I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Howick Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Monday, 15 March 2021

6.00pm

Howick Local Board Meeting Room
Pakuranga Library Complex
7 Aylesbury Street
Pakuranga

 

Howick Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Adele White

 

Deputy Chairperson

John Spiller

 

Members

Katrina Bungard

 

 

Bo Burns

 

 

David Collings

 

 

Bruce Kendall

 

 

Mike Turinsky

 

 

Bob Wichman

 

 

Peter Young, JP

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Vanessa Phillips

Democracy Advisor

 

9 March 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 891 378

Email: vanessa.phillips@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Howick Local Board

15 March 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     East Skate Club update to the Howick Local Board                                        5

8.2     Bucklands Beach Yacht Club carparking                                                          6

8.3     Citizens Advice Bureau Pakuranga update to the Howick Local Board       6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

9.1     Richard Waugh, Howick & Districts 175th celebrations                                  6

9.2     Lloyd Elsmore Community Hub Board introduction to the Howick Local Board                                                                                                                                7

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                    9

12        Governing Body Member update                                                                               11

13        Local board input into preparation of the draft 2021 Regional Parks Management Plan                                                                                                                                13

14        2021 Local Government New Zealand Conference and Annual General Meeting 19

15        Approval for 13 new public roads and two new private accessways within the 'Ormiston Rise' subdivision at 125c Murphys Road, Flat Bush                             35

16        Approval for a new private road name at 29 Abercrombie Street, Howick           45

17        Approval for a new private road name at 263 Ormiston Road, Flat Bush            51

18        Governance forward work calendar                                                                          59

19        Workshop records                                                                                                       63

20        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Howick Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Monday, 15 February 2021, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Howick Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       East Skate Club update to the Howick Local Board

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Aaron Martin, from East Skate Club Incorporated will return to provide the local board with progress the club has been making since their introduction to the local board at the December 2020 meeting. The club’s intention is to continue to engage with the local board on behalf of the skateboarding community for improved skatepark facilities in the Howick Local Board area.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from East Skate Club and thank them for their attendance.

 

 

8.2       Bucklands Beach Yacht Club carparking

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Sara Poore, Commodore and Richard Hosking, Vice Commodore of the Bucklands Beach Yacht Club will be in attendance to present to the local board on the following matters in relation to the club:

a)  Bucklands Beach Yact Club (BBYC) at Ara Tai Reserve

b)  reserve areas that BBYC would like to use

c)  why BBYC needs dedicated carparks

d)  solutions to carparking

e)  future potential carparking

f)  next steps.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

g)      receive the deputation from Bucklands Beach Yacht Club and thank them for their attendance.

 

 

8.3       Citizens Advice Bureau Pakuranga update to the Howick Local Board

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Angela Guptill, on behalf of the Citizens Advice Bureau in Pakuranga will be in attendance to introduce herself to the Howick Local Board and provide an update on the Citizen Advice Bureau’s statistics for Pakuranga and Botany.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from the Citizens Advice Bureau in Pakuranga and thank them for their attendance.

 


 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Richard Waugh, Howick & Districts 175th celebrations

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Richard Waugh will be in attendance to provide an update to the local board on the Howick & Districts 175th celebrations. In addition to reporting on progress and acknowledging the Board’s helpfulness to date.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      thank Richard Waugh for his attendance.

 

 

9.2       Lloyd Elsmore Community Hub Board introduction to the Howick Local Board

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Howick Local Board will be introduced to the newly formed Lloyd Elsmore Community Hub Board.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      thank the Lloyd Elsmore Community Hub Board for their attendance.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Howick Local Board

15 March 2021

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2021/00012

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This item gives the local board chairperson an opportunity to update the local board on any announcements and note the chairperson’s written report.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing the local board chairperson with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the chairperson’s verbal update and written report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

15 March 2021

 

 

Governing Body Member update

File No.: CP2021/00025

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Howick Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the local board on regional matters.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing the Howick Ward Councillors with an opportunity to update the local board on regional matters they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal reports from Cr Paul Young and Cr Sharon Stewart QSM.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

15 March 2021

 

 

Local board input into preparation of the draft 2021 Regional Parks Management Plan

File No.: CP2021/01445

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable local boards to provide formal input into the preparation of the draft Regional Parks Management Plan 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) Committee initiated the 10-year review of the Regional Parks Management Plan (RPMP) in 2020. Written suggestions from 758 submitters were received on the intention to draft the plan, and in December 2020 a summary was sent to local board members.

3.       The main overarching theme in the suggestions is that people highly value the natural, undeveloped nature of the regional parks, particularly in the face of continuing growth of Auckland’s population and urban area. They want to be able to access and enjoy regional parks while at the same time protecting these natural spaces.

4.       Track closures to prevent the spread of kauri dieback continue to be a source of frustration and the council received numerous requests for it to do more to re-establish access while protecting kauri. Vehicles on Muriwai Beach, dog control, visitor impacts on wildlife, and the need for greater plant and animal pest control were other sources of concern.

5.       People highlighted that regional parks can play a positive role in responding to climate change as natural carbon sinks, with many people suggesting ‘that more trees be planted’. Other suggestions included ways for farming to be more sustainable, regenerative and diverse and for visitor vehicle emissions to be reduced.

6.       Submitters also suggested regional parks play an important role in connecting and educating people about nature, Māori heritage, and farming. They suggested volunteering and partnerships could support this role.

7.       There was both opposition and qualified support for revenue generation from regional parks. Some suggested donations could be sought to support projects in parks.

8.       The next steps are to consider these suggestions in the preparation of the draft RPMP, together with local board input provided through this report, and engagement with mana whenua. Key decisions and issues will be workshopped with the PACE Committee before the draft RPMP is presented for the committee’s adoption and release for public consultation.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      resolve formal feedback to inform the preparation of the draft Regional Park Management Plan 2021.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The regional parks management plan guides the management and use of regional parks. The regional park network has been managed via an omnibus management plan since 2002 and the 2010 version is still operative. Having a management plan is a statutory requirement under the Reserves Act 1977 and the Waitakere Ranges Heritage Area Act 2008.

10.     The PACE Committee initiated the 10-year review of the RPMP[1] in 2020. The review encompasses 28 regional parks comprising approximately 41,000 hectares of park land.

11.     The process for the review is as follows.

Figure One: Process for the 10-year review of the RPMP:

12.     On 20 August 2020, Auckland Council notified its intention to prepare a new plan and sought written suggestions from the community and organisations, as required under the Reserves Act 1977.

13.     During an eight-week consultation period from 1 September to 26 October 2020, comments and suggestions were received from 758 people and organisations along with a petition from 3681 petitioners.

14.     Elected members were provided with a summary of the suggestions in December 2020. The summary of suggestions was publicly released in January 2021 and is available on the RPMP review webpage.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Summary of suggestions from organisations and the community

15.     The suggestions ranged from general comments about what people value about regional parks and the role the parks should play, to comments and suggestions about specific regional parks.

16.     Comments included brief suggestions from many different park users, through to multiple-page submissions quoting clauses of the current RPMP and in-depth suggestions from those who have had years of close association with the regional parks. Organisations representing specific recreation, community or conservation interests put forward their members’ views. 

Key themes

·   almost universally, people told us they love the natural, undeveloped character of regional parks, and value the ability to freely access natural and open spaces as Tāmaki Makaurau continues to grow

·   many value native biodiversity for its own sake and want to protect and restore the natural environment.

Issues that the largest numbers of submitters felt strongly about were:

·   the impact of kauri dieback related track closures on wellbeing, with requests to improve access while protecting kauri

·   vehicles on beaches, particularly at Muriwai, drew comment about conflicts with other users and concerns about safety and environmental damage

·   in response to climate change, people saw regional parks as fulfilling the role of a carbon sink. By far the most common suggestion was to ‘plant more trees.’ Other common suggestions were for farming to be more sustainable, regenerative and diverse, and to build cycle trails and bus links between parks and communities so people don’t have to drive.

·   some requested more spaces to take dogs, while others wanted to keep areas dog-free with a greater focus on enforcing dog bylaws

·   many raised concerns about plant and animal pest infestations and suggested priority go to conservation and pest control and suggested actions to reduce visitor impacts on wildlife.

Other key themes raised by the community and organisations included:

·   requests from many outdoor recreation groups and users (trampers, horse riders, mountain bikers, vehicle-based campers, four-wheel drive recreation, dog walkers and others) for more opportunities to enjoy their activities in more parts of regional parks

·   regional parks were viewed as the natural place to educate and build connections to nature including through volunteering, and to learn about farming and provide experiences with animals. Suggestions to provide visitor information, nature education, support volunteers and provide a more visible ranger presence were received.

·   a petition from 3681 people sought an end to the killing of farmed animals for food production at Ambury and other regional parks, on the grounds that animals deserve to live out their full lives

·   people said they want to understand and connect with the heritage and history of the whenua, particularly its Māori history

·   commercial use was both opposed and given conditional support, providing it fits into the natural character of the regional parks. Some suggested donations could help fund projects and volunteering could be increased.

·   the Waitākere Ranges drew the most comment by far of all the regional parks, including comments on kauri dieback and tracks, and the impact of visitor pressures in many areas

·   the Hūnua Ranges were seen to have considerable untapped potential for active recreation, with many suggestions for horse riding, mountain biking, tramping, day walks and cycle links.

17.     Further detail is available in the Summary of Suggestions, published on the RPMP review webpage.

18.     Staff are seeking formal feedback from local boards by resolution in local board meetings held in February or March 2021 to help inform the draft RPMP preparation.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     Climate change is one of the key topics of the review. We invited comment on the role that regional parks might play in responding to the climate change emergency and many suggestions were received on this topic, as summarised in the section above.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The preparation of the draft RPMP in 2021 involves subject matter experts from many parts of the council including Infrastructure and Environmental Services, Plans and Places, Regional Parks, Community Facilities; as well as council-controlled organisations such as Auckland Unlimited, Auckland Transport, and Watercare.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     Following workshops in early 2021 with those local boards who requested it, this report seeks formal feedback from local boards to be considered in preparation of the draft RPMP.

22.     Local boards will have a further opportunity to comment on the draft 2021 RPMP following the public submission process.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     We are engaging with mana whenua during the drafting stage of the RPMP. In addition, we have requested region-wide input through the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum. The forum’s response to this request is being considered in February 2021.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The cost of the plan review will be met within existing Regional Parks and Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships budgets and resources, confirmed in the Emergency Budget 2020/2021.

25.     Revising the RPMP does not commit the council to future expenditure. The feedback received during the review and direction in the RPMP will guide priorities within available funding for regional parks.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     The table sets out risks and mitigations relating to the preparation of a draft RPMP in 2021.

Table One: Risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

If there is any move back into a higher level of Covid-19 Emergency during the plan drafting period, direct contact methods of engagement with mana whenua and key stakeholders may be disrupted

·  aim to move engagement to remote methods such as Skype, if necessary

·  consider moving the deadlines if sufficient engagement cannot be undertaken.

The review may raise expectations for a higher level of facilities or services on regional parks

·  manage expectations regarding the review scope and the relationship between the draft RPMP and the Long-term Plan and annual plan in all communications.

If we do not follow the correct processes under the Reserves Act 1977 and other legislation, the review process could be open to challenge.

·  confirm the legal status of regional park land holdings and check the statutory and other obligations over each land parcel to ensure compliance

·  ensure legal requirements regarding consultation processes are correctly followed.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Analysis of the range of suggestions received from the community, feedback from local boards and mana whenua will help to inform the preparation of the draft RPMP in 2021, which will also draw on extensive staff expertise across the council group.

28.     Key decisions and issues will be workshopped with the PACE Committee before the draft RPMP is presented for the committee’s adoption and release for public consultation.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jo Mackay - Project Manager

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager, Service Strategy and Integration

Louise Mason – General Manager, Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

15 March 2021

 

 

2021 Local Government New Zealand Conference and Annual General Meeting

File No.: CP2021/02087

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse the process for appointing elected members to attend the Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) conference taking place from 15 to 17 July 2021, appoint delegates to the Annual General Meeting (AGM) and provide process information regarding remits and awards.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2021 LGNZ Conference will be held at the ASB Theatre Marlborough, Blenheim from 15 to 17 July 2021. The conference programme is appended as Attachment A.

3.       Due to reductions in the Emergency Budget (current financial year) and risks associated with uncertainty of alert levels during the COVID-19 pandemic, the number of members who will be able to attend the LGNZ conference this year is limited.

4.       After considering a number of options (detailed in attachment B), staff recommend an option that enables a representative Auckland Council delegation to be funded from the reduced budget as follows:

·   elected members with a formal role as Auckland Council representatives to LGNZ 

·   six additional local board members to be selected from the local board clusters.

5.       The estimated cost of attending the conference (registration, travel and accommodation) is $2410 per person, bringing the total for the recommended option to $38,560.

6.       As in previous years, elected members may use their Individual Development Budget (IDB) allocation to attend the conference. The IDB allocation has also been reduced under the Emergency Budget to $1500 per member per electoral term. It is therefore not sufficient to cover the total cost of a member’s attendance. Members who wish to take up this opportunity would need to cover the shortfall themselves, approximately $900.

7.       Auckland Council is entitled to four delegates at the AGM. These delegates are appointed by the Governing Body. Staff recommend that the four delegates include Mayor Phil Goff (as presiding delegate), Chief Executive Jim Stabback, and up to two other Auckland Council conference attendees.

8.       The adoption of remits at the AGM and the 2021 LGNZ Excellence Awards are elements of this event. This report outlines the Auckland Council process for deciding Auckland Council remits and council positions on the conference remit, as well as a consolidated process for Auckland Council entries to the awards. The LGNZ Auckland Zone meeting, which is attended by representatives of local boards and the governing body is the forum that will coordinate these discussions.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the budget constraints in the current financial year and the recommended process for the appointment of attendees and delegates to the Local Government New Zealand 2021 Conference and Annual General Meeting in Blenheim from 15 to 17 July 2021

b)      endorse the selection of one local board representative per cluster through the Local Board Chairs’ Forum and agree to put nominations for cluster representatives through the local board chair for consideration at their April 2020 meeting.

c)      note the process to submit remits to the Annual General Meeting and entries for the 2021 Local Government New Zealand Excellence Awards has been communicated to elected members on 2 March 2021.

d)      confirm that conference attendance including travel and accommodation will be paid for in accordance with the current Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy.

e)      note that all local board members who are appointed to attend the conference will be confirmed to the General Manager Local Board Services by 15 April 2021 at the latest to ensure that they are registered with Local Government New Zealand.

f)       note that any member who wishes to attend the conference using their Individual Development Budget (IDB) allocation will need to subsidise the cost and must contact the General Manager Local Board Services by 8 April 2021 to make the necessary arrangements.

g)      note that the Governing Body will be appointing delegates to the 2021 LGNZ Annual General Meeting at their 25 March 2021 meeting, with the recommendation being to appoint Mayor Phil Goff as presiding delegate, and to appoint Chief Executive Jim Stabback and up to two other Auckland Council conference attendees as delegates.

h)      note that conference attendees can attend the 2021 Local Government New Zealand Annual General Meeting in an advisory capacity provided their names are included on the Annual General Meeting registration form, which will be signed by the mayor.

Horopaki

Context

9.       LGNZ is an incorporated society of local government organisations whose primary objective is to represent and advocate for the interests of local authorities in New Zealand. LGNZ champions policy positions on key issues that are of interest to local government and holds regular meetings and events throughout the year for members. The schedule of meetings includes an annual conference and meetings of local government geographical clusters (known as LGNZ zones) and sectors.

10.     LGNZ is governed by a National Council made up of representatives from member authorities as outlined in the constitution. Some of its work is conducted through committees and working groups which include representatives from member authorities.

11.     Elected members who have been formally appointed to LGNZ roles including members who are involved in advisory groups are:

Table One: Elected members formally appointed to LGNZ roles:

Name

LGNZ role

Mayor Phil Goff

National Council representative for Auckland

Auckland Council representative on the Metropolitan Sector Group

Councillor Pippa Coom

 

Local Board Chair Richard Northey

National Council representative for Auckland (appointed by Governing Body) and co-chair of the Auckland Zone

National Council representative for Auckland (appointed by local boards) and co-chair of the Auckland Zone

Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore

Auckland Council representative on Regional Sector

Councillor Alf Filipaina

Auckland Council representative on Te Maruata Roopu Whakahaere

Local Board Member Nerissa Henry

Auckland Council representative on Young Elected Members

Councillor Angela Dalton

Local Board Deputy Chair Danielle Grant

Auckland Council representatives on Governance and Strategy Advisory Group

Councillor Richard Hills

Local Board Member Cindy Schmidt

Auckland Council representatives on Policy Advisory Group

Auckland Zone

12.     LGNZ rules were amended in 2019 to allow Auckland Council, with its unique governance arrangements, to be set up as its own Zone, rather than be part of LGNZ Zone 1 with Northland councils.

13.     Auckland Zone meetings are scheduled on a quarterly basis. These meetings are co-chaired by the two Auckland representatives appointed to the LGNZ National Council by the Governing Body (Councillor Pippa Coom) and local boards’ (Chair Richard Northey) and attended by appointed representatives of local boards and members of the Governing Body.

14.     The meetings of Auckland Zone are open to all elected members. The zone meetings receive regular updates from LGNZ Executive as well as verbal reports from Auckland Council elected members who have an ongoing involvement with LGNZ.

15.     The zone meetings provide an opportunity for council to have discussions across governing body and local boards on joint advocacy issues including remits and other shared priorities that fall within LGNZ’s mandate.

LGNZ Annual conference and AGM 2021

16.     The 2021 LGNZ conference and AGM will be held at the ASB Theatre Marlborough, Waiharakeke Blenheim, from 15 to 17 July 2021.

17.     This year, the conference programme has the theme “Reimagining Aotearoa from community up”. The programme is available online on the LGNZ website and is appended as Attachment A.

18.     The AGM takes place on the last day of the conference from 9.30am to 12.30pm. The LGNZ constitution permits the Auckland Council to appoint four delegates to represent it at the AGM, with one of the delegates being appointed as presiding delegate.

19.     Due to the restriction following the COVID-19 crisis, the 2020 conference was postponed and Auckland Council only sent two delegates to the AGM. The two delegates who attended the AGM via remote/electronic attendance were Mayor Phil Goff and Councillor Pippa Coom.

20.     In addition to the official delegates at the AGM, LGNZ allows conference participants to attend the AGM as observers but requires prior notice. Nominated attendees to the conference will be invited to register as observers to the AGM.

Remits (for consideration at the AGM 2021)

21.     LGNZ invites member authorities to submit remits for consideration at the AGM on 17 July 2021 and entries for consideration for the LGNZ Excellence Awards, to be announced at the conference dinner on 16 July 2021.

22.     Proposed remits should address only major strategic ‘issues of the moment’. They should have a national focus, articulating a major interest or concern at the national political level.  They should relate to significant policy issues that, as a council, we have not been able to progress with central government through other means.

23.     On 2 March 2021, elected members were sent detailed information inviting proposals for remits to be discussed at the Auckland Zone meeting on 12 March 2021. Remits that are agreed on at the zone meeting will be submitted by the due date.

24.     The June 2021 meeting of the Auckland Zone will review all the remits that will be discussed at the AGM with a view to recommending a council position that the Auckland Council delegates will advocate at the AGM.

LGNZ Excellence Awards 2021

25.     LGNZ also invites member authorities to submit entries for consideration for the LGNZ Excellence Awards, to be announced at the conference dinner on 16 July 2021.

26.     The LGNZ Excellence Awards recognise and celebrate excellent performance by councils in promoting and growing the well-being of their communities. The awards are judged on a combination of general and specific criteria, incorporating best practice and components from the CouncilMARK™ excellence programme’s four priority areas. The awards categories for 2021 are:

·   Creative New Zealand EXCELLENCE Award for Cultural Well-being

·   Martin Jenkins EXCELLENCE Award for Economic Well-being

·   Air New Zealand EXCELLENCE Award for Environmental Well-being

·   Kāinga Ora Homes and Communities EXCELLENCE Award for Social Well-being

·   in addition, one or more individuals will be awarded the Te Tari Taiwhenua Internal Affairs EXCELLENCE Award for Outstanding Contribution to Local Government, and Fulton Hogan will also select the Local EXCELLENCE Award from among the finalists.

27.     The email to elected members on 2 March 2021 also outlined detailed information inviting potential awards entries to be discussed at the Auckland Zone meeting on 12 March 2021 so that entries from Auckland Council can be coordinated.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Overall costs per attendee

28.     The estimated total cost of attendance to the conference is $2410 per person, distributed as follows (all costs are GST inclusive):

Registration (early bird)

$1400

Accommodation* @ $190 per night x 3 nights

$570

Flights**

$280

Miscellaneous***

$160

Total

$2410

* based on average cost of Blenheim hotels.

** flights may range from $49 one way (take on bag only) to $199 for a 5pm flight (with a checked bag). $280 is as per 2020 budgeting.

*** for travel to and from airport and reasonable daily expenses under the Auckland Council Elected Member Expenses policy

Options

29.     Staff considered several options (Attachment B) that ensure a fair balance of representatives across the governing body and local boards while keeping within budget. The key considerations that were applied to selecting the staff preferred option are:

a)  the available budget for the LGNZ conference attendance is only $40,000

b)  the cost of attendance per person (registration, travel, accommodation) is estimated at $2410

c)  with the uncertainty to public events and gatherings posed by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, there is a possibility the COVID-19 alert levels may not be favourable in July 2021. If this is the case, cancellations will not recoup all monies spent. Staff estimate that although this risk may be lower in July, it will continue to exist

d)  ensure fair representation from local boards given the inability to accommodate 21 representatives

e)  empowering elected members who have a formal involvement with LGNZ to be prioritised for attendance to maximise their ongoing contributions on behalf of Auckland Council.

30.     Staff recommend Option B which will cost $38,560 and fund attendance of 16 elected members including:

·   all members who have been formally appointed or nominated to LGNZ National Council, subsidiary bodies and advisory groups (10 members)

·   a representative from each of the six local board clusters – North, South, West, Central, Islands and Rural (six members).

31.     This is not the cheapest option but is the one that enables a wider representation from local boards. The more expensive options which allow for one representative per local board cannot be accommodated as it will exceed the available budget.

32.     Local boards have an existing method for choosing a limited number of representatives. This approach utilises informal cluster groups based on geographic locations and unique characteristics (North, South, West, Central, Island, Rural) and involves local board chairs liaising with and agreeing with others in their cluster on their representative.

33.     There is an opportunity to select local board representatives using this methodology at the Local Board Chairs’ Forum on 12 April 2021.

Use of IDB to fund additional attendees

34.     Elected members who wish to attend the LGNZ conference and are not nominated or appointed can still attend using their IDB. As IDB entitlements are $1500 per elected member per term and the cost of attendance is approximately $2410, these elected members will need to meet the cost difference.

35.     It is recommended that elected members who wish to attend and can pay the difference are included in the group booking for accommodation and travel. Any elected member who wishes to take up this opportunity is encouraged to liaise further with the Kura Kāwana team.

36.     LGNZ are working on introducing some form of virtual attendance to the conference but the details are still to be confirmed.

37.     As per previous years, LGNZ will make some session recordings available online after the conference.

Delegates for the Annual General Meeting

38.     In line with previous years, staff recommend that AGM delegates are appointed from within the attending members as follows:

·   Mayor Phil Goff as presiding delegate

·   Chief Executive Jim Stabback

·   up to two additional delegates.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

39.     This report is procedural in nature, however the key impact on climate is through supporting attendance at a conference by means of air travel. A conservative approach to conference attendance would help reduce this impact.

40.     Estimates for emissions associated with travel to Blenheim or travel within Auckland for local meetings have not been calculated at the time of writing this report. Emissions, when known, can be offset through a verified carbon offset programme at a small cost.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

41.     LGNZ is an incorporated body comprising members who are New Zealand councils.  Council-controlled organisations are not eligible for separate membership. However, remits can cover activities of council-controlled organisations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

42.     LGNZ advocates for issues that are important to local government. Many of these issues are aligned with local board priorities. As such, there is interest from local boards in contributing to the work of LGNZ and in identifying and harnessing opportunities to progress other advocacy areas that local boards may have.

43.     Each local board has a nominated lead who represents them at Auckland Zone meetings and is involved in discussions about LGNZ matters.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     LGNZ advocates on a variety of issues that are important to Māori, including Māori housing, various environmental issues and Council-Māori participation and relationship arrangements. In addition, LGNZ provides advice including published guidance to assist local authorities in understanding values, aspirations and interests of Māori.

45.     The LGNZ National Council has a sub-committee, Te Maruata, which has the role of promoting increased representation of Māori as elected members of local government, and of enhancing Māori participation in local government processes. It also provides support for councils in building relationships with iwi, hapu and Māori groups. Te Maruata provides Māori input on development of future policies or legislation relating to local government. Councillor Alf Filipaina is a member of the sub-committee.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

46.     Staff considered options to reduce the financial impact of the attendance to the conference, in line with the budget restrictions imposed as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic.

47.     The costs associated with conference attendance, travel and accommodation within the recommended option can be met within the allocated Kura Kāwana (Elected Member development) budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     The key risk is of delayed decision-making which can impact costs and registration choices. The sooner the registration for the nominated members can be made, the more likely it is that Auckland Council can take advantage of early bird pricing for the conference, flights and accommodation, all done via bulk-booking.

49.     A resurgence of COVID-19 in the community and a change of alert level might prevent elected members from travelling to attend the conference. LGNZ is keeping an active review on the COVID-19 situation and will update directly to registered participants should a change affect the delivery of the conference. LGNZ is still working through a number of scenarios and how these would affect their decision to proceed as planned, postpone, cancel or switch delegates to virtual attendance, with the final decision resting with the National Council on the basis of the information available at the time.

50.     In the current COVID circumstances, the reputational risk associated with any financial expenditure is heightened and there is high scrutiny from the public on the council’s expenses. The recommendation to limit the number of members attending the conference mitigates this risk to a certain degree.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     Once representatives are confirmed to attend, the Manager Governance Services will coordinate all conference registrations, as well as requests to attend the AGM.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

LGNZ Conference 2021 programme

27

b

Options for attendance

33

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elodie Fontaine - Advisor - Democracy Services

Authorisers

Rose Leonard – Manager, Governance Services

Louise Mason – General Manager, Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

15 March 2021

 

 

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Howick Local Board

15 March 2021

 

 

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Howick Local Board

15 March 2021

 

 

Approval for 13 new public roads and two new private accessways within the 'Ormiston Rise' subdivision at 125c Murphys Road, Flat Bush

File No.: CP2021/01562

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Howick Local Board to name 13 new public roads and two new private commonly owned access lots (COALs hereafter) within the 'Ormiston Rise' subdivision at 125c Murphys Road, Flat Bush.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

3.       On behalf of the developer and consent holder Ormiston Rise Limited, consultant Nathan McIntosh, Civil Engineer at McKenzie and Co Ltd, has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the local board.

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region in any close proximity radius. Mana Whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines and Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki have proposed the names marked with an asterisk (*) in the table below.

5.       The proposed names for the 13 new public roads and two new private commonly owned access lots within the 'Ormiston Rise' subdivision at 125c Murphys Road, Flat Bush are:

Table One: Proposed road names and their alternatives:

Road Label

Preferred Name

First alternative

Second alternative

1 & 13

Long George Drive*

N/A

N/A

2

Tāhere Road*

Tūpākihi Road*

Kōpī Drive*

3

Bugle Road

Sagitta Road

Pasture Road

4

Pukanui Avenue

Rubus Avenue

Blackthorne Avenue

5

Canna Street

Pictor Avenue

Gaia Street

6

Salvia Lane

Mensa Lane

Tarragon Lane

7

Harvie McWatt Drive

Calendula Crescent

Aspect Road

8

Olearia Street

Spica Road

Squill Street

9

Ruapuke Road*

Kakau Road*

Te Kā Street*

10

Primula Lane

Castor Lane

Thicket Lane

11

Protea Avenue

Volans Avenue

Zephyr Avenue

12

Te Tū Road*

Ka Tau Lane*

Papa Tupu Road*

14

Figo Place

Beta Place

Terra Place

COAL 5

Foxtail Lane

Norma Lane

Tellus Lane

COAL 10

Pikopiko Lane

Dorado Lane

N/A

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve the following names in the table below (being the applicant’s preferred names and including those proposed by Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki) for the 13 new public roads and two new private commonly owned access lots within the 'Ormiston Rise' subdivision at 125c Murphys Road, Flat Bush, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60307990 and SUB60338530):

Road Label

Name

1 & 13

Long George Drive*

2

Tāhere Road*

3

Bugle Road

4

Pukanui Avenue

5

Canna Street

6

Salvia Lane

7

Harvie McWatt Drive

8

Olearia Street

9

Ruapuke Road*

10

Primula Lane

11

Protea Avenue

12

Te Tū Road*

14

Figo Place

COAL 5

Foxtail Lane

COAL 10

Pikopiko Lane

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent reference BUN60307990 (subdivision reference number SUB60338530) was issued in December 2019 for a staged subdivision of the site as part of the new ‘Ormiston Rise’ development that will ultimately provide over 650 new dwellings and associated roads and infrastructure.

7.       Site and location plans of the development and the new roads requiring names can be found in Attachment A.

8.       In accordance with the Standards, any road including private ways, COALs, and right of ways, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical, and efficient street numbering.

9.       Therefore, in this development, 13 new public roads and two new private COALs require names. Note that the roads marked 1 and 13 on the diagram in Attachment A will form one continuous stretch of road, so only one name is required here, as set out in the tables below.

10.     The lanes marked in dark grey on the diagram in Attachment A are rear service lanes that do not require road names as the dwelling street addresses will be taken from the main roads to be named in this application.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

12.     The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

 

13.     The applicant has provided the following themes and meanings for their proposed road names:

a)  Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki have proposed the names for Roads 1 & 13, 2, 9 and 12, as per the letter contained in Attachment B and meanings set out in the table below (paragraph 14). These have been adopted by the applicant and included in the table of name options.

b)  Auckland Botanical Gardens: For the applicant’s preferred name options, they have used names of plant species found in the nearby Auckland Botanical Gardens, including reference to trials the Gardens are running to find species of plants that are particularly suitable for the Auckland climate

c)  stars found in the Auckland sky is the theme for the ‘first alternative’ name options

d)  plants and landscape features with a Scottish/Irish focus is the theme for the ‘Alternative 2’ name options, relating to the history of the early settlers in the area

e)  the only exception to the above themes is the proposed name for Road 7, ‘Harvie McWatt Drive’, referencing a prominent family in the area. Harvie McWatt’s father Laurence was a coal miner who decided to leave Scotland and arrived in Auckland to start a new life with his family in 1863. Laurence’s sons started a variety of businesses in the area including a dairy farm, a farming contracting and haymaking business and a cream run. This evolved into general contracting and earthmoving services, and the family business McWatt Group Ltd still exists today in the area. Harvie McWatt is also the Grandfather of Clinton Webber, one of the developers of this project. Harvie McWatt died on the 27 March 1971 and is buried at St Paul’s Anglican church in East Tamaki.

14.     The meanings of the names proposed by Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki for Roads 1 & 13, 2, 9 and 12, as per the letter contained in Attachment B, are set out in the table below:

Table Two: Proposed names and meanings as described by Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki

Road

Proposed name

Meaning as described by Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki

Road

1 & 13

 

 

Long George Drive

(Preferred Name)

 

 

Ngāi Tai rangatira Hori Te Whētuki, son of Nuku and Kimoka born c.1820 was known as a friendly and was often seen wearing a British uniform in and around the Howick Local Board footprint. He became known to early settlers as ‘Long George’ due to his immense stature, being reputedly 6’ 6’’ tall, and took the lead role on behalf of Ngāi Tai in engaging with European settlers and traders following the passing of his uncle Tara te Irirangi. 

Despite the Road Naming protocols, given Hori Te Whētuki was a rangatira of his time we do not wish to offer other names for selection here, rather we seek the support of the Developer and Local Board to support this name.

Road 2

Tāhere Road

(Preferred Name)

Tāhere - a snare, to set a snare to capture manu. The area ngahere manu were a staple in the diet of our tūpuna (ancestors).

Road 2

Tūpākihi Road

(first alternative)

Native shrub still used today by Māori for medicinal purposes

Road 2

 

 

Kōpī Drive

(second alternative)

 

 

Nga Kōpī ō Toi (The Karaka berries of Toi). Tradition states that Karaka were bought to Tamaki from the Chatham Islands by Toi Te Huatahi and planted at the base of Matanginui (now Greenmount Landfill). The grove is now gone from the landscape due to early settler farming and development of the landfill. Toi te Huatahi took Ngāi Tai ancestress Huiarangi for wife (Ōhuiarangi). Te Karaka Berry were a part of the staple diet of Ngāi Tai when harvested at the correct time and roasted over a fire. For manu, these are as we call them ‘forest chocolate’.

Road 9

Ruapuke Road

(Preferred Name)

A leading Ngāti Tai/Ngāti Te Rau rangatira and participant in the Fairburn transactions of 1836. He passed shortly afterwards with no issue

Road 9

Kakau Road

(first alternative)

The stalk of a plant but also used for a long-handled axe - ‘toki kakauroa’

Road 9

Te Kā Street

(second alternative)

of ahikā, to burn to glow, home fires of occupation

Road 12

Te Tū Road

(Preferred Name)

Tū has a variety of meanings depending on context

e.g. “e tū – please stand”.

Road 12

Ka Tau Lane

(first alternative)

to settle

Road 12

Papa Tupu Road

(second alternative)

ancestral land / homeland.

15.     All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in any close proximity, as confirmed and accepted by LINZ.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

16.     Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

17.     The proposed road types have been checked and are acceptable, suiting the form and layout of each road as per the Appendix 1 list of road types in the Guidelines.

18.     Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate.   The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

23.     Mana whenua Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki provided a detailed response and commentary, choosing to propose names for Roads 1 & 13, 2, 9 and 12, as per the letter contained in Attachment B, and meanings set out in the table under paragraph 14. The applicant adopted these names and they have been included in the table of name options for the local board to choose from.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

25.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     There are no significant risks to the council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site & Location Plans

41

b

Ngāi Tai Formal Reply, Ormiston Rise

43

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Emerald James - Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

15 March 2021

 

 

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Howick Local Board

15 March 2021

 

 

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PDF Creator


Howick Local Board

15 March 2021

 

 

Approval for a new private road name at 29 Abercrombie Street, Howick

File No.: CP2021/01601

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Howick Local Board to name a new private road, being a commonly owned access lot (COAL), created by way of a subdivision development at 29 Abercrombie Street, Howick.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

3.       On behalf of the developer and Applicant, BCLP Developments Ltd, agent Brad Christie of David Reid Homes Ltd has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the local board.

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana Whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines.

5.       The proposed names for the new private road at 29 Abercrombie Street are:

·    Stockade View Lane (Applicant Preferred)

·    Taonga Mews (first alternative)

·    Flygers Lane (second alternative).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve the name Stockade View Lane (Applicant’s preferred name) for the new private road created by way of subdivision at 29 Abercrombie Street, Howick, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60329583 and SUB60329585).

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent reference BUN60329583 (subdivision reference number SUB60329585) was issued in February 2019 for the construction of seven new residential freehold units and one commonly owned access lot (COAL).

7.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachment A.

8.       In accordance with the Standards, any road including private ways, COALs, and right of ways, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

9.       Therefore, in this development, the new COAL requires a road name because it serves more than five lots.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

11.     The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

12.     The Applicant has proposed one name to reference local history related to Stockade Hill (more detail below), and two names intended to relate to the finished development, one of them being in Te Reo Māori.

13.     The Applicant’s proposed names are detailed in the table below:

Table One: Proposed names and meanings

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Stockade View Lane

(Applicant preferred)

Almost all the new dwellings will be able to see Stockade Hill.

Stockade Hill was the location of a stockade built by British settlers to defend from indigenous Māori during the British colonisation of New Zealand. Howick's war memorial is located in the centre of the remains of the stockade's earthworks which are readily visible today.

Taonga Mews

(first alternative)

Te Reo Māori word meaning ‘treasure, anything prized’

 

Flygers Lane

(second alternative)

The development concept and subsequently the primary purchaser and development funding came from 2 family members whose family home was on Flygers Line (in the Manawatu).

14.     All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity. It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

15.     Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

16.     ‘Lane’ and ‘Mews’ are acceptable road types for the new private road, suiting the form and layout of the COAL as per Appendix 1 of the Guidelines.

17.     Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

22.     On 12 January 2021 mana whenua were contacted by council on behalf of the applicant, through the Resource Consent department’s central facilitation process, as set out in the Guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with an interest in the general area were contacted:

•    Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki

•    Te Ākitai Waiohua

•    Te Ahiwaru Waiohua

•    Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

•    Ngāti Paoa

•    Ngāti Maru

•    Ngāti Tamaterā

•    Waikato-Tainui

•    Ngāti Whanaunga

•    Te Patukirikiri.

23.     By the close of the consultation period, no responses, comments, or feedback were received. Dependent on the scale of the development and its level of significance, not all road naming applications receive comments from mana whenua.

24.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua and one Te Reo Māori name is proposed.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

26.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     There are no significant risks to the council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site & Location Plans

49

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Andrea Muhme - Planner

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

15 March 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Howick Local Board

15 March 2021

 

 

Approval for a new private road name at 263 Ormiston Road, Flat Bush

File No.: CP2021/01870

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Howick Local Board to name a new private road, being a commonly owned access lot (COAL), created by way of a subdivision development at 263 Ormiston Road, Flat Bush.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

3.       On behalf of the developer and applicant, Mountain City Development Limited, agent Bridget Murdoch of Woods has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the local board.

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana Whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines.

5.       The proposed names for the new private road at 263 Ormiston Road are:

·    Whakaora Lane (Applicant Preferred)

·    Hikitia Lane (first alternative)

·    Aranga Lane (second alternative)

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve the name Whakaora Lane (applicant’s preferred name) for the new private road created by way of subdivision at 263 Ormiston Road, Flat Bush, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60308837, LUC60308838-A & SUB60308839-A).

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent reference BUN60308837 (subdivision reference number SUB60308839-A) was issued in October 2019 for the construction of 23 new residential fee-simple allotments and a commonly owned access lot (COAL).

7.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachment A.

8.       In accordance with the Standards, any road including private ways, COALs, and right of ways, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

9.       Therefore, in this development, the new COAL requires a road name because it serves more than five lots fronting the new COAL. This can be seen in Attachment B, where the COAL to be named is highlighted in yellow.

10.     The balance of the COAL will be treated as an unnamed service lane. The new dwellings that gain vehicular access off this service lane also front existing roads so will have street numbers allocated off their respective frontages.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval

12.     The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Maori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

13.     The proposed names have been chosen from suggested names from previous consultation with Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki and were sent through to them by the applicant on 13 November 2020 for consideration and consultation:

Table One: Proposed names and meanings

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Whakaora Lane

(Applicant preferred)

This name choice has been a suggestion from Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki for previous road naming applications in the Flat Bush area.

The name means to save, rescue, revive, restore to health.

Hikitia Lane

(first alternative)

This name choice has been a suggestion from Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki for previous road naming applications in the Flat Bush area.

The name means to uplift, to raise, to step up.

Aranga Lane

(second alternative)

This name choice has been a suggestion from Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki for previous road naming applications in the Flat Bush area.

The name means resurrection.

14.     All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity. It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

15.     Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that a road name is required, and the proposed names have been checked as acceptable for use at this location.

16.     ‘Lane’ is an acceptable road type for the new private road, suiting the form and layout of the COAL.

17.     Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

22.     On 2 November 2020 mana whenua were contacted by the applicant, as set out in the Guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with an interest in the general area were contacted:

·   Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki (Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Tribal Trust)

·   Ngāti Maru (Ngāti Maru Rūnanga Trust)

·   Ngāti Pāoa (Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust)

·   Ngāti Pāoa (Ngāti Paoa Trust Board)

·   Ngāti Tamaoho

·   Ngāti Tamaterā (Ngāti Tamaterā Settlement Trust

·   Ngāti Te Ata (Te Ara Rangatu o Te Iwi o Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua)

·   Ngāti Whanaunga (Ngāti Whanaunga Incorporated)

·   Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua (Makaurau Marae Māori Trust)

·   Te Ākitai Waiohua (Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority)

·   Te Patukirikiri (Te Patukirikiri Incorporated)

·   Waikato – Tainui (Te Whakakitenga o Waikato Incorporated).

23.     Waikato-Tainui advised that they support mana whenua to take the lead role in this situation and withdrew from the discussion.

Zaelene Maxwell-Butler represents Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki has also advised that they support all proposed road names from the applicant.

Note: Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki has also proposed the alternative name “Rangai Lane”, but this was not accepted by LINZ due to similar road names located in close proximity. The name “Rangai Lane” has therefore not been included for consideration.

By the close of the consultation period, no other responses, comments, or feedback were received. Depending on the scale of the development and its level of significance, not all road naming applications receive comments from mana whenua.

24.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua and the proposed Te Reo Māori names are suggestions from previous consultation with Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

26.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     There are no significant risks to the council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan

55

b

Location map

57

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elizabeth Salter - Subdivision Technical Officer

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

15 March 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Howick Local Board

15 March 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Howick Local Board

15 March 2021

 

 

Governance forward work calendar

File No.: CP2021/00035

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Howick Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Howick Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities;

·   clarifying what advice is expected and when; and

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the governance forward work calendar included as Attachment A of the agenda report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work calendar

61

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

15 March 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Howick Local Board

15 March 2021

 

 

Workshop records

File No.: CP2021/00045

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This item attaches the workshop records taken for the period stated below.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under Standing Order 12.1 workshop records shall record the names of members attending and a statement summarising the nature of the information received, and nature of matters discussed. No resolutions are passed, or decisions reached but are solely for the provision of information and discussion.

3.       This report attaches the workshop records for the period stated below.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the workshop records for workshops held on 4, 11, 18 and 25 February 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop record 4 February 2021

65

b

Workshop record 11 February 2021

67

c

Workshop record 18 February 2021

69

d

Workshop record 25 February 2021

71

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

15 March 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Howick Local Board

15 March 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Howick Local Board

15 March 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Howick Local Board

15 March 2021

 

 

PDF Creator 



[1]        The 2010 Regional Parks Management Plan is available online via this link.