I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Auckland Domain Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Monday, 8 March 2021

2.00pm

Via Skype

 

Kōmiti o te Papa Rēhia o Pukekawa /

Auckland Domain Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Adriana Avendano Christie

Waitematā Local Board

Members

Member Renata Blair

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

Member Alexandra Bonham

Waitematā Local Board

 

Cr Pippa Coom

 

 

Member Hon Tau Henare

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

 

Member Sarah Trotman, (ONZM)

Waitematā Local Board

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Sonja Tomovska

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Governance Advisor

 

3 March 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 09 8908022

Email: Sonja.Tomovska@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 



 

Terms of Reference

 

Background

 

The Auckland Domain is an important regional park and also has areas within it managed by the Waitematā Local Board.  This committee is set up jointly by the Governing Body and Waitematā Local Board to co-ordinate decisions relating to the Domain.

 

Responsibilities

 

Decision-making responsibility for parks, recreation and community services and activities in Auckland Domain including those anticipated in the Auckland Domain Act 1987, which are the responsibility of the Governing Body or the Waitematā Local Board.

 

Powers

 

All powers of the Governing Body and Waitematā Local Board necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities including those powers conferred on Auckland Council pursuant to the Auckland Domain Act 1987.

Except:

(a)        powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2)

(b)        where a matter is the responsibility of another committee or local board

(c)        the approval of expenditure that is not contained within approved budgets

(d)        the approval of expenditure of more than $2 million

(e)        the approval of final policy

(f)         deciding significant matters for which there is high public interest, and which are controversial.


 

Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·        Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·        Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·        Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·        In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·        The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·        However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·        All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·        Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·        Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·        All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·        Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·        Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·        Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 


Auckland Domain Committee

08 March 2021

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                           7

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                   7

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                   7

4          Petitions                                                                                          7  

5          Public Input                                                                                     7

6          Local Board Input                                                                           7

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                 8

8          Landowner approval to install a memorial called the 'Garden of Humanity' within the Auckland Domain                                  9

9          Landowner approval to undertake works within 24 Nicholls Lane related to the Parnell railway station underpass            29

10        Public feedback on proposal to amend the Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014                                                                                    49

11        Auckland Domain LTP budget update                                     439

12        Auckland Domain - General and Financial Update                447

13        Auckland Bowling Club Parking Allocation 100 Stanley Street Grafton                                                                                         455

14        Summary of Auckland Domain Committee information memoranda, workshops and briefings (including the Forward Work Programme) - 8 March 2021                                            461

15        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Auckland Domain Committee:

a)           confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Monday, 9 November 2020, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public input had been received.

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.


 

 

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Auckland Domain Committee

08 March 2021

 

Landowner approval to install a memorial called the 'Garden of Humanity' within the Auckland Domain

File No.: CP2021/01873

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To approve the landowner approval application received from the Auckland Holocaust Memorial Trust to create a memorial called ‘the Garden of Humanity’ within the Auckland Domain.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Auckland Holocaust Memorial Trust is proposing to install a memorial called the ‘Garden of Humanity’ at the Fairy Pond within the Auckland Domain.

3.      The key objectives for the project are to:

·        establish a memorial which expresses the magnitude of the holocaust using cobblestones from the Warsaw ghetto which have been donated to the trust

·        achieve a high standard of design that is sympathetic to, and adds value to, the memorial’s location and surroundings

·        restore the pond

4.      Auckland Domain is highly valued for its green open space, specimen trees, significant ecological bush areas, heritage buildings and rich Māori and European history.

5.      The Auckland Domain master plan aims to ‘de-clutter’ the Domain as there is a proliferation of objects and memorials in the park.

6.      The project is considered by staff to lift park qualities through the restoration of an existing feature, the installation of an improved footpath link and the significance of the memorial.  

7.      Specialists from various Auckland Council departments have provided input and are supportive of the proposal.

8.      The applicant has consulted with several groups including mana whenua as part of their application.

9.      The Auckland Domain Committee holds decision-making responsibility for park developments and memorials at the domain. 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland Domain Committee:

a)      approve the land owner approval application from the Auckland Holocaust Memorial Trust to create a memorial, ‘the Garden of Humanity’, within the Auckland Domain (as outlined in Attachment A to the agenda report) subject to following all relevant statutory and design-led processes.

b)      delegate approval of detailed design to Parks, Sport and Recreation and Community Facilities.

c)      supports in principle the Auckland Holocaust Memorial Trust liaising with the Chair of the City Centre Residents Group (CCRG) about providing an appropriate link with the existing Raoul Wallenberg Centenary Memorial Tree.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.    The Auckland Holocaust Memorial Trust (the Trust) is proposing to create a memorial at the existing ‘Fairy Pond’ located to the east of the Wintergarden. The memorial would be integrated into the pond and would include the addition of an accessible pathway.

11.    The works within the Domain to construct the memorial include:

·    refurbishment of existing pond

·    reinforcement of pond wall

·    minor earthworks

·    tree removal

·    retention of existing stairs and path 

·    landscaping

·    planting of specimen trees 

·    construction of an accessible path.

12.    The proposed location of the memorial within Auckland Domain is shown Figure 1.

 

Figure 1: Location of proposed memorial marked as the Fairy Pond - aerial view  

 

13.    The Warsaw Ghetto cobblestones are proposed to be shown in two different ways:

·   laid into the ground sur­face as traditional cobblestones so they can be seen and walked on as they would have been at their point of origin

·   attached on a vertical fin structure to create a changing perspective.

14.    The proposed ground disturbance plan is shown in attached plans in Attachment B. Erosion and sediment control measures will be in place.

15.    A portion of the existing carpark on Wintergarden Drive will be used as a lay down area. Access to the site will be via adjacent formed roads.

16.    The proposed trees to be removed are shown in red in the ‘Existing Tree Plan’ in Attachment B.

17.    The applicant is proposing replacement planting as shown in the ‘Proposed Planting Plan’ in Attachment B.

18.    The project is to be entirely funded by the Trust, with ongoing maintenance responsibilities to be undertaken by Auckland Council’s community facilities department. 

19.    During the detailed design phase, the applicant will investigate whether the pond needs to be connected to any additional services and drains if existing services and drains cannot be re-used including:

·   connections for power supply (pump and lights for the pond)

·   connections for water supply

·   stormwater (for any outlet/s or overflow from the pond).

20.    Any costs associated with connecting to services will be covered by the applicant as part of the project.

 

Figure 2: Concept Plan of the proposed memorial ‘Garden of Humanity’

 

Background

21.    The Auckland War Memorial Museum received a gift of approximately 250 granite cobblestones from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) which originally came from the Warsaw Ghetto. The USHMM installed hundreds of cobblestones in their permanent exhibition in Washington, D.C. and are distributing the remaining stones to museums in countries around the world where survivors of the Holocaust had emigrated.

22.    The Auckland War Memorial Museum retained some cobble stones in their Holocaust exhibition space and donated the remaining stones to the Auckland Hebrew Congregation.

23.    The Trust was formed in 2012 with the mission to use the cobblestones for a memorial of all who perished in the Holocaust and to provide a physical reminder to all Aucklanders/New Zealanders that the unthinkable is always possible.

24.    Early consultation with Auckland Council began in 2012 to identify a suitable location for the ‘Garden of Humanity’ and Holocaust Memorial.

25.    At the July 2016 meeting, the Auckland Domain Committee, resolved to “authorise staff to engage with the Auckland Holocaust Memorial Trust to seek an appropriate location (outside the object exclusion and event zones) for a memorial in the Auckland Domain and report back to the committee” (resolution number ADC/2016/20).

26.    Following the meeting the Trust indicated a preference to work with or around the fairy pond site due to the pond needing a full renovation provided the design of the memorial was integrated into the landscape and honour the historical context of the site.

27.    At the November 2017 the Auckland Domain Committee resolved to (resolution number ADC/2017/45):

a)         receive the report

b)         note that the committee have authorised staff to work with the Auck­land Holocaust Memorial Trust to find a suitable location and that the Trust has indicated an interest in the Fairy Ponds

c)         invite the Auckland Holocaust Memorial Trust to present design options for the Fairy Ponds to the committee for further consideration (Resolution number ADC/2017/45).

28.    In August 2020 the trust presented an update on the project to the Auckland Domain Committee. 

Alternative locations

29.    The Trust identified the Auckland Domain as their first choice for a Holocaust memorial because of its proximity to the Auckland Museum and its association to the First and Second World Wars.

30.    Council staff suggested alternative sites including near Myers Park, Symonds Street Cemetery and Waikumete Cemetery. Myers Park was considered the most appropriate because of the proximity to the synagogue on Greys Avenue but was considered by the Trust as less appropriate to the trust than the Domain. 

31.    Within the Domain, the Trust proposed to locate the cobbles next to the Wallenberg Tree adjacent to the museum. The Auckland Domain Committee did not support this location as it planned to keep the flanks of the museum clear of development and memorials.

32.    The Trust then looked at an alternative option in the vicinity of the closed road known as Lovers Lane. This was discounted because of the proximity to the Parnell Train station.

History of the Fairy Pond

33.    In 1913-14 the Auckland Exhibition was held in the Domain and many temporary structures were installed (Figure 2) including the great exhibition hall (Palace of Industries) where the Wintergardens are now located and the Fairy Fountain where the Fairy Pond is now located.

34.    In 1913 the organisers of the exhibition decided to include a “fairy fountain” to the attractions which consisted of a large circular tank of water, a pumping system for jets of water in the middle, and a system of coloured electric lights. Following the exhibition, the City Council agreed to accept the fountain in October 1914 as a permanent asset as part of the Domain’s overall beautification scheme. In 1918 the council decided to dispose of the fountain and other equipment because it was likely to collapse.

35.    In 1921 the site of the fountain was converted into a rockery/grotto. In the 1960’s conifers were added to the rockery.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

36.    Auckland Domain is Auckland’s oldest park and at 75 hectares is one of the largest in the city. It is the extinct cone of Pukekawa volcano and has an extensive history of Māori and European use. The park contains several important civic facilities and is used for numerous sporting and cultural events throughout the year. The park’s size, location and facilities, breadth of heritage, landscape, and architectural qualities mean it is Auckland’s premier park.

37.    The governing framework for the park is the Auckland Domain Act 1987, the Auckland Domain Management Plan 1993, the Auckland District Plan, Operative Isthmus Section 1999 and the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan 2014.

38.    The Auckland Domain Committee has decision making responsibility for landowner approval applications within the Auckland Domain.

39.    The Auckland Domain Masterplan (approved in 2016) is a twenty-year aspiration for how the coordinated development of the park should be directed to realise the following outcomes:

• a fair, safe and healthy Auckland

• a green Auckland

• a well-connected and accessible Auckland

• a beautiful Auckland that is loved by its people

• a Māori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference.

40.    The master plan states that as a consequence of the Domain’s popularity, it has suffered from a relatively recent proliferation of objects placed in the park. This proliferation of unnecessary objects detracts from the legibility and significance of all the heritage layers associated with the park. A general “less is more” approach to the Domain is required, to de-clutter and rationalise, and give consistency to all built objects in the park.

41.    In this instance no new significant design elements are being proposed but a significant memorial is proposed by integrating it with an established park feature, namely the Fairy Pond. The project looks to harness external investment to provide for a key outcome identified in the plan under Enhancing and maintaining the amenities and facilities within the Domain in the plan:

6.13 Upgrade the Fairy Pool and the duckponds so they are high quality

amenities with level and easily accessible paths. Investigate the potential

to restore the original intent of a water fountain spouting out of the Fairy

Pool.

42.    The current memorial guidelines (the Plaques and Memorials on Parks Interim Guidelines 2011) aim to prevent parks becoming overly filled with memorials and because of the reasonably high level of memorial structures in open spaces around central Auckland the Waitematā Local Board, as a general rule, no longer support requests for memorial benches. 

43.    The operative guidelines on plaques and memorials in parks (2011) includes application of the following principles:

·    value the importance of acknowledging tangata whenua and significant people and events with an association to the park, location or city as a whole

·    remain cognisant that the atmosphere created by the presence of remembrance structures and plaques is not necessarily conducive to the use and enjoyment of the park by the general public

·    ensure structures do not detract from the natural setting through contributing to a proliferation of built structures, visual clutter and obscuring views and vistas.

44.    The proposal in this instance is to integrate the memorial with an existing design element at the site. The operative guidelines also provide for memorials in recognition of a significant event, the definition for which includes commemoration of international, national and local events.

45.    The ‘Garden of Humanity’ Memorial marks a historic event that resonates with cultures across the world. It is considered a ‘significant event’ and while the memorial does not have a direct link to Auckland Domain, such was the extent and scale of the Holocaust that its impact continues to be felt today on an international scale.  

Access

46.    During the works, an area of the Domain will not be available to the public as it will be required to be closed off for public safety. It is proposed to use a portion of the carpark on the crescent, which will reduce the amount of parking within the Domain. The public will still be able to access the Wintergardens by the Wintergarden Road and The Kiosk. 

47.    Any machinery would be limited to light machinery with the additional condition to use track mats for access on the grassed areas to protect the park surface and tree roots of trees that will be retained.

48.    The applicant will be using the existing roads within the Domain to access the work area. This may cause disruption when machinery and materials are transported to and from site. 

49.    Following construction, the applicant has proposed to construct a new accessible path to allow wheelchair and pram access to the memorial which is currently not available to visitors to the Fairy Pond. The historic stairs, which are remnants of Exhibition landscape from 1913-14, are retained.

Staff recommendation

50.    The applicant’s proposal is considered acceptable to Community Facilities as it aligns with the Auckland Domain Masterplan and is supported by specialist staff of council. In addition to other standard conditions, the following specific conditions are recommended by specialist staff if approved:

·    detailed design must be approved by staff including any new assets to be vested to council

·    applicant must provide evidence/assurance that they have sufficient funds to complete the project prior to beginning works

·    final construction methodology and landscaping plan to be approved by staff prior to starting works

·    pre and post construction site visits with the facilities manager

·    conditions provided by the contaminated land specialist.

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

51.    The proposal is anticipated to have a neutral effect in emissions. The proposal involves the removal of mature trees. The trees affected are exotic, considered to be of poor health and were breaking the asphalt path around the pond. The applicant is proposing to plant new native trees as mitigation. 

52.    The site is not subject to potential climate change impacts and hazards such as coastal inundation and flooding.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

53.    Staff from parks sports and recreation, area operations the heritage unit, engineering and technical services unit and were consulted and support the proposal. 

54.    Auckland Domain is shown on council GIS maps as being within the Historic Heritage Overlay. The works will trigger a resource consent which will be assessed by a heritage advisor during the consenting process. The heritage advisor has reviewed an archaeological assessment for the project and does not object to the project progressing.  The technical report that needs to be prepared for the resource consent application needs to be broader in terms of its heritage perspective and the design elements need to reflect the intrinsic heritage value of the site.

55.    Auckland Domain is shown on council GIS maps as being a closed landfill. There is an operative site management plan for works within the Domain. The principal contaminated land specialist has reviewed the proposal and says the site is in the Low Potential Contamination Risk Zone 2 and says the pond does not present any real contamination risk. The principal contaminated land specialist will review the construction methodology once it is finalised.

56.    The views of other council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report.

57.    The proposal is subject to receiving resource and building consents and engineering plan approvals.

58.    Due to the significant heritage values of the Domain, the applicant is also required to obtain archaeological authority from Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga (HNZPT). This is a separate process to the landowner approval and the resource consent.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Strategic alignment

59.    The proposal aligns with the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2020:

·    Outcome One - “Māori are empowered, and their identity and culture is visible”

the applicant has undertaken extensive consultation with mana whenua groups and is proposing to include to work with a Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei artist within the design process and as part of the installation works as well as the sourcing of native planting

·    Outcome two – “Connected communities that are inclusive, accessible and equitable”

the memorial is proposed to be for all New Zealanders to serve as a physical reminder of the Holocaust by providing a calm and reflective environment which is easy to access by all.  

 

 

 

Consultation

60.    The applicant has undertaken consultation with a number of groups as summarised in the table below:

Organisation

Feedback Received

Auckland War Museum

A meeting was held with the Stakeholder Relationships Manager and a letter of support was received.

Retired Serviceman Association (RSA)

Letter of support provided by Lt Col (retired) Chris Mullane

City Centre's Resident Group (CCRG)

Email of support received with the additional request to design a linkage with the Wallenberg Tree into the design of the Garden of Humanity.

 

It is noted that the Wallenberg Tree was the initial location proposed for the memorial, but that location was not supported because of the Committee’s desire for the slopes of the museum to be free from memorials.

 

Staff are seeking the support of the Committee to engage with the applicant on how the Wallenberg Tree can be incorporated into the memorial.

Grafton Residents Association

The chair was emailed details of the project and attempts to make contact by phone but no response was received.

Parnell Community Committee

The applicant contacted the chair by phone and email.

Parnell Business Association

Provided an email in support of project.

Auckland Bowling Club

Email to the chair but no response received.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

61.    The whenua is taonga to iwi and enhancing, protecting and preserving the natural environment is of fundamental importance to mana whenua.

62.    This site is culturally significant to iwi and in the care for and management of the Auckland Domain, the council wishes to instil the ethic of stewardship in staff, park visitors, users and our residents, that is complementary to the Māori concept of kaitiakitanga. Both concepts promote guardianship of the earth as a key responsibility of all people and reflect a belief that we need to work towards a future not just better for our children, but for all things, and all time.

63.    In March 2018, on behalf of the Trust, Boffa Miskell sent correspondence to all 21 mana whenua groups with a potential interest. Responses were received from Waiohua – Te Ahiwaru – Makaurau, Ngati Tamaoho, Te Patukirikiri iwi, Ngai Tai ki Tamaki Tribal Trust, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, Ngaati Whanaunga Te Ākitai Waiohua and Ngāti Maru.

 

 

64.    The project received some opposition from Ngai Tai ki Tamaki, Te Ākitai Waiohua and Ngāti Maru. Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei were supportive of the project and willing to work with the project.

65.    Subsequent to this, the project team met several times with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, Te Ākitai Waiohua and Ngāti Maru representatives.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

66.    The proposal will not result in any financial costs to the Auckland Domain Committee as all project costs are being met by the applicant.

67.    Community Facilities will be responsible for ongoing maintenance of the asset and this can be funded from within their budgets. The pond is an existing asset which is already maintained. Future renewals are subject to the available regional renewals funding.   

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

68.    Memorials have the potential to create exclusive use areas in parks and their effect can go beyond their footprint, while having meaning to only a few. This can deter other users and uses.

69.    Additional risks include:

·        high visitation levels at the Domain could conflict with creating a reflective space

·        the Domain has a large number of art works and memorials and adding another could dilute the significance and impact of established memorials

·        there is no direct link between the holocaust and the Auckland Domain.

70.    The risks are mitigated as the size of the Domain should provide sufficient space for all uses. The integration of the memorial with an existing design element at the site creates an aesthetic improvement and up-grades this part of the Domain rather than introducing a new feature and creating clutter.

71.    The following table identifies the significant risks of approving the landowner approval application.

Risk description

Mitigation

Risk rating post mitigation

Approve the landowner application

If landowner approval is granted, vehicle movements pose a risk to park users.

The contractors will need to move through the park with care. Spotters must be present for all vehicle and material movements through the park.

Low

If the landowner approval is granted, vehicle and material movements could damage significant archaeological and arboricultural features.

Approval will be required from the HNZPT.

Tree asset owner approval will be required for work around trees. A suitably qualified arborist will be present for any work within the root zone of trees. Trees that are to remain will be fenced off to protect them from damage. 

 

Low

If the landowner approval is granted, some members of the community may not be satisfied with the memorial and associated infrastructure.

New features in public spaces do not always get full support from local and wider Auckland residents.

The applicant has engaged with local community groups and mana whenua.

Low

If the Trust runs out of funds and cannot complete the project.

A condition will be added to the approval that prior to beginning works the trust will need to provide assurance/evidence that  they have sufficient funds to complete the project

Low

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

72.    If land owner approval is received, staff will issue a letter to the applicant with relevant conditions.

73.    The applicant will then apply for resource consent for the work and approval from the HNZPT.

74.    It is anticipated that detailed design will take three months and another five to six months for tender and construction. This is subject to confirmation throughout the consenting and detailed design phases.

75.    If the Auckland Domain Committee does not support the application, the applicant will be notified of the decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Plans for images for Garden of Humanity

19

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Glenn Riddell - Land Use Advisor

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Stakeholder and Land Advisory

Martin van Jaarsveld - Manager Community Parks & Places

 


Auckland Domain Committee

08 March 2021

 

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Auckland Domain Committee

08 March 2021

 

Landowner approval to undertake works within 24 Nicholls Lane related to the Parnell railway station underpass

File No.: CP2021/01787

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To request the endorsement of the Auckland Domain Committee for the landowner approval application from Auckland Transport to undertake works within 24 Nicholls Lane, Parnell related to the Parnell railway station underpass.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Auckland Transport have applied for landowner approval to undertake works within 24 Nicholls Lane, Parnell which is owned by council. The works are part of a joint project between Auckland Transport and Summerset Villages (Parnell) Limited to construct an underpass beneath Parnell railway station at the northern end, to connect Heather Street in Parnell with an existing path within the Auckland Domain.

3.      Works within 24 Nicholls Lane include minor earthworks and vegetation removal, removal of a section of the existing boardwalk, construction of new stairs, a ramp, and new landscaping.

4.      The proposal aligns to relevant strategic documents such as the Waitematā Local Board Plan, the Waitematā Greenways Plan, the Parnell Plan, the Auckland Domain Masterplan and is supported by specialist staff of council.

5.      The proposal will provide a new connection between Parnell and the Auckland Domain improving accessibility to the train station platforms, from Parnell and Carlaw Park. East-West journeys between Parnell and the Auckland Domain will be improved.

6.      24 Nicholls Lane is held under the Local Government Act 2002 and not under the Auckland Domain Act 1987.

7.      The Waitematā Local Board has decision making responsibility for any works within 24 Nicholls Lane. However, as the site is located within the Auckland Domain area staff are seeking the endorsement of the Auckland Domain Committee prior to contacting the Waitematā Local Board.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland Domain Committee:

a)      endorse the landowner approval for works within 24 Nicholls Lane by Auckland Transport related to the Parnell railway underpass.

Horopaki

Context

8.      In 2011 Auckland Transport (AT) and the New Zealand Railways Corporation agreed to allow works within the Auckland Domain to enable the development of Parnell Railway Station.  AT will meet pedestrian connections costs from the Parnell Railway Station to Lower Domain Drive and any other points required.

9.      Auckland Transport are proposing to undertake works within 24 Nicholls Lane, Parnell which is owned by council. The works form part of a project to build a pedestrian underpass at the northern end of Parnell Railway station connecting Parnell with the domain.

10.    The works within 24 Nicholls Lane include:

·    minor earthworks and associated vegetation removal (which typically comprises of grasses and weeds)

·    removal of an existing section of the Carlaw Park pathway (boardwalk)

·    installation of new stairs and ramp connections to the existing timber pedestrian walkway

·    landscaping around the new connection.

11.    An aerial map of the proposed location of the works is indicated in Figure 1.

 

Figure 1: Location of proposed works (red shade area) - aerial view  

12.    Works within council land include new stairs and ramp connections to the existing boardwalk, construction of the wingwalls connecting to the underpass and a new concrete base slab between the underpass (part of these elements are within Council land) as shown in Figure 2 and the plans in Attachment A. 

13.    A small section of the existing walkway will be removed and reconstructed to align with the level of the proposed new set of stairs and ramp, which will provide access to the underpass.

14.    Auckland Transport are proposing to build the underpass from the Parnell side of the railway and cut through the embankment. Once the underpass is installed they will be able to track vehicles via the underpass to the boardwalk area. Machinery will be limited to small plant such as diggers and dump trucks. There will not be any machinery or equipment needed outside the footprint of the boardwalk and therefore there will be very little impact on council land. 

15.    The proposed earthworks area is shown in plans attached in Attachment B (Plan reference 150785-402). Erosion and sediment control measures will be in place.   

16.    Following construction, the ground on the western embankment will be reinstated (topsoil and grass seed), the fencing will be re-instated and landscaping undertaken. The new planting will consist of low maintenance ground cover and specimen trees (if approved by Kiwi Rail).  

17.    The entire underpass project is expected to take six months to complete. Works within 24 Nicholls Lane is to be undertaken during Kiwirail’s “Block of Line” close-down period which normally occurs around the Christmas and New Year break. The shutdown period is typically ten days.

18.    An additional closedown of the boardwalk may be required to re-grade the boardwalk. Final details regarding timeframes and the closing of the walkway during works will be agreed with council once the construction programme is finalised.

19.    Landscaping will be completed after the ’block of line’ closure during the next planting season.

20.    Once constructed the new assets will be oned and maintained by Auckland Transport. 

 

Figure 2: Landscaping Plan showing the works within council owned 24 Nicholls Lane

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Background

21.    An agreement was entered to in 2011 between council, Auckland Transport (AT) and the New Zealand Railways Corporation, to allow works within the Auckland Domain to enable the development of Parnell Railway Station.  As part of the agreement AT are responsible for meeting the costs associated with providing new pedestrian connections from the Parnell Railway Station to Lower Domain Drive and any other points required.

22.    At the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee meeting on10 February 2015 the layout, direction and function of four pedestrian connections within the domain was approved (Resolution number PAR/2015/5). 

23.    At the 27 July 2016 the Auckland Domain Committee approved three path connections within the Domain to be delivered prior to the opening of the Parnell Railway station in 2017 (Resolution number ADC/2016/22).

24.    The Carlaw Park footpath, connecting the Parnell Rail Station with the Carlaw Park area, was opened to the public on Tuesday 13 November 2018.

25.    Auckland Transport have been working with Summerset Villages (Parnell) Limited to improve the existing pedestrian and cycle access at the Parnell Railway Station by establishing a new underpass beneath the rail tracks at the northern end of the station.

Site details

26.    The land at 24 Nicholls Lane is legally descried as Section 1 SO 516461 and contained in Record of Title 826952. The land was acquired by Council under the Public Works Act 1981 for park purposes from Carlaw Campus Limited Partnership.

27.    The land is held under the Local Government Act 2002 and not under the Auckland Domain Act 1987. Therefore the Waitematā Local Board has decision making responsibility for any works within 24 Nicholls Lane.

28.    The project will result in a new pedestrian underpass connecting the eastern and western train station platforms and cater for a footpath connection to the North of the station, linking with Heather Street. 

29.    The proposal aligns with the current use of the land which functions as pedestrian connection point between the train station, Carlaw Park, Parnell and the Domain. The proposed underpass will provide a new access point between Parnell and the Domain.

30.    Alternative options for connecting the rail platforms were considered, including the construction of a pedestrian overbridge. This option was dismissed because of the impact it would have on the Auckland Domain.

 Staff recommendation

31.    The applicant’s proposal is considered acceptable to Community Facilities as it aligns with the statutory classification of the land, Waitematā Local Board Plan, the Waitematā Greenways Plan, the Parnell Plan, the Auckland Domain Masterplan and is supported by specialist staff of council. In addition to other standard conditions, the following specific conditions are recommended by specialist staff for inclusion if approved:

·    final construction methodology to be provided to staff prior to starting works

·    construction programme including timeframes to close off the walkway to be agreed by staff

·    final landscaping plan to be approved by council prior to construction beginning 

·    pre and post construction site visits with the facilities manager

·    conditions provided by the contaminated land specialist

·    conditions provided by the heritage advisor.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

32.    The proposal is anticipated to have a potential decrease in emissions as it supports an increase in walking, cycling and public transport. The proposal also includes tree planting which can lead to increased carbon capture, resulting in potential reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

33.    The site sits within a flood plain which may be covered by flood water during a 1-in-100-year rainstorm event. A predicted effect of climate change is an increase in rainfall intensity due to warmer atmosphere holding more moisture.

34.    The site is not subject to other potential climate change impacts and hazards such as coastal inundation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

35.    Staff from parks sports and recreation, landscape architecture, resource consents, the heritage unit, engineering and technical services unit and area operations were consulted and support the proposal. 

36.    24 Nicholls Lane is shown on council GIS maps as being within the Historic Heritage Overlay. AT have commissioned an archaeological assessment for the project which has been reviewed by the heritage advisor. The heritage advisor does not object to the proposal provided conditions and advice notes are included within the landowner approval if granted.

37.    24 Nicholls Lane is shown on council GIS maps as being a closed landfill. The principal contaminated land specialist has reviewed the proposal and says there is potential for contaminated materials to be found within 24 Nicholls Lane. Any contaminated land would be required to be removed from the site and surface soils to be reinstated to achieve compliance with standards for recreational land use. The principal contaminated land specialist has provided conditions to be included in the landowner approval if approved.

38.    The facilities manager does not object to the proposed works and underpass. Any new assets created on council land that service this underpass will remain as Auckland Transport assets and maintained by them.

39.    The views of other council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report.

40.    The proposal is subject to receiving resource and building consents and engineering plan approvals. The proposal may change as consultation with the regulatory teams progresses.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.    A meeting was held between Auckland Transport with the Waitematā Local Board on 27 February 2020 to explain the proposal and receive feedback. The local board was supportive of the proposed works in principle, noting its consistency with the outcomes sought by the Parnell Local Plan in respect of improving connections to the Parnell Train Station.

Strategic alignment

42.    The proposal aligns with the Waitematā Local Board Plan (2020) Outcome five – “sustainable transport network that is safe and accessible”. An objective of the plan is to provide a connected network of parks, open spaces and streets. The proposal will improve accessibility between the train station platforms, and between Parnell and Carlaw Park, while East-West journeys between Parnell and the Auckland Domain will be improved.

43.    The proposal aligns with the Parnell Plan (June 2019) objective – “enhance connectivity and accessibility within Parnell and with its neighbouring places”. A key action area is to “make Parnell Station a key gateway to Parnell and the Domain”.  A key project within this action area is “a high amenity pedestrian and cycle crossing (underpass preferred) at the northern end of the station”.

44.    The proposal aligns with the Waitematā Greenways Plan (2013). The proposal will provide an additional link to the proposed Priority Greenway G2 - Waipapa Valley connection and Parnell Parks Link.

45.    The proposal aligns with the Auckland Domain Masterplan (2016) key principle “Improving connectivity to the Domain and to the key features within it”. Key proposals include connecting the Auckland Domain with the Parnell railway station and implementing the Waitematā Greenways Plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

46.    Auckland Transport held a hui with Mana Whenua Groups who had interest in the project, on 11 December 2019 to discuss the proposal. Those groups who confirmed interest and attended the hui included:

·    Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei

·    Ngāti Whanaunga

·    Te Patukirikiri

·    Ngāti Tamaoho

·    Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

47.    During this hui, Mana Whenua groups in attendance confirmed they are generally supportive of the proposed underpass and associated walkways, and the connection improvements that will occur following its construction.

48.    No cultural heritage sites or architectural sites are shown on council planning maps close to the area of proposed works.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

49.    The proposal will not result in any financial costs to the Auckland Domain Committee or Waitematā Local Board. Auckland Transport will be responsible for the maintenance of the underpass, stairs, boardwalk and landscaping.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

50.    There will be disruption to public access to a small part of the reserve for ten days during construction. This will only impact a small section of the reserve with the remainder of the Domain remaining accessible to public. The works will also be undertaken during the railway closedown when trains will not be running, which will mean that less people will be using the existing boardwalk.

51.    An underpass is seen as less safe than an overbridge as an underpass does not provide clear lines of site. To mitigate this, AT’s design has included a number of features to increase safety such as angling the wingwalls, lighting levels in line with station requirements and providing CCTV. A Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) assessment has been undertaken as part of the resource consenting process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

52.    If the Auckland Domain Committee endorses the application, staff will contact the Waitematā Local Board for approval of the application.

53.    If the Waitematā Local Board approve the proposal, the applicant will be informed via a formal landowner approval letter.

54.    If the Auckland Domain Committee does not endorse the application, the landowner application from Auckland Transport will be declined and the applicant will be informed via a formal letter.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Plans for underpass within 24 Nicholls Lane

37

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Glenn Riddell - Land Use Advisor

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Stakeholder and Land Advisory

Martin van Jaarsveld - Manager Community Parks & Places

 


Auckland Domain Committee

08 March 2021

 

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Auckland Domain Committee

08 March 2021

 

Public feedback on proposal to amend the Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014

File No.: CP2021/01332

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek views on public feedback to the proposal to amend Te Ture ā-Rohe Whakararata Waipiro / the Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014 relating to Pukekawa / Auckland Domain before a final decision is made.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      To enable the Auckland Domain Committee to provide its views on public feedback to the proposal to amend the Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014 relating to Pukekawa / Auckland Domain, staff have prepared summary and deliberation reports.

3.      The Bylaw continues to enable alcohol bans in public places to reduce crime and disorder caused or made worse by alcohol consumed there.

4.      The proposal seeks to improve the Bylaw by including new temporary alcohol bans for major events at Rarotonga / Mount Smart Stadium, Waiōrea / Western Springs Stadium, Eden Park and Pukekawa / Auckland Domain, and by making the Bylaw easier to read and understand.

5.      Staff recommend that the Auckland Domain Committee provide its views on public feedback to the proposal relating to Pukekawa / Auckland Domain, and if it wishes, present those views to the Bylaw Panel. Taking this approach will assist the Panel and Governing Body to decide whether to adopt the proposal.

6.      There is a reputational risk that feedback from the local area is from a limited group of people and does not reflect the views of the whole local area. This report mitigates this risk by providing the Auckland Domain Committee with a summary of all public feedback.

7.      The Panel will consider all local board and Auckland Domain Committee views and public feedback, deliberate and make recommendations to the Governing Body on 19 March 2021. The Governing Body will make a final decision on 29 April 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland Domain Committee:

a)      receive the public feedback from within the local area on the proposal to amend Te Ture ā-Rohe Whakararata Waipiro / the Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014 relating to Pukekawa / Auckland Domain as attached to the report.

b)      adopt views on the public feedback in clause a) for the consideration of the Bylaw Panel in its deliberations on all public feedback.

c)      appoint one or more Auckland Domain Committee members to present the views in clause b) to the Bylaw Panel on Friday 19 March 2021.

d)      delegate authority to the Auckland Domain Committee chair to appoint replacement(s) to the persons in clause c) should an appointed member be unable to present to the Bylaw Panel on Friday 19 March 2021.

 

Horopaki

Context

The Alcohol Control Bylaw enables council to make alcohol bans

8.      Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Whakararata Waipiro / the Auckland Council Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014 (Bylaw) aims to help reduce crime and disorder in certain public places caused or made worse by alcohol consumed there.

9.      The Bylaw achieves this by providing a framework that enables alcohol bans to be made by resolution of the relevant delegated authorities the Regulatory Committee, local boards and the Auckland Domain Committee.

10.    The New Zealand Police enforce alcohol bans.

Council proposed amendments to improve the Bylaw for public feedback

11.    On 24 September 2020 the Governing Body adopted a proposal to improve the Bylaw for public consultation (Item 15, GB/2020/109).

12.    The proposal arose from a statutory review of the Bylaw (see figure below).

13.    The proposal seeks to better reduce alcohol-related crime and disorder by making:

·    new temporary alcohol bans for major events[1] at four regional venues (Rarotonga / Mount Smart Stadium, Waiōrea / Western Springs Stadium, Eden Park and Pukekawa / Auckland Domain)

·    the Bylaw easier to read and understand. 

14.    The proposal was publicly notified for feedback from 10 October until 13 November 2020. During that period, council received feedback from 881 people.

Decisions leading to the proposal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The committee has an opportunity to provide views on public feedback

15.    The Auckland Domain Committee (committee) now has an opportunity to provide its views on public feedback to the proposal relating to Pukekawa / Auckland Domain by people from the local area before a final decision is made.

16.    Auckland Domain Committee views must be provided by resolution to the Bylaw Panel. The committee can also choose to present those views to the Bylaw Panel on 19 March 2021.

17.    The nature of the views is at the discretion of the Auckland Domain Committee. Any views must however remain inside the scope of the proposal and public feedback. For example, the committee could:

·    indicate support for public feedback by people from the local area

·    recommend how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Feedback from people in the local area supports the proposal

18.    A total of 82 people from the Waitematā Local Board area provided feedback to the proposal via online and written feedback.[2] There was majority support for the proposal relating to Pukekawa / Auckland Domain, similar to the total support from all people who provided feedback.

         Percentage support of proposal in the Waitematā Local Board area

Proposal

Total support from local area

Total support from people across Auckland

1A:   New temporary alcohol ban for all major events at Pukekawa/Auckland Domain

73 per cent

75 per cent

1B:   New temporary alcohol ban for ‘Christmas in the Park’ at Pukekawa/Auckland Domain

72 per cent

75 per cent

2:     Replace unnecessary clauses with a ‘related information’ note

70 per cent

70 per cent

3:     Clarify exceptions to alcohol bans, council’s ability to make temporary alcohol bans, and the Bylaw wording

88 per cent

87 per cent

19.    Key themes from feedback from people in the local area are consistent with key themes from all public feedback. For example, that the proposal:

· reduces alcohol-related crime and disorder and improves public safety

· creates clearer, more efficient and enforceable rules.

20.    The full proposal can be viewed in the link. Attachments A to E to this report contain a summary of all public feedback by local board area, all public feedback related to the Waitematā Local Board area, ‘Have Your Say’ event feedback, operational and non-bylaw-related feedback and draft Bylaw Panel deliberations report.

Staff recommend the committee provide its views on public feedback

21.    Staff recommend that the Auckland Domain Committee provide its views on the public feedback relating to Pukekawa / Auckland Domain by resolution, and if it wishes, present those views to the Bylaw Panel on 19 March 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.    There are no implications for climate change arising from this decision.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.    The proposal impacts the operation of units across the council group involved in events, processing alcohol ban requests and alcohol ban signage. Those units are aware of the impacts of the proposal and their implementation role.

24.    Auckland Unlimited advise Proposal 1E: New temporary alcohol ban for all major events at Waiōrea / Western Springs Stadium also apply to major events held on the outer fields.

25.    Community Action on Youth and Drugs (CAYAD) Tāmaki Makaurau, and the Safety Collective Tāmaki Makaurau provided advice including about event implementation that has been circulated to other relevant council units.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.    Local board and Auckland Domain Committee views were sought on a draft proposal in July and August 2020 as they have delegated authority to make local alcohol bans.

27.    Nineteen local boards and the Auckland Domain Committee provided views and all supported public consultation on the proposal.

28.    Four local boards suggested changes, some of which resulted in updates to the draft proposal (click link to view in 01 September 2020 Regulatory Committee agenda, Item 9).

29.    Local board and Auckland Domain Committee views on public feedback to the proposal are being sought in reports to business meetings in February and March 2021, before a final decision is made.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.    The Bylaw has significance for Māori as users and kaitiaki / guardians of public space. Māori are also over-represented in alcohol-related hospital visits, the criminal justice system and as victims of crime.

31.    Māori health advocacy organisations, Te Puni Kōkiri and the Tūpuna Maunga Authority support the use of alcohol bans as a tool to reduce alcohol-related harm.

32.    The Tūpuna Maunga Authority provided general feedback on the proposal noting that Tūpuna Maunga are subject to alcohol and smoke-free policy that supports the spiritual, cultural and community significance of the maunga.

33.    The majority of people identifying as Māori who provided feedback support the proposal. This is consistent with the overall percentage of public feedback in support.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.    There are no financial implications from this decision.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.    There is a reputational risk that feedback from the local area is from a limited group of people and does not reflect the views of the whole local area. This report mitigates this risk by providing the Auckland Domain Committee with a summary of all public feedback.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.    The Bylaw Panel on 19 March 2021 will consider all formal local board and Auckland Domain Committee views and public feedback, deliberate, and make recommendations to the Governing Body. The Governing Body will make a final decision on any amendments to the Bylaw on 29 April 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of public feedback

55

b

Public feedback from people in the Waitematā Local Board area

83

c

'Have Your Say' event feedback

415

d

Operational and non-bylaw-related feedback

417

e

Draft Bylaw Panel deliberations report

419

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elizabeth Osborne - Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Paul Wilson - Team Leader Bylaws

Martin van Jaarsveld - Manager Community Parks & Places

 


Auckland Domain Committee

08 March 2021

 

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Auckland Domain Committee

08 March 2021

 

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Auckland Domain Committee

08 March 2021

 

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Auckland Domain Committee

08 March 2021

 

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08 March 2021

 

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Auckland Domain Committee

08 March 2021

 

Auckland Domain LTP budget update

File No.: CP2021/01483

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek the Auckland Domain Committee’s support for the prioritisation of projects to be considered in the Long Term Plan (LTP) planning process.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The LTP process is underway and with reduced budgets across the council group there is a need to revisit what can realistically be delivered in the Domain over the next 10 years.

3.      A range of projects have been planned for the Domain, and a number of these have been pushed out with Council’s Emergency Budget.  This report seeks to provide some priority to the projects, so as funding becomes available these can be delivered across the life of the LTP.

4.      The funding required is in the order of $9,6M.  Some of this is allocated through the asset-based services (ABS) capital development and renewal budgets already in place, some from the Waitematā Local Board’s Parking Fund and their Transport Capital Fund, and some from the deferred Growth Budget. At this stage the list includes around $5M of unbudgeted projects.

5.      The projects include as a priority health and safety improvements, creating better connectivity and addressing the vehicle dominance created by the high use by commuter parkers.  Other projects look to upgrade signage, lighting, sports field drainage and entrances, extend the tree cover, address bus management, and develop a new carpark, natural play area and the Kari Street Commons site.

6.      As some of the funding for the delivery of projects already commenced has been provided by the Waitematā Local Board there is a need to check back in with them around their priorities. This includes the potential to reallocate some of the Parking Fund from delivering a new carpark in Kiosk Road to providing a more permanent solution to commuter parking management.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland Domain Committee:

a)      approve the prioritisation set out in this report for LTP funding as this is available, being:

i)        Wintergardens upgrade

ii)       Delivery of four new path connections

iii)      Management of commuter parking (permanent solution following trial)

iv)      Signage improvements

v)       Tree plan implementation

vi)      Lighting upgrade

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.      Following the Emergency Budget and constraints placed on the council’s expenditure, capital budgets to develop new assets have been reduced significantly.  Over the next three years only capital works that were already in progress prior to the Covid-19 pandemic will continue to be delivered. It is anticipated that no new projects will be supported until years 4-10 of the LTP.

8.      Works in the Domain will be funded by the regional budget lines which fund renewals on assets that are considered non-service assets for local boards such as regional parks, Auckland Botanic Gardens and holiday parks. Due to the combined governance of the Domain, it has no specific budget line, and with limited funding allocation the Waitematā Local Board had formerly contributed funding to a few of the current projects.

9.      To prepare for the new LTP the committee have been requested to consider how future projects in the Domain might be prioritised.  Some consideration has been given to the logical sequencing of the delivery of projects based on the following criteria:

a)           health and safety need

b)           demonstrable community demand/support

c)            reputational risk

d)           size and scale of project 

e)           ease of deliverability and

f)             likelihood of budget availability.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.    The following table outlines a list of projects that have been discussed with the committee at their workshop on 15 February 2021. This includes a combination of completing works in the current work programme and recognising the need to push projects out. It is proposed the committee support the prioritisation of these projects as follows: 

11.      LTP projects

 

 

Project

Budget FY22

Year 1

Budget FY23

Year 2

Budget FY23

Year 3

Budget FY24–31

Yrs 4-10

Total

Funding source

1

Wintergardens renewal and upgrade

2,120,451

1,392,290

 

 

**3,512,741

ABS:capex developn

& renewal

2

Deliver the 4 new path connections (phased over 3 years)

277,500

277,500

277,500

 

832,500

WLB’s  transport capital fund

3

Manage commuter parking

 

300,000

 

 

300,000

Unfunded *

4

Signage improvements

 

 

 

150,000

150,000

Unfunded

5

Implement the Tree Plan

 

 

 

150,000

150,000

Unfunded

6

Lighting upgrade

 

 

 

500,000

500,000

Unfunded

7

Address bus management

 

 

 

1,000,000

1,000,000

Unfunded

8

Address sports fields drainage

 

 

 

400,000

400,000

Unfunded

9

Park Rd / Carlton Gore entrance improvements

 

 

 

500,000

500,000

Unfunded

10

Deliver the Kiosk Rd carpark

 

 

 

425,000

425,000

WLB’s parking fund *

11

Develop natural play area

 

 

 

850,000

850,000

Unfunded

12

Kari St Commons development

 

 

 

1,032,000

1,032,000

Unfunded

 

Totals

2,397,951

1,969,790

277,500

5,007,000

9,652,241

 

*Proposal to request reprioritisation of the Waitematā Local Board’s parking fund as set out below.

**The total budget for the Wintergarden renewal is $6.05M, including the current financial year budget of $2.5M.

 

12.    This table provides for expenditure of $4,645,241 in the first three years of the LTP and then potential expenditure of $5,007,000 in the remaining seven years; totaling $9,652,241 over the ten years of the plan.  At this stage approximately $5M of this is unfunded.

13.    Note that renewal projects such as the band rotunda and lighting renewal will be delivered as part of the regional renewal programme as required. This is driven by asset condition and asset life.

Detail on prioritisation of projects

14.    The following outlines further detail on each project and the rational for its priority.

Wintergardens upgrade

15.    This project commenced in 2019 and has required a significant budget to address the health and safety risks presented in the glass houses.  The works includes seismic strengthening.  The physical works will commence this year but are anticipated to run into the next two years.  The works are being scheduled to enable one of the glass houses to be open while the other is being worked on. With work first commencing on the tropical house. Recent updated cost estimates have indicated additional budget will be required to deliver the cool house upgrade.

Delivery of the four new path connections

16.    This project was funded by the Waitematā Local Board’s transport capital fund and provides path connections between:

•     Titoki St carpark and Football Road 

•     Football Road and along the Crescent to the public toilets

•     Centennial Path, along Grafton Mews to Lower Domain Drive

•     Parnell Train Station to Lower Domain Drive

 


 

 

17.    The funding for these paths was approved in 2019 and concept designs were developed. The project was then delayed by the Covid-19 lockdown. Following the impact of Covid-19 AT reviewed their budgets and this significantly reduced what was available to the local board to support a range of projects in their area. The decision was made that only $70,000 was to be allocated in 2021 to develop the detailed designs for these paths. The figures in the table indicate the physical delivery of the paths will now need to be staged over a few years, these are preliminary and will be subject to AT approval. 

18.    As discussed at the 15 February workshop, the committee recognise as this funding has been supplied by the Waitematā Local Board, they may wish to provide recommendations around their prioritisation of the delivery of these paths. There has been some indication that the path from the Parnell Station to Lower Domain Drive be the priority.

19.    Of note is the Garden of Humanity project being proposed by the Auckland Holocaust Memorial Trust includes a path connection to the Crescent.  Further discussion needs to take place around the design of this possible path to ensure this compliments what is being delivered as part of the planned new path connection between Football Rd and Kiosk Rd along the Crescent.  

20.    There is potential to define interim paths in some locations where there will be a delay in budgets being available to deliver the more permanent solution.  This could be achieved by the use of paint to demarcate a path or moveable planters. This option will be explored for both along the Crescent and Grafton Mews.

Manage commuter parking

21.    As part of this year’s work programnme temporary gates are to be installed in the Titoki St carpark in an effort to address commuter parking and ensure availability of parking for visitors to the Domain. This project was funded by the Waitematā Local Board’s parking fund a legacy fund from the Auckland City Council days. It was anticipated this would run as a trial for approximately a year to determine its effectiveness. Following this either permanent gates will need to be installed or some other form of parking management, such as paid parking, will need to be explored.  This is currently unfunded. However, a more permanent solution will need to be put in place in 2022.  An estimate of $300,000 would be required to install permanent gates in several locations within the Domain.

22.    Consideration could be given to requesting the Waitematā Local Board also use their parking fund to deliver the more permanent solution. The local board could re-prioritise the funding allocated to the Kiosk Road carpark, as managing the commuter parking would address a more immediate need and provide greater benefit to all visitors to Domain.

Signage

23.    There is a recognised need to improve wayfinding in the Domain to enhance the visitor experience.  An assessment of current navigation and wayfinding signs is required to determine how this can be improved. In the longer term it would also be beneficial to provide some interpretation and storytelling, potentially around the cultural significance of the site and the more recent history of the park’s development.

Implementation of the tree plan

24.    A tree plan was prepared for the Domain in 2017.  This aims to ensure that succession planting is undertaken to replace aging trees, that the arboretum is extended and that the overall tree cover in the Domain is enhanced. There may be opportunities for the Mayor’s Million Trees programme to assist with some planting in the Domain in the short term, but dedicated funds are required to develop an implementation programme for the planting of further specimen and shade trees plus enhancement of the bush areas.

 

 

Lighting upgrades

25.    Lighting in the Domain is inconsistent. Making improvements to the lighting around the Sri Chinmoy Circuit would enable greater use of this in the early morning and later into the evenings. There is also a need to improve lighting and electrical supply for events in the Domain. The $500,000 proposed for this would just be an initial budget that would provide for a lighting plan and more immediate lighting and electrical needs.

Addressing bus management

26.    The Domain in the past has experienced quite high numbers of bus movements.  This has reduced recently with Covid-19’s impact on international tourism.  Tour operators have traditionally brought in a number of tours serving the Auckland War Memorial Museum and the Wintergardens. The museum has indicated there are presently relatively large numbers of school groups visiting and that they are planning for tourist numbers to increase again in the next few years.  AT also run a public bus service that terminates at the museum.

27.    Buses currently stack along the western side of the museum and are quite visually intrusive. The Auckland Domain Masterplan and the Accessibility Improvement Programme recognised the need to review bus management and potentially relocate this layover site. This will require consultation with the museum. Some investigation is required into the options available to better provide for bus movements and layovers.

Address sports field drainage

28.    Sand-carpeting the fields was a component of an existing sports field improvement project that has seen the realignment and reduction in the cricket pitches.  This component of the project was cut as was not considered urgent. Some investigation is required into the most appropriate way to provide better drainage to the fields given they are used for various sporting codes and events.

Development of the Park Rd / Carton Gore entrance

29.    This is the main entrance into the Domain from the Grafton Station and an important entry for events. There is a need to improve the path into the Domain and make this more of a substantial entrance. This project was initially proposed as a potential priority for funding as there was an opportunity to benefit from synergies in work AT was to be undertaking along Park Road. Their budget has been pushed out for this, so it is proposed this is deferred for a number of years.

Delivery of the Kiosk Rd carpark

30.    This project was also funded by the Waitematā Local Board’s parking fund. The aim of the new car park is to improve the safety of this area, particularly relating to the development of the natural play area between Kiosk Rd and the duckponds.  An initial concept design has been developed and further investigation is required to determine if there may be additional costs, above the original estimate, associated with managing contaminated land and stormwater filtration. It has also been determined that a formal pedestrian mall process will need to be undertaken with AT to provide for the partial closure of the road. With these likely additional costs to the project, it seems prudent to push out the delivery of this for a few years.

31.    It is also proposed, as outlined above, that the funding originally dedicated to this project be reallocated to the management of commuter parking.

New natural playground

32.    This project has been designed but not yet consented. It was to be funded through the Growth Budget, but this has been placed on hold. Given this was dependent on safety improvements to Kiosk Rd being delivered in the project above, it is suggested this be deferred until 2024 or beyond.

 

 

Developing Kari St Commons

33.    This project requires a significant amount of funding given the size and undeveloped nature of the site. It was to be funded through the Growth Budget, but this has been placed on hold. A concept plan has been developed with a staged approach to providing facilities for youth and active recreation as well as supporting smaller scale events.  Limited development has occurred to date and it is proposed any further expenditure on this would best be pushed out until at least 2024.

34.    It is expected that as funding becomes available with further review of the LTP in 2024 this list of projects will provide a basis for prioritising improvements.   

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

35.    Many of the activities in the proposed LTP work programme will contribute towards climate change adaptation. These positive impacts will be considered as projects progress and will be reported to the committee at future reporting opportunities. The sorts of impacts to be considered include:

·    Encouraging active transport and reducing vehicle use

·    Building design to ensure the maximum lifetime and efficiency of the building is obtained, maximum upcycling and recycling of old material, installation of energy efficiency measures etc.

·    Increased tree cover.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.    This report seeks endorsement from the committee on the future capital work programme to be supported through LTP funding and is considered to be in line with council group activities.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

37.    The LTP priorities include projects to be funded by the Waitematā Local Board transport capital fund and parking fund.

38.    The Waitematā Local Board views will be sought on their priority on the delivery of the four paths funded by their Transport Capital Fund and potentially their support to reallocate their Parking Fund to provide a more permanent solution to the management of commuter parking.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.    The future work programme proposes a range of improvements to the Domain facilities and open space assets and recreational experiences that benefit the local community, including Māori. When developing and delivering work programmes consideration is given to how the activities can contribute to Māori well-being, values, culture and traditions.

40.    Karanga Atu! Karanga Mai! relationship approach responds to Māori aspirations and delivers on council’s statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori.

41.    Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken. An example of this would be the development of any future interpretation around the cultural significance of the site.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.    Limited funding is currently allocated to delivering projects in the Domain. Some projects that have commenced have seen budgets pushed out to future years. It is anticipated that funding will continue to be restricted for the next three years of the LTP.  

43.    However, as funding does become available the prioritisation of projects outlined in this report will assist the allocation of this funding.

44.    The current breakdown of budget allocations shown in the table below highlight the dependency on the Waitematā Local Board to continue to fund connectivity and parking improvements, and the longer term need for an allocation of approximately $5M in the LTP to deliver the projects that are currently unfunded.

45.   

Budget source

Budget FY 22

Year 1

Budget FY 23

Year 2

Budget FY 24

Year 3

Budget FY 24-31

Years 4-10

Total

ABS: capex development & renewal

2,120,451

1,392,290

 

 

3,512,741

Waitemata LB

277,500

277,500

277,500

425,000

1,257,500

Unfunded

 

300,000

 

4,582,000

4,882,000

 

2,397,951

1,969,790

$277,500

$5,007,000

$9,652,241

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

46.    There are no substantive risks identified at this point in time.

47.    Projects discussed in this report will be subject to operational health and safety plans. This includes a process for incident and near-miss reporting, and these will be reported to the committee where they have occurred.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

48.    Following the endorsement of this priority list, this will be used to prioritise the delivery of projects in the Domain.

49.    A further report will be prepared for the Waitematā Local Board to seek their priority on the delivery of the four paths funded by their Transport Capital Fund and potentially their support to reallocate their Parking Fund to provide a more permanent solution to the management of commuter parking.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Martin van Jaarsveld - Manager Community Parks & Places

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Martin van Jaarsveld - Manager Community Parks & Places

 


Auckland Domain Committee

08 March 2021

 

Auckland Domain - General and Financial Update

File No.: CP2021/01714

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide the Auckland Domain Committee with an update on the current year work programme and to seek approval for a staged approach of the parking removal and trial gate projects.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary  

2.      Since the November 2020 meeting of the Auckland Domain Committee (the Committee), the following activities of note have occurred:

·        The Auckland Domain received a green flag award for 2020.  

·        The installation of eight new cricket wickets has been completed.

·        The physical works contract for the wintergardens has been awarded.

3.      The initial proposal was for temporary gates to be installed at the Titoki St carpark and the Carlton Gore Rd entrance. However, it is recommended a softer and staged approach is now taken to this trial with this now being tested within the confines of the Titoki St carpark only.

4.      The parking removal project was not included in this year’s work programme and put on hold pending budget and the approval of Auckland Transport’s Traffic Control Committee (TCC). TCC approval was finally granted in February 2021. Funding has been found through savings and contributions from the Auckland museum that is sufficient to implement some of the parking removals. It is proposed a staged approach is taken and that priority be given to the approximately 38 spaces in front of the museum.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland Domain Committee:

a)      receive the Auckland Domain – general and financial update report.

b)      approve the staged approach to the implementation of the gate trial in the Titoki Street carpark to address commuter parking demand.

c)      approve the staged approach to the removal of parking with stage 1 being the removal of 38 parks in front of the museum, on Cenotaph Road and the Museum Circuit.

Horopaki

Context

Work programme

5.      The following table shows the budget allocation and year to date expenditure of the Auckland Domain FY20/21 capex work programme.


 

 

Project

Budget Source

2020/2021 budget allocation $

YTD Expenditure $

Wintergarden renewal

ABS Capex - Regional Renewal and Seismic Strengthening

$4,053,087

100,864.07

Sportsfields renewal - Install 8 new concrete cricket wickets

ABS: Capex Development and ABS Capex - Regional Renewal

$31,595

176,615.10

Trial gates to address commuter parking

Waitemata Local Board - Parnell Parking Fund

$16,781

460

New pathway connections -

Waitematā Local Board's AT Capital Transport Fund

$70,000

9,059.50

New carpark on Kiosk Road

Waitematā Local Board - Parnell Parking Fund

$30,000

2,067

 

 

6.      The following table gives a brief summary of the progress of work programme projects as well as other initiatives that are to be delivered this financial year.

Project

Update

Status

Wintergarden renewal

This project will be delivered over three financial years. The physical works contract was awarded to Cape Limited to carry out the above works in two separable portions. The complex is to undergo seismic strengthening next month. (refer to par 7 and 8 for more detail)

On track

Install 8 new concrete cricket wickets

The installation of eight new cricket wickets and removal of two concrete wickets have been completed. Note that regional renewal funding was brought forward to complete this project within this financial year, hence the expenditure is higher than the original allocation.

Completed

Trial gates to address commuter parking

This project is on track to be delivered this financial year. It is recommended a softer and staged approach is now taken to this trial with this now being tested within the confines of the Titoki St carpark only.  (Refer to par xxx for analysis and advice on this)

On track

New pathway connections -

This project includes the design component only. Preliminary concept designs have been completed for 4 pathway connections (refer to par xx for more detail)

On track

New carpark on Kiosk Road

High level concept design and rough order of costs have been completed. A planning assessment has also been undertaken to identify the relevant regulatory planning requirements.

On track

Greenflag Award

The Auckland Domain is one of 24 parks across New Zealand to receive a Green Flag Award for 2020. The Green Flag Award recognises and rewards parks and green spaces providing high quality and innovative recreational experiences for our communities. The award sets a benchmark standard for recreational outdoor spaces worldwide. Parks are awarded based on a criterion marked by experienced Green Flag Award judges throughout the country

Completed

Implement AT parking plan at Grafton Mews carpark

A proposal to allocate 15 car parks to the bowling club will be considered by the Committee and Waitemata local board during March. This is a potential solution that will enable the implementation of paid parking at the Grafton mews carpark.

Issues being managed

Garden of Humanity

The application for landowner consent has been lodged and will be considered for approval at the March committee meeting.

On track

Increase volunteer activities

Several community volunteer events are planned for later this financial year. This is in addition to the pest animal control that are undertaken by volunteers.

On track

Repaint grandstand

Contractors are currently scoping the work with an estimated completion date of June 2021.

On track

Pipe repairs at the Millennium Tree

The pipes are still in working order, but repair and renewal options are being explored.

On track

Pond aeration device - Duckponds

Options for the supply and installation of aeration devices are being investigated

On track

Duck Pond gardens

The garden re-vamp is ongoing and is being carried out through general maintenance.

Completed

Japanese walkway and garden

In December 2020 the red Japanese bridge was closed off due to rotting timber supports. The bridge was removed in late December and a replacement installed in early January.

Completed

Parking removal project

The parking removal project was not part of this year’s programme due to lack of funding. It was put in hold pending budget and the approval of Auckland Transport’s Traffic Control Committee (TCC). TCC approval was finally granted in February 2021. Funding has been found through savings that is sufficient to implement some of the parking removals. (refer to par xxx for analysis and advise)

Issues being managed

 

Wintergardens Renewal- Seismic Upgrade and Repairs Project

7.      The physical works contract was awarded to Cape Limited to carry out the above works in two separable portions: -

·    Portion 1: Cool house and part 1 external areas

·    Portion 2: Tropical House and Part 2 external areas

8.      The popular attraction will be affected for the next 18 months. Work will start with the temperate climate glasshouse and upon completion, will move onto the tropical climate glasshouse. The work is expected to take 9-10 months on each glasshouse and when completed will ensure the Wintergardens meet the new building standard.

9.      Both buildings will have steel ties installed internally with new laminated glass and stronger code compliant aluminum glazing bars placed on the roofs. This major work will add to the post tension strengthening work that was carried out on the Tropical House chimney stack in 2003. In addition, the timber joinery will be repaired and repainted. These improvements include installing larger gutters and additional rainwater pipes and a return to the original design of clear glass on the roofs instead of the current opaque glass.


New Pathway connections

10.    Preliminary concept designs have been completed for the following four pathway connections, which are funded by the Waitematā Local Board’s transport capital fund:

·    Titoki St carpark and Football Road 

·    Football Road and along the Crescent to the public toilets

·    Centennial Path, along Grafton Mews to Lower Domain Drive

·    Parnell Train Station to Lower Domain Drive

11.    These are consistent with the Auckland Domain masterplan (5.1 Improve pedestrian and cycling circulation).

12.    Once the designs and rough order of costs for each pathway package have been completed, it will be presented for feedback to the Committee and Waitematā Local Board.


 

Operations and maintenance

13.    With ongoing water saving measures in place the mirror pond and Valkyries fountain have been kept empty and remain closed. The Valkyries fountain uses a reticulated supply to remain topped up and the mirror pond has a slow leak that requires the water feature to have a constant supply topping it up. A condition assessment is going to be undertaken on the mirror pond to ascertain the full extent of repairs required to ensure this fountain remains watertight for an extended time.

14.    Contractors have provided stunning wildflower displays in the annual beds for the second year running. These wildflowers require significantly less irrigation and provide a wide range of food sources for pollinators.

15.    Two additional accessible car parks have been installed at the Wintergardens following the recommendation of the committee. The accessible parks were installed shortly after the walking tour and have been well used by those with accessibility needs. Two additional park benches will be installed adjacent to these accessible car-parks to provide a safe waiting space for pick-up and drop-offs.

16.    Staff completed extensive walk throughs of the walking track network through the bush areas of the Domain. Maintenance schedules to the walking tracks that connect the Parnell Train station and the upper Domain has been planned for February and March. This includes signage realignment, track surface top-ups and addition of handrails along track stairways.


 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Trial Gates

17.    The initial proposal was for temporary gates to be installed at the Titoki St carpark and the Carlton Gore Rd entrance. However, it is recommended a softer and staged approach is now taken to this trial with this now being tested within the confines of the Titoki St carpark only.  This would not unduly limit parking or circulation on legal roads for people visiting the Domain early in the morning or evenings to recreate, it would be easier to manage operationally, easier to monitor the impacts on the contained carpark, and would provide greater benefit to museum visitors.  

Parking Removal

18.    The committee resolved to remove approximately 120 carparks from the Domain through two separate resolutions. Of note the masterplan supported parking removals from the central area of the Domain to reduce vehicle dominance where most people recreate. The idea was to move parking provision to the periphery with the redevelopment of the Titoki Street carpark. The parking removals were supported as the first stage of delivering the Accessibility Improvement Programme and were to be timed to coincide with addressing parking demand through the management of commuter parking.  The redevelopment of the Titoki Street carpark has not to date been prioritised as a project by the committee but does provide an option to offset the parking removals already approved. 

19.    The resolutions were:

ADC/2018/36

That the Auckland Domain Committee:

a)  

endorse the Stage 1 improvements as part of the Auckland Domain Accessibility Improvement Programme (Attachment A).

ADC/2019/18

That the Auckland Domain Committee:

e)      support the request by the Auckland War Memorial Museum for the removal of parking in front of the museum and Cenotaph Court of Honour, being up to:

i)   27 parking spaces from Cenotaph Road

ii)  13 parking spaces from the Museum Circuit


 

 

20.    The parking removal project was put in hold pending budget and the approval of Auckland Transport’s Traffic Control Committee (TCC). TCC approval was finally granted in February 2021. Funding has been found through savings that is sufficient to implement some of the parking removals. It is proposed a staged approach is taken and that priority be given to the approximately 38 spaces in front of the museum. This being 27 parks along Cenotaph Drive and 11 on Museum Circuit. This will improve health and safety for pedestrians and cyclists and the movement of buses, particularly on pinch points on Museum Circuit. In addition, it will improve the views to and from the iconic heritage building.

21.    The second stage of implementing this project would be along the Sri Chinmoy Circuit with parking removed from the inside of the circuit along Grandstand Road South (12 parks), Football Road (13 parks) and the west of the Crescent (11 parks). With the aim of improving the pedestrian and cycling experiences of this popular walking and biking circuit.

22.    It was noted in the 15 February workshop that the parking removal on the Cresent and the layout of the new path planned in this area will depend on the Garden of Humanity project and path connections proposed as part of this.  It was also noted that it would be easy to implement the removal of parking on the Crescent and designate a temporary path ahead of the more permanent solution being funded. However, further investigations need to be undertaken to ensure any temporary solution such as paint to designate a path or use of moveable planters is able to be implemented in such a way that it is in keeping with the Domain being a destination park.

23.    It is also felt from a communications perspective that the removal of the parking in front of the museum can be seen as a package with the trial gates.  And that the Crescent parking removal is best tied into the messaging around improving safety on the Sri Chinmoy circuit. A further report on the stage 2 parking removals will be brought to the committee at their June meeting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.    Many of the activities in the proposed work programme will have a positive impact on greenhouse gas emissions and contribute towards climate change adaptation. These impacts will be considered as projects progress and will be reported to the committee at future reporting opportunities. The sorts of impacts to be considered include:

·    Maximum upcycling and recycling of old material

·    Installation of energy efficiency measures

·    Building design to ensure the maximum lifetime and efficiency of the building is obtained

·    Lifecycle impacts of construction materials (embodied emissions)

·    Exposure of building location to climate change hazards (sea level rise, flooding (floodplains), drought, heat island effect)

·    Anticipated increase in carbon emissions from construction, including contractor emissions

·    Lifecycle impacts of construction materials.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.    This report largely reflects ’business as usual’ operational activities and is considered to be in line with council group activities.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.    There are no impacts on local boards arising specifically from this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.    The Community Facilities work programme ensures that all facilities and open space assets continue to be well-maintained assets that benefit the local community, including Māori. When developing and delivering work programmes consideration is given to how the activities can contribute to Māori well-being, values, culture and traditions.

28.    Karanga Atu! Karanga Mai! relationship approach responds to Māori aspirations and delivers on council’s statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori.

29.    Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.    This is an information report that relates to implementation of activities within budget or proposals that will be considered in a future report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.    There are no substantive risks identified at this point in time.

32.    Projects discussed in this report are subject to operational health and safety plans. This includes a process for incident and near-miss reporting, and these will be reported to the committee where they have occurred.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.    If approved by the Committee, the staged implementation of the trial gates and parking removal projects will be implemented.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Martin van Jaarsveld - Manager Community Parks & Places

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Martin van Jaarsveld - Manager Community Parks & Places

 


Auckland Domain Committee

08 March 2021

 

Auckland Bowling Club Parking Allocation 100 Stanley Street Grafton

File No.: CP2021/01693

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek endorsement from the Committee for the allocation of 15 car parks to the Auckland bowling club outside their leased area at the Grafton Mews car park (100 Stanley Street).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The car park agreement with the Auckland Bowling club that allows them to manage and use the Grafton Mews car park expires at the end of June 2021. This carpark comprises approximately 75 parking spaces, seven of which are within the club’s leased area.

3.      The plan is for Auckland Transport (AT) to take over the management of the car park (excluding the seven spaces within the club’s leased area) later this year.

4.      The bowling club has requested to retain 15 dedicated car parks within the Grafton Mews carpark for bowling club purposes when the car park agreement expires. This is in addition to seven car parks within their leased area, which would bring the total number of parking spaces allocated to the bowling club to 22 spaces.

5.      A total of 22 parking spaces is consistent with other bowling clubs in the Auckland region where leases include dedicated spaces.

6.      The mechanism to allocate the 15 parking spaces would be through a license under the Local Government Act.

7.      The area proposed for the licensed parking sits outside the domain boundary, so the Waitemata Local Board is the delegated authority for the proposed license.

8.      Since this car park is associated with activities in the Domain, endorsement from the Committee is sought prior to presenting a report to the Waitemata local board for their decision.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland Domain Committee:

a)      endorse a license to the Auckland bowling club for 15 car parks at the Grafton Mews car park at 100 Stanley Street subject to public and iwi consultation.

Horopaki

Context

9.      The Auckland Council has an Operation and Management Agreement with Auckland Bowling Club for the club to manage the council carpark in the Grafton Mews area used in conjunction with Auckland Domain adjacent to the club’s leased site. This was to record the clubs practice of leasing the majority of the car parks to local health and business entities. This arrangement had been operating without consent for some time. The agreement temporary with the knowledge that a longer-term solution was required to manage the parking area.

10.    The agreement commenced in 2017 with several extensions being granted.  The intention is that AT take over the management of the carpark later in 2021.

The Proposal

11.   
The bowling club requested the allocation of 15 dedicated car parks within the area highlighted below. This is in addition to seven car parks within their leased area, which would bring the total number of parking spaces allocated to the bowling club to 22 spaces.

12.    These parking spaces are required to meet the bowling club needs of members as well as social bowling club events by non-members during the week and at weekends.

 

13.    Key aspects of the proposal are;

·    The 15 parking spaces are for club purposes only, e.g. no sub-leasing to businesses.

·    Two of the dedicated spaces are disabled spaces.

·    The dedicated spaces come at no cost to the bowling club.

·    The parking spaces will be allocated to the club on a 24/7 basis.

·    The public would be able to traverse the area.

·    The 15 parking spaces will be based on the new AT parking plan, which includes angled parking as illustrated in the diagram below.


License Process

14.    The mechanism to allocate the 15 parking spaces is through a license under the Local Government Act. This includes a public and iwi consultation prior to granting the licence.

15.    The Grafton Mews carpark is situated across two lots. Half the car park is located within the Auckland Domain boundary, and half of it outside.

16.    The proposed license area is on that part of the carpark that is located outside the domain boundary.

17.    For this reason, the Waitemata Local Board has delegated authority to consider and approve the formal license proposal.  

18.    The term of proposed license will be aligned with the bowling club lease, which expires 31 March 2026.   

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The need for 15 additional car parking spaces

19.    Last year, the bowling club had over 6,000 people to the club to bowl. The current participation levels are however restricted by the weather and limited capacity of the greens.

20.    To help increase the capacity of the greens and mitigate the loss in revenue, the bowling club’s intention is to change one of the greens to an all-weather green. We understand that Auckland Bowls has offered support for this new asset subject to the club securing car parking.

21.    With an all-weather green and allocated car parking, the club has advised that their bookings would increase and the options they could offer to the community would also increase. These options include;

·    More community events.

·    Early morning meetings, which include a game of bowls and lunch. This is very popular but require car parking.

·    Mid-week bowling events.

·    Bare foot bowling, normally a weekend event.

·    More corporate events.

·    Team building events during the week and weekend.

22.    The bowling club has advised that at this point they cannot give more details on the specific days and times these additional events will be delivered. They do however need the option for all time slots during the week and weekends, and their intention is to promote the club for weekdays as well as weekends.

23.    An all-weather surface and associated car parking would enable the club to increase participation, which would help with the long-term survival of the club.

Participation trends in bowls

24.    Based on information from Bowls NZ, there have been a 1.5% increase year on year for the last two years in full playing membership of bowling blubs, which is a major turnaround from five years ago where there was an 8-10% decline and the closing of clubs.

25.    Social membership in clubs is up by over 20% and casual bowls programmes are growing year on year to the point where clubs are struggling to meet the numbers of people wanting to play.

26.    This is an area where Bowls NZ is assisting clubs to build capability. There is a significant amount of investment being put into bowling facilities. This includes updating artificial greens, converting natural greens to artificial, upgrading of natural greens, installing covered greens or upgrading the clubrooms. This investment in bowling facilities gives bowling clubs a 12-month playing programme.

Comparison with other bowling clubs

27.    It is not possible to make a direct comparison of parking allocations between different sporting clubs across Auckland due to site specific characteristics, different parking demands, historical allocations, legacy agreements, and participation numbers. However, a comparison of bowling clubs situated on Council owned parkland with exclusive parking suggests that the proposal from the Auckland bowling club is not unique, and that a request of 15 additional parking spaces is reasonable.

28.    Across Auckland, there are seven bowling clubs on Council land that have dedicated parking spaces. (refer to the table below).

29.    Of the seven bowling clubs, the Auckland Bowling club has the least number of dedicated car parks. Note that this excludes the current agreement with the Auckland bowling club to manage the Grafton Mews carpark.

Club

Park

 

No of allocated / exclusive car parks

Method

1

St George Bowling and Sports Club

Stadium Reserve, Papatoetoe

60

Part of leased area

2

Marne Road Papakura Bowling Club

Massey Park Papakura

40

Part of leased area

3

Blockhouse Bay Bowls

Blockhouse Bay Recreation Reserve

25

Part of leased area

4

Riverhead Bowling club

Riverhead War Memorial Park

17

Part of leased area

5

Henderson Bowls

Cranwell Reserve, Henderson

15

Allocation outside leased area

6

Western Indoor Bowling

Olympic Park

12

Informal allocation -Signage indicating it is for club users only

7

Auckland Bowling club

Auckland Domain

7

Within leased area

 

30.    A total of 22 parking spaces in this case is consistent with spaces allocated to other bowling clubs in the Auckland region.

31.    An analysis of community leases on parkland within the Waitemata local board area shows that most community lease facilities do not have exclusive parking.

32.    There are however many variables that make any comparison of parking allocation of community leases in central Auckland difficult. Apart from variables such as site-specific characteristics, different parking demands and legacy agreements, there are variables around the availability of Council owned parking. For example, in many cases Council does not have any parking to offer. 

33.    Based on the high-level analysis of parking allocation in the Waitemata local board area, there are seven community lease facilities with exclusive parking. This is a mixture of sporting facilities, kindergartens and community facilities. 

Key factors for consideration

34.    Several factors need to be considered when assessing the request from the Auckland bowling club for 15 additional parking spaces including;

·    The historical use and management of the carpark by the bowling club.

·    The current Operation and Management Agreement in place between Council and the club that allows the club to manage and use the Grafton Mews car park.

·    The upward trend in the participation in bowls.

·    The intention of the Auckland bowling club to increase capacity through an artificial surface and thereby increase participation.

·    The intention of the Committee to introduce paid parking at the Grafton Mews carpark and for AT to take over the management when the Operation and Management Agreement with the club expires.

·    The high demand for commuter parking in and around the Domain. 

·    Settlement of a litigation matter.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

35.    The proposed parking license will have no additional impact on climate change. There is no impact on Green House gas emissions as the proposal does not introduce any new source of emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.    The carpark will be managed by Auckland Transport (AT) as a paid parking area. The effect of this proposal will marginally reduce the revenue generating opportunity when the licence area is being used by the bowling club.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

37.    A workshop was held with the Waitematā Local Board on 23 February 2021.

38.    Some of the feedback and discussions from the local board included;

·    An understanding of the future usage levels of the proposed 15 car parks is important. This is to ensure that there is a need for the exclusive use by the club on a 24/7 basis. This includes weekend use compared to weekdays.

·    Safety issues at the exit of the car park were highlighted. AT will be requested to investigate any improvements.

·    Discussion on the term of the proposed license. It was confirmed that the term would be aligned with the bowling club lease term.

·    Consideration should be given to reviewing the usage levels of the licensed car parks on an annual basis. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.    An aim of community leasing is to increase targeted support for Māori community development. This proposal seeks to improve access to facilities for all Aucklanders, including Māori living in the Waitemata Local Board and wider areas.

40.    Iwi will be consulted as part of the public notification process

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.    There may be a small reduction in revenue generated by the pay and display management of the carpark area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.    There is the potential for members of the public parking the Grafton Mews Carpark to be unfamiliar with the arrangement with the bowling club. Signage both on the ground and at each space will need to clearly set out the conditions under which parking is undertaken.

43.    There is a risk of litigation if this matter is not resolved.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.    Provided the proposal is supported by the committee and the Waitemata Local Board staff will present a report to the March Waitemata Local Board business meeting to approve the granting of a license to the club subject to conditions.

45.    Before granting the licence public notification and consultation with iwi groups with an interest in the area will be undertaken.

46.    Public consultation if supported by the Auckland Domain Committee and local board.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Martin van Jaarsveld - Manager Community Parks & Places

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Martin van Jaarsveld - Manager Community Parks & Places

 


Auckland Domain Committee

08 March 2021

 

Summary of Auckland Domain Committee information memoranda, workshops and briefings (including the Forward Work Programme) - 8 March 2021

File No.: CP2021/01875

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A.

2.      To receive a summary and provide a public record of memoranda, workshop and briefing papers that may have been held or been distributed to Auckland Domain Committee members.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.      This is a regular information-only report which aims to provide greater visibility of information circulated to Auckland Domain Committee members via memoranda/workshops and briefings or other means, where no decisions are required.

4.      The following workshops/briefings have taken place:

Date

Workshop/Briefing

15/2/21

Workshop

 

5.      These documents can be found on the Auckland Council website, at the following link: http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

·    at the top left of the page, select meeting/Te hui “Auckland Domain Committee” from the drop-down tab and click “View”;

·    under ‘Attachments’, select either the HTML or PDF version of the document entitled ‘Extra Attachments’.

6.      Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary.  Auckland Domain Committee members should direct any questions to the authors

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland Domain Committee:

a)      note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A of the agenda report.

b)      receive the Summary of Auckland Domain Committee information memoranda, workshops and briefings – 8 March 2021

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Forward Work Programme - 2021

463

b

Workshop notes - 15 February 2021

467

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sonja Tomovska - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Martin van Jaarsveld - Manager Community Parks & Places

 


Auckland Domain Committee

08 March 2021

 

 

Auckland Domain Committee
Forward Work Programme 2021

This committee deals with policy and landowner decision-making that relates to the Auckland Domain. The full terms of reference can be found here: Auckland Council Governing Body Terms of Reference

 

 

Area of work and Lead Department

Reason for work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Expected timeframes

Highlight the month(s) this is expected to come to committee in 2021

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

General Update

To inform the committee on progress of delivery of the work programme and update on general operational matters of interest. This includes.

·    Renewals

·    Maintenance

·    Project delivery

·    Volunteer activities

Progress report for the committee’s information and update.

 

Progress to date:

General update reports on this financial year’s work programme  have been given at the following meetings;

17 August 2020
Link to decision

9 November 2020
Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LTP work programme priorities

Prioritise the strategic projects in the Auckland Domain for the next 10 years. Funding will then be allocated to priority projects as it becomes available.

To approve the prioritisation of the work programme.

 

Progress to date:

A workshop was held with the committee on 15 February 2021 to discuss the priorities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Landowner approval - Garden of Humanity memorial

The Auckland Holocaust Memorial Trust is proposing to install a memorial called the ‘Garden of Humanity’ at the Fairy Pond within the Auckland Domain.

 

To consider granting landowner consent for the Garden of Humanity memorial

 

Progress to date:

Public input from Auckland Holocaust Memorial Trust 30 November 2017
Link to tabled documents

Decision for staff to work with Trust and for Trust to submit design options 30 November 2017
Link to decision

Update on the project to the Auckland Domain Committee August 2020
Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grafton Mews carpark – Auckland Bowling club parking request

A proposal from the Auckland bowling club for exclusive use of 15 additional parking spaces.

To consider endorsing a license for 15 parking spaces at the Grafton Mews carpark.

 

Progress to date:

A workshop was held with the committee on 15 February 2021 to discuss the proposal from the bowling club.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Landowner approval – Parnell railway station underpass

Auckland Transport have applied for landowner approval to undertake works within 24 Nicholls Lane, Parnell which is owned by council. The works are part of a joint project between Auckland Transport and Summerset Villages (Parnell) Limited to construct an underpass beneath Parnell railway station at the northern end, to connect Heather Street in Parnell with an existing path within the Auckland Domain.

Request the endorsement of the Auckland Domain Committee for the landowner approval application from Auckland Transport to undertake works within 24 Nicholls Lane, Parnell related to the Parnell railway station underpass.

 

Progress to date:

This proposed underpass was discussed on 15 February 2020 at a committee workshop as part of the pathway projects.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Public feedback on proposal to amend the Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014

 

To enable the Auckland Domain Committee to provide its views on public feedback to the proposal to amend the Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014 relating to Pukekawa / Auckland Domain, staff have prepared summary and deliberation reports.

 

 

To seek views on public feedback to the proposal to amend Te Ture ā-Rohe Whakararata Waipiro / the Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014 relating to Pukekawa / Auckland Domain before a final decision is made.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Events policy

An updated event approval form for the Auckland Domain, with a focus on te reo and zero waste principles.

To consider the updated event approval policy for the Domain.

 

Progress to date:

Committee requested an updated event/ landowner approval/policy form for the Auckland Domain 17 November 2020
Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accessibility Improvement programme (AIP)

An investigation of options to extend pathway connections and safety for walking and cycling in the Domain using interim low cost intervention.

Communication on AIP programme / parking removals, road closure, path connections

Report back on trials

 

To consider interim measures to extend pathway connections.

Update on communications / approval for rollout timeframe and messages.

 

Progress to date:

Requested staff investigate options to extend pathway connections and safety for walking and cycling in the Domain using interim low cost interventions such as painted pathways on the existing carriageway, consistent with the Master Plan 17 November 2020
Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Events

All events within committee delegation (also updates if available with decision reports – otherwise updates to go in general update)

To consider landowner approvals for events within the Domain.

Progress to date

Auckland Domain Event Approvals from 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021
Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Auckland Domain Committee

08 March 2021

 

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[1] In Council’s Events Policy, major events have a regional, national and international profile.

[2]    Local board information on people who gave feedback at ‘Have Your Say’ events is unknown.