Māori.

48.     The draft Resource Recovery Network Strategy aligns to a number of the Māori priorities that were identified, in particular:

·   protection of Papatūānuku by keeping waste from landfill

·   developing respectful and innovative partnerships for waste minimisation in order to restore the ‘mauri’ of Papatūānuku

·   nurturing relationships, looking after people, taonga and taiao

·   fostering mutual respect. 

49.     The council also partners with Para Kore ki Tāmaki – a Māori-developed and implemented programme that integrates mātauranga Māori and zero waste principles and practices to support marae, Māori organisations, Kura Kaupapa Māori and Kōhanga Reo to divert significant quantities of recycling and organic waste from landfill.

50.     The draft Resource Recovery Network Strategy was presented to the Infrastructure and Environmental Services Mana Whenua Forum on 11 September 2020, and then at a workshop on 14 September 2020. As a result of the workshop a number of mana whenua identified interest in potential opportunities for engaging with the development of the Resource Recovery Network.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

51.     The 2020/2021 net operating cost of the community recycling centres that are currently in operation is approximately $2.6 million per year. An additional budget of approximately $8.6 million spread over 10 years is proposed to fund new and existing sites.

52.     Ongoing operational funding will mainly be provided through the solid waste targeted rate. Changes to the strategy will not result in any increase to the waste targeted rate until 2025 in order to maintain budgets during the post COVID-19 recovery and response phase. Any minor increases in operational expenditure over this period will be covered by waste levy funding from central government.

53.     No operational expenditure is planned for resource recovery parks, which should operate as commercial ventures and be self-funding.

54.     An additional $28 million in capital expenditure is proposed for the new resource recovery facilities, spread over ten years. The new facilities are proposed to be funded through the budget allocated to Auckland Council from the central government waste levy. The waste levy will increase incrementally from its current rate of $10 per tonne to $60 per tonne by 2025.


 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

55.     The key risks and mitigations associated with the revised Resource Recovery Network Strategy are outlined in Table One.

Table One: Resource Recovery Network Strategy key risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation/s

Community recycling centres will not be able to become financially viable

·  the increase in the waste levy will provide a greater incentive to keep resources out of landfill and increase use (and revenue generation) of community recycling centres. It will also provide increased funding to the council to establish new facilities

·  the introduction of product stewardship schemes, such as a container return scheme will provide additional revenue for community recycling centres and attract new users of the facilities

·  additional operational funding provided as proposed in the refreshed strategy will support the centres until sufficient revenue is generated.

Suitable sites will not be available for the proposed additional nine community recycling centres

Staff are investigating a wide range of opportunities to secure sites, including new models of ownership and operation. This could include joint ventures or lease arrangements

There will not be suitable operators to tender for the operation of the community recycling centres

Staff are undertaking early engagement in areas where community recycling centres are planned to build capacity and link interested groups to existing operators and the national membership body for community recyclers, the Zero Waste Network

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

56.     Local board feedback will be included in a report to Environment and Climate Change Committee on 12 November 2020 seeking adoption of the updated Resource Recovery Network Strategy.

57.     Budgets to deliver the revised strategy will be sought through the Long-term Plan 2020-2031 process.

58.     The Resource Recovery Network will continue to develop over the next 10 years, with the Western Springs and Onehunga Community Recycling Centres expected to be operational by the end of 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Resource Recovery Network Strategy

89

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jenny Chilcott – Senior Waste Planning Specialist

Julie Dickinson – Principal Advisor Waste Planning

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Lesley Jenkins – Acting General Manager, Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 

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Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 

Landowner approval for Marist Eastern Rugby Club shipping containers at Barry Curtis Park

File No.: CP2020/14297

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek landowner approval from the Howick Local Board for the placement of an additional shipping container to act as storage and the retrospective approval of the existing two shipping containers on Barry Curtis Park for two years.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The applicant, Marist Eastern Rugby Club (‘MERC’ or ‘the club’) seeks landowner approval to place an additional shipping container for storage of equipment at Barry Curtis Park.

3.       MERC have a growing membership and require additional storage space to continue club operations and maximise participation at Barry Curtis Park.

4.       The club currently have two shipping containers which have existed on the park for over five years without formal landowner approval.

5.       Council staff support the placement of an additional 40-foot shipping container for two years subject to conditions including a licence to occupy and visual mitigation.

6.       The relevant specialists have provided input and are supportive of the occupation as the containers will not adversely affect the current or future use of the park.

7.       A licence to occupy is a statutory requirement for a two-year occupation.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve the grant of landowner approval for Marist Eastern Rugby Club for the placement of an additional shipping container and the retrospective approval of the existing two shipping containers on Barry Curtis Park.

b)      approve the grant of a licence to occupy to Marist Eastern Rugby Club for the container area on Barry Curtis Park for two years subject to public notification.

c)      request Community Facilities and Parks, Sport & Recreation staff work with Marist Eastern Rugby Club on a permanent storage building proposal to replace the containers.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

Barry Curtis Park

8.       169 Ormiston Road, Flat Bush, known as Barry Curtis Park, is owned by Auckland Council and held in fee simple under the Local Government Act 2002. The location of the shipping containers is on parcel Lot 200 DP 494671 and shown in attachment A.

9.       The southern part of the park provides space for recreational activities and bookable playing fields for sports such as rugby, rugby league, soccer and cricket. A toilet block and changing space was recently built however there is no additional space for storage of equipment for the club.

Marist Eastern Rugby Club

10.     The club was founded in 2008 to service the rapidly growing junior rugby population in East Auckland. It has an affiliation with the Auckland Marist Brothers Old Boys Rugby Club.

11.     Club membership is increasing both in the number of members and registered teams as shown in Table One. Between 2018 and 2019 registered juniors rose from 186 to 248 and teams doubled. The club also ran a local school programme in conjunction with NZ Rugby last year that attracted 3500 children from which it is hoped they will see new members.

Table One: Registered team numbers

Age bracket

2018 teams

2019 teams

Under 6-8

8

18

Under 9-11

4

10

Under 12-13

4

10

TOTAL

16

38

Container proposal

12.     The club requested landowner approval to place additional storage in the form of either two 20-foot or one 40-foot shipping containers on Barry Curtis Park, and to formalise the occupation of their two existing 20-foot containers. The existing containers will be re-positioned end-to-end and placed next to the proposed new container.

13.     The club have proposed containers for storage as they are restrained by costs. The additional container will hold overflow equipment such as post pads, hit shields, and tackle bags; and new equipment as membership grows.

14.     The club also wish to safely house the scrum machine all year round and attach stored goal post poles to the outside of the containers. Equipment needs to be accessible and centrally located for the teams as it is shared amongst members. Other sports do not require this amount of equipment. Land Advisory Services have no record of requests from other sports teams requesting shipping containers or similar, at Barry Curtis Park

15.     The original proposal was for an additional 20-foot container this year and a further one next year. The club will have the option to purchase either a single 40-foot container or two 20-foot containers depending on funds available if approval is given.

16.     The use of industrial shipping containers on parks is a growing concern and issue across the region and this case is symptomatic of the issues that can arise. Parks, Sport and Recreation draft operational guidelines for containers on sports parks does not support the use of containers on parks except for temporary storage; being subject to visual mitigation, and not adversely impacting park usage or amenity. Ultimately, long term storage must be by way of appropriate buildings.

17.     For visual mitigation the existing and proposed containers will be painted dark green. This will make them as recessive as possible in front of vegetation along the eastern side of the park. An option to further mitigate could be for the club to attach a sign with their team logo on the side of the container facing towards the playing fields. This will help make the containers look more like they hold sports related equipment and further reduce the appearance of containers but is dependent on funding.

18.     The club have started to investigate and prepare a proposal to replace the containers with a secure permanent storage shed at Barry Curtis Park.

Licence to occupy

19.     A licence to occupy under the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 is required to formalise the containers’ occupation because the duration is longer than six months. The club do not have a lease or licence for the existing containers or any area of the field but do have regular bookings under the training lights most nights of the week. Provision of a licence to occupy has statutory processes which requires public notification and iwi consultation if the landowner approval is granted by the Howick Local Board.

20.     Approval for two years is considered appropriate because it will allow the club to continue providing valuable recreational and activation opportunities to their growing membership while planning a permanent storage solution and sourcing funding and sponsorship. It will give the club time to work with staff and the local board on an acceptable permanent storage solution for the club. A condition will require the club to provide quarterly updates to staff on progress of their proposal.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Specialist consultation

21.     All specialists are supportive of a two-year occupation subject to visual mitigation. They are also supportive of the club securing the goal posts off the grass and the scrum machine within the containers when not in use.

22.     The senior maintenance delivery coordinator had no issues with the proposal and is happy with the access point for delivery. The club will be responsible for maintenance of the containers.

23.     The parks and places specialist is supportive of allowing for temporary additional storage.

24.     The Parks Sport and Recreation Specialists are supportive of the proposal as it promotes activation of the park and maximises participation in recreational activity and organised sport.

25.     The benefits of activation in the park were considered to outweigh the visual effects for this situation however this may not extend to future additional containers proposed in other areas of Barry Curtis Park.

26.     The sport and recreation lead also reviewed the current containers and confirmed the existing containers are being used efficiently, and that further storage requests are consistent with junior rugby equipment and the number of members the club have.

Rationale for a two-year occupancy

27.     A two-year occupancy is acceptable to the Community Facilities department because:

·   the additional storage space will allow the club to continue operations, maximise growing participation and increase activation of the park. From 2018 to 2019 the club membership rose from 186 to 248 registered members and from 16 to 38 registered teams

·   equipment needs to be accessible and centrally located for the teams as it is shared. Barry Curtis Park is a relatively new park with limited storage facilities and the newly built changing room and bathroom building does not have space for the club to use

·   the proposal aligns with the Howick Local Board Plan 2017 Outcome 5, as the storage space will enable the club to maximise participation and encourage more youth to be physically active in the area

·   the containers will be visually mitigated and clustered to prevent clutter and CPTED (Crime prevention through Environmental Design) issues

·   a proposal for permanent storage options to replace the containers is being compiled by the club

·   conditions will be placed on any landowner approval letter issued to mitigate potential adverse effects of the proposal

·   the relevant specialists have provided input and are supportive of the occupation as the containers will not adversely affect the current or future use of the park

·   Land Advisory Services have not received any complaints regarding the existing containers located on the park. Other codes do not require the same amount of shared equipment and Land Advisory Services have no record of requests from other sports codes requesting storage at this park.

Options

28.     The options available to the local board are to support or decline the landowner approval application. If the board supports the application, this will enable the placement of containers for two years subject to a licence to occupy. If the local board declines the application, the club will not be able to place further containers on or formalise their existing two. If the local board declines the application, they may give staff direction on time frames for removal of the existing containers.

Proposed conditions

29.     Conditions that will be placed on the landowner approval if approved, will include:

·   a licence to occupy for two years

·   quarterly updates by the club to staff on a permanent storage proposal

·   containers to be painted dark green to visually mitigate

·   any vandalism to be repaired and any graffiti to be removed

·   poles to be secured in a way they are not able to be climbed on or fall on anyone when not in use

·   scrum machine to be stored inside a container when not in use

·   spotters must always be used during container movements

·   any damage to the park during delivery or after removal shall be reinstated to previous or a better state. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

30.     The proposal does not introduce any new source of emissions and therefore has no impact on greenhouse gas emissions. The containers are placed temporarily and therefore do not have long term impacts on the land.

31.     Climate change will not have the potential to impact the proposed container site as the area is significantly above the flood plain of the tributary of ōtara Creek to the east.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

32.     As discussed earlier in the report, the relevant council specialists were consulted and are supportive of the proposal. Staff do not consider any other council departments or the council-controlled organisations to be impacted by the proposal.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

33.     Staff attended a workshop with the local board in March 2020. The board were supportive of helping the club and requested further rationale on a two-year timeframe as provided in paragraphs 20 and 27 of this report.

34.     The application is consistent with and supports the Howick Local Board plan 2017 Outcome 5: Our people are active and healthy. Allowing additional storage space will enable the club to maximise participation and encourage more youth to be physically active in the area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     There are no areas of significance to mana whenua or Cultural Heritage Inventory sites in the area proposed to occupy.

36.     Staff engaged with mana whenua requesting feedback and no concerns were raised. One response was received, this was from the Ngāti Paoa Trust Board representative confirming they had no objection to the proposal.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.     The club are responsible for all ongoing maintenance of the licence area including any reinstatement required after placement and during delivery. There are no financial operational implications for the local board over and above the existing maintenance requirements of the reserve.

38.     The cost of advertising the intent to grant a licence is approximately $1000 for public notification. This is a statutory requirement and will be borne by Community Facilities.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     It is recommended that the local board approve the application, as the additional storage space will increase the ability of MERC to expand at Barry Curtis Park and provide activation benefits to the park as listed in paragraphs 20 and 27 of this report. The risks and mitigations for approving the application are shown in Table Two below.

Table Two. Identified risks of approving the application

Risk

Mitigation

Risk rating

Visual impact – industrial appearance, vandalism, un-tidy

The containers will be painted green and MERC will be responsible for all maintenance and graffiti removal. Conditions will be included in the landowner approval and licence requiring this. The poles will be secured which will make the area look tidier. The approval is for a limited timeframe.

Low

Damage to turf

Delivery, removal and re-alignment of containers will only be done during a period of dry weather. The club will be required to meet with the senior maintenance delivery coordinator to confirm the date of any movement and any damage will be reinstated at the expense of MERC.

Low

Other codes may see the containers and request containers for their equipment storage

There have been no landowner approval applications from any other applicants at this park. If this does occur, in the first instance they will be directed to MERC to discuss sharing space. Any application will be assessed on its merits.

Low

40.     If the application were to be declined the club will have inadequate storage space for growing membership and it may take longer to fund a permanent storage shed.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     If approved, staff will complete public notification and subject to no objections, will grant a licence to occupy and landowner approval with conditions to the club for the proposed and existing containers for a two-year timeframe.

42.     Staff will work with the club on their proposal for permanent storage and engage with the Howick Local Board for feedback in due course.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Container location and photos on Barry Curtis Park

109

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Alayna Fiatau - Land Use Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 


 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 

Local board views on plan change to enable rainwater tank installation for the Auckland region

File No.: CP2020/15000

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To invite local board views on a plan change by Auckland Council to enable rainwater tank installation across urban and rural Auckland.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Decision-makers on a plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan must consider local boards’ views on the plan change, if the relevant local boards choose to provide their views.

3.       Each local board has a responsibility to communicate the interests and preferences of people in its area on Auckland Council policy documents.  A local board can present local views and preferences when expressed by the whole local board.[1]

4.       Auckland Council’s plan change would change the Auckland Unitary Plan by adding a line entry in rural and urban zone activity tables, stating that a rainwater tank is a permitted activity. Additionally, a number of baseline standards designed to avoid objectionable outcomes would be developed for the installation of rainwater tanks along with assessment criteria where a resource consent was still required. Rainwater tanks would be excluded from the definition of “Building” in the Auckland Unitary Plan, and therefore would avoid many rules pertaining to buildings which have the potential to trigger the need for resource consent.

5.       This report is the mechanism for the local board to resolve and provide its views on the council’s plan change. Staff do not recommend what view the local board should convey.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      provide local board views on council’s proposed change to the Auckland Unitary Plan to enable rainwater tank installation for the Auckland region

b)      appoint a local board member to speak to the local board views at a hearing on council’s enabling rainwater tanks plan change for the Auckland region

c)      delegate authority to the chairperson of Howick Local Board to make a replacement appointment in the event the local board member appointed in resolution b) is unable to attend the private plan change hearing.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of Auckland Council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards provide their views on the content of these documents.  Decision-makers must consider local boards’ views when deciding the content of these policy documents.[2]

7.       If the local board chooses to provide its views, the planner includes those views in the hearing report. Local board views are included in the analysis of the plan change, along with submissions.

8.       If appointed by resolution, local board members may present the local board’s views at the hearing to commissioners, who decide on the plan change request.

9.       This report provides an overview of the plan change.

10.     The report does not recommend what the local board should convey. The planner must include any local board views in the evaluation of the plan change. The planner cannot advise the local board as to what its views should be, and then evaluate those views.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Plan change overview

11.     The plan change applies to the Auckland region. The definition of “Building” in the Auckland Unitary Plan will be amended so that a rainwater tank will not be considered a building. A new definition will be introduced for “rainwater tank”. The activity tables of the following zones will have a new line entry stating that rainwater tanks are a permitted activity. The zones directly concerned are as follows:

·   Single House Zone

·   Large Lot Zone

·   Rural and Coastal Settlement Zone

·   Mixed Housing Suburban Zone

·   Mixed Housing Urban Zone

·   Terrace Housing and Apartment Buildings Zone

·   Special Character Areas Overlay - Residential

·   Rural Production Zone

·   Mixed Rural Zone

·   Rural Coastal Zone

·   Rural Conservation Zone

·   Countryside Living Zone

·   Waitākere Foothills Zone

·   Waitākere Ranges Zone.

12.     The purpose of the plan change is to enable rainwater tank installation across the Auckland region without the need for resource consent. Some baseline standards will be developed to avoid objectionable outcomes.

13.     The notified plan change and section 32 of the document providing the rationale for the council plan change are available on the council’s website at: https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/plans-projects-policies-reports-bylaws/our-plans-strategies/unitary-plan/auckland-unitary-plan-modifications/Pages/details.aspx?UnitaryPlanId=83

14.     Public submissions will be loaded onto the council’s website once the notification period has closed.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan include:

·   to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·   to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

16.     The need to initiate a plan change to enable rainwater tank installation is a response to Auckland’s current drought and potential water shortage in 2020/2021.

17.     This uncertainty in water supply is likely to continue as our climate changes. Climate projections released by the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research indicated that the Auckland region is likely to experience an increase of unpredictable rainfall and drought events in the Auckland region. 

18.     Removing unnecessary restrictions around the installation of rainwater tanks will support Auckland’s water security and resilience to climate change.

19.     The proposed plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan supports Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan. One of the goals of the climate plan is to prepare Aucklanders to adapt to the impacts of climate change.  

20.     Easing barriers to the installation of rainwater tanks supports water supply management and aligns with the ‘Built Environment’ priority area in the Auckland Climate Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     Other parts of the council group directly involved with the plan change include Healthy Waters, which has assisted with scoping the plan change, consultation and providing information for inclusion in the section 32 of the document (which provides the rationale for the plan change). Consultation has also occurred with Watercare and the Independent Māori Statutory Board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     This plan change affects all local boards.

23.     Factors the local board may wish to consider in formulating its view:

·   interests and preferences of people in the local board area

·   well-being of communities within the local board area

·   local board documents, such as the local board plan and the local board agreement

·   responsibilities and operation of the local board.

24.     This report is the mechanism for obtaining formal local board views. The decision-maker will consider local board views, if provided, when deciding on the plan change.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     If the local board chooses to provide its views on the plan change it includes the opportunity to comment on matters that may be of interest or importance to Māori People, well-being of Māori communities or Te Ao Māori (Māori worldview).

26.     The council has initiated consultation with all iwi authorities in the Auckland region including the Independent Māori Statutory Board. Healthy Waters have engaged with iwi in the past on the matter of rainwater tanks and to date iwi have been very supportive of harvesting rainwater for household use.

27.     The hearing report will include analysis of Part 2 of the Resource Management Act which requires that all persons exercising RMA functions shall take into account the principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi - the Treaty of Waitangi.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     The plan change does not pose any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     There is a risk that the local board will be unable to provide its views and preferences on the plan change, if it doesn’t pass a resolution. This report provides:

·   the mechanism for the Howick Local Board to express its views and preferences

·   the opportunity for a local board member to speak at a hearing.

30.     If the local board chooses not to pass a resolution at this business meeting, these opportunities are forgone.

31.     The power to provide local board views regarding the content of a plan change cannot be delegated to individual local board member(s).[3] This report enables the whole local board to decide whether to provide its views and, if so, to determine what matters those views should include.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     The planner will include, and report on, any resolution of the local board in the hearing report. The local board member appointed to speak to the local board’s views will be informed of the hearing date and invited to the hearing for that purpose. 

33.     The planner will advise the local board of the decision on the plan change request by memorandum.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Barry Mosley - Principal Planner

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager, Plans and Places

Louise Mason – General Manager, Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 

Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) six-monthly update to Howick Local Board 1 July to 31 December 2019

File No.: CP2020/15008

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update Howick Local Board with highlights of Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development’s (ATEED) activities within the local board area and the region for the six months from 1 July to 31 December 2019.

2.       This report should be read in conjunction with ATEED’s Quarter one and Quarter two reports to Auckland Council (available at www.aucklandnz.com). Although these reports focus primarily on the breadth of ATEED’s work at a regional level, much of the work highlighted has significant local impact.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This report provides the Howick Local Board with relevant information on the following ATEED activities:

a)  locally driven initiatives: Howick Tourism Development

b)  supporting local business growth

c)  filming activity

d)  Young Enterprise Scheme (YES)

e)  youth connections

f)  local and regional destination management and marketing

g)  delivered, funded and facilitated events.

4.       Further detail on these activities is listed under analysis and advice.

5.       This update report to the board is being received late due to providing updated figures in relation to the impact of COVID-19. This report is being received along with the 1 January to 30 June 2020 update report (also on the agenda) to give a full 2019/2020 financial year review to the Howick Local Board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the update from Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) for the period 1 July to 31 December 2019.

 

 


 

Horopaki

Context

6.       ATEED has two areas of focus:

a)  Economic Development – including business support, business attraction and investment, local economic development, trade and industry development, skills employment and talent and innovation and entrepreneurship

b)  Destination - supporting sustainable growth of the visitor economy with a focus on destination marketing and management, major events, business events (meetings and conventions) and international student attraction and retention.

7.       These two portfolios also share a common platform relating to the promotion of the city globally to ensure that Auckland competes effectively with other mid-tier high quality of life cities.

8.       ATEED works with local boards, the council and Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs) to support decision-making on local economic growth and facilitates or co-ordinates the delivery of local economic development activity. ATEED ensures that the regional activities that ATEED leads or delivers are fully leveraged to support local economic growth and employment.

9.       In addition, ATEED’s dedicated Local Economic Development (LED) team works with local boards who allocate locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget to economic development activities. The LED team delivers a range of services1 such as the development of proposals, including feasibility studies that enable local boards to directly fund or otherwise advocate for the implementation of local initiatives.

10.     ATEED delivers its services at the local level through business hubs based in the north, west and south of the region, as well as its central office at 167B Victoria Street West.

11.     Additional information about ATEED’s role and activities can be found at www.aucklandnz.com/ateed

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     As at 31 December 2019, 1876 businesses had been through an ATEED intervention or programme. Of these, 48 businesses were in the Howick Local Board area – 13 businesses went through Destination-related programmes and 35 businesses went through Economic Development-related programmes.

Economic Development

Locally Driven Initiative

13.     Howick tourism development: The project is well connected to surrounding regions and has ongoing engagement and planning with TEED Tourism Innovation team advisors. The preparation is progressing, and thinking is well in tune with the objectives. The next quarter should aim for acceleration of community relationships and observable activities to raise the profile and outcomes.

Supporting local business growth

14.     This area is serviced by the Business and Enterprise team in the south hub, located at Te Haa o Manukau. The team comprises of two Business and Innovation Advisors and administration support. The role of this team is to support the growth of Auckland’s key internationally competitive sectors and offer support to provide quality jobs.

15.     A key programme in achieving this is central government’s Regional Business Partnership Network (RBPN). This is delivered by ATEED’s nine Business and Innovation Advisors (BIA), whose role is to connect local businesses to resources, experts and services in innovation, Research and Development (R&D), business growth and management.

16.     ATEED’s BIAs engage one on one with businesses through a discovery meeting to understand their challenges, gather key data, and provide connections and recommendations via an action plan.

17.     Where businesses qualify (meet the programme criteria and/or align to ATEED’s purpose as defined in the Statement of Intent) the advisors facilitate government support to qualifying businesses, in the form of:

·   Callaghan Innovation R&D grants (including Getting Started, project and student grants (https://www.callaghaninnovation.govt.nz/grants)

·   Callaghan Innovation subsidised innovation programmes (https://www.callaghaninnovation.govt.nz/innovation-skills)

·   BPN business capability vouchers (NZTE), where the business owner may be issued co-funding up to $5000 per annum for business training via registered service providers. Voucher co-funding is prioritised to businesses accessing this service for the first time, in order to encourage more businesses to engage with experts to assist their management and growth

·   NZTE services such as Export Essentials (https://workshop.exportessentials.nz/register/)

·   referrals to NZ Business Mentors via The Chamber of Commerce.

18.     During this reporting period, ATEED Business and Innovation Advisors met with 54 businesses and individuals in the Howick Local Board area, no meetings were conducted for innovation advice and services and 42 for business growth and capability advice and services (one was a returning client). From these engagements:

·   ten RBPN vouchers were issued to assist with business capability training

·   no connections were made to Callaghan Innovation services and programmes

·   four referrals were made to Business Mentors New Zealand

·   one connection was made to ATEED staff and programmes

·   thirty-eight connections were made to other businesses or programmes.

Other support for new businesses

19.     During the period, ATEED also ran workshops and events aimed at establishing or growing a new business and building capability. Six people from the Howick Local Board area attended an event below:

·   Starting off Right workshop – one

·   Business clinic – four

·   Innovation clinic – one.

Filming activity within the Howick Local Board area

20.     ATEED’s Screen Auckland team provides film facilitation services as part of ATEED’s support for the screen and digital sector of Auckland’s economy. Screen Auckland facilitates, processes and issues film permits for filming activity in public open space. This activity supports local businesses and employment, as well as providing a revenue stream to local boards for the use of local parks.

21.     Between 1 July and 31 December 2019, a total of 310 film permits were issued in the Auckland region, five of these permits were issued in the Howick Local Board area.

22.     The Howick Local Board area’s share of film permit revenue was $556.52 for the period (total for all boards combined was $38,208.55).

23.     One of the key film productions that was issued permits to film in the Howick Local Board area was:

·   The Justice of Bunny King (feature film).

Young Enterprise Scheme (YES)

24.     The Auckland Chamber of Commerce has delivered the Lion Foundation Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) since January 2018. ATEED maintains a strategic role. During the period, there were 58 schools participating in the Auckland YES programme, representing 1364 students completing the programme. There is currently one school from the Howick Local Board area participating in the YES programme.

Local Jobs and Skills Hubs

25.     ATEED is the regional partner for the network of Auckland Jobs and Skills Hubs. These multi-agency hubs support employers at developments where there is a high and sustained demand for local labour and skills development. The Auckland network includes Ara (Auckland Airport development), the Central Business District (Wynyard Quarter and city centre development, and Tāmaki hubs. The new Manukau and Northern hubs launched in August 2019 with new initiatives underway. ATEED established City Centre Hub reports a total of 480 people into employment, 2092 training outcomes and 14 apprenticeships facilitated as at 28 February 2020. ATEED is the backbone organization for the CBD Jobs and Skills Hub, where Maori represented over a third (36 per cent) of job placements towards a 40 per cent target.

26.     ATEED provided funding to the Central Rail Link (CRL) Progressive Employment programme for at risk youth supporting training and developing capability within businesses. Five of six youth graduated the 18-week programme in October into jobs, the evaluation report received shows the programme delivered excellent results.

Offshore talent attraction

27.     The ‘Auckland Smart Move’ Quarter one and Quarter two campaign launched in July 2019 with Immigration New Zealand and resulted in 2126 technology and construction job applications from high-skilled offshore migrants, reaching more than 121,000 offshore high-skilled professionals.

Destination

North, West, South, East and Gulf area destination management and marketing activity

28.     27. Over the period, the ATEED Tourism Innovation Team has cemented its highly effective regional cluster and program development. The city is managed on a North/West and Great Barrier area and South/East/Central and Waiheke area. This is a proactive programme that is generating success and clustering of businesses capability, skills and delivery across the entire city.

29.     Results are visible and reported, including:

·   East/South and North/West visitor maps

·   a Tourism Innovation Partnership Fund which identifies and focuses on capability building and content & product development

·   groups include the Franklin Tourism Group, now closely aligned with East Auckland Tourism, the Waiheke Tourism Cluster, the Matakana Cluster and the Waitakere Ranges Cluster as well as more bespoke groups on Great Barrier and specific territories

·   project and opportunity awareness for operators

·   regional showcase days, product awareness and updates, site familiarity visits (Famils), and opportunity discussions

·   innovation sessions with topics such as capability building for smaller operators, common issues and themes, key takeaways, and networking opportunities.

30.     The Auckland Visitor Survey Insights Report is the culmination of significant development in qualitative and quantitative data capture across all of Auckland. The report identifies the region by main areas, north, south, east, west, and gulf islands, and delivers a valuable and timely insight into visitors’ characteristics, behaviour, experience and perceptions of the Auckland region. This report will be available for local board access in the New Year.

Regional destination management and marketing activity

31.     Auckland cruise ship activity for the 2018/2019 financial year reported growth for Auckland with visitor expenditure of $192.5 million (note: this is not the GDP figure previously taken from Cruise NZ as it is no longer available). This is up from $145 million in the 2017/2018 financial year. Passenger numbers in the 2018/2019 financial year were up to 238,000 from 211,000 in the 2017/2018 financial year.

32.     It was a strong six months of highly visible activities designed to attract visitors from overseas and around New Zealand to Auckland using these various platforms:

·   social media including Instagram @Visitauckland

·   media and PR including an Auckland Insider article. Best escapes for a long weekend and Appetite for Auckland. Online Food stories

·   marketing programs such as the Australian ‘Short Break to Auckland’ campaign in October 2019

·   collateral to continue in the AA Auckland Visitor Summer Guide 2019 -2020

·   creating a B-roll of striking footage and images of Tāmaki Makaurau for free use by tourism operators and promoters across the Auckland region and the gulf

·   focus was also given to trade and content development including ‘Elemental AKL 2020’.

Māori Tourism Development activity that may be relevant to local boards:

33.     ATEED continued to support and advocate for the development of new Māori tourism experiences and unique marketing opportunities in support of the priorities contained in the ‘Destination AKL’ 2025 strategy.

Māori Tourism Innovation Partnership Programme - Pilot

34.     In alignment to the ‘Destination AKL’ strategy, ATEED has development a new Tourism Innovation Partnership fund to enable and support sustainable growth of Māori Tourism in Tāmaki Makaurau. Funding is available to iwi, hapū, marae, urban Māori authorities and Māori tourism collectives to apply for during the 2019/2020 financial year. So far, we have supported the following two initiatives:

a)  Ngai Tai ki Tamaki/Te Haerenga have been awarded $25,000 to develop and promote day tours to Rangitoto and Motutapu through walking and e-bike tours.

b)  Te Manu Taupua (with support from the Tupuna Maunga Authority & Nuu Limited) have been awarded $20,000 to grow digital capacity and capability to amplify the cultural narratives of Tāmaki Makaurau. These resources will then be used to educate and develop cultural competency within Auckland’s tourism industry.

Examples of separate local board area activity includes:

35.     Waitematā – Feasibility study for a Māori Cultural Centre

RFA, ATEED and Panuku Development Auckland in partnership with mana whenua (in particular, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, Ngāti Pāoa and Te Kawerau a Maki) are in the final stages of finalising a feasibility study for a Māori Cultural Centre, with a penultimate draft being circulated internally. The cultural centre is closely linked to the city centre work being undertaken by the Auckland Design Office.

36.     Ōtara-Papatoetoe – Elemental – Te Ahi Kōmau Event

ATEED, in collaboration with Panuku Development Auckland are supporting The Cause Collective and Papatūānuku Marae in the delivery and marketing of an indigenous food and cultural storytelling event as part of the Elemental 2020 programme.

37.     Albert-Eden - Whau Café

In collaboration with the Tūpuna Maunga Authority, ATEED supported the marketing and promotion of a new Māori centred café and visitor centre called Whau Café located in the historic kiosk on Maungawhau. Whau Café officially opened to the public in December 2019 and has been successfully operating since.

38.     Rodney – Capability Development

ATEED is supporting Te Hana Community Development Charitable Trust with the re-prioritising of their commercial tourism aspirations and product development. ATEED is also involved in the Auckland Council working group, to support Te Hana with renewing and re-accessing the lease model as well and supporting further community engagement focused initiatives.

Delivered, funded and facilitated events

39.     During the period, the inaugural Elemental AKL winter festival was held 1 to 31 July 2019. There were 67 events across the region, and 120 restaurants that took part through ‘Elemental Feast’. The new festival generated more than 1000 media stories.

40.     ATEED delivered the Auckland Diwali Festival which was held at Aotea Square and Upper Queen Street from 12 to 13 October 2019. Approximately 65,000 people attended, up 9 per cent from an estimated 59,990 in 2018. The festival had more than 40 food stallholders, more than 50 hours’ live entertainment and over 200 performances.

41.     ATEED led the cross-council communications and programme implementation of the 2019 New Year’s Eve coverage to alert Aucklanders and visitors to the road closures, extra public transport options, event highlights and TV viewing options, with positive feedback received.

42.     During the period, residents of the Howick Local Board area were also able to enjoy events funded or facilitated by ATEED across the Auckland region, including the New Zealand International Film Festival, ASB Auckland Marathon, the Virgin Australia Supercars Championship, The Food Show, New Zealand Fashion Week, the ITM Auckland SuperSprint, Taste of Auckland, EQUITANA Auckland, 19/20 Nacra/49ers Class Sailing World Champs, Wondergarden, Auckland On Water Boat Show.

43.     A full schedule of major events is available on ATEED’s website, aucklandnz.com

Go With Tourism

44.     Go with Tourism (GWT) is a jobs-matching platform that targets young people (18 to 30 years) and encourages them to consider a career in Tourism. In 2019, Go with Tourism was rolled out nationally with launches in Queenstown and Wanaka. The platform signed over 300 businesses for the first time in the six months between July and December 2019.

45.     The most popular industries in the GWT programme in Auckland (as classified by ANZSIC code) were Accommodation and Food Services (61 per cent), Arts and Recreation Services (19 per cent), Transport, Postal and Warehousing (5 per cent), and Administrative and Support Services (5 per cent).

46.     In Howick Local Board, one business has signed up to use the platform out of a total of 165 in the Auckland region.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

47.     ATEED is currently considering how we respond to climate impacts in our projects and programmes. In the interim, ATEED assesses and responds to any impact that our initiatives may have on the climate on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

48.     ATEED assesses and manages our initiatives on a case-by-case basis and engages with the council where required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

49.     Local Board views are not sought for the purposes of this report. Local Board views were sought for some of the initiatives described in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

50.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly update has no impact on Māori. ATEED assesses and responds to any impact that our initiatives may have on Māori on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

51.     The proposed decision of receiving this report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

52.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly update has no risk. ATEED assesses and manages any risk associated with our initiatives on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

53.     ATEED will provide the next six-monthly update to the Howick Local Board in August 2020 and will cover the period 1 January to 30 June 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Stephanie Sole, Strategy and Planning, ATEED

Authorisers

Quanita Khan - Manager Strategy & Planning, ATEED

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 

Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) six-monthly update to Howick Local Board 1 January to 30 June 2020

File No.: CP2020/15009

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Howick Local Board with an update on Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) activities in each local board area as well as ATEED’s regional activities for the period 1 January to 30 June 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To inform the local board about local/regional initiatives and how they are tracking.

3.       The role of ATEED is to support:

a)  the growth of Auckland’s key internationally competitive sectors

b)  the provision of quality jobs across Auckland.

4.       ATEED has supported multiple local board/regional initiatives that have supported economic development through development of businesses and an increase in events and sustainable tourism growth (including for Māori) across Auckland.  

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the update from Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) for the period 1 January to 30 June 2020.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       ATEED has two areas of delivery focus:

a)  Economic Development – including business support, business attraction and investment, local economic development, trade and industry development, skills employment and talent and innovation and entrepreneurship

b)  Destination – supporting sustainable growth of the visitor economy with a focus on destination marketing and management, major events, business events (meetings and conventions) and international student attraction and retention.

6.       ATEED works with local boards, the council and other council-controlled organisations (CCOs) to support decision-making on local economic growth and facilitates or coordinates the delivery of local economic development activity. It further ensures that the regional activities it leads and/or delivers fully support local economic growth and employment.

7.       Additional information about ATEED’s role and activities can be found at: www.aucklandnz.com/ateed

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       From 1 January to 30 June 2020, 3726 businesses had been through an ATEED intervention, including 3174 businesses for Economic Development-related programmes and 549 for Destination-related programmes.[4]

9.       The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent lockdowns have seen a marked increase in demand for business support in both resource and monetary terms, cancellation and postponement of major events and significant fallout incurred by the tourism sector. Figure 1 shows the number of businesses in each local board area who have sought out an ATEED Economic Development and/or Destination intervention.

Figure One: Number of businesses that have been through an ATEED Economic Development and/or Destination Intervention

10.     Waitematā Local Board had the highest number of business interventions, while Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board had the lowest. Because Waitematā Local Board includes the region’s CBD, it is unsurprising that it has had the highest number of interventions. The data shows that within a local board area, between 1 per cent and 4 per cent of businesses took part in an ATEED intervention.

11.     Most local board areas had higher rates of participation in Economic Development-related programmes compared to Destination-related interventions over the six months. The following local board areas had Destination-related interventions of over 25 per cent:

·   Waiheke

·   Waitematā

·   Rodney

·   Māngere-Ōtāhuhu.

12.     The businesses in these local board areas have high rates of Auckland Convention Bureau[5] membership and many benefit from ATEED’s tourism advocacy programme.

Māori businesses

Figure Two: Number of self-identified Māori businesses involved in an ATEED intervention by local board January – June 2020

13.     Māori businesses are represented in ATEED interventions across all local board areas, with Waitematā Local Board having the highest intervention uptake. This is due to the high number of businesses in the Waitematā Local Board area relative to other local board areas.


 

Jobseekers in Auckland

14.     During the April to June 2020 quarter, New Zealand experienced a rapid increase in the number of people who became recipients of a jobseeker benefit from the Ministry of Social Development. Jobseeker benefit data acts as a proxy for unemployment figures. The number of new recipients of the Jobseeker – Work Ready benefit from April to June 2020 can be compared for each local board area in Figure Three. Please note that the data from the Ministry of Social Development grouped together Waiheke and Aotea / Great Barrier local boards and cannot be separated for the purposes of this graph.

Figure Three: Recipients of the Jobseeker – Work Ready benefit by Auckland local board’s June quarter 2020

15.     Maungakiekie-Tāmaki and Henderson-Massey Local Board areas have the highest numbers of recipients in the second quarter of the year. Aotea / Great Barrier, Waiheke, and Devonport-Takapuna Local Boards reflect the lowest number of recipients in Auckland. The number of recipients generally correlate with socio-economic status and population size.


 

Economic Development

Locally driven initiatives

Table One: Locally driven initiatives

Local board

Initiative

Update

Budget

Albert-Eden

Sustainability Kick Start

Business participation: 10

Programme completed: March 2020

$24,000

Franklin

Hunua Trail Plan Implementation

Project reinstated after Covid-19 interruptions in Q4 with expected increase in project activity going into 2020/2021.

$80,000

Hibiscus and Bays

Pop-Up Business School

Course delivered: 10-21 February 2020

Registrations: 57

$7500

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

Young Enterprise Scheme

Local board funds supported the Kick Start Days (February). Sponsorship Agreement signed. Expected draw-down of funds by 30 June 2020.

$3500

Manurewa

Young Enterprise Scheme

Local board funds supported the Kick Start Days (February). Sponsorship Agreement signed. Expected draw-down of funds by 30 June 2020.

$2000

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

Onehunga Sustainability Development Programme

First year of two-year project. First stage focuses on retail/services. Waste audits scheduled for April-June, however continued business participation in programme uncertain due to pandemic.

$20,000

Ōrākei

Young Enterprise Scheme

Local board funds supported the Kick Start Days (February). Sponsorship Agreement signed. Expected draw-down of funds by 30 June 2020.

$2000

Ōtara-Papatoetoe

Young Enterprise Scheme

Local board funds supported the Kick Start Days (February). Sponsorship Agreement signed. Expected draw-down of funds by 30 June 2020.

$3000

Business Sustainability Follow-Up Programme

Programme launched mid-March, however continued business participation in programme uncertain due to pandemic.

$20,000

Little India Promotion

The promotion part of Visitor Attraction Programme, launched in February. Programme put on hold in March due to the pandemic.

$20,000

Upper Harbour

Young Enterprise Scheme

Local board funds supported the Kick Start Days (February). Sponsorship Agreement signed. Expected draw-down of funds by 30 June 2020.

$2000

Waitematā

Sustainability Kick Start Programme

Business participation: 10

Programme completed: March 2020

$24,000

Young Enterprise Scheme

Local board funds supported the Kick Start Days (February). Sponsorship Agreement signed. Expected draw-down of funds by 30 June 2020.

$5000

Whau

Young Enterprise Scheme

Local board funds supported the Kick Start Days (February). Sponsorship Agreement signed. Expected draw-down of funds by 30 June 2020.

$1000

Supporting local business growth

16.     A key programme in supporting the growth of Auckland’s internationally competitive sectors and the provision of quality jobs is central government’s Regional Business Partnership Network. This is delivered by ATEED’s Business and Innovation Advisors, whose role is to connect local businesses to resources, experts and services in innovation, Research and Development, business growth and management.

17.     Three thousand and seven businesses participated in this programme from January 1 to June 30, represented below in Figure Four which also breaks down business uptake per local board area.

Figure Four: Regional Business Partnership programme by local board for 1 January – 30 June 2020

18.     Demand for business support increased significantly between March and June because of the fallout from the pandemic. To this end, programme coverage for the region ranged from 1 per cent to 2 per cent of all businesses in each local board area. Local boards with the highest coverage in percentage terms were Waitematā (2.1 per cent), Upper Harbour (2 per cent), Maungakiekie-Tāmaki (2 per cent), and Kaipātiki (1.8 per cent).


 

Other support for new businesses

19.     Figure Five shows the number of Auckland businesses that took part in ATEED’s business innovation clinics per local board area from January to June 2020. Local board areas with the highest number of participants were:

·   Albert-Eden

·   Kaipātiki

·   Manurewa

·   Ōrākei

·   Waitematā.

Figure Five: Businesses attending Business / Innovation Clinics from January to June 2020

20.     As businesses refocus their efforts to cope with uncertainties arising from the pandemic, ATEED has reviewed one of its programmes with a decision for it to be discontinued - no workshops took place over the relevant six-month period. The ‘Starting Off Right’ programme gave free support and provided expert advice to new business owners and managers. ATEED is working on an alternative approach to support Auckland business start-ups and entrepreneurs.

Film activity

21.     ATEED’s Screen Auckland team issues film permits for filming in public open spaces. This activity supports local businesses and employment, as well as providing a revenue stream to local boards for the use of local parks.

22.     Between 1 January and 30 June 2020, a total of 246 film permits[6] were issued across Auckland. During lockdown, most filming activity ceased, however once the more restrictive alert levels were lifted in May, there was an increase in permits being issued.

23.     Although Waitākere Ranges Local Board had the most permits issued (46), Franklin Local Board’s share of the permit revenue was the highest ($9921.74) from its 12 permits. Total revenue for all local boards was $45,342.49.[7] This information is shown in Figure Six and Table Two below.

Figure Six: Film Permits and Revenue from January to June 2020

Table Two: Film permits and revenue

Local Board

Film permits

Revenue

Albert-Eden

15

$2893.92

Aotea / Great Barrier

0

$0.00

Devonport-Takapuna

16

$3756.51

Franklin

12

$9921.74

Henderson-Massey

31

$3147.82

Hibiscus and Bays

18

$4066.08

Howick

3

$460.87

Kaipātiki

5

$1085.21

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

8

$2452.18

Manurewa

3

$252.18

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

6

$600.00

Ōrākei

8

$1017.39

Ōtara-Papatoetoe

14

$2782.60

Papakura

0

$0.00

Puketāpapa

4

$973.91

Rodney

26

$2817.39

Upper Harbour

0

$0.00

Waiheke

0

$0.00

Waitākere

46

$4860.87

Waitematā

30

$4210.34

Whau

1

$43.48

Total:

246

$45,342.49

Young Enterprise Scheme

24.     The Auckland Chamber of Commerce has delivered the Lion Foundation Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) since January 2018. ATEED plays a strategic role and provides funding for this initiative. Through the programme, students develop creative ideas into businesses, complete with real products and services generating profit (and sometimes losses). During the period, there were 53 schools (1523 students) that completed the programme. This year, the programme took place mostly online.

Table Three: YES Schools

Local Board

Schools involved

Albert-Eden

Auckland Grammar School

Diocesan School for Girls

Epsom Girls Grammar School

Mt Albert Grammar School

St Cuthbert's College (Epsom)

Devonport-Takapuna

Rosmini College

Takapuna Grammar School

Westlake Boys' High School

Westlake Girls' High School

Franklin

Onewhero Area School

Pukekohe High School

Wesley College

Henderson-Massey

Henderson High School

Massey High School

Waitakere College

Hibiscus and Bays

Kingsway School

Whangaparāoa College

Howick

Macleans College

Edgewater College

Pakuranga College

Saint Kentigern College (Pakuranga)

Kaipātiki

Birkenhead College

Glenfield College

Northcote College

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

Al-Madinah School

De La Salle College

King's College

Māngere College

Southern Cross Campus

TKM o Nga Tapuwae

Manurewa

Alfriston College

Manurewa High School

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

One Tree Hill College

Onehunga High School

Ōrākei

Baradene College

Glendowie College

Sacred Heart College (Auckland)

Selwyn College

Ōtara-Papatoetoe

Aorere College

Ormiston Senior College

Papatoetoe High School

Sancta Maria College

Sir Edmund Hillary Collegiate Senior School

Rodney

Mahurangi College

Upper Harbour

Albany Senior High School

Hobsonville Point School (Secondary)

Kristin School

Waitematā

Auckland Girls' Grammar School

St Mary's College (Ponsonby)

Western Springs College

Whau

Auckland International College

Avondale College

Kelston Girls' College

25.     Figure Seven shows the number of schools participating in the Young Enterprise Scheme by local board area.

Figure Seven: Auckland schools participating in the Young Enterprise Scheme 2020

26.     Higher participation in the scheme occurred in the following local board areas:

·   Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

·   Albert-Eden

·   Ōtara-Papatoetoe.

27.     This is mainly due to there being a higher number of schools in these areas.

Local jobs and skills hubs

28.     The City Centre, Manukau and Northern hubs were all closed during lockdown and were open in June but with limited public-facing services. A reorganisation of the jobs and skills hubs services is underway in response to the impact of COVID-19 on the labour market and the funding received in the central government budget in May this year.

The South and West Auckland Prosperity Project

29.    ATEED, the Southern Initiative (TSI) and the Western Initiative (TWI) have been working together on a project that is focused on how we can ensure that the mega economic shock of Covid-19 does not create further disparity and inequity for South and West Auckland, in partnership with Stakeholder Strategies. The presentation of the South and West Prosperity Project has been compiled using Auckland, South and West, Māori and Pacific-specific data, and includes a number of next steps for ATEED, TSI and TWI, and direction for the eco-system to enable prosperity for South and West Auckland.

Destination

Visitor survey insights report

30.     The Auckland Domestic Visitor Insights Report was created to inform the Auckland tourism industry about the changing domestic visitor market to assist with improved product development and destination marketing. This report was released in May 2020 for the year up to January 2020. It contains insights that can be used to market regions and local board areas to domestic visitors. Relevant insights are captured below.

31.     Central Auckland (Albert-Eden, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki, Puketāpapa, Ōrākei, & Waitematā Local Board’s):

·   the majority of domestic visitors surveyed (78 per cent) came to Central Auckland, with an average satisfaction of experienced activities and attraction of 8.2/10. The top three attractions were Queen Street, Sky Tower and downtown waterfront/viaduct area

·   of the surveyed domestic visitors that came to Auckland Central (year to December 2019), the most popular activities were frequenting a restaurant/café (59 per cent) followed by shopping (55 per cent). Other activities included visiting the casino or participating in gambling (21 per cent) and attending an event, concert or festival (20 per cent).

32.     North Auckland (Devonport-Takapuna, Hibiscus and Bays, Kaipātiki, Rodney, and East Upper Harbour Local Board’s):

·   just under half of surveyed domestic visitors (43 per cent) visited North Auckland. Their average satisfaction with experienced activities and attractions was 8.2/10. Of these domestic visitors, the top attraction was Albany (30 per cent), followed by Devonport (27 per cent) and Takapuna (27 per cent). This group also visited Wellsford (17 per cent) and Whangaparaoa Peninsula (13 per cent)

·   the most common activity undertaken by surveyed international (39 per cent) and domestic (50 per cent) visitors was visiting a restaurant/café.

33.     East Auckland (Franklin (East) and Howick Local Board’s):

·   a third of surveyed domestic visitors (32 per cent) visited East Auckland. Average satisfaction with East Auckland’s experienced activities/attractions was 8.2/10. Almost half (46 per cent) of domestic visitors went to Sylvia Park, a quarter (24 per cent) visited Howick and 18 per cent visited Half Moon Bay. In comparison to the international market, domestic visitors called in on the Howick Historical Village (13 per cent) and the Pakuranga Night Markets (11 per cent) in greater numbers

·   further, surveyed domestic visitors visited art galleries, museums, historic sites (10 per cent) in the region more than surveyed international visitors.

34.     South Auckland (Franklin (West), Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Manurewa, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, and Papakura Local Board’s):

·   over half of surveyed domestic visitors (52 per cent) to Auckland visited South Auckland, with the average satisfaction with South Auckland’s activities and attractions being 8.0 out of 10. Over half of surveyed domestic visitors that visited South Auckland visited the Auckland Airport (53 per cent); a third (33 per cent) visited Manukau; and a quarter (26 per cent) visited Rainbow’s End. In comparison to the international market, surveyed domestic visitors visited the Ōtara Market (13 per cent) and Ōtara (10 per cent) in greater numbers

·   of the visitors that visited South Auckland, the top three activities for surveyed international and domestic visitors was visiting a restaurant or café, shopping and general exploration.

35.     West Auckland (Henderson-Massey, West Upper Harbour, Waitākere Ranges, and Whau Local Board’s):

·   over a third of surveyed domestic visitors (35 per cent) to Auckland visited West Auckland. The average satisfaction with West Auckland’s activities and attractions for the international market was 8.2 out of 10. A third of the surveyed domestic visitors who visited West Auckland went to Piha Beach (34 per cent); 20 per cent visited Titirangi; and 19 per cent visited the Avondale Sunday Markets. In comparison to the international market, domestic visitors visited the Kumeu Farmers’ Market (14 per cent) and Parakai Hot Pools (13 per cent) more often

·   visiting a restaurant or café, shopping and going to the beach were the top three domestic visitor activities.

36.     Hauraki Gulf Islands (Aotea / Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Board’s):

·   20 per cent of surveyed domestic visitors to Auckland visited Hauraki Gulf Islands. Average satisfaction with the area’s experienced activities/attractions was 8.5/10 (highest satisfaction rating from the domestic market). The top domestic visitor attraction was Waiheke Island (44 per cent), followed by Rangitoto Island (18 per cent) and Onetangi Bay on Waiheke Island (18 per cent). In comparison to the international market, domestic visitors visited the Kaitoke Hot Springs on Great Barrier Island (12 per cent) and Whittaker’s Musical Museum on Waiheke Island (11 per cent) in greater numbers

·   the top three activities for surveyed domestic visitors was visiting a restaurant (33 per cent), general exploration (24 per cent) and sightseeing (22 per cent). Visiting wineries/breweries was a common activity cited by both international and domestic markets and was unique to the Hauraki Gulf Islands.

Local board destination management and marketing activities

37.     During the six months to July 2020, there were a number of tourism-related ATEED interventions in each of the local board areas, including:

·   Spring Campaign: number of businesses promoted and supported through a multi-platform campaign to drive domestic visitation and spend in the spring off-season in Auckland

·   Tourism Advocacy: number of businesses promoted for example in:

o offshore trade events

o trade shows

o marketing material

o broadcasts

o social media

o specific campaign content.

·   Tourism Destination Development/Innovation: tourism business capability building through coaching and facilitation. This includes one-on-one advice from ATEED Tourism team members for new and existing Auckland businesses.

·   Tourism Famils (familiarisation trips for travel agents or media): number of businesses who benefited from agent famils (ATEED links tourism operators to travel agents which results in bookings being made with the operators) and media famils (ATEED facilitated media files/hosting media to showcase tourism products).

38.     Figure Eight below shows the number of Auckland businesses in local board areas (excluding Rodney and Waitematā lLocal Board’s) involved in an ATEED tourism intervention (January-June 2020).

Figure Eight: Number of Auckland businesses involved in an ATEED Tourism Intervention from January to June 2020

39.     Waitematā and Rodney Local Boards are excluded from Figure Nine to allow for intervention participation scales of the other local boards to be appreciated without distraction.

40.     Specific tourism interventions in the period included the Nau Mai multi-media content series in collaboration with New Zealand Media and Entertainment, which saw ambassadors promoting their favourite places in Auckland including where they love to eat, shop and go on ‘staycations’. These stories were aimed at encouraging Aucklanders to experience and explore their own region and targeted and encouraged other regions in the upper North Island to come and visit Auckland. Ambassadors mentioned attractions such as cafés, walks, beaches, parks, venues from the Matakana Farmers’ Market in Rodney Local Board to Castaways Resort on the west coast in Franklin Local Board, Ambury Farm in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and Waiheke Island’s Oyster Inn.

41.     In March 2020, the ‘Journeys North’ project in collaboration with Northland Inc saw the development of ‘Auckland Journeys’ offering visitors richer and easier journeys in the region to enjoy. Promoted locations included:

·   Puhoi to Pakiri in Rodney

·   Auckland Airport to Wellsford through Waitākere and Kumeu in the Waitākere Ranges

·   Rodney.

42.     ‘Famils’ are a means of promoting Auckland to influential international travel sellers, and prior to March hosted guests from the United States. Orewa and Waiheke Island were profiled in Air New Zealand’s in-flight magazine. Two episodes of Emmy award-winning US Travel show Samantha Brown’s Places to Love which focused on marketing Auckland to domestic and overseas viewers aired in January with an advertising spend rate of NZ$2.1 million per episode, and a reach of 700,000+ people per episode. Samantha enjoyed sailing in the Waitematā Harbour, eating and drinking in the city’s centre, hiking with a local Māori guide in the Parnell Domain, and taking a surf lesson at Piha beach.

Examples of separate local board area activities include:

43.     Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board – Direct/indirect marketing activity increased in late June/July 2020 including:

·   Surfer Today articulating the best surf spots in New Zealand featuring the Great Barrier Island

·   Stuff.co.nz published an article detailing the successes of Aotea / Great Barrier Island and other small towns, in terms of recovery from the pandemic

·   New Zealand Herald in an article about the ‘Life on Great Barrier Island: Local remedies led to thriving Māori health business’ and other articles (‘Off the Beaten Track’ andThe Best of Great Barrier’) promoting Aotea / Great Barrier Island as a great place for domestic tourists to visit

·   Radio New Zealand interviewed the owner of Great Barrier Island’s ‘The Curragh’ to talk about the upswing in domestic tourism after lockdown

·   ATEED will continue to play a supportive and facilitative role for tourism product development in the region to help raise the profile of Auckland as a destination.

44.     Devonport-Takapuna Local Board – Devonport, Takapuna and Milford Business Improvement Districts were supported via the marketing activity of Explore North Shore – a digital site encouraging visitation and activity into the North Shore. Takapuna Beach Business Association received a grant from the local board for providing highly targeted and relevant tactics for businesses impacted by the Hurstmere Road infrastructure upgrade. The grant is endorsed and managed by ATEED.

45.     Franklin Local Board – Ongoing support to the East Auckland Tourism Group and the Franklin Tourism Group through regular attendance at board meeting and important events, working with ATEED and leveraging this relationship for mutual benefit across marketing and product opportunities, and working with individual operators on product development for example the continuing development of the Hunua Trail and the Glenbrook Vintage Railway. Additionally, there was a focus on ongoing work with the development of Clevedon as a destination.

46.     Howick Local Board – Continued engagement and strategy sessions through the ATEED Tourism Innovation team and South Auckland tourism clusters as well as managing an increased Howick Local Board grant to East Auckland Tourism development.

47.     Rodney Local Board – Initiated multi-linked support for Aotea Organics in Rodney, which is one of the oldest organic farms in New Zealand. Multi-linked means that ATEED has a very large suite of products and services it can offer businesses, in this case ATEED was able to establish links and actions for tourism; inclusion in the travel maps, identification of event hosting, and research and development activity.

48.     Waiheke Local Board – Collaboration with the Waiheke Island Tourism Group and other key stakeholders on the sustainable future of tourism for the island.


 

Māori Tourism Development Activity

49.     ATEED worked with 45 Māori businesses in the tourism and 23 Māori businesses on the Māori and Iwi Tourism Development programme. Table Four details the number of Maori tourism businesses by local board area:

Table Four: Māori Tourism businesses

Local board

Māori businesses

Māori and Iwi tourism development businesses

Albert-Eden

4

3

Aotea / Great Barrier

1

1

Henderson-Massey

4

4

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

5

2

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

1

1

Orākei

2

1

Rodney

4

3

Waiheke

1

-

Waitākere Ranges

4

1

Waitematā

18

7

Whau

1

-

50.     Waitematā Local Board had the most Māori businesses involved in an ATEED tourism intervention, once again, owing to its inclusion of the CBD and being a top tourist destination. Just under half of local boards are not included in this table because no businesses that were involved in an ATEED tourism intervention were identified as Māori.

51.     The Māori Tourism Innovation Partnership Programme has been established to enable ATEED to work collaboratively with the tourism industry to support the sustainable growth of tourism within Tāmaki Makaurau  The programme aims to grow and strengthen the Auckland visitor economy by supporting iwi, hapū, marae, Māori Trusts, Urban Māori Authorities and Māori Tourism collectives within the region, and to aid the development of new Māori tourism experiences, build capability and business partnerships to meet the diverse needs of international and domestic markets.

Delivered, funded and facilitated events

52.     The Tāmaki Herenga Waka Festival occurred on 31 January 2020 celebrating Auckland’s Māori heritage. The event was attended by nearly 6000 people and received media coverage. Overall customer satisfaction with the festival was 90 per cent.

53.     To date, event cancellations and postponements due to COVID-19 have resulted in the loss of an estimated 74,179 visitor nights and over $10 million in GDP for the local economy. Cancelled events include the 2020 Auckland Lantern Festival, the 2020 Pasifika Festival and the 2020 Corona Piha Pro Challenger Series event.

54.     Diwali and the second year of Elemental are confirmed to join other exciting events for the region in the coming months. Elemental 2020, like its inaugural festival last year, will take place all over the Auckland region. It will feature over 30 free and ticketed events in October. Elemental 2019 was attended by over 147,000 people. Due to uncertainty in the domestic tourism market, it is unlikely that there will be the same attendance for the 2020 festival.

55.     Diwali is an annual festival that celebrates traditional and contemporary Indian culture in Aotea Square in the city centre and is set to occur in the last weekend of October this year. Last year’s festival was attended by approximately 65,000 people, up 9 per cent from an estimated 59,990 in 2018. Due to COVID-19, festival attendance is uncertain, but likely to decrease.

56.     Figure Nine shows businesses ATEED works with across its major events. Major events stallholders are businesses that were supported through ATEED delivered events. Major Events Investments are those that were supported through ATEED sponsored events. Local boards not included in the graph were not part of such interventions.

Figure Nine: Number of businesses involved in ATEED’s Major Events across Auckland from 1 January – 30 June 2020


 

Go With Tourism

57.     Go with Tourism (GWT) is a jobs-matching platform that targets young people (18-30 years) and encourages them to consider a career in tourism. Since 2019, GWT has been expanded from an ATEED initiative to a national programme.

58.     The platform signed up over 550 businesses prior to COVID-19, 149 of those were in Auckland.

59.     In response to the pandemic, GWT formed a new ‘Support the Tourism Workforce’ Strategy which aims to help redeploy displaced tourism workers and provide guidance to businesses as they navigate their way through the impacts of the pandemic and, in due course, begin a post-crisis rebuild. Go with Tourism has received over 2200 requests for assistance from employees and businesses, since adopting the new strategy.

Figure Ten: Auckland Businesses involved in Go With Tourism by local board from 1 January – 30 June 2020

60.     The industries most represented in the Auckland GWT programme (classified by Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification codes) are:

·   Accommodation and Food Services (60 per cent)

·   Arts and Recreation Services (19 per cent)

·   Administrative and Support Services (7 per cent)

·   Transport, Postal and Warehousing (5 per cent).

61.     Because the programme is sector-focused, there is a cluster of businesses in tourism-heavy Waitematā Local Board (central city), and surrounding areas (Albert-Eden, Devonport-Takapuna, and Ōrākei local boards). Local boards not included in the graph did not have any businesses take part in the interventions.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

62.     ATEED is currently considering how we respond to climate impacts in our projects and programmes. In the interim, ATEED assesses and responds to any impact that our initiatives may have on the climate on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

63.     The proposed recommendation of receipt of this paper by the Howick Local Board has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required in the preparation of this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

64.     Local board views were not sought for the purposes of this report. However, such views were sought in the development of some of the initiatives as described in this paper.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

65.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no impact on Māori. ATEED assesses and responds to any impact that our initiatives may have on Māori on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

66.     The recommendation to receive the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

67.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no risk. ATEED assesses and manages any risk associated with our initiatives on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

68.     ATEED will provide the next six-monthly report to the Howick Local Board in February 2021 which will cover the period 1 July to 31 December 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Stephanie Sole - Strategy & Planning Graduate, ATEED

Authorisers

Quanita Khan - Manager Strategy & Planning, ATEED

Lesley Jenkins – Acting General Manager, Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 

Workshop records

File No.: CP2020/08625

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This item attaches the workshop records taken for the period stated below.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under Standing Order 12.1 workshop records shall record the names of members attending and a statement summarising the nature of the information received, and nature of matters discussed. No resolutions are passed, or decisions reached but are solely for the provision of information and discussion.

3.       This report attaches the workshop records for the period stated below.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the workshop records for workshops held on 3, 10, 17 and 24 September 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop record 3 September 2020

143

b

Workshop record 10 September 2020

145

c

Workshop record 17 September 2020

147

d

Workshop record 24 September 2020

149

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 


 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 

Governance forward work calendar

File No.: CP2020/14577

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Howick Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Howick Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities;

·   clarifying what advice is expected and when; and

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the governance forward work calendar included as Attachment A of the agenda report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work calendar

153

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

19 October 2020

 

 

    

    



[1] Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, section 15(2)(c).

[2] Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, ss15-16.

[3] Local Government Act 2002, Schedule 7, clause 36D.

[4] Some businesses were involved in an ATEED intervention for both Destination- and Economic Development-related activities, hence the numbers adding to over 3726. Business names must remain confidential for privacy reasons.

[5] Auckland Convention Bureau is responsible for positioning Auckland as a premium business events destination and for sales and marketing activity to grow the value and volume of business events in Auckland.

[6] This does not reflect all filming that takes place in studio, private property or low impact activity that does not require a permit.

[7] This includes local board fees only, other permit fees are directed to Auckland Transport (Special Events) and Regional Parks. Figures exclude GST and are as per the month the permit was invoiced, not necessarily when the activity took place.