I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 23 March 2021

10.00am

Local Board Office
7-13 Pilkington Road
Panmure

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Chris Makoare

 

Deputy Chairperson

Debbie Burrows

 

Members

Don Allan

 

 

Nerissa Henry

 

 

Peter McGlashan

 

 

Maria Meredith

 

 

Tony Woodcock

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Tracey Freeman

Democracy Advisor

 

18 March 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 537 862

Email: Tracey.Freeman@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Governing Body Member's Update                                                                              7

12        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                    9

13        Board Member's Reports                                                                                            13

14        Election of Deputy Chairperson                                                                                 15

15        Maungakiekie-Tamaki Transitional Rates Grants                                                    17

16        Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Paths (Greenways) Plan                                            49

17        Approval for a new private road name at 339 - 341 Panama Road, Mt Wellington 99

18        Approval for two new private road names in Stage 2B at Hinaki Street, Point England.                                                                                                                      107

19        New Community Lease and License to Auckland Stock & Saloon Car Club Incorporated                                                                                                               117

20        Proposed land exchange Taniwha Reserve and Maybury Reserve, Glen Innes. 129

21        Clifton Court – Concept Design Approval                                                              139

22        2021 Local Government New Zealand Conference and Annual General Meeting 157

23        Local board feedback on the Climate Change Commission’s 2021 Draft Advice 173

24        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      179

25        Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops                                  183

26        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 23 February 2021, as  true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

Governing Body Member's Update

File No.: CP2021/02607

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on local activities that the Governing Body representative is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To provide the Governing Body Member an opportunity to update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Governing Body Member’s update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2021/02608

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the Chairperson is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing the Chairperson with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Chairperson’s report for March 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board Chair's Report March 2021

11

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

Board Member's Reports

File No.: CP2021/02609

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the local board members are involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the board members report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

Election of Deputy Chairperson

File No.: CP2021/02685

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       In accordance with Schedule 7, clause 21(5)(b) of the Local Government Act 2002, the Chairperson will call for nominations for the Deputy Chairperson of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the local board’s inaugural meeting dated 29 October 2019, the board resolved to defer the election of a Deputy Chairperson for period two from Wednesday, 28 April 2021 to the end of the 2019-2022 political term, (resolution number MT/2019/62).

3.       The Local Board must elect a member to the Deputy Chairperson position in accordance with Schedule 7, clause 25 of the Act.

4.       The Local Board will also need to determine (by resolution) what method they will apply to elect the Deputy Chairperson.

Schedule 7, Part 1, Clause 25 of the Local Government Act 2002 stipulates that:

25              Voting systems for certain appointments

(1)     This clause applies to -

(a)    the election or appointment of the chairperson and deputy chairperson of a regional council; and

(b)   the election or appointment of the deputy mayor; and

(c)     the election or appointment of the chairperson and deputy chairperson of a committee; and

(d)    the election or appointment of a representative of a local authority.

(2)     If this clause applies, a local authority or a committee (if the local authority has so directed) must determine by resolution that a person be elected or appointed by using one of the following systems of voting:

(a)    the voting system in subclause (3) (system A):

(b)    the voting system in subclause (4) (system B).

(3)     System A -

(a)     requires that a person is elected or appointed if he or she receives the votes of a majority of the members of the local authority or committee present and voting; and

(b)     has the following characteristics:

(i)      there is a first round of voting for all candidates; and

(ii)      if no candidate is successful in that round there is a second round of voting from which the candidate with the fewest votes in the first round is excluded; and

(iii)     if no candidate is successful in the second round there is a third, and if necessary subsequent, round of voting from which, each time, the candidate with the fewest votes in the previous round is excluded; and

(iv)    in any round of voting, if 2 or more candidates tie for the lowest number of votes, the person excluded from the next round is resolved by lot.

(4)     System B -

(a)     requires that a person is elected or appointed if he or she receives more votes than any other candidate; and

(b)     has the following characteristics:

(i)      there is only 1 round of voting; and

(ii)     if 2 or more candidates tie for the most votes, the tie is resolved by lot.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      elect a Deputy Chairperson for period two, Wednesday, 28 April 2021 to the end of 2019-2022 political term, utilising either System A or System B of Schedule 7, Part 1, Clause 25 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

Maungakiekie-Tamaki Transitional Rates Grants

File No.: CP2021/02670

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note that the transitional rates grants are ending on 30 June 2021.

2.       To decide the next steps for the transitional rates grants allocated to groups in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Overview of transitional rates grants

3.       At the end of the 2017/2018 financial year the council removed the legacy rates remission schemes carried over from the legacy councils. These schemes provided community and sporting groups in some parts of Auckland with property rates relief. In the 2019/2020 financial year community groups located on maunga were also added to the transitional rates grant scheme.

4.       To minimise the impact on the recipients of these schemes, the Governing Body provided transitional rates grants for three years, from the 2018/2019 financial year ending on 30 June 2021. These grants were available automatically on the same terms as the original legacy remission schemes. Recipients of the grants were notified in the 2017/2018 financial year that the scheme would be limited to three years.

5.       Budgets for local grants (including inflation) was allocated to local boards for 10 years so local boards could eventually integrate them into their community support programme. As the transitional rates grants are automatically distributed, local boards do not currently have authority to make decisions on the use of these funds. An amount of $4,832 was paid to five organisations in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area in the 2020/2021 financial year. Details of these grants are in Attachment A to the report.

6.       With the transitional grants now expiring, the local board must decide how to utilise the associated budget. The local board can choose to either:

·    let the grants end, and reallocate the budget

·    amend their grants programme criteria to enable rates grants to continue high value grants on a temporary or permanent basis.

7.       Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has three “low value grants” (less than $500). Removal of these grants is unlikely to have a significant impact on the recipients. The remaining 2 “high value grants” provide a more material level of support to local community organisations, and the impact of their removal is unclear.

8.       If the local board wishes to continue to support existing beneficiaries and enable integration of community rates funding into their grants programme they should:

·    amend their grants programme criteria to enable rates grants to continue for any high value grants the local board consider are broadly aligned with the local board’s community funding strategy. This can be done when the local board review its grants programme criteria in April.

·    retain the budget for these grants in the Asset Based Services (ABS) budget as a separate line item. This enables the grants to be considered as part of the Governance Framework Review of funding for asset-based services.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note that transitional rates grants are ending 30 June 2021;

b)      note that the local board retains the budget for the transitional rates grants as Asset Based Services (ABS) budget as a separate line item, with discretion over its future allocation. This will enable the grants to be considered as part of the Governance Framework Review on funding for asset-based services;

(c)     agree to continue the high value transitional rates grants for the 2021/2022 financial year during which period staff will report back to the local board with more information on the recipients and these grants will be reviewed prior to the adoption of the 2022/2023 Local Board Agreement;

(d)     agree that rates grants paid out in future will be calculated by applying the average rates increase to the previous year’s grants;

(e)     agree in principle to amend its discretionary community grants programme criteria for the 2021/2022 financial year to enable the rates grants to continue for the financial year 2021/2022;

(f)      request the above resolutions be forwarded to the community grants team for consideration prior to the development of the local board’s 2021/2022 community grants criteria.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Transitional rates grants replaced rates remission schemes (Attachment B) for community organisations that were inherited from Franklin District Council (FDC), North Shore City Council (NSC), Rodney District Council (RDC) and Auckland Regional Council (ARC). The district and city council schemes were only available to properties within the relevant former district. The regional scheme was only available to properties not covered by a district or city council scheme.

10.     In 2019, five community groups located on Auckland’s maunga (in Devonport-Takapuna, Howick, Māngere-Ōtāhuhu and Maungakiekie-Tāmaki) were included in the transitional rates scheme. Prior to the crown settlement of the maunga these organisations did not pay rates under a council community lease. The transfer of the maunga to the Maunga Authority resulted in the Authority becoming liable for rates. As a consequence, these organisations are now required to pay rates under their new lease agreements.  

11.     The removal of legacy rates remissions and options for transition were consulted on alongside the 10-year Budget 2018-28.  Following consideration of feedback (Attachment C) from remission recipients, local boards and the general public, the Governing Body decided to remove the legacy remissions, and introduce a transitional grants scheme for three years, ending 30 June 2021. Under the criteria agreed by the Governing Body, grants were automatically available to organisations that:

·    received a legacy rates remission for community organisations in the 2017/2018 financial year

·    continued to meet the criteria and conditions of the original remission scheme.

12.     The amount of support provided by the grants was determined by the original remission scheme. Each scheme offered differing amounts of support. The district and city council schemes remitted 50 to 100 per cent of the rates, while the regional scheme provided five to 10 per cent of the general rates.

 

Transitional Rates Grants

13.     In the 2020/2021 financial year, 169 local transitional rates grants were made to 104 local organisations. The total value of these grants was $400,000. Of these, 66 grants are less than $500, and are paid as a credit to the rate account for the qualifying property. The remaining 103 grants are paid directly to the bank account of the beneficiary.

14.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board holds five transitional rates grants. Three of these grants are made under the criteria of the Auckland Regional Council scheme, with the remaining two for maunga properties. The grants range from $220 to $2,350 and pay between 2 and 87 per cent of the rates for the qualifying properties. Details of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki transitional rates grants paid in the 2020/2021 financial year are provided in Attachment A.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     All recipients of the rates transition grants were advised that the grants were limited to three years. At the end of the scheme recipients are to be advised of any other options for support, such as local and regional grants programmes.

16.     Staff recognise that in some cases recipients may not be fully prepared for the end of the transition grants scheme and/or that local boards may wish to provide for further support. Two options for this are set out below and assessed against the following criteria:

·    managing impact for recipients

·    administration cost.

Options

17.     Staff did not consider retaining the transitional rates grants in their current form. The transition rates grants process consumes significant administrative resource. This includes rates specialists to manually calculate grants amounts. Resource for this work is no longer available in the rates team. 

Option one: Status quo:  grants end and recipients may seek support through existing grants programmes.

Option two: amend Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board grants programme: to enable high value rates grants to continue on a temporary or permanent basis using a simplified grants process.

Under both options the local board retains the budget under Asset Based Services operational (opex) budget. The funds cannot be reallocated to LDI opex budget due to Local Board Funding Policy limitations but can be used to top-up LDI opex work programmes.

18.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s current grant programme does not identify assistance with rates as a criteria or priority. If the local board decides to retain the transitional rates grant in some form the local board’s grant programme will need to be updated to set the criteria for this grant. This can be part of the local board’s review of the grant programme in April.

Managing the impact on recipients

19.     Three of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki grants are below $500. These grants provided limited support and their ending is unlikely to have a significant impact on the recipients.

20.     The remaining 2 grants are above $500 and pay between 54 and 87 per cent of the property rates. These grants may provide a significant level of support to the recipient organisations. To minimise impacts on the recipients, the local board can consider whether it is appropriate to continue to offer rates assistance through their grants programme.

21.     The impact of Option one on recipients is unclear. Option two minimises any impact on current recipients by retaining the grants for a further period of time. Retaining the high value grants on a transitional basis also provides the local board with additional time to consider the future of the grants.

Administration cost

22.     Option one has no associated administration cost.

23.     Option two will require administrative resource, although significantly less than before, as only the high value grants will remain. The grants team is able to administer the high value rates grants within their current resources, if in future the grants are calculated by applying the average rates increase to the previous year’s grants.

Conclusion

24.     Administration costs are lower for option one but the impact on recipients of grants is unclear. Option two mitigates the impact on recipients of high value grants while grants continue to be offered. This option can be undertaken within current council resourcing if the grants are simplified as proposed above.

25.     It is the local board’s decision whether to continue to offer high value rates grants. If the local board wish to continue to support recipients on a temporary or permanent basis then it can amend its grant criteria when the local board’s grant programme is reviewed in April.

Local board budgets

26.     The funding for transitional rates is currently held and will remain as Asset Based Services (ABS) budget. The amount of budget allocated to each local board is a function of the value of rates remitted in each local board area under the legacy remission schemes.

27.     If transitional rates grants are to be continued, funding should be retained in the Asset Based Services budget under Community Services group of activities. This ensures there is no impact on the local board’s Locally Driven Initiative budget allocation. This approach also enables these grants to be included in the equity-based funding allocation being considered by the Governance Framework Review. Local boards will retain decision making responsibility for these grants.

28.     If transitional rates grants are removed, the associated funding is available to the local board for reallocation. While these funds will remain within the ABS budget, they can be used to support Local Discretionary Initiatives (LDI) such as the local board’s community grants programme without impacting on LDI budget allocations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     The effects of climate change were not a consideration when the existing transitional rates grants established. Integrating the transitional rates grants into the local boards community grants programmes will enable local boards to consider climate impacts in the future application of these funds.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

30.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for preparation of this advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.     This report advises the local board of their options now that the transitional grants scheme is ending. The local impacts of the proposal are set out in the report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     No Māori organisations are receiving funding through the transitional rates grants. Māori land is eligible for support under the Rates remission for Māori freehold land policy. This policy is not under review.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     The financial implications are set out in the report. The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has $4,832 in transitional rates grants budget that it can reallocate. 2 of the 5 grants held by the local board provide a significant level of support to the recipients. The local board can opt to amend its grant programme to continue the high value grants to minimise impacts to recipients.

34.     If the local board decide not to continue the grants, they can reallocate the budget through the work programme process.

35.     The budget will continue to be held as Community Services ABS operating expenditure and the use of these funds will be included in the equity-based funding allocation being considered by the Governance Framework Review.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     Removal of transitional rates grants may cause hardship for some organisations. This report advises the local board of the options available to them to manage any impacts.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     If the local board choose to retain some or all of its high value grants then it will need to amend its grant programme criteria to include rates grants. This can be completed in April 2021 as part of the annual review of local boards grant programmes

38.     A letter will be issued to all recipients of transitional rates grants informing them of the changes and any future options for support as appropriate.

39.     Decisions on future allocation of the funds for transitional rates grants can be made through the local board’s budgeting process.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Local Transitional Rates Grants Maungakiekie-Tamaki

23

b

Legacy Rates Remission Schemes

25

c

Local Boards and Rural Advisory Panel Feedback on the Rates Remission and Postponement Policy proposal from 2018

37

     

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Beth Sullivan - Principal Advisor Policy

Jestine Joseph - Lead Financial Advisor

David Rose - Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Ross Tucker - General Manager, Financial Strategy and Planning

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

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23 March 2021

 

 

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23 March 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Paths (Greenways) Plan

File No.: CP2021/01455

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Paths (Greenways) Plan Review (Attachment A).

2.       To identify local path (greenway) routes that the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board support as development priorities over the short to medium term (2022-2027). 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The original Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Greenways Network Plan was adopted in 2013.

4.       The reviewed plan does not supersede the adopted plan and should be read in conjunction with the adopted 2013 document.

5.       The review has been named the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Paths (Greenways) Plan Review in line with the change in naming from greenways to local paths. 

6.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Paths (Greenways) Plan Review (2019) was undertaken to reassess the 2013 Greenways Plan to better understand the impacts of growth and identify the latest opportunities to improve walking and cycling in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area. 

7.       Consultation for the review included workshops with local board members in March 2019 and November 2020.

8.       The review involved updating the local board’s priority routes and amending graphics to update and clarify the information provided in the original document.

9.       The final reviewed Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Paths (Greenways) Plan Review (2019) is attached for the board’s information. (Attachment A).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)   approve the reviewed Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Paths (Greenways) Plan Review (Attachment A) as an addendum to the original Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Greenways Network Plan 2013;

b)   note the key routes that will be prioritised when considering investment in, and where relevant, advocating for the development of the local path (greenway) projects:

·    Route 4 – part of the route extending along Beachcroft Road to connect with Onehunga High School.

 

·    Route 10 – part of the route from Kotae Road to Wai-o Taiki.

 

·    Route 12 – from Panmure Wharf, along Kings Road, Riverview Road, Queens Road and Bridge Street to Mokoia Pa.

 

·    Route 13 – from Ian Shaw Park to the west toward Flat Rock Reserve and beyond to Otahuhu.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The intent of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Greenways Network Plan (2013) is to create pedestrian and cycle connections between communities and destinations, encouraging safe travel and a reduction in vehicle use for local trips. It provides a high-level vision for the development of connections through parks and on-road within the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area, and connections with neighbouring areas.

11.     At the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board workshop on 17 October 2017 funding was approved to complete a review of the existing Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Greenways Network Plan (2013).

12.     A draft of the plan review was presented to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board in March 2019 and the board requested amendments to the priority rating of some routes set out in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Greenways Network Plan (2013) and identified where improvements to the maps could be made for clarity.

13.     The board requested the following four routes in the plan be identified as their top four development priorities:

·    Route 4 – part of the route extending along Beachcroft Road to connect with Onehunga High School.

·    Route 10 – part of the route from Kotae Road to Wai-o Taiki.

·    Route 12 – from Panmure Wharf, along Kings Road, Riverview Road, Queens Road and Bridge Street to Mokoia Pa.

·    Route 13 – from Ian Shaw Park to the west toward Flat Rock Reserve and beyond to Otahuhu

14.     The following two additional routes were identified as high priority for advocacy with Auckland Transport (AT). 

·    Route 5 from Cornwall Park to Waikaraka Park, includes Fergusson Domain and lengthy on road sections.

·    Route 11 which connects the Panmure transport hub and town centre with several parks, mainly on quiet residential streets.

15.     At the 10 November 2020 local board workshop, the reviewed plan was presented to the board in draft form for any further feedback or amendments.

16.     The name of the reviewed plan has been updated to the Local Paths Plan to reflect the current terminology.

17.     The final version of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Paths (Greenways) Plan Review (2019) is a strategic document which rates routes established in the Greenways Network Plan (2013) in terms of current development priority. This is an addendum to the original Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Greenways Network Plan (2013).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     Development priority has been assessed by considering the following key outcomes;

 

·    meaningful, safe, and where possible, off road active transport options

·    connections with nature and reserves including those special places such as our maunga and harbour

·    independent travel options for children and youth particularly around connectivity with schools

·    access to major recreation facilities including libraries, leisure centres, sports fields and swimming pools

·    access to public transport hubs

·    connections to commercial centres.

 

19.     The priority routes identified the following benefits:

·    Extending Route 4 provides an improved connection with Onehunga High School, creating a safer environment on Beachcroft Avenue.

·    Route 10 provides a continuous park to park connection which is largely off-road, creating a safer user environment.

·    Route 12 provides a continuous park connection adding to the existing coastal path.

·    Route 13 provides a continuous off-road route creating a safer user environment.

20.     Routes within the road corridor sit with Auckland Transport (AT) and the local board can prioritise or further investigate these connections with AT.

21.     Minor amendments were made to route maps to improve clarity. This included extending Route 4 along Beachcroft Avenue to connect with Onehunga High School, removing unlabelled paths on page 7 and adjusting route labels on page 8.   

22.     Identification of key routes by the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board gives weight to progressing the funding and implementation of the priority routes within the parks network and to advocating for the development of routes within the AT road corridor.

23.     As connections and associated projects are progressed through investigation and design, further opportunities will arise to undertake community consultation and shape community aspirations within the design phases.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.     Safe and attractive local path routes will encourage more active transport journeys and contribute to a reduction in vehicle movements and emissions.

25.     The provision of adequate hydration stations on local paths and in open space is a topic that local board has identified and included in the local board plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     The reviewed Local Paths Plan aligns to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2017 Outcome 4: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki has quality infrastructure to match growth. The key objective of this outcome is: Better transport connections and improved transport infrastructure.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Paths (Greenways) Review (2019) was funded through the board’s Parks, Sport and Recreation Response Fund (ID1104) opex budget.

28.     The 2019 reviewed Local Paths Plan was discussed on 10 November 2020 at a Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board workshop.

29.     Members supported the document’s vision for improving connections in their local board area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     No iwi consultation was undertaken in the development of the reviewed plan.

31.     As each identified connection is progressed, engagement will be undertaken with mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     The routes and connections have been prioritised in order of preferred delivery, as and when funding and other opportunities arise through local board, Auckland Transport, community support and/or developer initiatives.

33.     Staff will work with the local board to identify possible opportunities for funding as part of the proposed Community Facilities work programme.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     There is an inherent risk in investing in investigation and design to initiate a project when there is no capital funding identified to deliver the physical work components. However, there is greater risk starting physical works without knowing detailed planning implications and costs. 

35.     The investigation and design phase of the project delivery may identify issues that require the feasibility of routes to be reassessed. In this instance routes can be redesigned as required.

36.     The local board can approve routes which pass through parks and reserves but can only advocate for Auckland Transport to complete sections of routes outside of parks. There is a risk routes will remain incomplete due to issues beyond the board’s control. Up front communication and planning with AT will mitigate this.  

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Greenways Network Plan was adopted in 2013; it identifies routes for existing and new connections. The priority routes identified in the 2019 review will require investigation, design and engagement with mana whenua, interested stakeholders and the community.

38.     Where capex funding is available, candidate projects can be included in the Community Facilities future work programmes to be delivered following investigation and design.

39.     As each identified connection is progressed, further engagement will be undertaken with the local board, mana whenua, relevant key stakeholders, community groups and the local community.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Local Paths Plan Proposal

55

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Paul Murphy - Parks & Places Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

Approval for a new private road name at 339 - 341 Panama Road, Mt Wellington

File No.: CP2021/01953

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board to name a new private road, being a commonly owned access lot (COAL), created by way of a subdivision development at 339-341 Panama Road, Mt Wellington.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

3.       On behalf of the developer and applicant, Tung Wei Ling of The One Property Group has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the local board.

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana Whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines.

5.       The proposed names for the new private road at 339–341 Panama Road are:

·    Tōanga Place (Applicant Preferred)

·    Ahurei Place (Alternative 1)

·    Mahaki Place (Alternative 2)

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      approves the name Tōanga Place (applicant’s preferred name) for the new private road created by way of subdivision at 339-341 Panama Road, Mt Wellington, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60361914 and SUB60361916).

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent reference BUN60361914 (subdivision reference number SUB60361916) was issued in November 2020 for the construction of 32 new residential freehold units and one commonly owned access lots (COAL).

7.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachment A.

8.       In accordance with the Standards, any road including private ways, COALs, and right of ways, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

9.       Therefore, in this development, the new COAL requires a road name because it serves more than five lots. This can be seen in Attachment A, where the COAL that requires a name is highlighted in yellow.

10.     The three new sites (Lots 1-3) facing the existing street will have street numbers allocated off of Panama Road, seeing as they can be accessed via Panama Road.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

12.     The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

 

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

13.     The proposed names have been chosen from suggested names from previous consultation with Te Ākitai Waiohua and were sent through to all iwi groups by the applicant on 14 December 2020 for consideration and consultation:

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Tōanga Place

(Applicant preferred)

This name was suggested and acknowledged by Kathleen Wilson from Te Akitai.

Tōanga has a few positive meanings in Māori, such as brave conduct, courage, victory, etc. It also means a place where something is dragged, hauling (e.g., portage).

This name generally represents the concept of the development and is supported by iwi groups.

Ahurei Place

(Alternative 1)

“Ahurei” in Māori means to be chief, prominent, unique. It also stands for outstanding or importance. This shows the ambition from the developer that he wants the development to be one of the unique developments within the area.

Mahaki Place

(Alternative 2)

“Mahaki” is a word that stands for mild, meek or modest. It is a neutral word that contains positive meanings. The iwi groups also support this name as an alternative.

 

14.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

15.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

16.     Road Type: ‘Place’ is an acceptable road type for the new private road, suiting the form and layout of the COAL.

17.     Consultation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) and mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     To aid local board decision-making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognizing cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate.   The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

22.     On 14 December 2020 mana whenua were contacted by the applicant, as set out in the Guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with an interest in the general area were contacted:

·    Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki (Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Tribal Trust)

·    Ngāti Maru (Ngāti Maru Rūnanga Trust)

·    Ngāti Pāoa (Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust)

·    Ngāti Pāoa (Ngāti Paoa Trust Board)

·    Ngāti Tamaterā (Ngāti Tamaterā Settlement Trust)

·    Ngāti Te Ata (Te Ara Rangatu o Te Iwi o Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua)

·    Ngāti Whanaunga (Ngāti Whanaunga Incorporated)

·    Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua (Makaurau Marae Māori Trust)

·    Te Ākitai Waiohua (Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority)

·    Te Patukirikiri (Te Patukirikiri Incorporated)

·    Waikato – Tainui (Te Whakakitenga o Waikato Incorporated)

·    Ngāti Tamaoho

·    Ngā Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara (Nga Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara Development Trust)

·    Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei (Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Trust)

·    Te Kawerau a Maki (Te Kawerau Iwi Settlement Trust & Tribal Authority)

·    Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua

23.     By the close of the consultation period, responses were received from Ngāti Te Ata, Te Ahiwaru, Waikato Tainui and Ngāti Pāoa. In particular, Ngāti Te Ata, Waikato Tainui and Ngāti Pāoa support the name “Tōanga” recommended by Te Ākitai. Te Ahiwaru supports all names proposed by the applicant.

24.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the Council.

26.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     There are no significant risks to Council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan

103

b

Location map

105

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elizabeth Salter - Subdivision Technical Officer

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

Site Plan for 339-341 Panama Road, Mt Wellington

 

 

 

New COAL to be named highlighted in yellow

 

 


Streetfacing lots will have new addresses off Panama Road

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Attachment B


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

Location plan for 339-341 Panama Road, Mt Wellington

Subject Site
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

Approval for two new private road names in Stage 2B at Hinaki Street, Point England.

File No.: CP2021/02227

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board to name two new private roads, both being commonly owned access lots (COALs), in Stage 2B of the Hinaki development in Point England.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval.

3.       On the 27 November 2018, the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board approved the name ‘Ngakahikatea Lane’ for a new private road (referred to as ‘JOAL 1’) in Stage 1A of the Hinaki development, located between Hinaki Street, Parata Street and Tripoli Road in Point England. A variation to the Stage 1A Hinaki development was approved by Council on the 1 October 2019 (Council reference number LUC60312421-A) to remove JOAL 1 from the road layout. 

4.       In order to retain ‘Ngakahikatea Lane’ in the Hinaki development, on behalf of the developer, Jalcon Homes, agent Tāmaki Regeneration Company (TRC), in partnership with Kāinga Ora, has proposed to relocate the already approved name from its paper-only location in Stage 1A, across the street to the new private road (referred to as ‘COAL 1’) in Stage 2B. Relocating ‘Ngakahikatea Lane’ would require the recission of resolution MT/2018/191, so that the name can be used in Stage 2B. No Stage 1A properties would be affected by this change as no dwellings have been constructed there yet, however construction of 11 properties are due to be completed in Stage 2B soon and addresses will need to be allocated for service provision.

5.       The applicant has proposed six names for the second new private road in Stage 2B (‘COAL 2’) for the local board’s consideration, with their preference being ‘Takoto Way’.

6.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity.

7.       The proposed names for the two new COALs at Stage 2B in the Hinaki development are:

Road Reference

Applicant Preferred name to be reallocated from Stage 1A to COAL 1 in Stage 2B

COAL 1

Ngakahikatea Lane

 

 

 

 

Road Reference

Applicant Preferred name

COAL 2

Takoto Way

Pool of Alternative Names:

These alternative names are proposed to be used for COAL 2 only.

Maroke Place

Tupuna Place

Konatu Place

Kōmitimiti Lane

Lumanai Lane

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      Rescind resolution MT/2018/191 to name the private road (JOAL 1) ‘Ngakahikatea Lane’ in Stage 1A of the Hinaki development in Point England (Council reference BUN60312399 and SUB60312424), in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

b)      approve the name Ngakahikatea Lane (applicant’s preferred name) for the new commonly owned access lot (COAL 1) in Stage 2B of the Hinaki development in Point England, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60357631 and SUB60357633).

c)      approve the name Takoto Way (applicant’s preferred name) for the new commonly owned access lot (COAL 2) in Stage 2B of the Hinaki development in Point England, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60357631 and SUB60357633).

Horopaki

Context

8.       Resource consent reference BUN60357631 (subdivision reference number SUB60357633) was issued in July 2020 for Stage 2B of the Hinaki development, to construct 42 new residential units and two commonly owned access lots (COAL).

9.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachment A and Attachment B.

10.     In accordance with the Standards, any road including private ways, COALs, and right of ways, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

11.     COAL 1

On the 27 November 2018, the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board approved the name ‘Ngakahikatea Way’ for Hinaki Stage 1A (resolution MT/2018/191). Unfortunately, since that approval, the negotiating build partner at the time did not agree to the Stage 1A design and pulled out of the project. Stage 1A was then put back out to market in 2019 to procure a new development partner. On 1 October 2019, a variation to the Hinaki Stage 1A road layout was approved by Council to remove all but one public road (this being an extension to Parata Street) to enable the prospective development partner to design on a clear site. The private road (JOAL 1) that ‘Ngakahikatea Way’ was approved for in 2018 has now been removed as part of the 2019 variation.

12.     In order to avoid the costly and lengthy road naming process, it is proposed to relocate the already approved name ‘Ngakahikatea Lane’ from JOAL 1 in Stage 1A across the road to COAL 1 in Stage 2B. Relocating ‘Ngakahikatea Lane’ would require the recission of resolution MT/2018/191, so that the name can be moved.

13.     As this is a previously approved road name, consultation with the wider community and mana whenua is not required.

 

14.     COAL 2

Rather than finding entirely new names for COAL 2, the applicant has proposed six names that were previously submitted as alternative options in former TRC road naming reports. These names were not approved for any roads by the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board, and LINZ has confirmed they are still acceptable for use in this area. All six names were submitted to mana whenua for their feedback in 2018, with no objections or comments received for any of the proposed names. Following the direction from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Chair on 5 March 2021, additional engagement with mana whenua on the six names was not required.

15.     The applicant has advised that they require road names to be approved as soon as possible in order to allocate addresses to the new titles. Any approval delays beyond the March local board business meeting will cause significant delays in the Hinaki development, as well as financial implications for the developer.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval

17.     The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Maori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

18.     Theme: The applicants preferred name for COAL 1 was selected based on a nomination by a community member and is a descendant who has provided significant long-term service and devotion to the local area. The remaining proposed road names reflect the character and landscape of this neighbourhood – from the past and into the future.

19.     The Applicant’s preferred name and meaning for COAL 1 is set out in the table below:

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Ngakahikatea Lane

(Applicant preferred name to be reallocated from Stage 1A to COAL 1 in Stage 2B)

Nanny Ngakahikatea was born in the 1800's. Throughout her lifetime, she came into contact with all the Kiingitanga monarchs (including Potatau Te Wherowhero, Tawhiao, Mahuta, Te Rata, and Te Atairangikahu), and was around when the current monarch, Kiingi Tuheitia, Potatau Te Wherowhero Tuawhetu, was born. Her descendants have lived in the Pt England/Glen Innes area over several generations, with many still living there and maintaining strong links to this area. This Waikato-Tainui Kuia was over 120 years of age when she passed away at 245 Pilkington Road, Point England, in 1975.

This name was submitted by family members of the deceased. The applicant has proposed this name for COAL 1 to ensure it remains within the Hinaki development area. The length of the name compliments the length of this open-ended COAL.

 

20.     The Applicant’s proposed names and meanings for COAL 2, as well as a pool of alternative names, is set out in the table below:

Road number

Proposed Name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

COAL 2

Takoto Way
(Applicant Preferred)

Te Reo Māori word – 1. [verb] to lie down, lie, lay, lie in the future, in prospect; 2. [noun] layout, topography.

This word has been chosen to reflect the change in layout of this neighbourhood along the western side of Hinaki Street where the new laneway will settle a future community of residents.

Pool of alternative names to be used for COAL 2

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Maroke Place

Te Reo Māori word – [stative] be dry, arid.
A word chosen to describe the new warm dry homes which will be delivered through this development.

Konatu Place

Te Reo Māori word - [verb] to stir, mix, blend.
Submitted by a community member “based on new residents and families who will live there and will blend together as a community which many of us did in GI in the 60s, 70s and 80s”.
To acknowledge and reflect the diverse community in Tāmaki.

Lumanai Lane

Samoan word meaning 'the future' - [verb] to have before one, to have in prospect, either of time or place.

A word chosen to acknowledge future generations in this neighbourhood.

Tupuna Place

Te Reo Māori word which a member of the community submitted “to remember who stayed on these lands before time”.
[noun] ancestors, grandparents - western dialect variation of tīpuna.

Alternatively: Tipuna [(noun) ancestors, grandparents - plural form of tipuna and the eastern dialect variation of tūpuna].

This word compliments the nomination of significant persons and pays respect to an area which has benefited many generations over time.

Kōmitimiti Lane

Te Reo Māori word - [verb] to mingle, integrate, blend, combine, mix, come together, fuse, merge, intermingle.

A word chosen to reflect the coming together of new residents within an existing neighbourhood.

 

21.     All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity. It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

22.     Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

23.     ‘Lane’ and ‘Place’ are acceptable road types for the new private roads, suiting the form and layout of the COALs.

24.     Mana whenua were consulted in 2018 in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

25.     Permission from Nanny Ngakahikatea’s relatives for the use of her name in the Hinaki development was obtained as part of the Stage 1A road naming process.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     As ‘Ngakahikatea Lane’ is a previously approved road name, additional engagement with mana whenua is not required.

30.     The remaining six names were sent by the applicant to mana whenua for their feedback in September 2018 as part the road naming process for other TRC developments in the area. No objections or comments for any of the proposed names were received.

31.     As mana whenua have previously been given the opportunity to provide feedback, and following direction from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Chair on 5 March 2021, additional consultation was considered unnecessary.

32.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the Council.

34.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     There are no significant risks to Council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan

113

b

Hinaki master plan

115

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elizabeth Salter - Subdivision Technical Officer

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

New Community Lease and License to Auckland Stock & Saloon Car Club Incorporated

File No.: CP2021/02554

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a new community lease to The Auckland Stock & Saloon Car Club Incorporated, for land situated at Waikaraka Park, 175-243 Neilson Street, Te Papapa

2.       To grant a new community license to The Auckland Stock & Saloon Car Club for occupation of land situated at Waikaraka Park, 175-243 Neilson Street, Te Papapa.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The Auckland Stock & Saloon Car Cub Incorporated seeks a new community lease and license to occupy, for part of the council-owned land at Waikaraka Park, 175-243 Neilson Street, Te Papapa.

4.       The club holds a community ground lease with Auckland Council. The lease commenced on 24 September 2004 for a term of five (5) years with two (2) five (5) year rights of renewal and reached final expiry on 23 September 2019. The lease is holding over on a monthly basis on the same terms and conditions. 

5.       The club have operated from the premises for over 45 years. The club was established in 1967 and incorporated in December 1976.  The racetrack at Waikaraka Park is one of New Zealand’s top-rated speedway tracks and is known nationally and internationally as a motorsport venue.

6.       The lease is for the land comprising 13.2 Ha (more or less) shown outlined in blue on Attachment A. The land is legally described as Part Allotments N44, N45, N46 and N61 Small Lots near Onehunga – NA47A/1200; owned by Crown and vested in Auckland Council under the Reserves Act 1977 as classified recreation reserve.

7.       The license to occupy is for the land comprising 436m² (more or less) shown outlined in red on Attachment A. The land is legally described as Part Allotment N61 Small Lots Near Onehunga – Certificate of title NA47A/1200; owned by the Crown and vested in Auckland Council under the Reserves At 1977 as a classified recreation reserve.

8.       The club has submitted a comprehensive application in support of the new lease request.  Staff have assessed the application and are satisfied that the requirements under Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 have been met.

9.       As the building facilities and improvements are tenant-owned, calling for expressions of interest to occupy the site is not required. 

10.     As the club and its activities are contemplated in the newly endorsed Waikaraka Park Reserve Management Plan 2021, public notification of the proposed new lease and iwi engagement is not required.

11.     The recommendations within this report align with the Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes: “Our diverse communities are active, involved and engaged,” and “Our physical and social infrastructure is future-proofed.”

12.     This report recommends that the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board approve a new community lease of the current site and approve a new license to occupy for the proposed pit area to The Auckland Stock & Saloon Car Cub Incorporated.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      grant a new community lease to The Auckland Stock & Saloon Car Cub Incorporated, for Part Allotments N44, N45, N46, and N61 Small Lots near Onehunga – Certificate of Title NA47A/1200, comprising 13.2 Ha (more or less) shown in Attachment A, outlined in blue, subject to the following terms:

i)        term – ten (10) years commencing on the date of the board resolution with (1) ten (10) year right of renewal 

ii)       rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded

iii)      the tenant shall before 1 January each year provide Auckland Council with the following information:

a.   Evidence of a track rating (to a national standard) and a track operating license, issued to each member group by Speedway New Zealand and/or a recognised governing body respectively provided that if a member group ceases to use their track for any reason including a suspension, that member group shall provide evidence of a track rating (to a national standard) and a track operating license prior to recommencing use of the track.

b.   A copy of the calibration certificate for the noise meter in respect of each member group, as approved by a recognised national company acceptable to council and including the serial number of the said meter.

c.   A letter from the national body of the member group holding the event, confirming that the event has been sanctioned, permitted and will be conducted only in accordance with the recognised registered national body rules and regulations for that member group, and that at least one official member of the member group’s recognised governing national body will be present at all times during the event.

iv)      all other terms and conditions in accordance with Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, the Reserves Act 1977, and Speedway New Zealand rules and regulations for motorsport.

b)      approve a license to occupy to The Auckland Stock & Saloon Car Cub Incorporated for Part Allotment N61 Small Lots Near Onehunga – Certificate of title NA47A/1200 comprising 436m² (more or less) shown in Attachment A outlined in red, for the proposed pit area, the term to be concurrent with the community lease agreement under the following terms:

i)       term – ten (10) years commencing on the date of the board resolution with one (1) ten (10) year right of renewal

ii)      the tenant shall use the pit area during concurrent scheduled speedway events in their lease area, during speedway season

iii)     the tenant shall manage the operation of the pit area during those times, and shall not store items, vehicles, or equipment in the area outside of those times

iv)     the area shall be available to and accessible by the public for parking outside of those times that scheduled speedway events are being held

v)      rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded

c)      delegate authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair to approve the Community Outcomes Plan to be attached to the deed of lease as a schedule.

Horopaki

Context

13.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

14.     The current lease to the club which commenced on 24 September 2004 for a term of five (5) years with two (2) five (5) year rights of renewal has fully expired.

15.     The club are well established having operated from the site since 1976 and wish to continue their activities.  An application has been received for a new lease and license to occupy to allow the club to continue its activities and future development of the area. 

16.     The club own the building facilities and improvements on the leased site, and the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 provide for the club to apply as of right for a new lease without the need for an expression of interest to occupy the site.

17.     The club’s application for a license to occupy is for the area adjacent to its lease site on Waikaraka Road side of the lease area. This is contemplated in the Waikaraka Park Master Plan 2021 and Waikaraka Park Reserve Management Plan 2021, to be developed and utilised as a pit area by the club, for its scheduled races during speedway season and utilised as a public carpark when not being used by the club.  The license is to run concurrently with the lease.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Land, Buildings and Lease and License

18.     The Auckland Stock & Saloon Car Cub Incorporated holds a community lease for part of the council owned land situated at Waikaraka Park, 175-243 Neilson Street, Te Papapa. The land is legally described as Part Allotments N44, N45, and N46 and N61, Small Lots near Onehunga – Certificate of Title NA47A/1200, comprising 13.2 Ha (more or less), owned by the Crown and vested in Auckland Council under the Reserves Act 1977 as classified recreation reserves (Attachment A). s

19.     The club have been onsite since 1976 when the Auckland Stock and Saloon Car Club opened its first racing season, and this began the long and successful relationship between the club and Waikaraka Park.

20.     The club holds a community lease with Auckland Council.  The lease commenced on 24th September 2004 for a term of five (5) years with two (2) five (5) year rights of renewal and reached final expiry on 23 September 2019. The lease is holding over on a monthly basis on the same terms and conditions.

21.     The buildings and improvements which are tenant-owned include a speedway track, infield pit area, club rooms, commentary box, and seating near the access to the infield.  A site visit has been completed and shows the clubroom is fit for purpose and in good condition.  Other tenant-owned assets are in fair condition and require maintenance work.

22.     Council owned assets within the lease area include bathroom facilities on the eastern end of the park; the ticket booth/entry gates, newly erected temporary grandstand with 1956 seats situated where the former grandstand was previously; 900 temporary seats located on the opposite side, one portacom purchased by Community Facilities in 2018 and another portacom on loan to council from Regional Facilities Auckland.  The council owned bathrooms and ticket booth are open and operated by the club during its events and season.

23.     The club is seeking a new lease and new license to occupy, to continue their activities and to undertake a redevelopment of the site. The proposed lease area is shown outlined in blue and the proposed license area is outlined in red on Attachment A.

24.     The park master plan and reserve management plan contemplate a speedway grandstand at the northern end of the track adjacent to Neilson Street, for spectator seating and incorporating community meeting facilities.  A new multi-use building along the length of the eastern side of the track is to accommodate more spectators, public ablutions, changing rooms, storage and indoor sport training facilities. The club made comprehensive submissions on both plans during the consultation process, outlining their long-term vision and aspirations for the development of the motorsport precinct.  The land is also identified in the unitary plan as a motorsport precinct.

The former grandstand

25.     Owned by Auckland Council, the former grandstand was built in the 1930s with strengthening work carried out in 1984. In 2015 the grandstand was identified to be “potentially earthquake prone” under the Building Act.

26.     In September 2018, a joint inspection with representatives from Auckland Council, Synergine and Babbage Consultants revealed widespread concrete damage to the stands structure.  In a moderate earthquake event, it was likely the grandstand would collapse. 

27.     In June 2016 the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board approved the demolition of the grandstand based on an options assessment presented by Auckland Council staff. 

28.     The former grandstand provided the majority of seating for large spectator events with other areas around the track able to take the spectator overflow.  The grandstand provided 3,000 seats, while the park has a capacity of 7,000.  The grandstand along with most of the adjacent public toilets were closed from 2015 forcing the club to limit its spectator numbers to 4,000.  This had a significant impact on the club resulting in a constrained spectator experience, access issues, and financial cost.

29.     Auckland Council provided temporary seating supplied gratis by Regional Facilities Auckland and paid for the initial cost of the set up and dismantling; the club have since been responsible for this cost each season. Following the 2018 inspection, more temporary seating and a temporary public amenity costing $20,000 was provided by council to ease the seating constraints faced by the club. The club claim to have spent $180,000 since 2015, installing, repairing, and moving various temporary infrastructure components.

30.     The former grandstand has now been demolished and erected in its place is a temporary grandstand with 1956 seats which council will purchase from Regional Facilities Auckland next financial year for $280,000. The temporary grandstand will remain in council ownership until the redevelopment work onsite is complete. The club will bear the cost for compliance checks and any movement of the seating to other areas of the park.

The Auckland Stock & Saloon Car Club Incorporated

31.     The club was established in 1967 and incorporated under the name Auckland Stock & Saloon Car Club Incorporated in December 1976. It was re-registered under its current name in January 2002.

32.     Since opening its first season in 1976, the sport rapidly expanded across New Zealand and within a few years, the club began introducing new racing classes and running its own promotions.  Within five years of the club taking control of stock car and saloon car racing in Auckland, Waikaraka Park became known as a place associated with this form of motorsport nationally and internationally.

33.     From those early days, the club has grown from stock car and saloon car racing to now having eight speedway racing classes, including a very popular youth development class, and they have produced multiple national speedway champions.  The club has hosted 21 New Zealand Championships, 20 New Zealand Grand Prix and 30 North Island Speedway Championships.

34.     Waikaraka Park is scheduled to host two New Zealand Championships, one New Zealand Grand Prix and two North Island Championship events during the summers of 2020-2021 and 2021-2022. The ability to host these major events at the park historically, has been largely due to the ability to cater for the significant spectator numbers the events attract.

35.     The club is affiliated to the national governing body Speedway New Zealand.  Some of the club’s objectives include:

·    To foster, control, encourage and develop Speedway Racing in Auckland and New Zealand pertaining to classes licensed by the club.

·    To provide entertainment for the general public and endorse the core values of the governing body for motorsport.

·    To establish and maintain reasonable standards of safety on and off the track in accordance with the governing body rules and policies.

·    To be the drivers and car owners voice to negotiate with any promoters and Speedway New Zealand.

36.     The club has 170 registered members, twenty percent are female and the largest portion of its membership falls within the 22-50 year age group.  The club have fifty part-time staff volunteers and views itself as a grass-roots sporting and social organisation, whose members and supporters include children and families as well as professional motor-sport people.

37.     The club has submitted a comprehensive application supporting the new lease and license request and is able to demonstrate its ability to deliver services.  The club is financially viable and audited accounts show proper accounting records have been kept.

38.     A community outcomes plan is being negotiated with the club to identify the benefits it will provide to the community.  This will be attached as a schedule to the lease document when complete and approved by the Chair and Deputy Chair of the local board.

39.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 set out the requirements for community occupancy agreements.  The club has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance in place. 

40.     After assessing the club’s application and meeting with representatives, staff advise that the club qualifies for a new community lease and new license to occupy by virtue of the following:

·      Its activities support the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020 Outcome One: “Our diverse communities are active, involved and engaged”, and Outcome Three: “Our physical and social infrastructure is future-proofed”.

 

·      It is not in breach of the current occupancy agreement

 

 

·      The financial accounts have sufficient reserves to cover its operating costs with no declared contingent liabilities

 

 

·      It sustains its activities predominantly through a combination of grants, fundraising, membership subscriptions, ticket sales and sponsorship.

 

41.     The club will meet all the operational and maintenance costs of the existing and any new buildings and on-site improvements, as owners of the assets.

42.     The newly erected temporary grandstand and the temporary ablutions blocks provided by council will be returned to council for use elsewhere once future redevelopment of the site as detailed in both park plans is complete.

43.     Public notification and iwi consultation on the proposal to lease is not required as this has been undertaken as part of the reserve management plan approval.

Proposed Club Development

44.     The club has continued to develop motorsport at Waikaraka Park since first opening and has produced multiple national speedway champions over time. They have a vision for the long term future of motorsport at the park and plans to develop its activities and infrastructure upon securing a lease and license. The club have requested a 10 year lease with two (2) 10 year rights of renewal and a license to run concurrently with the lease, to provide surety of tenure and allow ample time to complete the planning, funding and redevelopment as set out in Attachment B.

45.     The club aspire to build:

·      New parking areas for the whole park and surrounds; with a new pit area to be used during speedway season (licensed area)

 

·      A new multi-use clubroom with bathrooms, changing rooms, storage, and meeting rooms, along the eastern side of the park (lease area)

 

·      Possible indoor sports and training space for park stakeholders with additional spectator capacity and terrace seating in the north eastern corner of the park (lease area)

 

·      Replace single tier grandstand to the west; with community functions centre and racetrack upgrade (lease area)

 

46.     The club intend to use the pit area during scheduled events in their lease area during speedway season. They will manage the operations within the licensed area during those times, and the lease will require that the area not be used to store items, vehicles, or equipment outside of those times. The area can be used as a carpark by the public and be available and accessible outside of the times of scheduled speedway events.

47.     The proposed redevelopment will contribute to the activation and better utilisation of the park.  While the club will be the owner and primary user of the leased facilities, it is intended that they will share the space with other sporting codes and across-park users.

48.     The club is proposing to make a significant investment in building the facilities by approaching external funders and sponsors.  An initial estimate of the project costs indicates a project value of $33,000,000. The club has indicated that they wish to have a longer-term lease to amortise their investment in the facility.

49.     In accord with the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, this report recommends that a new lease be granted to The Auckland Stock & Saloon Car Cub Incorporated for an initial term of 10 years with one (1) 10 year right of renewal, subject to conditions, and that a new license to occupy be granted for the proposed pit area to run concurrently with the lease.

Other site occupants and amenities

50.     Also occupying part of the Waikaraka Park is Auckland Canine Agility Club Incorporated on the eastern corner of the park, Auckland Studio Potters Incorporated and City of Sails Auckland Brass Incorporated, all on the Captain Springs Road side of the park, and Onehunga Combined Sports Trust Incorporated on the south eastern end of the park. All four groups and their respective activities are acknowledged in the newly endorsed reserve master plan and park management plan and hold leases with Auckland Council. Three of these leases, have expired and are pending renewal upon completion of the park management plan process.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

51.     The issue of a lease and licence is administrative. This decision does not contribute to greenhouse emissions.

52.     The activity on the land under the lease and licence does contribute to greenhouse emissions, but does not introduce new emissions more than current activity levels.

53.     In addition, the exhaust gas and particulate scrubber technology applied to sport motor vehicles is best practice resulting in less harmful emissions and is aligned with Speedway New Zealand rules for vehicle emissions.

54.     Climate change has some potential to impact the lease as the site sits 30 metres east of a flood prone area, 100 meters south of another, and is 2 kilometres north of the Manukau Harbour with overland flow paths running across the site and adjacent to it.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

55.     The proposed new lease and new license to occupy has identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of Parks Sports and Recreation, Service and Asset Planning, Area Operations and Project Specialisation, were all sought in preparation of this report’s advice and all were supportive of the new lease and license to The Auckland Stock & Saloon Car Club Incorporated.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

56.     This is an approved item on the Community Facilities Work Programme for 2019/2020.  The proposed new community lease was workshopped with the local board in November 2020 who provided their position and feedback on the application.

57.     The club’s activities are specified in the recently approved Waikaraka Park Master Plan 2021 and the Waikaraka Reserve Management Plan 2021.

58.     The club’s activities are the best use of the premises, offering services which are beneficial to the community and meeting identified needs.

59.     The club have requested a 30 year lease (initial 10 year term with two (2) 10 year rights of renewal). The report recommends a 20 year lease (Initial 10 year term with one (1) 10 year right of renewal in accord with the councils Community Occupancy Guidelines. The board may wish to consider varying the lease term recommendation to accommodate the club’s request.

60.     The Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board is the allocated authority to approve the granting of a new community lease and new license to occupy.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

61.     An aim of community leasing is to increase targeted support for Māori community development. This proposal seeks to improve access to facilities for all Aucklanders, including Māori living in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki area.

62.     Iwi engagement is not required as the proposed new lease and license conforms to and is contemplated by the approved reserve management plan. Iwi engagement was undertaken during the consultation process for the reserve master plan and management plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

63.     The proposed new rental of $1 per annum versus the current rent of $1 per annum means there will be no change to the board’s revenue.  There is no maintenance fee charged as the club owns the building and improvements and meets the cost of maintaining their assets.

64.     A proposed rental of $1 per annum for the license to occupy for the proposed pit area is a small increase in revenue. 

65.     Council staff sought advice and input from the local board’s Lead Financial Advisor and received positive feedback. There are no other financial implications for the board.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

66.     If the application for a new lease and license is not approved, the current lease will continue to roll over on a monthly basis. This may adversely affect the club financially as the club requires surety of tenure to continue its activities and services and complete its plans for the redevelopment of the site.  Without a new lease and license, the club will not be able to continue planning and developing programmes for the future, and it will be inhibited in continuing to deliver its world-class services to both the local and international communities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

67.     Subject to the grant of a new community lease and license to occupy, staff will work with the club to finalise the community outcomes plan and community lease and license to occupy arrangements.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Site Plan of Leased and Licensed Areas

125

b

Attachment B Proposed Redevelopment

127

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Valerie Vui - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Stakeholder and Land Advisory

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

Proposed land exchange Taniwha Reserve and Maybury Reserve, Glen Innes.

File No.: CP2021/00321

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek support to publicly notify a proposed land exchange of part of Taniwha Reserve, Glen Innes, with private land.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The local board’s support is sought to inform decision-making about a proposed exchange of 2,779m² of land at Taniwha Reserve (in part) with 10,472m² of the Tāmaki Regeneration Company’s land.

3.       The land exchange would result in increased road frontage for both Maybury Reserve and Taniwha Reserve. It would improve their visibility from adjoining roads and allow increased passive surveillance. The exchange would improve the configuration of the open space network in Glen Innes, an outcome of the Open Space Network Plan for Part of Panmure, Glen Innes and Saint Johns 2019-2034.

4.       The proposed exchange has been assessed against council open space policies and is deemed to be a high priority.

5.       The proposed land exchange could benefit the community by:

·      increasing amenity values and open space (net gain of 7,693m2 open space)

·      providing more multifunctional and useable recreational space 

·      improving sightlines and pedestrian access into and through the open spaces.

6.       There is a low risk of challenge to decision-making for the land exchange in accordance with section 15(2) of the Reserves Act 1977. This is mitigated by ensuring appropriate public and mana whenua consultation.

7.       Staff recommend that the local board supports notification of the proposed land exchange. Public notification is the first step of the land exchange process.

8.       The local board’s views on the proposed land exchange will be included in a report seeking approval to public notification by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee on 13 May 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Local Board:

a)      support notification under section 15(2) of the Reserves Act 1977 of a proposed exchange of 2,779m² of reserve land at 193-195 Taniwha Street, Glen Innes (part Lot 142 DP 42356) for 10,472m² of Tamaki Regeneration Company’s land located:

Adjacent to Maybury Reserve West

i.    12A, 12B, 12C,12D,12E, 14A, 14B, 14C, 14D, 14E Maybury Street (1,286m²) (Lot 4 DP 184600)

ii.    2/12 Maybury Street (617m²) (Lot 3 DP 184600)

iii.   part of 1/12 Maybury Street (118.8m²) (Lot 2 DP 184600)

iv.  part of 8 Maybury Street (110.7m²) (Part of Lot 1 DP 184600)

v.   part of 4 Maybury Street (70.1m²) (Part of Lot 7 DP 187240)

Adjacent to Maybury Reserve North

vi.  200A, 202 Taniwha Street (1,072m²) (Lot 165 DP 43833)

vii.  192, 192A, 198A Taniwha Street (2,008m²) (Lot 166 DP 43833)

viii. 184,184A, 184B,190A Taniwha Street (2,008m²) (Lot 167 DP 43833)

ix.  180-182A Taniwha Street (1216m²) (Lot 168 DP 43833)

Adjacent to Taniwha Reserve East

x.   45 Epping Street (751m²) (Lot 128 DP 39662)

xi.  47 Epping Street (771m²) (Lot 129 DP 39662)

xii.  49 Epping Street (774m²) (Lot 130 DP 39662)

xiii. 179A Taniwha Street (329m²) (Part of Lot 1 DP 188991)

xiv. 179B Taniwha Street (26.7m²) (Part of Lot 1 DP 188991)

 

Horopaki

Context

There are opportunities to enhance open space provision in Glen Innes

9.       The Tāmaki Regeneration Company is undertaking a major redevelopment in Glen Innes.   

10.     This development presents opportunities for Auckland Council to improve access to, and the functionality of, Maybury Reserve and Taniwha Reserve.

11.     Maybury Reserve and Taniwha Reserve are recreation reserves owned by Auckland Council and subject to the Reserves Act 1977. Figure 1 shows the location and layout of these two reserves. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 1: Maybury Reserve and Taniwha Reserve

 

Tāmaki Regeneration Company has proposed a land exchange

12.     To facilitate the implementation of their housing re-development, the Tāmaki Regeneration Company requests to exchange part of Taniwha Reserve (2,779m²) for 10,472m² of Tāmaki Regeneration Company land to be vested as recreation reserve.

13.     This proposed land exchange would improve the configuration of Maybury and Taniwha reserves. This will help to improve crime prevention by increasing road frontage and visibility into the parks from the surrounding roads.

14.     The proposed land exchange would enable (not fund) any future development of a shared pathway connecting Maybury and Taniwha reserves to the Glen Innes town centre. It would also enable (not fund) the development of a destination playground at Maybury Reserve and the extension of Ruapotaka Marae onto Maybury Reserve West. These actions are listed in the Open Space Network Plan for Part of Panmure, Glen Innes and Saint Johns 2019-2034.

15.     Figures 2 and 3 show the proposed Tāmaki Regeneration Company land (outlined in red) to be vested to Auckland Council. The Auckland Council reserve land to be vested to Tāmaki Regeneration Company is outlined in blue.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 2: Proposed land exchange areas

 

 

Figure 3 Proposed land parcels to be exchanged

Land to be exchanged to Auckland Council as local purpose reserve (recreation) (OUTLINED RED)

Shown

Legal Name

Area (Total = 10,472m²)

Current owner

Site A

Lot 4 DP 184600

Lot 3 DP 184600

Part of Lot 2 DP 184600

Part of Lot 1 DP 184600

Part of Lot 7 DP 187240

2,202.6m²

Tāmaki Regeneration Company

Site B

Lot 165 DP 43833

Lot 166 DP 43833

Lot 167 DP 43833

Lot 168 DP 43833

6,306m²

Tāmaki Regeneration Company

Site C

Lot 128 DP 39662

Lot 129 DP 39662

Lot 130 DP 39662

Part of Lot 1 DP 188991

Part of Lot 1 DP 188991

1,972m²

Tāmaki Regeneration Company

 

Land to be exchanged to Tāmaki Regeneration Company (OUTLINED BLUE)

Shown

Legal Name

Area (Total = 2,779m²)

Current owner

Site D

 

Part of Lot 142 DP 42356

2,779m²

Auckland Council

 

The land exchange process is set out in the Reserves Act 1977

16.     Section 15 of the Reserves Act prescribes the process for a land exchange between reserves and other land. The process has four key steps:

·      the administering body (in this case Auckland Council) publicly notifies its intention to undertake the land exchange and calls for objections in writing, allowing a period of at least one month for objections to be received

·      after a period of at least one month following public notification the administering body considers all objections to the proposed land exchange

·      the administering body passes a resolution supporting the land exchange if it considers it appropriate to do so considering the objections received

·      a copy of the resolution supporting the land exchange is forwarded to the Minister of Conservation, or their delegate, along with the objections for authorisation.

17.     Relevant mana whenua must also be consulted.

 There is shared decision-making allocation for open space acquisition

18.     The decision-making allocations for the acquisition of land for parks and open space are set out in Volume Two of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

19.     The Governing Body is responsible for:

·      the number and general location of all new parks and the prioritisation of major upgrades to existing parks (including sports fields within parks).

·      acquisition and divestment of all park land, including land exchanges.

20.     Local boards are responsible for the specific location of new local parks (including the prioritisation for acquisition) within budget parameters agreed with the Governing Body.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The proposed land exchange is deemed to be a high priority when assessed against council policy

21.     Land exchanges are formally assessed against the Parks and Open Space Acquisition Policy (2013) and the Open Space Provision Policy (2016). They are prioritised according to the highest rating achieved.

22.     The proposed land exchange at Maybury and Taniwha reserves is deemed high priority due to its potential benefits.

23.     Table 1 below summarises the assessment of the proposed land exchange.

Table 1: Initial assessment of the proposed land exchange against acquisition criteria

1.  

1.         

1.         

Acquisition criteria

Comment

Overall rating

Meeting community needs, now and in the future

·        Increases accessibility and capacity of reserves that serve an area of high growth and redevelopment.

The land exchange is a high priority

 

Connecting parks and open spaces

·        High priority as the land exchange would enable the planned development of a pedestrian path providing a link between Taniwha Reserve, Maybury Reserve and Glenn Innes town centre.

Protecting and restoring Auckland’s unique features and meanings

·        High priority as the land exchange would enable the revegetation of Ōmaru Creek with riparian planting to improve ecological function and resilience against flood events.

Improving the parks and open spaces we already have

·        High priority as the proposed land exchange would improve the accessibility and functionality of existing open space.

·        A destination youth playground is proposed on the land acquired from the Tāmaki Regeneration Company adjacent to Maybury Reserve. The playground is an action in the Open Space Network Plan for Part of

·        Panmure, Glen Innes and Saint Johns 2019-2034

·        The proposed land exchange would improve crime prevention through environmental design for both reserves by improving entrance visibility, increasing road frontage, and opening up views to the surrounding area.

 

Staff recommend that the Committee support the land exchange

24.     Staff recommend that the Local Board support public notification of the proposed land exchange.

·      The proposed exchange has been assessed against council open space policies and is deemed to be a high priority.

·      If approved, the proposed land exchange would improve access to, and the functionality of, Maybury Reserve and Taniwha Reserve. The reserves would better meet the needs of existing and future residents.

25.     The land exchange would result in an approximate loss of 2,779m² of council land. However, Auckland Council would receive 10,472m² of land at no capital cost. The net gain for Auckland Council is 7,693m² of open space.

26.     There will be additional maintenance costs associated with the increased open space area. The Long-term Plan 2018-2028 provides for maintenance including land acquired at no capital cost.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.     Parks and open spaces can serve as ecological corridors. They can promote and protect native plants and animals, enhance biodiversity and increase resilience to environmental change. Vegetation captures carbon from the air, helping slow the accumulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

28.     Vegetated areas, including grass, help reduce maximum temperature ranges in urbanised areas. Parks and open spaces can also help reduce flood risk during rainstorms by buffering peak flows and reducing the volume and velocity of stormwater runoff.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     Minor impact on operational activities to manage additional 7,693m² of open space. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     The proposed land exchange aligns with the following objectives on the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020:

Outcome three: Our physical and social infrastructure is future-proofed

·        The Tāmaki Regeneration Company is delivering a major social, economic and physical transformation of Glen Innes.

·        The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will work closely with the Tāmaki Regeneration Company to upgrade Glen Innes town centre, enhancing local parks and reserves and upgrading key infrastructure.

·        The Local Board is committed to creating an appealing and attractive open space network by carrying out the Open Space Network Plan for Part of Panmure, Glen Innes and Saint Johns 2019-2034 as funding allows.

Outcome five: Our built, natural and cultural taonga / treasures are protected and celebrated

·        The Local Board will partner with the community and mana whenua to restore Ōmaru Creek

·        The proposed land exchange will contribute to the future health of Maybury Reserve and Taniwha Reserve. The Open Space Network Plan for Part of Panmure, Glen Innes and Saint Johns 2019-2034 identifies future riparian planting to be undertaken at these reserves to improve the health of Ōmaru Creek.

31.     The Open Space Network Plan for Part of Panmure, Glen Innes and Saint Johns 2019-2034 identifies the proposed land exchange as a high priority. This includes improving open space configuration, connectivity and ecological restoration at both Taniwha Reserve and Maybury Reserve West.

32.     This report seeks the local board support to publicly notify the proposed land exchange. The public consultation process would enable residents to express their views.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     The provision of quality parks and open spaces has broad benefits for Māori, including:

·      help facilitate Māori participation in outdoor recreational activity

·      help make Auckland a green, resilient, and healthy environment consistent with the Māori worldview of the natural world and their role as kaitiaki of the natural environment.

34.     The proposed land exchange does not contain any known sites or places of significance to mana whenua.

35.     Subject to the proposed land exchange being approved for public notification, consultation with mana whenua will be undertaken as part of the statutory land exchange process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     There are no financial implications of public notification of a proposed land exchange. The costs of public and mana whenua engagement on the land exchange will be met within current budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     There is a low risk of challenge to council decision-making for the proposed land exchange in accordance with section 15 of the Reserves Act 1977. Key aspects of this process include public and mana whenua consultation. This is mitigated by ensuring appropriate public and mana whenua consultation.

38.     There is a low delivery risk as there is no guarantee that the proposed land exchange will be:

·     approved by the governing body for notification

·     supported by mana whenua through the consultation process

·     supported by the public through the consultation process

·     supported by the governing body following consultation

·     authorised by the Minister of Conservation or their delegate.

39.     The Tāmaki Regeneration Company will manage any risks associated with their redevelopment projects in Glen Innes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     The local board’s views on the proposed land exchange will be included in a report to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee on 13 May 2021 seeking their approval to publicly notify the proposed land exchange.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Holly Meese - Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

Clifton Court – Concept Design Approval

File No.: CP2021/02677

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To obtain formal approval from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board of the final concept design for Clifton Court.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Clifton Court is part of the wider Unlock Panmure programme because of its strategic location and significance to the community. Upgrading this area will provide much-needed improved public open space in a priority growth location for Auckland.

3.       Over the last year, Panuku Development have worked with the businesses on Clifton Court, the Panmure Business Association, mana whenua and the wider community, inviting people to share their thoughts both on the current space and how it could be improved for the future.

4.       Key opportunities identified in the consultation led to development of the following four key design principles - Safety and Security, Greening, Play and Community Interaction.

5.       A concept design for these works has been prepared (Attachment A) that responds to the key design principles and has been developed in consultation with the Panmure Business Association and the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board. The overall design intent of the concept plan is to create an open space that acts as an extension of the surrounding properties is the key driving aspect.

6.       Following these proposed upgrades, businesses and residents will be enabled to best determine how they wish to use the space with a focus on facilitating play and learning opportunities. Existing light columns will also be upgraded around the Court to further improve security at night.

7.       Approval of the concept design by the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will allow Panuku to commence the next phase of business case approval.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      approves the concept design (Attachment A) to upgrade Clifton Court and for Panuku to commence the next phase of business case approval.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Panmure has been prioritised as a key Unlock location where public investment is being used as a catalyst to unlock development potential for others and to facilitate urban renewal. This investment supports the programme vision to ‘Create a vibrant centre that is a great place to live, visit and do business’.

9.       Clifton Court, Panmure is a 1,130m2 town centre space adjacent to Pilkington Road that is currently underutilised by the community and local businesses due to the layout and perception of safety.

10.     This project helps deliver on the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan outcome one objectives (Communities are active and healthy and People have a sense of safety in our community), and outcome three objectives (We encourage well-planned physical infrastructure that supports our growth, Community places are accessible and welcoming to our diverse communities and Our parks and open spaces are treasured and loved).

11.     This delivers towards the vision of revitalising the Panmure town centre as a great place to live, visit and do business. This public realm upgrade contributes to the Unlock Panmure High Level Project Plan (HLPP) vision of creating a high-quality urban neighbourhood.

12.     The project seeks to upgrade the site at Clifton Court to enable a welcoming and inviting space for the businesses and community to retreat and relax, whilst lending itself to future community activities held by the Panmure Business Association.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     Over the last year Panuku Development have worked with the businesses on Clifton Court, Panmure Business Association, and the wider community, inviting people to share their thoughts both on the current space and how it could be improved for the future.

14.     The existing issues and opportunities noted as part of the site analysis and consultation are summarised below:

a)   The existing surface is in good condition with adequate drainage

b)   Covered seating is outdated, obstructs sight lines and restricts movement into the space

c)   Small play space is outdated and rarely used

d)   Shop front grating and screens impact perceived security

e)   Shop front canopies provide shelter but restrict light

f)    Raised planters obstruct sight lines and restrict the flexible use of the space

g)   Existing street furniture is outdated

h)   Two existing trees with dense canopy restrict light and sight lines

i)    Failed tree-pit in the centre of the site needs to be removed

15.     The key opportunities identified in the consultation led to the development of the following four key design principles:

a)   Safety and Security

b)   Greening

c)   Play

d)   Community Interaction

16.     Panuku developed three design options to respond to the issues and opportunities. These were socialised with the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board and the Panmure Business Association. Feedback was received and a hybrid concept design was produced. This was presented to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on 8 December 2020.

17.     The Key Moves in the concept design are:

a)    remove raised planters and create sunken gardens that collect stormwater run-off, with low level planting and standard trees, with elements of informal nature play;

b)    provide a flexible open space at the western end that is large enough to support a variety of activities (e.g. school classes, outdoor cinema, Tai-Chi). Proposed turfed area, mounded slightly as it meets the sunken gardens;

c)    retain, clean and re-use existing paving, reducing waste. Whāriki (welcome mat) design to create a threshold into the space;

d)    seating is modular with 4-5 different types of units that fit together to create social seating in passive areas. The intention is that these seats can be moved around the space relatively easily, ensuring it’s flexible. To be placed on Pilkington Road as seating area for bakery etc;

e)    a play space with a range of equipment that provides opportunity for children 2-5 years and 5-12 years old. Design kept linear with social seating around perimeter;

f)     provide bicycle parking on Pilkington Road to promote active modes;

g)    remove tree at the western end. Thin and lift the crown of the central existing tree to improve sightlines;

h)    provide power and water connection to facilitate pop-up activations (e.g. market stalls, an audio-visual system or a food/drinks cart).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     Reuse of existing materials and enhancement of local stormwater provision.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     If the concept design is approved by Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board the concept design will be socialised with Auckland Council’s Community Streetscapes team as well as Auckland Transport. This will ensure that Auckland Council understands the maintenance requirements of the improved space and that any Council design requirements linked to asset acceptance once construction is completed are incorporated into the design.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     Panuku has worked with the local community, Panmure Business Association and Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board to develop and refine the concept design.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     An initial interest was noted from several mana whenua representatives at the start of the project. It was agreed that mana whenua would be provided with the opportunity to input into the design phase when a concept design had been approved. Mana whenua will be invited to contribute to the next design phase of the project.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The preparation of the concept design has been funded from operating expenditure by Panuku. A capital budget to complete design and deliver the project has been provided for in the Panmure programme.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     To mitigate the risk of cost overrun, a cost estimation of the concept design is being undertaken. The next phase of design work will manage the proposed works to ensure they remain within the allocated project budget.

24.     To mitigate any risk associated with tree removal, Panuku will work with Auckland Council arborists to ensure retainment where possible and that appropriate planting is undertaken to further improve the green space areas within Clifton Court.

25.     To mitigate risks associated with asset acceptance, Panuku will work with Auckland Council’s Community Streetscapes team as well as Auckland Transport. This will ensure that Auckland Council understands the maintenance requirements of the improved space and that any Council design requirements linked to asset acceptance once construction is completed are incorporated into the design.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Following approval of the concept design by the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board, Panuku will prepare the business case to take the project to detailed design and construction.

27.     Construction is scheduled to commence in the new calendar year pending all approvals.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Clifton Court Concept Design

143

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Andrew Firth – Panuku Development Auckland, Project Manager

Authorisers

Richard Taylor – Panuku Development Auckland, Priority Location Director

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

2021 Local Government New Zealand Conference and Annual General Meeting

File No.: CP2021/02679

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse the process for appointing elected members to attend the Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) conference taking place from 15 to 17 July 2021, appoint delegates to the Annual General Meeting (AGM) and provide process information regarding remits and awards.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2021 LGNZ Conference will be held at the ASB Theatre Marlborough, Blenheim from 15 to 17 July 2021. The conference programme is appended as Attachment A.

3.       Due to reductions in the Emergency Budget (current financial year) and risks associated with uncertainty of alert levels during the COVID-19 pandemic, the number of members who will be able to attend the LGNZ conference this year is limited.

4.       After considering a number of options (detailed in attachment B), staff recommend an option that enables a representative Auckland Council delegation to be funded from the reduced budget as follows:

·   elected members with a formal role as Auckland Council representatives to LGNZ 

·   six additional local board members to be selected from the local board clusters.

5.       The estimated cost of attending the conference (registration, travel and accommodation) is $2,410 per person, bringing the total for the recommended option to $38,560.

6.       As in previous years, elected members may use their Individual Development Budget (IDB) allocation to attend the conference. The IDB allocation has also been reduced under the Emergency Budget to $1,500 per member per electoral term. It is therefore not sufficient to cover the total cost of a member’s attendance. Members who wish to take up this opportunity would need to cover the shortfall themselves, approximately $900.

7.       Auckland Council is entitled to four delegates at the AGM. These delegates are appointed by the Governing Body. Staff recommend that the four delegates include Mayor Phil Goff (as presiding delegate), Chief Executive Jim Stabback, and up to two other Auckland Council conference attendees.

8.       The adoption of remits at the AGM and the 2021 LGNZ Excellence Awards are elements of this event. This report outlines the Auckland Council process for deciding Auckland Council remits and council positions on the conference remit, as well as a consolidated process for Auckland Council entries to the awards. The LGNZ Auckland Zone meeting, which is attended by representatives of local boards and the Governing Body is the forum that will coordinate these discussions.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the budget constraints in the current financial year and the recommended process for the appointment of attendees and delegates to the Local Government New Zealand 2021 Conference and Annual General Meeting in Blenheim from 15 to 17 July 2021

b)      endorse the selection of one local board representative per cluster through the Local Board Chairs’ Forum and agree to put nominations for cluster representatives through the local board chair for consideration at their April 2020 meeting.

c)      note the process to submit remits to the Annual General Meeting and entries for the 2021 Local Government New Zealand Excellence Awards has been communicated to elected members on 2 March 2021 

d)      confirm that conference attendance including travel and accommodation will be paid for in accordance with the current Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy

e)      note that all local board members who are appointed to attend the conference will be confirmed to the General Manager Local Board Services by 15 April 2021 at the latest to ensure that they are registered with Local Government New Zealand

f)       note that any member who wishes to attend the conference using their Individual Development Budget (IDB) allocation will need to subsidise the cost and must contact the General Manager Local Board Services by 8 April 2021 to make the necessary arrangements.

g)      note that the Governing Body will be appointing delegates to the 2021 LGNZ Annual General Meeting at their 25 March 2021 meeting, with the recommendation being to appoint Mayor Phil Goff as presiding delegate, and to appoint Chief Executive Jim Stabback and up to two other Auckland Council conference attendees as delegates.

h)      note that conference attendees can attend the 2021 Local Government New Zealand Annual General Meeting in an advisory capacity provided their names are included on the Annual General Meeting registration form, which will be signed by the mayor.

Horopaki

Context

9.       LGNZ is an incorporated society of local government organisations whose primary objective is to represent and advocate for the interests of local authorities in New Zealand. LGNZ champions policy positions on key issues that are of interest to local government and holds regular meetings and events throughout the year for members. The schedule of meetings includes an annual conference and meetings of local government geographical clusters (known as LGNZ zones) and sectors.

10.     LGNZ is governed by a National Council made up of representatives from member authorities as outlined in the constitution. Some of its work is conducted through committees and working groups which include representatives from member authorities.

11.     Elected members who have been formally appointed to LGNZ roles including members who are involved in advisory groups are:

Name

LGNZ role

Mayor Phil Goff

National Council representative for Auckland

Auckland Council representative on the Metropolitan Sector Group

Councillor Pippa Coom

 

Local Board Chair Richard Northey

National Council representative for Auckland (appointed by Governing Body) and co-chair of the Auckland Zone

National Council representative for Auckland (appointed by local boards) and co-chair of the Auckland Zone

Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore

Auckland Council representative on Regional Sector

Councillor Alf Filipaina

Auckland Council representative on Te Maruata Roopu Whakahaere

Local Board Member Nerissa Henry

Auckland Council representative on Young Elected Members

Councillor Angela Dalton

Local Board Deputy Chair Danielle Grant

Auckland Council representatives on Governance and Strategy Advisory Group

Councillor Richard Hills

Local Board Member Cindy Schmidt

Auckland Council representatives on Policy Advisory Group

Auckland Zone

12.     LGNZ rules were amended in 2019 to allow Auckland Council, with its unique governance arrangements, to be set up as its own Zone, rather than be part of LGNZ Zone 1 with Northland councils.

13.     Auckland Zone meetings are scheduled on a quarterly basis. These meetings are co-chaired by the two Auckland representatives appointed to the LGNZ National Council by the Governing Body (Councillor Pippa Coom) and local boards’ (Chair Richard Northey) and attended by appointed representatives of local boards and members of the Governing Body.

14.     The meetings of Auckland Zone are open to all elected members. The zone meetings receive regular updates from LGNZ Executive as well as verbal reports from Auckland Council elected members who have an ongoing involvement with LGNZ.

15.     The zone meetings provide an opportunity for council to have discussions across governing body and local boards on joint advocacy issues including remits and other shared priorities that fall within LGNZ’s mandate.

LGNZ Annual conference and AGM 2021

16.     The 2021 LGNZ conference and AGM will be held at the ASB Theatre Marlborough, Waiharakeke Blenheim, from 15 to 17 July 2021.

17.     This year, the conference programme has the theme “Reimagining Aotearoa from community up”. The programme is available online on the LGNZ website and is appended as Attachment A.

18.     The AGM takes place on the last day of the conference from 9.30am to 12.30pm. The LGNZ constitution permits the Auckland Council to appoint four delegates to represent it at the AGM, with one of the delegates being appointed as presiding delegate.

19.     Due to the restriction following the COVID-19 crisis, the 2020 conference was postponed and Auckland Council only sent two delegates to the AGM. The two delegates who attended the AGM via remote/electronic attendance were Mayor Phil Goff and Councillor Pippa Coom.

20.     In addition to the official delegates at the AGM, LGNZ allows conference participants to attend the AGM as observers but requires prior notice. Nominated attendees to the conference will be invited to register as observers to the AGM.

Remits (for consideration at the AGM 2021)

21.     LGNZ invites member authorities to submit remits for consideration at the AGM on 17 July 2021 and entries for consideration for the LGNZ Excellence Awards, to be announced at the conference dinner on 16 July 2021.

22.     Proposed remits should address only major strategic ‘issues of the moment’. They should have a national focus, articulating a major interest or concern at the national political level.  They should relate to significant policy issues that, as a council, we have not been able to progress with central government through other means.

23.     On 2 March 2021, elected members were sent detailed information inviting proposals for remits to be discussed at the Auckland Zone meeting on 12 March 2021. Remits that are agreed on at the zone meeting will be submitted by the due date.

24.     The June 2021 meeting of the Auckland Zone will review all the remits that will be discussed at the AGM with a view to recommending a council position that the Auckland Council delegates will advocate at the AGM.

LGNZ Excellence Awards 2021

25.     LGNZ also invites member authorities to submit entries for consideration for the LGNZ Excellence Awards, to be announced at the conference dinner on 16 July 2021.

26.     The LGNZ Excellence Awards recognise and celebrate excellent performance by councils in promoting and growing the well-being of their communities. The awards are judged on a combination of general and specific criteria, incorporating best practice and components from the CouncilMARK™ excellence programme’s four priority areas. The awards categories for 2021 are:

·   Creative New Zealand EXCELLENCE Award for Cultural Well-being

·   Martin Jenkins EXCELLENCE Award for Economic Well-being

·   Air New Zealand EXCELLENCE Award for Environmental Well-being

·   Kāinga Ora Homes and Communities EXCELLENCE Award for Social Well-being

·   In addition, one or more individuals will be awarded the Te Tari Taiwhenua Internal Affairs EXCELLENCE Award for Outstanding Contribution to Local Government, and Fulton Hogan will also select the Local EXCELLENCE Award from among the finalists.

27.     The email to elected members on 2 March 2021 also outlined detailed information inviting potential awards entries to be discussed at the Auckland Zone meeting on 12 March 2021 so that entries from Auckland Council can be coordinated.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Overall costs per attendee

28.     The estimated total cost of attendance to the conference is $2,410 per person, distributed as follows (all costs are GST inclusive):

Registration (early bird)

$1,400

Accommodation* @ $190 per night x 3 nights

$570

Flights**

$280

Miscellaneous***

$160

Total

$2,410

* based on average cost of Blenheim hotels.

** flights may range from $49 one way (take on bag only) to $199 for a 5pm flight (with a checked bag). $280 is as per 2020 budgeting.

*** for travel to and from airport and reasonable daily expenses under the EM Expenses policy

Options

29.     Staff considered several options (Attachment B) that ensure a fair balance of representatives across the governing body and local boards while keeping within budget. The key considerations that were applied to selecting the staff preferred option are:

a.   the available budget for the LGNZ conference attendance is only $40,000

b.   the cost of attendance per person (registration, travel, accommodation) is estimated at $2,410

c.   with the uncertainty to public events and gatherings posed by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, there is a possibility the COVID-19 alert levels may not be favourable in July 2021. If this is the case, cancellations will not recoup all monies spent. Staff estimate that although this risk may be lower in July, it will continue to exist

d.   ensure fair representation from local boards given the inability to accommodate 21 representatives

e.   empowering elected members who have a formal involvement with LGNZ to be prioritised for attendance to maximise their ongoing contributions on behalf of Auckland Council

30.     Staff recommend Option B which will cost $38,560 and fund attendance of 16 elected members including:

·   all members who have been formally appointed or nominated to LGNZ National Council, subsidiary bodies and advisory groups (10 members)

·   a representative from each of the 6 local board clusters – North, South, West, Central, Islands and Rural (6 members).

31.     This is not the cheapest option but is the one that enables a wider representation from local boards. The more expensive options which allow for one representative per local board cannot be accommodated as it will exceed the available budget.

32.     Local boards have an existing method for choosing a limited number of representatives. This approach utilises informal cluster groups based on geographic locations and unique characteristics (North, South, West, Central, Island, Rural) and involves local board chairs liaising with and agreeing with others in their cluster on their representative.

33.     There is an opportunity to select local board representatives using this methodology at the Local Board Chairs’ Forum on 12 April 2021.

Use of IDB to fund additional attendees

34.     Elected members who wish to attend the LGNZ conference and are not nominated or appointed can still attend using their IDB. As IDB entitlements are $1500 per elected member per term and the cost of attendance is approximately $2410, these elected members will need to meet the cost difference.

35.     It is recommended that elected members who wish to attend and can pay the difference are included in the group booking for accommodation and travel. Any elected member who wishes to take up this opportunity is encouraged to liaise further with the Kura Kāwana team.

36.     LGNZ are working on introducing some form of virtual attendance to the conference but the details are still to be confirmed.

37.     As per previous years, LGNZ will make some session recordings available online after the conference.

Delegates for the Annual General Meeting

38.     In line with previous years, staff recommend that AGM delegates are appointed from within the attending members as follows:

·   Mayor Phil Goff as presiding delegate

·   Chief Executive Jim Stabback

·   up to two additional delegates.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

39.     This report is procedural in nature, however the key impact on climate is through supporting attendance at a conference by means of air travel. A conservative approach to conference attendance would help reduce this impact.

40.     Estimates for emissions associated with travel to Blenheim or travel within Auckland for local meetings have not been calculated at the time of writing this report. Emissions, when known, can be offset through a verified carbon offset programme at a small cost.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

41.     LGNZ is an incorporated body comprising members who are New Zealand councils.  Council-controlled organisations are not eligible for separate membership. However, remits can cover activities of council-controlled organisations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

42.     LGNZ advocates for issues that are important to local government. Many of these issues are aligned with local board priorities. As such, there is interest from local boards in contributing to the work of LGNZ and in identifying and harnessing opportunities to progress other advocacy areas that local boards may have.

43.     Each local board has a nominated lead who represents them at Auckland Zone meetings and is involved in discussions about LGNZ matters.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     LGNZ advocates on a variety of issues that are important to Māori, including Māori housing, various environmental issues and Council-Māori participation and relationship arrangements. In addition, LGNZ provides advice including published guidance to assist local authorities in understanding values, aspirations and interests of Māori.

45.     The LGNZ National Council has a sub-committee, Te Maruata, which has the role of promoting increased representation of Māori as elected members of local government, and of enhancing Māori participation in local government processes. It also provides support for councils in building relationships with iwi, hapu and Māori groups. Te Maruata provides Māori input on development of future policies or legislation relating to local government. Councillor Alf Filipaina is a member of the sub-committee.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

46.     Staff considered options to reduce the financial impact of the attendance to the conference, in line with the budget restrictions imposed as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic.

47.     The costs associated with conference attendance, travel and accommodation within the recommended option can be met within the allocated Kura Kāwana (Elected Member development) budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     The key risk is of delayed decision-making which can impact costs and registration choices. The sooner the registration for the nominated members can be made, the more likely it is that Auckland Council can take advantage of early bird pricing for the conference, flights and accommodation, all done via bulk-booking.

49.     A resurgence of COVID-19 in the community and a change of alert level might prevent elected members from travelling to attend the conference. LGNZ is keeping an active review on the COVID-19 situation and will update directly to registered participants should a change affect the delivery of the conference. LGNZ is still working through a number of scenarios and how these would affect their decision to proceed as planned, postpone, cancel or switch delegates to virtual attendance, with the final decision resting with the National Council on the basis of the information available at the time.

50.     In the current COVID circumstances, the reputational risk associated with any financial expenditure is heightened and there is high scrutiny from the public on the council’s expenses. The recommendation to limit the number of members attending the conference mitigates this risk to a certain degree.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     Once representatives are confirmed to attend, the Manager Governance Services will coordinate all conference registrations, as well as requests to attend the AGM.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

LGNZ Conference 2021 programme

165

b

Options for attendance

171

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elodie Fontaine - Advisor - Democracy Services

Authorisers

Rose Leonard - Manager Governance Services

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

Local board feedback on the Climate Change Commission’s 2021 Draft Advice

File No.: CP2021/02596

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board of its formal feedback, developed through delegation by the Chair and Deputy Chair on the Climate Change Commission’s Draft Advice 2021 consultation document.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s 28 April 2020 business meeting it delegated authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair to approve and submit the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, parliament, select committees and other councils (resolution: MT/2020/32).

3.       The local board’s feedback has been approved by the Chair and Deputy Chair for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission to the Climate Change Commission.

4.       A copy of the local board’s feedback is Attachment A of this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the local board’s feedback on the Climate Change Commission’s 2021 Draft Advice.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Feedback on the Climate Change Commission's Draft Advice 2021

175

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Simone Tongatule - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2021/02613

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the board with the governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·     ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·     clarifying what advice is required and when

·     clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar is updated every month. Each update is reported to business meetings. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the attached Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar March 2021

181

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops

File No.: CP2021/02614

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a summary of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board workshops for 2, 9 and 16 March 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local board workshops are held to give board members an opportunity to receive information and updates or provide direction and have discussion on issues and projects relevant to the local board area. No binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the local board record of workshops held on 2, 9 and 16 March 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Record of Workshops March 2021

185

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 March 2021

 

 

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