I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 22 October 2020

4.00pm

Waitākere Ranges Local Board Office
39 Glenmall Place
Glen Eden

 

Waitākere Ranges Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Greg Presland

 

Deputy Chairperson

Saffron Toms

 

Members

Mark Allen

 

 

Michelle Clayton

 

 

Sandra Coney, QSO

 

 

Ken Turner

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Elizabeth Stewart

Democracy Advisor

 

16 October 2020

 

Contact Telephone: 021 194 6808

Email: elizabeth.stewart@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 October 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Titirangi Community House                                                          5

8.2     Deputation - VisionWest Community Trust                                                      6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

9.1     Public Forum - Ken Matthews - Titirangi Public Toilet                                    6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Waitākere Ward Councillors' Update                                                                          9

12        Auckland Transport Update - October 2020                                                             11

13        Submissions and feedback on the draft Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2020                                                                                                                                       21

14        Local board views on plan change to enable rainwater tank installation for the Auckland region                                                                                                           33

15        Resource Recovery Network Strategy update                                                         37

16        Panuku Auckland Development- Waitākere Ranges Local Board Six-Monthly Report 1 March to 31 August 2020                                                                                         57

17        Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development six-monthly update to local boards: 1 January to 30 June 2020                                                                            65

18        Addition to the 2019-2022 Waitākere Ranges Local Board meeting schedule    83

19        Chair's Report - October 2020                                                                                    87

20        Deputy Chair's Report - October 2020                                                                      89

21        Workshop Records                                                                                                      91

22        Governance Forward Work Programme                                                                 233  

23        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 24 September 2020, including the confidential section, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Titirangi Community House

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver an annual update report to the local board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Titirangi Community House would like to report back to the local board as per its management agreement.

 


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Ed King, Chair for his attendance.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - VisionWest Community Trust

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the Board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Brook Turner would like to address the Board about VisionWest's partnership Christmas event with the Auckland City Mission.

3.       The event serves over 6,000 whānau across west Auckland who are in desperate need for food, income and gift support at Christmas.

4.       Last year more than 1,000 people who live in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area accessed this support.

5.       VisionWest's deputation will be focused on informing the Board of the event, and requesting financial assistance to deliver it this year, especially with the increased needs due to COVID-19.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Brook Turner for her attendance.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Ken Matthews - Titirangi Public Toilet

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the local board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Ken Matthews would like to speak to the local board about the Titirangi Public Toilet.

 


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Ken Matthews for his attendance.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 October 2020

 

 

Waitākere Ward Councillors' Update

File No.: CP2020/15024

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an update from the Waitākere Ward Councillors Linda Cooper and Shane Henderson.

2.       A period of 10 minutes has been set aside for the Waitākere Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Waitākere Ranges Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga                                       

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      thank Waitākere Ward Councillors Linda Cooper and Shane Henderson for their verbal update.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Elizabeth Stewart - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 October 2020

 

 

Auckland Transport Update - October 2020

File No.: CP2020/15282

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Auckland Transport report to the Waitākere Ranges Local Board for October 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each month, Auckland Transport provides an update to the Waitākere Ranges Local Board on transport-related matters and relevant public consultation projects in its area, on the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) projects and decisions of Auckland Transport’s Traffic Control Committee.

3.       The Auckland Transport update report for October 2020 is attached to this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport October 2020 monthly update report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Transport Report - October 2020

13

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Elizabeth Stewart - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 October 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 October 2020

 

 

Submissions and feedback on the draft Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2020

File No.: CP2020/14335

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an overview of feedback and submissions received from public consultation on the draft Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires that each local board complete a local board plan for adoption by 31 October of the year following election and uses the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with its communities.

3.       The implementation of COVID-19 restrictions required the consultation period to be rescheduled to July and August 2020. Consequently, the adoption is delayed until a special Local Board meeting on November 12. This is to ensure the local board have enough time to consider the submissions received.

4.       In June 2020, the local board approved a draft Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2020 for public consultation. The consultation period ran from 13 July to 13 August 2020.

5.       A total of 159 pieces of feedback was received, including 101 submissions through the online survey tool, 55 hard copy submissions and three pieces of feedback through social media.

6.       Staff have prepared a summary of feedback (Attachment A) giving an overview of the results of the consultation.

7.       All feedback is available on the Auckland Council website (https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/waitakererangesplan/widgets/299441/documents).

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive submissions and feedback on the draft Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2020.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires that each local board must:

·    adopt its local board plan by 31 October of the year following an election

·    use the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

9.       The implementation of COVID-19 restrictions required the originally planned consultation period in June and July 2020 to be rescheduled to July and August 2020. The later dates consequently required a small extension of time for formal adoption, which will now be at a special Local Board meeting on 12 November. This is to ensure the local board has sufficient time to consider the submissions received.

10.     On 18 June 2020, Waitākere Ranges Local Board approved the release of a draft Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2020 for public consultation.

11.     The outcomes of the draft local board plan are:

i.          The Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area is protected and enhanced and connections with surrounding communities are strengthened

ii.          We work closely with mataawaka and mana whenua partners

iii.         We work to respect, protect and restore the environment

iv.        Our communities are resilient and strong

v.         Our communities experience wellbeing, belonging and participation

vi.        People have a range of opportunities to experience arts, culture and heritage

vii.        We have infrastructure and facilities which support and enhance our neighbourhoods and town centres.

12.     In addition to understanding the needs and aspirations of the community, feedback was sought on how the local board can support the community and local businesses in recovering from the impact of COVID-19.

How we consulted

13.     The consultation was held between 13 July and 13 August 2020. A range of engagement activities were undertaken including using digital and online platforms:

·   Public submissions: These were hard copy and online collected via email, post, libraries, service centres, local board offices, People’s Panel and the online survey tool akhaveyoursay/lovelocal. The latter is also where the submissions are publicly available.

·   Have Your Say: A Library drop-in at Glen Eden Library on 31 July. A planned ‘Have Your Say’ webinar was cancelled due to a lack of registrations.

·   Social media: Comments were received on the Waitākere Ranges Local Board Facebook page.

14.     The following community partners held or hosted events and presentations:

·    Pest-Free Waitākere Alliance – a presentation to 40+ attendees on the topic of the local board.

·    Glen Eden Methodist Church – stall before their AGM on Sunday 2 August

·    Green Bay High School – stall held at school on 7 August

·    Waitākere Ethnic Board – information session with board representatives to support them making a submission. A regional west view was taken during the meeting, but they only provided a formal submission to Henderson-Massey. 

·    Te Uru – 8 August with Arts organisations within the West area.

·    A promotional email was sent around to all grants recipients in the last 12 months to encourage them to participate. 

·    Kelston Girls High School – the opportunity was brokered by Kay Thomas, Chair of the Whau Local Board, so the content of the session focused on their environmental objectives. However, information from the respondents is relevant to all three West boards as attendees lived in all three areas. This information was shared with the Waitākere Ranges Senior Advisor.

·    In addition to the above, elected members spoke with their respective networks including the broader Residents and Ratepayers groups.

·    These events occurred before the SCP consultation due to scheduling and/or preferences of the partner:

Bilal e Masjid - 3 July

Combined Ratepayers and Residents Network Waitākere – 6 July

Waitākere Ranges Youth Providers Network – 30 June.

15.     In response, the local board received the following feedback:

·    101 submissions through the online survey tool

·    55 hard copy submissions

·    Three pieces of feedback via social media.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The results and analysis of the public consultation will form the basis for the development of the final local board plan.

17.     Staff have prepared a summary of feedback (Attachment A) giving an overview of the results of the consultation.  The key messages from the summary are described below.

·    61 per cent of submitters responded positively to the general direction of the plan, while 32 per cent responded negatively. 7 per cent were unsure.

Impact of COVID-19

·    35 per cent felt the plan would help the community recover from the impact of COVID-19, while 33 per cent did not. The remaining submitters were unsure.

·    Of the 4 responses to this question that came from a submitter identifying as Māori, two were unsure, one responded positively, and one responded negatively.

·    Of the 18 responses from submitters identifying as Asian, 17 thought the plan would help our recovery from the impact of COVID-19. Most of these submissions came via a community engagement partner.

 

Publishing the results of public consultation

18.     To conclude this phase of the local board plan development, staff recommend that the local board receive the submissions and feedback for consideration.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     Receiving the submissions and feedback has a neutral climate impact. The submissions are available online to reduce the printing of hard copies. 

20.     The draft Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2020 reflects the impacts of predicted climate change. The plan includes the outcome ‘Our communities are resilient and strong’. This includes as a specific initiative to ‘consider and evaluate the impact of all local board projects and activities on climate change.’

21.     The climate impact of any initiatives the Waitākere Ranges Local Board chooses to progress will be considered as part of the annual planning cycle.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     Staff will work closely with the local board in the development of the final plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     The Waitākere Ranges Local Board will consider all submissions and feedback to the draft Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2020 prior to adopting the final local board plan in November 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     The draft Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2020 was developed with consideration given to existing feedback from mana whenua and mataawaka. This included seeking their views and values at Hoani at Waititi on Waitangi Day, and via the Waitākere ki tua plan.

25.     Hāpai te Hauora supported the board with Māori engagement using a Māori-focused survey methodology with their networks.

26.     Four submissions were received from those identifying as Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     There are no financial implications associated with receiving the submissions and feedback.

28.     Budget to implement initiatives and projects is confirmed through the annual plan budgeting process.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     There is a risk relating to managing public expectations. The process of consultation is likely to have raised expectations as to the inclusion of the communities’ priorities and aspirations, while the full social and economic effects of COVID-19 are still being determined.

30.     The local board will consider all submissions and feedback before making changes to the draft Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2020.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     The submissions and feedback are available on the Auckland Council website.

32.     The Waitākere Ranges Local Board will adopt the Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2020 on 12 November 2020.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan 2020 - Summary of Feedback

25

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Raewyn Curran - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

Louise Mason – General Manager, Local Board Services

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 October 2020

 

 

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Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 October 2020

 

 

Local board views on plan change to enable rainwater tank installation for the Auckland region

File No.: CP2020/15017

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To invite local board views on a plan change by Auckland Council to enable rainwater tank installation across urban and rural Auckland.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Decision-makers on a plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan must consider local boards’ views on the plan change, if the relevant local boards choose to provide their views.

3.       Each local board has a responsibility to communicate the interests and preferences of people in its area on Auckland Council policy documents.  A local board can present local views and preferences when expressed by the whole local board.[1]

4.       Auckland Council’s plan change would change the Auckland Unitary Plan by adding a line entry in rural and urban zone activity tables, stating that a rainwater tank is a permitted activity. Additionally, a number of baseline standards designed to avoid objectionable outcomes would be developed for the installation of rainwater tanks along with assessment criteria where a resource consent was still required. Rainwater tanks would be excluded from the definition of “Building” in the Auckland Unitary Plan, and therefore would avoid many rules pertaining to buildings which have the potential to trigger the need for resource consent.

5.       This report is the mechanism for the local board to resolve and provide its views on the council’s plan change.  Staff do not recommend what view the local board should convey.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      provide local board views on council’s proposed change to the Auckland Unitary Plan to enable rainwater tank installation for the Auckland region

b)      appoint a local board member to speak to the local board views at a hearing on council’s enabling rainwater tanks plan change for the Auckland region

c)      delegate authority to the chairperson of Waitākere Ranges Local Board to make a replacement appointment in the event the local board member appointed in resolution b) is unable to attend the private plan change hearing.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of Auckland Council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards provide their views on the content of these documents.  Decision-makers must consider local boards’ views when deciding the content of these policy documents.[2]

7.       If the local board chooses to provide its views, the planner includes those views in the hearing report. Local board views are included in the analysis of the plan change, along with submissions.

8.       If appointed by resolution, local board members may present the local board’s views at the hearing to commissioners, who decide on the plan change request.

9.       This report provides an overview of the plan change.

10.     The report does not recommend what the local board should convey. The planner must include any local board views in the evaluation of the plan change. The planner cannot advise the local board as to what its views should be, and then evaluate those views.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Plan change overview

11.     The plan change applies to the Auckland region. The definition of “Building” in the Auckland Unitary Plan will be amended so that a rainwater tank will not be considered a building. A new definition will be introduced for “rainwater tank”. The activity tables of the following zones will have a new line entry stating that rainwater tanks are a permitted activity. The zones directly concerned are as follows:

§ Single House Zone

§ Large Lot Zone

§ Rural and Coastal Settlement Zone

§ Mixed Housing Suburban Zone

§ Mixed Housing Urban Zone

§ Terrace Housing and Apartment Buildings Zone

§ Special Character Areas Overlay - Residential

§ Rural Production Zone

§ Mixed Rural Zone

§ Rural Coastal Zone

§ Rural Conservation Zone

§ Countryside Living Zone

§ Waitākere Foothills Zone

§ Waitākere Ranges Zone.

 

12.     The purpose of the plan change is to enable rainwater tank installation across the Auckland region without the need for resource consent. Some baseline standards will be developed to avoid objectionable outcomes.

13.     The notified plan change and section 32 document providing the rationale for the council plan change are available on the council’s website at:

https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/plans-projects-policies-reports-bylaws/our-plans-strategies/unitary-plan/auckland-unitary-plan-modifications/Pages/details.aspx?UnitaryPlanId=83

 

14.     Public submissions will be loaded onto the council’s website once the notification period has closed.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan include:

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·    to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

16.     The need to initiate a plan change to enable rainwater tank installation is a response to Auckland’s current drought and potential water shortage in 2020/2021.

17.     This uncertainty in water supply is likely to continue as our climate changes. Climate projections released by the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research indicated that the Auckland region is likely to experience an increase of unpredictable rainfall and drought events in the Auckland region. 

18.     Removing unnecessary restrictions around the installation of rainwater tanks will support Auckland’s water security and resilience to climate change.

19.     The proposed plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan supports Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan. One of the goals of the climate plan is to prepare Aucklanders to adapt to the impacts of climate change.  

20.     Easing barriers to the installation of rainwater tanks supports water supply management and aligns with the ‘Built Environment’ priority area in the Auckland Climate Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     Other parts of the council group directly involved with the plan change include Healthy Waters, which has assisted with scoping the plan change, consultation and providing information for inclusion in the section 32 document (which provides the rationale for the plan change). Consultation has also occurred with Watercare and the Independent Māori Statutory Board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     This plan change affects all local boards.

23.     Factors the local board may wish to consider in formulating its view:

·    interests and preferences of people in the local board area

·    well-being of communities within the local board area

·    local board documents, such as the local board plan and the local board agreement

·    responsibilities and operation of the local board.

24.     This report is the mechanism for obtaining formal local board views. The decision-maker will consider local board views, if provided, when deciding on the plan change.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     If the local board chooses to provide its views on the plan change it includes the opportunity to comment on matters that may be of interest or importance to Māori People, well-being of Māori communities or Te Ao Māori (Māori worldview).

26.     The council has initiated consultation with all iwi authorities in the Auckland region including the Independent Māori Statutory Board. Healthy Waters have engaged with iwi in the past on the matter of rainwater tanks and to date iwi have been very supportive of harvesting rainwater for household use.

27.     The hearing report will include analysis of Part 2 of the Resource Management Act which requires that all persons exercising RMA functions shall take into account the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi/Te Tiriti o Waitangi.   

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     The plan change does not pose any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     There is a risk that the local board will be unable to provide its views and preferences on the plan change, if it doesn’t pass a resolution. This report provides:

·    the mechanism for the Waitākere Ranges Local Board to express its views and preferences

·    the opportunity for a local board member to speak at a hearing.

30.     If the local board chooses not to pass a resolution at this business meeting, these opportunities are forgone.

31.     The power to provide local board views regarding the content of a plan change cannot be delegated to individual local board member(s).[3]  This report enables the whole local board to decide whether to provide its views and, if so, to determine what matters those views should include.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     The planner will include, and report on, any resolution of the local board in the hearing report. The local board member appointed to speak to the local board’s views will be informed of the hearing date and invited to the hearing for that purpose. 

33.     The planner will advise the local board of the decision on the plan change request by memorandum.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Barry Mosley - Principal Planner

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 October 2020

 

 

Resource Recovery Network Strategy update

File No.: CP2020/15020

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for local boards to give formal feedback on the Resource Recovery Network Strategy update (Attachment A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Resource Recovery Network Strategy, which was approved in October 2014, is being refreshed. This will respond to the updated Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan. It will also reflect the current global context including changes to global recycling markets and the impacts of COVID-19.

3.       Key features of the strategy refresh include:

·        expanding the current strategy from 12 community recycling centres in total to 23 facilities by 2031, including nine additional community recycling centres and two resource recovery parks (capital expenditure to be funded through the central government waste levy)

·        seeking additional funding for ongoing operational support for community recycling centres beyond their current five-year contracts to enable continued service provision (to be funded through the waste targeted rate).

4.       The aim of the network is to maximise diversion of waste from landfill, contribute to creating a circular economy, achieve wider social and economic benefits and deliver local green jobs. The network helps to drive the aspiration of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan to achieve a zero waste Auckland by 2040.

5.       The Resource Recovery Network of nine community recycling centres has provided 80 local jobs. The network diverted 5,213 tonnes of materials from landfill in 2019/2020.

6.       Central government funding has boosted the development of existing sites in the Resource Recovery Network. The revised Resource Recovery Network Strategy will build on this funding and enable greater accessibility for residents and businesses.

7.       A number of local boards have provided support for the Resource Recovery Network through the funding of scoping and feasibility studies, assistance with identifying suitable sites and support for local initiatives such as education outreach.

8.       Staff presented the key points of the strategy refresh to the Waste Political Advisory Group and local boards in September and October 2020. Formal feedback from local boards will be included in a report to Environment and Climate Change Committee seeking adoption of the updated Resource Recovery Network Strategy in November 2020.

9.       Approximately $8.6 million spread over 10 years is proposed to fund new and existing sites. This funding will be sought through the Long-term Plan 2020-2031 process.

10.     An additional $28 million for the new resource recovery facilities, spread over ten years, is proposed to be funded through the budget allocated to Auckland Council from the central government waste levy.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the Resource Recovery Network Strategy update (Attachment A of the agenda report).

b)      note that local board feedback will be included in a report to Environment and Climate Change Committee in November 2020 seeking adoption of the updated Resource Recovery Network Strategy.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     The Resource Recovery Network is one of the nine priority actions in Te Mahere Whakahaere me te Whakaiti Tukunga Para i Tāmaki Makaurau – Auckland Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018.

12.     The network was initially identified as a key initiative under the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2012 and has been developing across the region since that time.

13.     The purpose of the Resource Recovery Network is ‘to maximise the diversion of reusable and recyclable materials from landfill and, in the process, generate multiple environmental, social, cultural and economic benefits for Auckland’. The network helps to drive the aspiration of the plan to achieve a zero waste Auckland by 2040, taking care of people and the environment and turning waste into resources.

14.     A 10-year strategy for the Resource Recovery Network was adopted in 2014 (resolution REG/2014/121). This strategy enabled the establishment of 12 community recycling centres across the Auckland region by 2024, funded by a combination of waste levy funding and targeted rates.

15.     Community recycling centres provide communities with a ‘one stop shop’ for people to drop off unwanted goods and recyclables. The focus is on reuse, repair, repurposing and upcycling resources, as well as providing low cost retail goods to the community. 

Progress of the Resource Recovery Network

16.     As of September 2020, nine community recycling centres have been established. These centres are located in Waiuku, Helensville, Henderson, Wellsford, Warkworth, Aotea / Great Barrier, Devonport, Waiheke and Whangaparaoa. Community recycling centres are also under development in Western Springs and Onehunga.

17.     Across the nine existing sites, 80 local full-time and part-time jobs have been created. In the 2019/2020 financial year, 5,213 tonnes of materials were diverted from landfill for reuse or recovery.

18.     The development of the Resource Recovery Network in Auckland has been further boosted by central government Waste Minimisation Fund and shovel-ready funding, including:

·        $2.3 million from the Waste Minimisation Fund was provided to support development of a Community Recycling Centre in Onehunga

·        $10.6 million in shovel-ready funding for infrastructure development for the existing Devonport, Waiheke, Helensville, Warkworth, Wellsford and Western Springs community recycling centres as well as the Waitākere Waste Transfer Station/ Resource Recovery Park.

 

19.     The recent central government shovel-ready investment will fast track the improvement of existing community recycling centres through developing fit for purpose infrastructure. It will expand employment by increasing the volume of materials and the number of related activities they can undertake to work towards zero waste.

Strategic context

20.     COVID-19 continues to put pressure on international recycling markets, as countries restrict import and export activity through their borders. In addition to this, China implemented its National Sword policy in January 2018, which sets tight contamination limits on imported recyclable materials, including paper and plastics. As a result, global commodity prices for these products have dropped significantly as there is an oversupply to other existing markets.

21.     Several strategic changes have occurred since the initial Resource Recovery Network was approved in 2014. These include the adoption of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028, the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan 2020.

22.     These strategic changes draw focus to the significance of the Resource Recovery Network, which is identified as a priority action in the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan and is also an action in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan. The revised Resource Recovery Network Strategy will also feed into the Long-Term Plan 2021-2031 which is currently being developed for adoption in June 2021.

23.     The opportunities for community recycling centres to divert waste from landfill, generate income and create local jobs are expected to increase significantly over the next few years as government policy changes come into effect. These include the increase in the waste levy, a container return scheme currently under consideration by the government, and the 2019 Climate Change response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Act.

24.     An overview of the revised strategy was presented to the Waste Political Advisory Group on 1 September 2020. The Waste Political Advisory Group indicated its support for the draft strategy refresh.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Key features of the refreshed Resource Recovery Network Strategy

25.     The refreshed Resource Recovery Network Strategy provides a pathway for futureproofing and scaling up the network. In developing the strategy, the priorities, budgets and method of delivery from the original 2014 strategy have been reassessed.

26.     The refreshed strategy focuses on five key areas:

·        increasing the number of sites from 12 to 21 community recycling centres to provide more equitable access to all Aucklanders and establishing two commercially focused resource recovery parks, bringing the total number of sites to 23 by 2031

·        supporting existing sites and operators to thrive

·        strengthening and enabling the network

·        developing a fit for purpose operating and governance model

·        fostering financial sustainability.

27.     Overall, the review has suggested that the strategy approved in 2014 is still valid. Two key changes have been identified that will require additional budget to enable the network to reach its full potential. These key changes are outlined below. Further detail is provided in the draft Resource Recovery Network Strategy update (Attachment A).

Increasing the number of resource recovery facilities

28.     One of the key changes in the updated strategy is an increase in the number of sites planned. The original strategy proposed 12 community recycling centres. The updated strategy proposes an expanded network with an additional nine community recycling centres and two resource recovery parks. This will bring the total number of sites up to 23, including:

·        21 community recycling centres that are strategically located across Auckland. They will be connected with their local communities, providing trusted places to take unwanted goods as well as fostering local innovation and resilience.

·        two resource recovery parks, which are larger-scale facilities that focus mainly on diverting commercial waste from landfill back into the circular economy, while also accepting and diverting domestic waste. One of these will be the upgrade of Waitākere Transfer Station to a resource recovery park and the second will be in south Auckland.

29.     Staff anticipate that an appropriate site will be found in south Auckland for a resource recovery parks. A resource recovery park in the south could provide an opportunity for economic transformation led by Māori or Pacifika businesses, social enterprises and local businesses. Studies have found that recycling results in around 10 times more jobs compared to sending materials to landfill.

30.     The location of facilities will be determined by the availability of suitable sites, opportunities for joint ventures or partnerships, local board feedback, location of existing facilities and accessibility for Auckland residents and businesses. Centres will be equitably spread across the region, depending on the availability of appropriate sites.

31.     Increasing the number of sites will enable greater accessibility for residents and businesses to maximise diversion from landfill and deliver further local green jobs.

Ongoing operational funding

32.     Another key change in the updated strategy is the provision of ongoing operational funding for existing community recycling centres.

33.     When the strategy was originally created in 2014, it was expected that the centres would become self-funding by the end of their initial five-year contract period. Revenue would be generated from income from gate fees, the sale of reusable and recyclable materials, and other services that the centres provide.

34.     This intention was reflected by a reducing management fee from the council over the course of the centres’ five-year contracts. However, although sites that have come to the end of their contracts have significantly reduced their management fee from the council, they are not in a position to be completely self-funding.

35.     This has been caused by a combination of factors, including sites not being developed as quickly as anticipated and the impacts of COVID-19. China’s National Sword restrictions on global recycling have also presented a challenge due to reduced revenue from recycling commodities such as paper, cardboard and plastics.

36.     To ensure the on-going viability and impact of the existing sites, an ongoing site management fee from council will be required beyond the initial five years. This will be negotiated on a site by site basis and will be reassessed as the increase in the waste levy and introduction of product stewardship schemes come into force. 

37.     No additional operational funding is planned for resource recovery parks, which should operate as commercial ventures and be self-funding.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     The expanded Resource Recovery Network is part of Action E6 in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan (manage our resources to deliver a zero waste, circular economy).

39.     The Auckland Zero Waste Programme as part of Auckland’s Climate Plan estimates that this programme will reduce emissions by 39,650 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalents per year by 2030.

40.     Resource recovery facilities also provide zero waste learning opportunities which will have impacts on residents’ purchasing decisions, with resulting climate impacts.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

41.     Waste Solutions staff have worked closely with Community Empowerment Unit and The Southern Initiative who have provided support the development of the community recycling centres. The Southern Initiative have also advocated for a resource recovery park in south Auckland as a contribution to the economic transformation for the south.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

42.     Several local boards have provided support and funding to enable the Resource Recovery Network through their local board work programmes. This has included funding for a range of initiatives from feasibility studies, local capacity building and waste minimisation and learning.

43.     Local boards have also provided feedback through the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 development process. A number of boards supported the establishment of community recycling centres in their area, with Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Manurewa, Ōtara-Papatoetoe and Papakura stating the establishment of a southern community recycling centre should be a priority.

44.     Staff will engage with local boards on individual sites in their local areas as new facilities are investigated and developed.

45.     Staff attended workshops with local boards between 15 September and 14 October 2020 to present on the key points of the strategy refresh.

46.     This report presents the draft Resource Recovery Network Strategy and seeks formal feedback from the local board ahead of Environment and Climate Change Committee adoption of the strategy in November 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

47.     Mana whenua and matāwaka were engaged in the development of the 2018 Waste Management and Minimisation Plan and identified priority actions for Māori.

48.     The draft Resource Recovery Network Strategy aligns to a number of the Māori priorities that were identified, in particular:

·        protection of Papatūānuku by keeping waste from landfill

·        developing respectful and innovative partnerships for waste minimisation in order to restore the ‘mauri’ of Papatūānuku

·        nurturing relationships, looking after people, taonga and taiao

·        fostering mutual respect. 

49.     The council also partners with Para Kore ki Tāmaki – a Māori-developed and implemented programme that integrates mātauranga Māori and zero waste principles and practices to support marae, Māori organisations, Kura Kaupapa Māori and Kōhanga Reo to divert significant quantities of recycling and organic waste from landfill.

50.     The draft Resource Recovery Network Strategy was presented to the Infrastructure and Environmental Services Mana Whenua Forum on 11 September 2020, and then at a workshop on 14 September 2020. As a result of the workshop a number of mana whenua identified interest in potential opportunities for engaging with the development of the Resource Recovery Network.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

51.     The 2020/2021 net operating cost of the community recycling centres that are currently in operation is approximately $2.6 million per year. An additional budget of approximately $8.6 million spread over 10 years is proposed to fund new and existing sites.

52.     Ongoing operational funding will mainly be provided through the solid waste targeted rate. Changes to the strategy will not result in any increase to the waste targeted rate until 2025 in order to maintain budgets during the post COVID-19 recovery and response phase. Any minor increases in operational expenditure over this period will be covered by waste levy funding from central government.

53.     No operational expenditure is planned for resource recovery parks, which should operate as commercial ventures and be self-funding.

54.     An additional $28 million in capital expenditure is proposed for the new resource recovery facilities, spread over ten years. The new facilities are proposed to be funded through the budget allocated to Auckland Council from the central government waste levy. The waste levy will increase incrementally from its current rate of $10 per tonne to $60 per tonne by 2025.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

55.     The key risks and mitigations associated with the revised Resource Recovery Network Strategy are outlined in Table 1.

Table 1: Resource Recovery Network Strategy key risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

Community recycling centres will not be able to become financially viable.

The increase in the waste levy will provide a greater incentive to keep resources out of landfill and increase use (and revenue generation) of community recycling centres. It will also provide increased funding to the council to establish new facilities.

The introduction of product stewardship schemes, such as a container return scheme will provide additional revenue for community recycling centres and attract new users of the facilities.

Additional operational funding provided as proposed in the refreshed strategy will support the centres until sufficient revenue is generated.

Suitable sites will not be available for the proposed additional nine community recycling centres.

Staff are investigating a wide range of opportunities to secure sites, including new models of ownership and operation. This could include joint ventures or lease arrangements.

There will not be suitable operators to tender for the operation of the community recycling centres.

Staff are undertaking early engagement in areas where community recycling centres are planned to build capacity and link interested groups to existing operators and the national membership body for community recyclers, the Zero Waste Network.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

56.     Local board feedback will be included in a report to Environment and Climate Change Committee on 12 November 2020 seeking adoption of the updated Resource Recovery Network Strategy.

57.     Budgets to deliver the revised strategy will be sought through the Long-term Plan 2020-2031 process.

58.     The Resource Recovery Network will continue to develop over the next 10 years, with the Western Springs and Onehunga Community Recycling Centres expected to be operational by the end of 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Resource Recovery Network Strategy

45

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jenny Chilcott – Senior Waste Planning Specialist

Julie Dickinson – Principal Advisor Waste Planning

Authorisers

Barry Potter, Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Lesley Jenkins, acting for Louise Mason, General Manager Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 October 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 October 2020

 

 

Panuku Auckland Development- Waitākere Ranges Local Board Six-Monthly Report 1 March to 31 August 2020

File No.: CP2020/14233

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Waitākere Ranges Local Board on Panuku Development Auckland (Panuku) activities within the local board area and the region for the six months from 1 March to 31 August 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report is a record of events for the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area during the stated time period. CCOs are legally required to prepare six-monthly and annual reports containing financial and other information about their performance. By reporting clearly the record of events, this report enables the council, and Panuku, to meet its legislative reporting obligations and also satisfy New Zealand Stock Exchange obligations. No decisions are to be made from this report.

3.       The Auckland Plan sets out, among other things, reporting requirements (statutory or otherwise), audit and risk reporting requirements, attendance at council meetings, and the process for buying, managing and selling assets.

4.       Panuku collaborates with other CCOs, government and non-governmental organisations as appropriate to obtain positive outcomes for Auckland.

5.       Panuku is charged with balancing our obligation to deliver returns for council with ensuring our regeneration projects are good quality, strategic and better for the environment.

6.       The activities of Panuku cover four broad areas: 

·   urban regeneration of particular neighbourhoods, as determined by Auckland Council

·   review of, and where appropriate, redevelopment of council non-service property

·   management of council property assets including commercial, residential, and marina infrastructure

·   other property related services such as service property optimisation (such as redevelopment incorporating a service delivery function), strategic property advice, acquisitions and disposals.

7.       The Auckland Council Group (‘the council group’) is made up of Auckland Council, and five substantive council-controlled organisations (CCOs) of which Panuku is one. Panuku delivers core activities and plays a major role in achieving the council group’s strategic outcomes for Tāmaki Makaurau. The Governance Manual for Substantive CCOs sets out the council’s expectations for CCOs including Panuku, and the key policies that guide our activities.

8.       Panuku has supported Auckland Council throughout its response to COVID-19 and continues to do so.

9.       Throughout the Alert Level 4 lockdown, our primary focus was to support our tenants and find savings across our organisation.

10.     Our capital programme delivery was impacted by the Alert Level 4 lockdown, however, this resumed on the return to Alert Level 3, with only minor delays across our capital programme as a result.

11.     Like Auckland Council, Panuku has made savings, with the majority of our people earning over $100,000, our executive leaders and our board taking voluntary salary reductions.

12.     To respond to the changing property market and the impacts of the Auckland Council group we confirmed a new organisational structure to deliver our programme.

13.     We have supported Auckland Council through the Emergency Budget 2020/2021. Our capital envelope for this financial year will allow us to deliver a credible urban regeneration programme in our neighbourhoods across the region.

14.     Panuku Development Auckland currently manages 18 commercial and residential interests in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area.

15.     No properties were purchased in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area during the six month reporting period.

16.     No properties were sold in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area during the six month reporting period.

17.     Five properties in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area are currently under review as part of our rationalisation process.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the Panuku Development Auckland - Waitākere Ranges Local Board Six-Monthly Report 1 March to 31 August 2020.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

18.     Panuku helps to rejuvenate parts of Auckland, from small projects that refresh a site or building, to major transformations of town centres or neighbourhoods.

19.     The Auckland Plan is the roadmap to deliver on Auckland’s vision to be a world-class city, Panuku plays a significant role in achieving the ‘Homes and Places’ and ‘Belonging and Participation’ outcomes.

20.     Panuku leads urban redevelopment in Manukau, Onehunga, Wynyard Quarter, Waterfront, Northcote, Avondale, Takapuna, Henderson, Old Papatoetoe, Ormiston, Panmure, Pukekohe, the city centre and redevelopment of the Haumaru Portfolio.

21.     Panuku manages around $3 billion of council’s non-service property portfolio, which is continuously reviewed to find smart ways to generate income for the region, grow the portfolio, or release land or property that can be better used by others. ‘Non-service properties’ are council-owned properties that are not used to deliver council, or CCO, services.

22.     As at 31 August 2020, the Panuku-managed non-service property portfolio comprises 1,674 properties, containing 998 leases. This includes vacant land, industrial buildings, warehouses, retail shops, cafes, offices, medical centres and a large portfolio of residential rental homes. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

23.     Panuku is contributing commercial input into approximately fifty region-wide council-driven renewal and housing supply initiatives.

24.     Panuku works with partners and stakeholders over the course of a project. It also champions best practice project delivery, to achieve best value outcomes within defined cost, time and quality parameters.

25.     Below is a high-level update on activities in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area:

Properties managed in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area

26.     Panuku currently manages one residential and 17 commercial interests within the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area.

Strategic Asset Optimisation

Service Property Optimisation

27.     Optimisation is a self-funding development approach targeting sub-optimal service assets, approved in 2015. The process involves an agreement between Community Facilities, Panuku and local boards and is led by Panuku. It is designed to equal or enhance levels of service to the local community in a reconfigured form while delivering on strategic outcomes such as housing or urban regeneration, with no impact on existing rate assumptions.

28.     Using optimisation, underperforming assets will have increased utility and efficiency, lower maintenance and operating costs, as well as improved service delivery benefiting from the co-location of other complementary services or commercial activities. Optimisation will free up a range of undercapitalised development opportunities such as air space, full sites, or part sites.

29.     Using optimisation as a redevelopment and funding tool, the local board can maximise efficiencies from service assets while maintaining levels of service through the release of some or all of that property for sale or development.

30.     Local boards are allocated decision making for the disposal of local service property and reinvestment of sale proceeds under the service property optimisation approach.

Portfolio review and rationalisation

Overview

31.     Panuku is required to undertake ongoing rationalisation of the council’s non-service assets, including the identification of properties from within the council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale and development if appropriate. This contributes towards Auckland Council’s Emergency Budget asset recycling target, as well as outcomes identified in the Long-term Plan, by providing the council with efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

32.     Panuku has a focus on achieving housing and urban regeneration outcomes for properties no longer required for a council service use. Identifying potential sale properties contributes to the Auckland Plan focus of accommodating the significant growth projected for the region over the coming decades.

Process

33.     Once identified as no longer delivering the council service use for which it was acquired, property is taken through a multi-stage rationalisation process. The agreed process includes engagement with council departments and CCOs, the local board, mana whenua and the relevant ward councillor The Finance and Performance Committee has the delegation to approve recommendations for disposal. Panuku works closely with Auckland Council business units, Auckland Council’s Finance team and Auckland Transport to identify and progress potential surplus properties to help achieve disposal targets.

Acquisitions and disposals

34.     Panuku manages the acquisition and disposal of property on behalf of Auckland Council. Panuku purchases property for development, roads, infrastructure projects and other services. These properties may be sold with or without contractual requirements for development.

35.     All land acquisition committee resolutions contain a confidentiality clause due to the commercially sensitive nature of ongoing transactions, and thus cannot be reported on while in process.

36.     21 properties have had purchase agreements signed this financial year for open space purposes around the region at a value of $42.6 million, and six properties have been purchased for stormwater purposes at a value of $19 million. 

Acquisitions

37.     Panuku undertakes acquisitions for Auckland Council’s parks team and Healthy Waters under delegation from council’s Chief Executive. Panuku does not unilaterally decide which properties to buy and when, but rather follows a directive to manage the commercial transactions following committee approval to purchase a particular property. A prerequisite of the committee resolution is reporting to the local board.

38.     Panuku has purchased one property for open space across Auckland, in Flat Bush between March 2020 and August 2020 at a cost of $3.3 million.

39.     No properties have been purchased in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area during the reporting period for open space.

Disposals

40.     In the current reporting period from March 2020 to August 2020, the Panuku disposals team has entered into for sale and purchase agreements, with an estimated value of $5.4 million of unconditional net sales proceeds. 

41.     Panuku 2020/2021 disposals target is $25 million for the year. The disposals target is agreed with the council and is reviewed on an annual basis.

42.     No properties have been sold in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area during the reporting period.

Under review

43.     Properties currently under review in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area are listed below. The list includes any properties that may have recently been approved for sale or development and sale by the Governing Body.

Property

Details

Adj. 45 Brandon Road, Glen Eden

A long narrow strip of land that could only be sold to adjacent landowner due to the size and shape of the property. This site is not required for open space purposes and could be disposed of with an access easement. It is a reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977.
The site was included in Schedule A of the Auckland Council Emergency Budget asset recycling programme. At its 16 July 2020 meeting, the Finance and Performance Committee approved the disposal.

67A Glengarry Road, Glen Eden

147m² accessway subject to Reserves Act 1977.  This site is not required as part of the open space network.
The site was included in Schedule A of the Auckland Council Emergency Budget asset recycling programme. At its 16 July 2020 meeting, the Finance and Performance Committee approved the disposal.
Panuku is undertaking a reserve revocation and plan change process before taking the site to market.

220-240 Shaw Road, Titirangi

Originally acquired for stormwater management purposes under Project Twin Streams by the former Waitakere City Council in 2004.
The site was included in Schedule A of the Auckland Council Emergency Budget asset recycling programme. At its 16 July 2020 meeting, the Finance and Performance Committee approved the disposal.
A disposal is not progressing due to advice from Healthy Waters that of flooding risk to the site and that any development may impact existing residents.

12 Western Road, Laingholm

Acquired for stormwater purposes (detention pond) by the former Waitakere City Council in 2002.  The vacant former residential site is not required for open space network purposes. 
The site was included in Schedule A of the Auckland Council Emergency Budget asset recycling programme. At its 16 July 2020 meeting, the Finance and Performance Committee approved the disposal.
A disposal is not progressing due to advice from Healthy Waters of flooding risk to the site and that any development may impact existing residents.

300 West Coast Road, Glen Eden

300 West Coast Road is a closed landfill and a medium risk contaminated site.
Approximately 5,500m2 of the former Glen Eden Borough Council works depot is being retained for open space network purposes.
The approximately 4,900m2 balance of the site is not required for public work.
The local board supports the retention of the entire site for open space and future growth purposes, and due to its strategic location and proximity to the Glen Eden town centre.
The site is included in Schedule B of the Auckland Council Emergency Budget asset recycling programme.

 

Housing for Older People - Haumaru Housing 

44.     The council owns 1,452 units located in 63 villages across Auckland, which provide rental housing to low income older people in Auckland.  

45.     The Housing for Older People (HfOP) project involved Auckland Council partnering with a third-party organisation, The Selwyn Foundation, to deliver social rental housing services for older people across Auckland. 

46.     The joint venture business, named Haumaru Housing, took over the tenancy, facilities and asset management of the portfolio, under a long-term lease arrangement from 1 July 2017.  

47.     Haumaru Housing was granted community housing provider (CHP) status in April 2017. Having CHP registration enables Haumaru to access the government’s Income Related Rent Subsidy (IRRS) scheme. 

48.     Auckland Council has delegated Panuku to lead a new multi-year residential development programme.  

49.     The following Haumaru Housing villages are located within the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area: 

Village 

Address 

Number of units 

Kaurilands Court

18 Kaurilands Road, Titirangi

22

Westview Village

100 West Coast Road, Glen Eden

42

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

50.     The Panuku urban regeneration programmes support the regeneration of existing town centres while also addressing climate mitigation and adaptation.

51.     Mitigation of climate change involves reducing the carbon emissions that contribute to climate change. Our neighbourhoods are transport-oriented communities that utilise existing infrastructure and transport links and we seek to make local walking and cycling safe and viable alternatives to the private vehicle. Panuku has also adopted a Homestar-6 minimum standard to ensure we can reduce energy, water and landfill waste. We are working to adopt similar standards for our public realm and commercial developments, whilst also taking guidance from precinct sustainability rating tools like Green Star Communities.

52.     Adaptation to climate change involves planning for the changes to our climate and associated impacts that are already happening or are projected to happen, including sea-level rise, hotter temperatures, extreme weather events, flooding and droughts. Climate change is likely to subject the Waitākere Ranges Local Board Area to hotter temperatures and more frequent flooding and drought. Panuku seeks to future-proof our communities by:

·   specifying that infrastructure and developments are designed to cope with warmer temperatures and extreme weather events

·   the use of green infrastructure and water sensitive design to increase flood resilience and provide ecological and biodiversity benefits

·   the provision of increased shade and shelter for storm events and hotter days

·   initiatives to build community resilience

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

53.     The views of the council group are incorporated on a project by project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

54.     Any local or sub-regional impacts related to local activities are considered on a project by project basis.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

55.     Panuku works collaboratively with mana whenua on a range of projects including potential property disposals, development sites in the area and commercial opportunities. Engagement can be on specific individual properties and projects at an operational level with kaitiaki representatives, or with the Panuku Mana Whenua Governance Forum who have a broader mandate.

56.     Panuku continues to partner with Māori on opportunities which enhance Māori social and economic wellbeing.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

57.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

58.     There are no risks associated with receiving this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

59.     The next six-month update is scheduled for March 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    


 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Perin Gerrand - Engagement Coordinator

Authorisers

Joanna Glasswell - Head of Corporate Affairs

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 October 2020

 

 

Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development six-monthly update to local boards: 1 January to 30 June 2020

File No.: CP2020/15022

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide local boards with an update on Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development activities in each local board area as well as Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development’s regional activities for the period 1 January to 30 June 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To inform the local board about local/regional initiatives and how they are tracking.

3.       The role of Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) is to support:

·        the growth of Auckland’s key internationally competitive sectors

·        the provision of quality jobs across Auckland.

4.       ATEED has supported multiple local board/regional initiatives that have supported economic development through development of businesses and an increase in events and sustainable tourism growth (including for Māori) across Auckland.  

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the update from Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development for the period 1 January to 30 June 2020.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       ATEED has two areas of delivery focus:

·        Economic Development – including business support, business attraction and investment, local economic development, trade and industry development, skills employment and talent and innovation and entrepreneurship.

·        Destination – supporting sustainable growth of the visitor economy with a focus on destination marketing and management, major events, business events (meetings and conventions) and international student attraction and retention.

6.       ATEED works with local boards, the council and other council-controlled organisations (CCOs) to support decision-making on local economic growth and facilitates or coordinates the delivery of local economic development activity. It further ensures that the regional activities it leads and/or delivers fully support local economic growth and employment.

7.       Additional information about ATEED’s role and activities can be found at: www.aucklandnz.com/ateed

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       From 1 January to 30 June 2020, 3726 businesses had been through an ATEED intervention, including 3174 businesses for Economic Development-related programmes and 549 for Destination-related programmes.[4]

9.       The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent lockdowns have seen a marked increase in demand for business support in both resource and monetary terms, cancellation and postponement of major events and significant fallout incurred by the tourism sector. Figure 1 shows the number of businesses in each local board area who have sought out an ATEED Economic Development and/or Destination intervention.

10.     Waitematā Local Board had the highest number of business interventions, while Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board had the lowest. Because Waitematā Local Board includes the region’s CBD, it is unsurprising that it has had the highest number of interventions. The data shows that within a local board area, between 1 per cent and 4 per cent of businesses took part in an ATEED intervention.

11.     Most local board areas had higher rates of participation in Economic Development-related programmes compared to Destination-related interventions over the six months. The following local board areas had Destination-related interventions of over 25 per cent:

·        Waiheke

·        Waitematā

·        Rodney

·        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu.

12.     The businesses in these local board areas have high rates of Auckland Convention Bureau[5] membership and many benefit from ATEED’s tourism advocacy programme.

Māori businesses

13.     Māori businesses are represented in ATEED interventions across all local board areas, with Waitematā Local Board having the highest intervention uptake. This is due to the high number of businesses in the Waitematā Local Board area relative to other local board areas.

Jobseekers in Auckland

14.     During the April to June 2020 quarter, New Zealand experienced a rapid increase in the number of people who became recipients of a jobseeker benefit from the Ministry of Social Development. Jobseeker benefit data acts as a proxy for unemployment figures. The number of new recipients of the Jobseeker – Work Ready benefit from April to June 2020 can be compared for each local board area in Figure 3. Please note that the data from the Ministry of Social Development grouped together Waiheke and Aotea / Great Barrier local boards and cannot be separated for the purposes of this graph.

15.     Maungakiekie-Tāmaki and Henderson-Massey Local Board areas have the highest numbers of recipients in the second quarter of the year. Aotea / Great Barrier, Waiheke, and Devonport-Takapuna Local Boards reflect the lowest number of recipients in Auckland. The number of recipients generally correlate with socio-economic status and population size.

Economic Development

Locally driven initiatives

Table 1: Locally driven initiatives

Local board

Initiative

Update

Budget

Albert-Eden

Sustainability Kick Start

Business participation: 10

Programme completed: March 2020

$24,000

Franklin

Hunua Trail Plan Implementation

Project reinstated after Covid-19 interruptions in Q4 with expected increase in project activity going into 2020/21.

$80,000

Hibiscus and Bays

Pop-Up Business School

Course delivered: 10-21 February 2020

Registrations: 57

$7500

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

Young Enterprise Scheme

Local board funds supported the Kick Start Days (February). Sponsorship Agreement signed. Expected draw-down of funds by 30 June 2020.

$3500

Manurewa

Young Enterprise Scheme

Local board funds supported the Kick Start Days (February). Sponsorship Agreement signed. Expected draw-down of funds by 30 June 2020.

$2000

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

Onehunga Sustainability Development Programme

First year of two-year project. First stage focuses on retail/services. Waste audits scheduled for April-June, however continued business participation in programme uncertain due to pandemic.

$20,000

Ōrākei

Young Enterprise Scheme

Local board funds supported the Kick Start Days (February). Sponsorship Agreement signed. Expected draw-down of funds by 30 June 2020.

$2000

Ōtara-Papatoetoe

Young Enterprise Scheme

Local board funds supported the Kick Start Days (February). Sponsorship Agreement signed. Expected draw-down of funds by 30 June 2020.

$3000

Business Sustainability Follow-Up Programme

Programme launched mid-March, however continued business participation in programme uncertain due to pandemic.

$20,000

Little India Promotion

The promotion part of Visitor Attraction Programme, launched in February. Programme put on hold in March due to the pandemic.

$20,000

Upper Harbour

Young Enterprise Scheme

Local board funds supported the Kick Start Days (February). Sponsorship Agreement signed. Expected draw-down of funds by 30 June 2020.

$2000

Waitematā

Sustainability Kick Start Programme

 

Business participation: 10

Programme completed: March 2020

 

$24,000

Young Enterprise Scheme

Local board funds supported the Kick Start Days (February). Sponsorship Agreement signed. Expected draw-down of funds by 30 June 2020.

$5000

Whau

Young Enterprise Scheme

Local board funds supported the Kick Start Days (February). Sponsorship Agreement signed. Expected draw-down of funds by 30 June 2020.

$1000

Supporting local business growth

16.     A key programme in supporting the growth of Auckland’s internationally competitive sectors and the provision of quality jobs is central government’s Regional Business Partnership Network. This is delivered by ATEED’s Business and Innovation Advisors, whose role is to connect local businesses to resources, experts and services in innovation, Research and Development, business growth and management.

17.     Three thousand and seven businesses participated in this programme from January 1 to June 30, represented below in Figure 4 which also breaks down business uptake per local board area.

18.     Demand for business support increased significantly between March and June because of the fallout from the pandemic. To this end, programme coverage for the region ranged from 1 per cent to 2 per cent of all businesses in each local board area. Local boards with the highest coverage in percentage terms were Waitematā (2.1 per cent), Upper Harbour (2 per cent), Maungakiekie-Tāmaki (2 per cent), and Kaipātiki (1.8 per cent).

Other support for new businesses

19.     Figure 5 shows the number of Auckland businesses that took part in ATEED’s business innovation clinics per local board area from January to June 2020. Local board areas with the highest number of participants were:

·        Albert-Eden

·        Kaipātiki

·        Manurewa

·        Ōrākei

·        Waitematā.

20.     As businesses refocus their efforts to cope with uncertainties arising from the pandemic, ATEED has reviewed one of its programmes with a decision for it to be discontinued - no workshops took place over the relevant six-month period. The ‘Starting Off Right’ programme gave free support and provided expert advice to new business owners and managers. ATEED is working on an alternative approach to support Auckland business start-ups and entrepreneurs.

Film activity

21.     ATEED’s Screen Auckland team issues film permits for filming in public open spaces. This activity supports local businesses and employment, as well as providing a revenue stream to local boards for the use of local parks.

22.     Between 1 January and 30 June 2020, a total of 246 film permits[6] were issued across Auckland. During lockdown, most filming activity ceased, however once the more restrictive alert levels were lifted in May, there was an increase in permits being issued.

23.     Although Waitākere Ranges Local Board had the most permits issued (46), Franklin Local Board’s share of the permit revenue was the highest ($9921.74) from its 12 permits. Total revenue for all local boards was $45,342.49.[7] This information is shown in Figure 6 and Table 2 below.

 

Table 2: Film permits and revenue

Local Board

Film permits

Revenue

Albert-Eden

15

$2,893.92

Aotea / Great Barrier

0

$0.00

Devonport-Takapuna

16

$3,756.51

Franklin

12

$9,921.74

Henderson-Massey

31

$3,147.82

Hibiscus and Bays

18

$4,066.08

Howick

3

$460.87

Kaipātiki

5

$1,085.21

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

8

$2,452.18

Manurewa

3

$252.18

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

6

$600.00

Ōrākei

8

$1,017.39

Ōtara-Papatoetoe

14

$2,782.60

Papakura

0

$0.00

Puketāpapa

4

$973.91

Rodney

26

$2,817.39

Upper Harbour

0

$0.00

Waiheke

0

$0.00

Waitākere Ranges

46

$4,860.87

Waitematā

30

$4,210.34

Whau

1

$43.48

Total:

246

$45,342.49

 

Young Enterprise Scheme

24.     The Auckland Chamber of Commerce has delivered the Lion Foundation Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) since January 2018. ATEED plays a strategic role and provides funding for this initiative. Through the programme, students develop creative ideas into businesses, complete with real products and services generating profit (and sometimes losses). During the period, there were 53 schools (1523 students) that completed the programme. This year, the programme took place mostly online.

Table 3: YES Schools

Local Board

Schools involved

Albert-Eden

Auckland Grammar School

Diocesan School for Girls

Epsom Girls Grammar School

Mt Albert Grammar School

St Cuthbert's College (Epsom)

Devonport-Takapuna

Rosmini College

Takapuna Grammar School

Westlake Boys' High School

Westlake Girls' High School

Franklin

Onewhero Area School

Pukekohe High School

Wesley College

Henderson-Massey

Henderson High School

Massey High School

Waitakere College

Hibiscus and Bays

Kingsway School

Whangaparāoa College

Howick

Macleans College

Edgewater College

Pakuranga College

Saint Kentigern College (Pakuranga)

Kaipātiki

Birkenhead College

Glenfield College

Northcote College

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

Al-Madinah School

De La Salle College

King's College

Māngere College

Southern Cross Campus

TKM o Nga Tapuwae

Manurewa

Alfriston College

Manurewa High School

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

One Tree Hill College

Onehunga High School

Ōrākei

Baradene College

Glendowie College

Sacred Heart College (Auckland)

Selwyn College

Ōtara-Papatoetoe

Aorere College

Ormiston Senior College

Papatoetoe High School

Sancta Maria College

Sir Edmund Hillary Collegiate Senior School

Rodney

Mahurangi College

 

Upper Harbour

Albany Senior High School

Hobsonville Point School (Secondary)

Kristin School

Waitematā

Auckland Girls' Grammar School

St Mary's College (Ponsonby)

Western Springs College

Whau

Auckland International College

Avondale College

Kelston Girls' College

 

25.     Figure 7 shows the number of schools participating in the Young Enterprise Scheme by local board area.

 

26.     Higher participation in the scheme occurred in the following local board areas:

·        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

·        Albert-Eden

·        Ōtara-Papatoetoe.

27.     This is mainly due to there being a higher number of schools in these areas.

Local jobs and skills hubs

28.     The City Centre, Manukau and Northern hubs were all closed during lockdown and were open in June but with limited public-facing services. A reorganisation of the jobs and skills hubs services is underway in response to the impact of COVID-19 on the labour market and the funding received in the central government budget in May this year.

The South and West Auckland Prosperity Project

29.    ATEED, the Southern Initiative (TSI) and the Western Initiative (TWI) have been working together on a project that is focused on how we can ensure that the mega economic shock of Covid-19 does not create further disparity and inequity for South and West Auckland, in partnership with Stakeholder Strategies. The presentation of the South and West Prosperity Project has been compiled using Auckland, South and West, Māori and Pacific-specific data, and includes a number of next steps for ATEED, TSI and TWI, and direction for the eco-system to enable prosperity for South and West Auckland.

Destination

Visitor survey insights report

30.     The Auckland Domestic Visitor Insights Report was created to inform the Auckland tourism industry about the changing domestic visitor market to assist with improved product development and destination marketing. This report was released in May 2020 for the year up to January 2020. It contains insights that can be used to market regions and local board areas to domestic visitors. Relevant insights are captured below.

31.     Central Auckland (Albert-Eden, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki, Puketāpapa, Ōrākei, & Waitematā local boards):

·        The majority of domestic visitors surveyed (78 per cent) came to Central Auckland, with an average satisfaction of experienced activities and attraction of 8.2/10. The top three attractions were Queen Street, Sky Tower and downtown waterfront/viaduct area.

·        Of the surveyed domestic visitors that came to Auckland Central (year to December 2019), the most popular activities were frequenting a restaurant/café (59 per cent) followed by shopping (55 per cent). Other activities included visiting the casino or participating in gambling (21 per cent) and attending an event, concert or festival (20 per cent).

32.     North Auckland (Devonport-Takapuna, Hibiscus and Bays, Kaipātiki, Rodney, and East Upper Harbour local boards):

·        Just under half of surveyed domestic visitors (43 per cent) visited North Auckland. Their average satisfaction with experienced activities and attractions was 8.2/10. Of these domestic visitors, the top attraction was Albany (30 per cent), followed by Devonport (27 per cent) and Takapuna (27 per cent). This group also visited Wellsford (17 per cent) and Whangaparaoa Peninsula (13 per cent).

·        The most common activity undertaken by surveyed international (39 per cent) and domestic (50 per cent) visitors was visiting a restaurant/café.

33.     East Auckland (Franklin (East) and Howick local boards):

·        A third of surveyed domestic visitors (32 per cent) visited East Auckland. Average satisfaction with East Auckland’s experienced activities/attractions was 8.2/10. Almost half (46 per cent) of domestic visitors went to Sylvia Park, a quarter (24 per cent) visited Howick and 18 per cent visited Half Moon Bay. In comparison to the international market, domestic visitors called in on the Howick Historical Village (13 per cent) and the Pakuranga Night Markets (11 per cent) in greater numbers.

·        Further, surveyed domestic visitors visited art galleries, museums, historic sites (10 per cent) in the region more than surveyed international visitors.

34.     South Auckland (Franklin (West), Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Manurewa, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, and Papakura local boards):

·        Over half of surveyed domestic visitors (52 per cent) to Auckland visited South Auckland, with the average satisfaction with South Auckland’s activities and attractions being 8.0 out of 10. Over half of surveyed domestic visitors that visited South Auckland visited the Auckland Airport (53 per cent); a third (33 per cent) visited Manukau; and a quarter (26 per cent) visited Rainbow’s End. In comparison to the international market, surveyed domestic visitors visited the Ōtara Market (13 per cent) and Ōtara (10 per cent) in greater numbers.

·        Of the visitors that visited South Auckland, the top three activities for surveyed international and domestic visitors was visiting a restaurant or café, shopping and general exploration.

35.     West Auckland (Henderson-Massey, West Upper Harbour, Waitākere Ranges, and Whau local boards):

·        Over a third of surveyed domestic visitors (35 per cent) to Auckland visited West Auckland. The average satisfaction with West Auckland’s activities and attractions for the international market was 8.2 out of 10. A third of the surveyed domestic visitors who visited West Auckland went to Piha Beach (34 per cent); 20 per cent visited Titirangi; and 19 per cent visited the Avondale Sunday Markets. In comparison to the international market, domestic visitors visited the Kumeu Farmers’ Market (14 per cent) and Parakai Hot Pools (13 per cent) more often.

·        Visiting a restaurant or café, shopping and going to the beach were the top three domestic visitor activities.

36.     Hauraki Gulf Islands (Aotea / Great Barrier and Waiheke local boards):

·        20 per cent of surveyed domestic visitors to Auckland visited Hauraki Gulf Islands. Average satisfaction with the area’s experienced activities/attractions was 8.5/10 (highest satisfaction rating from the domestic market). The top domestic visitor attraction was Waiheke Island (44 per cent), followed by Rangitoto Island (18 per cent) and Onetangi Bay on Waiheke Island (18 per cent). In comparison to the international market, domestic visitors visited the Kaitoke Hot Springs on Great Barrier Island (12 per cent) and Whittaker’s Musical Museum on Waiheke Island (11 per cent) in greater numbers.

·        The top three activities for surveyed domestic visitors was visiting a restaurant (33 per cent), general exploration (24 per cent) and sightseeing (22 per cent). Visiting wineries/breweries was a common activity cited by both international and domestic markets and was unique to the Hauraki Gulf Islands.

Local board destination management and marketing activities

37.     During the six months to July 2020, there were a number of tourism-related ATEED interventions in each of the local board areas, including:

·        Spring Campaign: Number of businsses promoted and supported through a multi-platform campaign to drive domestic visitation and spend in the spring off-season in Auckland.

·        Tourism Advocacy: Number of businesses promoted for example in:

o   offshore trade events

o   trade shows

o   marketing material

o   broadcasts

o   social media

o   specific campaign content.

·        Tourism Destination Development/Innovation: Tourism business capability building through coaching and facilitation. This includes one-on-one advice from ATEED Tourism team members for new and existing Auckland businesses.

·        Tourism Famils (familiarisation trips for travel agents or media): Number of businesses who benefited from agent famils (ATEED links tourism operators to travel agents which results in bookings being made with the operators) and media famils (ATEED facilitated media files/hosting media to showcase tourism products).

38.     Figure 8 below shows the number of Auckland businesses in local board areas (excluding Rodney and Waitematā local boards) involved in an ATEED tourism intervention (January-June 2020). Figure 9 depicts the number of Auckland businesses in the Albert-Eden, Rodney and Waitematā local board areas involved in an ATEED tourism intervention for the same period of time.

39.     Waitematā and Rodney Local Boards are excluded from Figure 8 to allow for intervention participation scales of the other local boards to be appreciated without distraction. Instead, Waitematā and Rodney local boards are depicted in Figure 9 and compared to the Albert-Eden Local Board to highlight a much larger uptake of interventions by businesses in the two previously mentioned local board areas.

40.     The reason for the difference in scale amongst the identified boards is because Waitematā includes the region’s central business district – it is therefore unsurprising that it maintains the highest number of business interventions.

41.     Specific tourism interventions in the period included the Nau Mai multi-media content series in collaboration with New Zealand Media and Entertainment, which saw ambassadors promoting their favourite places in Auckland including where they love to eat, shop and go on ‘staycations’. These stories were aimed at encouraging Aucklanders to experience and explore their own region and targeted and encouraged other regions in the upper North Island to come and visit Auckland. Ambassadors mentioned attractions such as cafés, walks, beaches, parks, venues from the Matakana Farmers’ Market in Rodney Local Board to Castaways Resort on the west coast in Franklin Local Board, Ambury Farm in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and Waiheke Island’s Oyster Inn.

42.     In March, the ‘Journeys North’ project in collaboration with Northland Inc saw the development of ‘Auckland Journeys’ offering visitors richer and easier journeys in the region to enjoy. Promoted locations included:

·        Puhoi to Pakiri in Rodney

·        Auckland Airport to Wellsford through Waitākere and Kumeu

·        Rodney.

43.     ‘Famils’ are a means of promoting Auckland to influential international travel sellers, and prior to March hosted guests from the United States. Orewa and Waiheke Island were profiled in Air New Zealand’s in-flight magazine. Two episodes of Emmy award-winning US Travel show Samantha Brown’s Places to Love which focused on marketing Auckland to domestic and overseas viewers aired in January with an advertising spend rate of NZ$2.1 million per episode, and a reach of 700,000+ people per episode. Samantha enjoyed sailing in the Waitematā Harbour, eating and drinking in the city’s centre, hiking with a local Māori guide in the Parnell Domain, and taking a surf lesson at Piha beach.

Examples of separate local board area activities include:

44.     Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board – Direct/indirect marketing activity increased in late June/July including:

·        Surfer Today articulating the best surf spots in New Zealand featuring the Great Barrier Island.

·        Stuff.co.nz published an article detailing the successes of Aotea / Great Barrier Island and other small towns, in terms of recovery from the pandemic.

·        New Zealand Herald in an article about the ‘Life on Great Barrier Island: Local remedies led to thriving Māori health business’ and other articles (‘Off the Beaten Track’ andThe Best of Great Barrier’) promoting Aotea / Great Barrier Island as a great place for domestic tourists to visit.

·        Radio New Zealand interviewed the owner of Great Barrier Island’s ‘The Curragh’ to talk about the upswing in domestic tourism after lockdown.

·        ATEED will continue to play a supportive and facilitative role for tourism product development in the region to help raise the profile of Auckland as a destination.   

45.     Devonport-Takapuna Local Board – Devonport, Takapuna and Milford Business Improvement Districts were supported via the marketing activity of Explore North Shore – a digital site encouraging visitation and activity into the North Shore. Takapuna Beach Business Association received a grant from the local board for providing highly targeted and relevant tactics for businesses impacted by the Hurstmere Road infrastructure upgrade. The grant is endorsed and managed by ATEED.

46.     Franklin Local Board – Ongoing support to the East Auckland Tourism Group and the Franklin Tourism Group through regular attendance at board meeting and important events, working with ATEED and leveraging this relationship for mutual benefit across marketing and product opportunities, and working with individual operators on product development for example the continuing development of the Hunua Trail and the Glenbrook Vintage Railway. Additionally, there was a focus on ongoing work with the development of Clevedon as a destination.

47.     Howick Local Board – Continued engagement and strategy sessions through the ATEED Tourism Innovation team and South Auckland tourism clusters as well as managing an increased Howick Local Board grant to East Auckland Tourism development.

48.     Rodney Local Board – Initiated multi-linked support for Aotea Organics in Rodney, which is one of the oldest organic farms in New Zealand. Multi-linked means that ATEED has a very large suite of products and services it can offer businesses, in this case ATEED was able to establish links and actions for tourism; inclusion in the travel maps, identification of event hosting, and research and development activity.

49.     Waiheke Local BoardCollaboration with the Waiheke Island Tourism Group and other key stakeholders on the sustainable future of tourism for the island.

Māori Tourism Development Activity

50.     ATEED worked with 45 Māori businesses in the tourism and 23 Māori businesses on the Māori and Iwi Tourism Development programme. Table 4 details the number of Maori tourism businesses by local board area:

Table 4: Māori Tourism businesses

Local board

Māori businesses

Māori and Iwi tourism development businesses

Albert-Eden

4

3

Aotea / Great Barrier

1

1

Henderson-Massey

4

4

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

5

2

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

1

1

Orākei

2

1

Rodney

4

3

Waiheke

1

-

Waitākere Ranges

4

1

Waitematā

18

7

Whau

1

-

 

51.     Waitematā Local Board had the most Māori businesses involved in an ATEED tourism intervention, once again, owing to its inclusion of the CBD and being a top tourist destination. Just under half of local boards are not included in this table because no businesses that were involved in an ATEED tourism intervention were identified as Māori.

52.     The Māori Tourism Innovation Partnership Programme has been established to enable ATEED to work collaboratively with the tourism industry to support the sustainable growth of tourism within Tāmaki Makaurau  The programme aims to grow and strengthen the Auckland visitor economy by supporting iwi, hapū, marae, Māori Trusts, Urban Māori Authorities and Māori Tourism collectives within the region, and to aid the development of new Māori tourism experiences, build capability and business partnerships to meet the diverse needs of international and domestic markets.

Delivered, funded and facilitated events

53.     The Tāmaki Herenga Waka Festival occurred on 31 January 2020 celebrating Auckland’s Māori heritage. The event was attended by nearly 6000 people and received media coverage. Overall customer satisfaction with the festival was 90 per cent.

54.     To date, event cancellations and postponements due to COVID-19 have resulted in the loss of an estimated 74,179 visitor nights and over $10 million in GDP for the local economy. Cancelled events include the 2020 Auckland Lantern Festival, the 2020 Pasifika Festival and the 2020 Corona Piha Pro Challenger Series event.

55.     Diwali and the second year of Elemental are confirmed to join other exciting events for the region in the coming months. Elemental 2020, like its inaugural festival last year, will take place all over the Auckland region. It will feature over 30 free and ticketed events in October. Elemental 2019 was attended by over 147,000 people. Due to uncertainty in the domestic tourism market, it is unlikely that there will be the same attendance for the 2020 festival.

56.     Diwali is an annual festival that celebrates traditional and contemporary Indian culture in Aotea Square in the city centre and is set to occur in the last weekend of October this year. Last year’s festival was attended by approximately 65,000 people, up 9 per cent from an estimated 59,990 in 2018. Due to COVID-19, festival attendance is uncertain, but likely to decrease.

57.     Figure 10 shows businesses ATEED works with across its major events. Major events stallholders are businesses that were supported through ATEED delivered events. Major Events Investments are those that were supported through ATEED sponsored events. Local boards not included in the graph were not part of such interventions.

Go With Tourism

58.     Go with Tourism (GWT) is a jobs-matching platform that targets young people (18-30 years) and encourages them to consider a career in tourism. Since 2019, GWT has been expanded from an ATEED initiative to a national programme.

59.     The platform signed up over 550 businesses prior to COVID-19, 149 of those were in Auckland.

60.     In response to the pandemic, GWT formed a new ‘Support the Tourism Workforce’ Strategy which aims to help redeploy displaced tourism workers and provide guidance to businesses as they navigate their way through the impacts of the pandemic and, in due course, begin a post-crisis rebuild. Go with Tourism has received over 2200 requests for assistance from employees and businesses, since adopting the new strategy.

61.     The industries most represented in the Auckland GWT programme (classified by Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification codes) are:

·        Accommodation and Food Services (60 per cent)

·        Arts and Recreation Services (19 per cent)

·        Administrative and Support Services (7 per cent)

·        Transport, Postal and Warehousing (5 per cent).

62.     Because the programme is sector-focused, there is a cluster of businesses in tourism-heavy Waitematā Local Board (central city), and surrounding areas (Albert-Eden, Devonport-Takapuna, and Ōrākei local boards). Local boards not included in the graph did not have any businesses take part in the interventions.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

63.     ATEED is currently considering how we respond to climate impacts in our projects and programmes. In the interim, ATEED assesses and responds to any impact that our initiatives may have on the climate on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

64.     The proposed recommendation of receipt of this paper by the local board has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required in the preparation of this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

65.     Local board views were not sought for the purposes of this report. However, such views were sought in the development of some of the initiatives as described in this paper.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

66.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no impact on Māori. ATEED assesses and responds to any impact that our initiatives may have on Māori on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

67.     The recommendation to receive the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

68.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no risk. ATEED assesses and manages any risk associated with our initiatives on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

69.     ATEED will provide the next six-monthly report to the local board in February 2021 which will cover the period 1 July to 31 December 2020.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     


 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Stephanie Sole, Strategy & Planning Graduate, ATEED

Authorisers

Quanita Khan, Manager Strategy and Planning, ATEED

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 October 2020

 

 

Addition to the 2019-2022 Waitākere Ranges Local Board meeting schedule

File No.: CP2020/15119

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for three meeting dates to be added to the 2019-2022 Waitākere Ranges Local Board meeting schedule in order to accommodate the 10-Year Budget 2021-2031 timeframes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board adopted the 2016-2019 meeting schedule on
5 December 2019 (Resolution number WTK/2020/168).

3.       At that time the specific times and dates for meetings for local board decision making in relation to the local board agreement as part of the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 were unknown. 

4.       The local board is being asked to approve three meeting dates as an addition to the Waitākere Ranges Local Board meeting schedule so that the modified 10-Year Budget 2021-2031 timeframes can be met.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      approve the addition of three extraordinary meeting dates to the 2019-2022 Waitākere Ranges Local Board meeting schedule to accommodate the 10-Year Budget 2021-2031 timeframes as follows:

·   Thursday, 3 December 2020, 10.00am

·   Thursday, 6 May 2021, 10.00am

·   Thursday, 17 June 2021, 10.00am

b)      agree to hold the three extraordinary meetings at the Waitākere Ranges Local Board office, 39 Glenmall Place, Glen Eden, Auckland 0602.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules.

6.       In summary, adopting a meeting schedule helps meet the requirements of:

·   clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings, which requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings.  Such notification may be provided by the adoption of a schedule of business meetings.

·   sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of the LGOIMA, which requires that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting and that local board meetings are open to the public.

7.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board adopted its 2019-2022 business meeting schedule at its 5 December 2019 business meeting (Resolution number WTK/2020/168).

8.       The timeframes for local board decision-making in relation to the local board agreement which is part of the 10-Year Budget 2021-2031 were unavailable when the meeting schedule was originally adopted.

9.       The board is being asked to make decisions in early-December 2020, early-May 2021 and mid-June 2021 to feed into the 10-Year Budget 2021-2031 process. These timeframes are outside the board’s normal meeting cycle. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The local board has two choices:

            i)          Add the meetings as additional to the meeting schedule.

            or

            ii)         Add the meetings as extraordinary meetings.

11.     For option one, statutory requirements allow enough time for these meetings to be scheduled as additions to the meeting schedule and other topics may be considered as per any other ordinary meeting. However, there is a risk that if the 10-Year Budget 2021-2031 timeframes change again or the information is not ready for the meeting there would need to be an additional extraordinary meeting scheduled anyway.

12.     For option two, only the specific topic 10-Year Budget 2021-2031 may be considered for which the meeting is being held. There is a risk that no other policies or plans with similar timeframes or running in relation to the 10-Year Budget 2021-2031 process could be considered at this meeting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision’s implementation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     There is no specific impact for the council group from this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule additional meetings and consider whether to approve them as extraordinary meetings or additions to the meeting schedule.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

16.     There is no specific impact for Māori arising from this report. Local boards work with Māori on projects and initiatives of shared interest.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

17.     There are no financial implications in relation to this report apart from the standard costs associated with servicing a business meeting.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

18.     If the local board decides not to add this business meeting to their schedule this will cause a delay to the 10-Year Budget 2021-2031 process, which would result in the input of this local board not being able to be presented to the Governing Body for their consideration and inclusion in the Budget.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

19.     Implement the processes associated with preparing for business meetings.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Elizabeth Stewart - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 October 2020

 

 

Chair's Report - October 2020

 

File No.: CP2020/15037

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on projects, meetings, and other initiatives relevant to the local board’s interests.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local board members are responsible for leading policy development in their areas of interest, proposing and developing project concepts, overseeing agreed projects within budgets, being active advocates, accessing and providing information and advice.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive Chair Presland’s tabled report for October 2020.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Elizabeth Stewart - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 October 2020

 

 

Deputy Chair's Report - October 2020

 

File No.: CP2020/15038

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on projects, meetings, and other initiatives relevant to the local board’s interests.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local board members are responsible for leading policy development in their areas of interest, proposing and developing project concepts, overseeing agreed projects within budgets, being active advocates, accessing and providing information and advice.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive Deputy Chair Tom’s tabled report for October 2020.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Elizabeth Stewart - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 October 2020

 

 

Workshop Records

 

File No.: CP2020/15029

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present records of workshops held by the Waitākere Ranges Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Following a Notice of Motion presented by Member K Turner at the 23 July 2020 Waitākere Ranges Local Board Business Meeting, the Board resolved to adopt as a principle that Waitākere Ranges Local Board workshops be open to public observation (Resolution number WTK/2020/72).

3.       At the following Business Meeting on 27 August 2020 the Board endorsed ‘The Workshop Guidelines: Waitākere Ranges Local Board’ (Resolution number WTK/2020/95) to be applied to workshops following that meeting, i.e. from 3 September 2020.

4.       Pursuant to Resolution number WTK/2020/72, the operation of open workshops is to be reviewed at the Board’s last workshop for the year in December 2020.

5.       A workshop record providing a brief summary of the general nature of the discussion is reported to the next business meeting, along with, where considered appropriate under the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, related supporting material.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the attached workshop records and supporting materials for 24 September and 1 and 8 October 2020.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitākere Ranges Local Board Workshop Record - 24 September 2020 (including supporting material)

93

b

Waitākere Ranges Local Board Workshop Record - 1 October 2020 (including supporting material)

163

c

Waitākere Ranges Local Board Workshop Record - 8 October 2020 (including supporting material)

211

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Elizabeth Stewart - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 October 2020

 

 

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Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 October 2020

 

 

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Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 October 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 October 2020

 

 

Governance Forward Work Programme

File No.: CP2020/15046

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Waitākere Ranges Local Board with its updated governance forward work programme calendar (the calendar).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The calendar for the Waitākere Ranges Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The calendar is part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the governance forward work programme calendar for October 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar - October 2020

235

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Elizabeth Stewart - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 October 2020

 

 

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[1] Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, section 15(2)(c).

[2] Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, ss15-16.

[3] Local Government Act 2002, Schedule 7, clause 36D.

[4] Some businesses were involved in an ATEED intervention for both Destination- and Economic Development-related activities, hence the numbers adding to over 3726. Business names must remain confidential for privacy reasons.

[5] Auckland Convention Bureau is responsible for positioning Auckland as a premium business events destination and for sales and marketing activity to grow the value and volume of business events in Auckland.

[6] This does not reflect all filming that takes place in studio, private property or low impact activity that does not require a permit.

[7] This includes local board fees only, other permit fees are directed to Auckland Transport (Special Events) and Regional Parks. Figures exclude GST and are as per the month the permit was invoiced, not necessarily when the activity took place.