I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitematā Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 16 March 2021

1.00pm

Waitematā Local Board Office
Ground Floor
52 Swanson Street
Auckland

 

Waitematā Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chair

Richard Northey, (ONZM)

 

Deputy Chair

Kerrin Leoni

 

Members

Adriana Avendano Christie

 

 

Alexandra Bonham

 

 

Graeme Gunthorp

 

 

Julie Sandilands

 

 

Sarah Trotman, (ONZM)

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Priscila Firmo

Democracy Advisor

 

9 March 2021

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 353 9654

Email: Priscila.firmo@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - James Watson, Doughnut Economics Advocates New Zealand (DEANZ): pilot plan for Urban Composting and Community Gardens          5

8.2     Deputation - Justine McFarlane: to update the Board on Merge Community 6

8.3     Deputation - Brigid Rogers: to speak about the Wynyard Quarter Transport Management Association (WQ TMA)                                                                 6

8.4     Deputation - David Batten: to present a report on the Great North Road Vision project                                                                                                                    6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  7

9.1     Public Forum                                                                                                        7

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                8

11        Ward Councillor's report                                                                                             11

12        Central Library Café Lease                                                                                         29

13        Auckland Bowling Club Incorporated - Parking Allocation 100 Stanley Street Grafton                                                                                                                          37

14        Classification of Section 1 SO 69238 at 55 West End Road, Herne Bay under the Reserves Act 1977                                                                                                       45

15        Local board input into preparation of the draft 2021 Regional Parks Management Plan                                                                                                                                51

16        2021 Local Government New Zealand Conference and Annual General Meeting 57

17        Waiheke Rāhui by Ngāti Paoa                                                                                    73

18        Local board feedback on the Climate Change Commission’s draft advice to Government                                                                                                                  83

19        Chairperson's report                                                                                                 277

20        Board member reports                                                                                              293

21        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      311

22        Waitematā Local Board workshop records                                                            315

23        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 16 February 2021, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waitematā Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - James Watson, Doughnut Economics Advocates New Zealand (DEANZ): pilot plan for Urban Composting and Community Gardens

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the Waitematā Local Board about a pilot plan for Urban Composting and Community Gardens to be trialed in the Waitematā Local Board area by Doughnut Economics Advocates New Zealand (DEANZ).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       James Watson, Doughnut Economics Advocates New Zealand (DEANZ) will be in attendance to inform the board about a pilot plan for Urban Composting and Community Gardens to be trialed in the Waitematā Local Board area.

This item was withdrawn.

Attachments

a          Presentation - Urban Composting and Community Gardens Project.......... 327

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Justine McFarlane: to update the Board on Merge Community

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the board regarding Merge Community and its activities.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Justine McFarlane will be in attendance to update the local board on Merge Community activities in the local board area.

This item was withdrawn.

Attachments

a          16 February 2021 Waitemata Local Board: Merge Community report........ 341

 

 

8.3       Deputation - Brigid Rogers: to speak about the Wynyard Quarter Transport Management Association (WQ TMA)

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To share results and details of research undertaken by Wynyard Quarter Transport Management Association (WQ TMA).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Brigid Rogers will be in attendance to share results and details of research undertaken by Wynyard Quarter Transport Management Association (WQ TMA) with the local board.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Brigid Rogers, Wynyard Quarter Transport Management Association for her attendance.

 

 

8.4       Deputation - David Batten: to present a report on the Great North Road Vision project

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the final report on the Great North Road Vision project.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

David Batten will be in attendance to present the final report on the Great North Road Vision project.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank David Batten, Grey Lynn Residents Association his attendance.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for a member of the public to address the 15 September 2020 Waitematā Local Board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Section 7.8 of the Waitematā Local Board’s set of Standing Orders provides for a member of the public to address a Waitematā Local Board meeting in its public forum section of the meeting.

3.       Formal approval from the Chair is not required.

Time

4.       A period of up to 30 minutes, or such other time as the local board or any of its committees may determine, will be set aside for a public forum at the commencement of meetings of the local board which are open to the public.

5.       Each speaker during the public forum section of a meeting may speak for three minutes.

6.       Standing orders may be suspended on a vote of not less than 75 per cent of those present to extend the period of public participation or the period any speaker is allowed to speak.

7.       This Standing Order does not apply to inaugural meetings and, where not appropriate, extraordinary meetings or a special consultative procedure.

Subjects of public forum

8.       The public forum is to be confined to those items falling within the scope or functions of that local board or committee. Speakers must not speak about a matter that is under judicial consideration or subject to a quasi-judicial process.

Questions of speakers during public forum

9.       With the permission of the chairperson, members may ask questions of speakers during the period reserved for public forum. Questions by members, if permitted, are to be confined to obtaining information or clarification on matters raised by the speaker.

10.     Members may not debate any matter raised during the public forum session that is not on the agenda for the meeting, or take any action in relation to it, other than through the usual procedures for extraordinary business if the matter is urgent.

11.     The meeting may not make any resolution on issues raised in public forum except to refer the matter to a future meeting, or to another committee, or to the chief executive for investigation.

12.     [Note: s 76 – 81, LGA 2002, regarding decision-making]

Language for speeches

13.     A member of the public may address a meeting in English, Māori or New Zealand Sign Language. However, the person should advise the chairperson of their intention to speak in a language other than English at least two clear working days before the meeting.

14.     Where practical, Auckland Council will arrange for a translator to be present at the meeting. The chairperson may also order the speech and any accompanying documents to be translated and printed in English or Māori or another language.

Chairperson’s discretion

15.     The chairperson may:

·   direct a speaker to a different committee if they consider this more appropriate, given the proposed subject matter

·   prohibit a speaker from speaking if they are offensive, repetitious or vexatious, or otherwise breach these standing orders.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank all public forum speakers for their presentations and attendance at the meeting.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

Ward Councillor's report

File No.: CP2021/01823

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the opportunity for Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor Pippa Coom, Ōrākei Ward Councillor Desley Simpson and Albert-Eden Roskill Ward Councillors Christine Fletcher and Cathy Casey to update the local board on regional issues that they have been involved with since the previous local board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Waitematā Local Board’s Standing Orders clauses 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provide provision in the local board meeting for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board, or on any matter the Governing Body member wishes to raise with the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the written report update from the Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor, Pippa Coom.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ward Councillor Pippa Coom report March 2021

13

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Priscila Firmo - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

Central Library Café Lease

File No.: CP2021/01459

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for a lease term of five years with two rights of renewals of one year each, or other variations up to but not longer than a total of 10 years for the commercial lease of the café space at the Central Library.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Central Library comprises a 203.5m² space previously used as a café. The space is currently vacant.

3.       Staff intend seeking requests for proposal from suitable café operators. The successful operator will be required to put some investment into the building.

4.       The proposed commercial lease will allow for occupancy of the café space and aids the activation of the Lorne Street area. In addition, the lease will support council’s recovery from the financial impacts of COVID-19.

5.       Staff recommend a total lease term of seven years including rights of renewal, up to a maximum of 10 years, as this represents a fair period for a good operator to realise a return on investment. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      note that staff will seek requests for proposal from suitable cafe operators to operate a café at the Central Library café space (Attachment A)

b)      approve the proposed term of five (5) years with two rights of renewal of one (1) year each (total term of seven years), or other variations up to but not longer than a total term of ten years including rights of renewal.

Horopaki

Context

6.       The land at 44-48 Lorne Street, legally described as Lot 1 DP 84127 on Record of Title NA40B/1036 on which the Central Library is located is held by Auckland Council under the Local Government Act 2002.

7.       The Central Library café space was occupied pursuant to a commercial lease that was previously managed by Panuku Development Auckland. In September 2019 the site was transferred to Auckland Council Community Facilities Department.

8.       Panuku terminated the commercial lease after the former tenant’s defaulted on the rent and were unable to repay arrears. The previous tenants were evicted in late 2019 and the space has remained vacant since. As a consequence of the eviction, the current  space is non-operational with several areas requiring repairs and maintenance.

9.       Auckland Libraries has expressed its vision and aspirations for this space. However, due to a lack of funding, their options for activating this space are severly limited.

10.     The space requires some (building) infrastructural investment, to bring it up to an operating standard, as well as an overall fit out by the preferred operator.

11.     The total rentable floor area is approximately 203.5m² ,inclusive of the additional rear space (21.42m²) and the area referred to as the ‘lantern space’  (58.4m²). The previous lease included an additional designated outdoor seating area of 26.1m².

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The proposed lease term is five years with two rights of renewal of one year each, with the option to negotiate the term up to but not longer than a total of 10 years, including any rights of renewal.

13.     The successful operator will need to contribute towards the building and fit-out cost. Staff consider that the proposed term of between five to 10 years represents a reasonable period to realise an acceptable return on investment.

14.     The proposed term will allow council the ability to review its position leading up to the first renewal with the potential to explore options that better align with the Auckland Council vision.

15.     The proposed commercial lease will:

a)      allow quick occupancy of the café and lantern space and will improve the provision of services to Library visitors and the overall Library visitor experience

b)      assist with the activation of the Lorne Street area

c)      support event collaboration with Auckland Council, Auckland Libraries and other stakeholders, for example Academy Cinemas

d)      through the incoming rental, support Auckland Council’s recovery from the financial impacts of COVID-19

e)      support broader conservation and sustainability initiatives through the procurement process

16.     The planned procurement approach is to seek proposals through a closed Request For Proposal (RFP). This approach will allow faster activation of the space while still ensuring fair opportunity for Social Enterprises and Maori and Pacifica businesses to participate.

17.     Proposals will be assessed on weighted criteria attributed to the following measures:

·    Product offering, sustainability and community initiatives

·    Operator experience and track record

·    Operational delivery and quality control

·    Financial and delivery capacity

18.     The options available for the Waitematā Local Board to consider are:

 

Options

Pros

Cons

A

Term of five (5) years with two rights of renewal of one (1) year each (total term of 7 seven years), or other variations up to but not longer than a total term of 10 years including rights of renewal.

· Suitable period of occupancy to allow council to evaluate its position and recover from the financial impacts of COVID-19

· Provides a reasonable term for a potential operator to realise a fair return on investment

Secures the space for the agreed term (however, council will be able to re-evaluate its position at renewal)

 

B

A total lease term of less than five years

The shorter term will provide greater flexibility for council to review its position

It is likely to constrain the level of investment into the operation which will consequently affect the service outcomes

C

Foregoing the RFP and exploring alternative uses for the space

The potential to improve utilisation of the space through alternative uses e.g., expansion of library services

This is dependent on the availability of funding for any repurposing. With the Emergency Budget constraints this is unlikely to progress in the short term thereby leaving the space vacant and underutilised.

19.     Option A is the recommended option.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     Climate change is unlikely to impact the term proposed because the site does not sit directly within a flooding or coastal inundation zone.

21.     The designated impact level of the recommended decision on greenhouse gas emissions falls within the “no impact” category because the proposal continues an existing activity and does not introduce new sources of emissions. 

22.     The procurement plan will have a weighting of 40% allocated to product offering, sustainability and community initiatives. Council is seeking a collaborative and innovative partner, who will drive and support community and sustainability outcomes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Staff consulted the following units within council regarding the proposed lease:

·    Connected Communities, Community Libraries (North/Central)

·    Financial and Business Performance, Commercial Advisory

·    Community Facilities,

24.     The respective units indicated support for the proposal.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     The proposed lease supports the following key outcomes of the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2020:

a)      Outcome two: Connected communities that are inclusive, accessible and equitable. The proposal will provide a space for people to relax and connect and will create synergies between the library and café operations.

b)      Outcome six: Waitematā businesses are sustainable, innovative and prosperous. A significant aspect of this outcome is to enable local jobs and employment to help boost the local economy. The proposed lease will support job creation and have key measures aimed at sustainability and community outcomes.

26.     Additional benefits of the proposal include improved service offerings for Library users, supporting the activation of Lorne Street and the positive financial benefit from the commercial operation which will support Auckland’s recovery from the effects of COVID-19.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     Council will work with He Waka Eka Noa, the Southern and Western Initiatives to explore opportunities for Social Enterprises and Maori and Pacifica businesses to participate.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     Staff sought advice from the Finance and Performance Manager for Community Facilities to address the funding gaps for the repairs and maintenance work that needs to take place before the site is tenantable.

29.     The options proposed are to:

a)      reallocate repairs and maintenance funds to this space, and reimburse these within the same financial year through future revenue from this space; or

b)      to negotiate a pay-back opportunity with the chosen vendor in form of rent reduction or other arrangement to cover the funding shortfall

30.     Staff support option (a), to reallocate repairs and maintenance funds as all services will need to be operational before any tenant commences with their fit-out.

31.     Council revenue would be optimised through the rental from the commercial lease

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     The following risk assessment has been prepared for the proposal:

Risk Type

Risk

Mitigation

Commercial

Nonperformance of the contracting party.

Implement robust evaluation standards including assessing the experience, delivery capacity and financial standing of the operator.

Lease to include specified performance standards

Obtain a bond or guarantee if appropriate.

Regulatory

Fit out may require Building consent.

Licensing conditions may be required for the operation.

Inclusion of consent conditions into the lease and for any conditions to be acceptable to the council.

33.     If the proposed lease is not supported, the space will remain vacant and unused.  This may adversely impact on the optimal negotiation outcomes council is seeking.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     If approved, the procurement process seeking requests for proposal from selected operators will commence with the objective of formalising the occupancy within the current calendar year.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Site Plan

35

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Yusuf Khan - Senior Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Stakeholder and Land Advisory

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

Auckland Bowling Club Incorporated - Parking Allocation 100 Stanley Street Grafton

File No.: CP2021/02114

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the local board for the allocation of 15 car parks to the Auckland Bowling Club Incorporated (the bowling club) outside their leased area and licence to occupy at the Grafton Mews car park 100 Stanley Street Grafton.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The car park agreement with the bowling club allowing them to manage and use the Grafton Mews car park expires at the end of June 2021. This carpark comprises approximately 75 parking spaces, seven of which are within the club’s leased area.

3.       The proposal is for Auckland Transport (AT) to take over the management of the car park, excluding the seven spaces within the club’s leased area, later this year.

4.       The bowling club has requested to retain 15 dedicated car parks within the Grafton Mews carpark for bowling club purposes when the car park agreement expires. This is in addition to seven car parks within their leased area, which would bring the total number of parking spaces allocated to the bowling club to 22 spaces.

5.       A total of 22 parking spaces is consistent with parking allocated to other bowling clubs in the Auckland region where leases include dedicated spaces.

6.       The mechanism to allocate the 15 parking spaces would be through a license under the Local Government Act 2002.

7.       The area proposed for the licensed parking is outside the Auckland Domain boundary, so the Waitemata Local Board is the delegated authority for the proposed license.

8.       Since this car park is associated with activities in the Auckland Domain, endorsement from the Auckland Domain Committee has been sought prior to presenting a report to the Waitematā Local Board for their decision. The Auckland Domain Committees recommendation will be reported to the meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)   approves a license to the Auckland Bowling Club Incorporated for 15 car parks at the Grafton Mews car park at 100 Stanley Street subject to public and iwi consultation and the following conditions;

·    The term of the licence to align with the term of the lease to the club for their adjacent premises with final expiry on 31 March 2026

·    Rent for the licence shall be one ($1) per annum plus GST

·    the parking spaces are for bowling club purposes only

·    two disabled car parks will be included in the license area

·    the license term aligns with the lease (March 2026)

·    the usage of the licensed parking will be reviewed on an annual basis

·    the carparks will be managed by Auckland Transport on an authorised vehicle only basis

·    the Bowling Cub must agree to withdraw the current legal proceedings

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Auckland Council has an Operation and Management Agreement with Auckland Bowling Club Incorporated, for the club to manage the council carpark in the Grafton Mews area, that is used in conjunction with Auckland Domain adjacent to the club’s leased site. This agreement was to record the bowling clubs practice of leasing the majority of the car parks to local health and business entities. This arrangement had been operating without consent for some time. The agreement was implemented as a temporary measure with the knowledge that a longer-term solution was required to manage the parking area

10.     The agreement commenced in 2017 with several extensions being granted.  The intention is that AT take over the management of the carpark later in 2021.

The Proposal

11.     The bowling club requested the allocation of 15 dedicated car parks within the area highlighted below. This is in addition to seven car parks within their leased area, which would bring the total number of parking spaces allocated to the bowling club to 22 spaces.

12.    

These parking spaces are required to meet the bowling club needs of members as well as social bowling club events by non-members during the week and at weekends.

13.    Key aspects of the proposal are;

·    the 15 parking spaces are for club purposes only, e.g., no sub-leasing to businesses.

·    two of the dedicated spaces are disabled spaces.

·    the dedicated spaces come at no cost to the bowling club.

·    the parking spaces will be allocated to the club on a 24/7 basis.

·    the public would be able to traverse the area.

·    the 15 parking spaces will be based on the new AT parking plan, which includes angled parking as illustrated in the diagram below.


License Prcoess

14.    The mechanism to allocate the 15 parking spaces is through a license under the Local Government Act 2002. This includes undertaking public and iwi consultation prior to granting the licence.

15.     The Grafton Mews carpark is situated across two lots. Half the car park is located within the Auckland Domain boundary, and half of it outside.

16.     The proposed license area is on that part of the carpark that is located outside the Auckland Domain boundary.

17.     For this reason, the Waitematā Local Board has delegated authority to consider and approve the formal license proposal.  

18.     The term of proposed license will be aligned with the bowling club lease, which expires 31 March 2026.   

19.     The following conditions will apply;

·        the parking spaces are for bowling club purposes only

·        two disabled car parks will be included in the license area

·        the license term aligns with the lease (March 2026)

·        the usage of the licensed parking will be reviewed on an annual basis.

·        the carparks will be managed by Auckland Transport on an authorised vehicle only basis

·        the Bowling Cub must agree to withdraw the current legal proceedings.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

 

The need for 15 additional car parking spaces

 

20.     Last year, the bowling club had over 6,000 people visit the club to bowl. The current participation levels are however restricted by the weather and limited capacity of the greens.

21.     To help increase the capacity of the greens and mitigate the loss in revenue from parking, the bowling club’s intention is to change one of the greens to an all-weather green. We understand that Auckland Bowls has offered support for this new asset subject to the club securing car parking.

22.     With an all-weather green and allocated car parking, the club has advised that their bookings would increase and the options they could offer to the community would also increase. These options include;

·        more community events.

·        early morning meetings, which include a game of bowls and lunch. This is very popular but require car parking.

·        mid-week bowling events.

·        bare foot bowling, normally a weekend event.

·        more corporate events.

·        team building events during the week and weekend.

23.     The bowling club has advised that at this point they cannot give more details on the specific days and times these additional events will be delivered. They do however need the option for all time slots during the week and weekends, and their intention is to promote activities at the club during the week as well as weekends.

24.     An all-weather surface and associated car parking would enable the club to increase participation, which would help with the long-term survival of the club.

Participation trends in bowls

25.     Based on information from Bowls NZ, there have been a 1.5% increase year on year for the last two years in full playing membership of bowling blubs, which is a major turnaround from five years ago where there was an 8-10% decline and the closing of clubs.

26.     Social membership in clubs is up by over 20% and casual bowls programmes are growing year on year to the point where clubs are struggling to meet the demand for the numbers of people wanting to play.

27.     This is an area where Bowls NZ is assisting clubs to build capability. There is a significant amount of investment being put into bowling facilities. This includes updating artificial greens, converting natural greens to artificial, upgrading of natural greens, installing covered greens, or upgrading the clubrooms. This investment in bowling facilities allows bowling clubs to provide a 12-month playing programme

Comparison with other bowling clubs

28.    It is not possible to make a direct comparison of parking allocations between different sporting clubs across Auckland due to site specific characteristics, different parking demands, historical allocations, legacy agreements, and participation numbers. However, a comparison of bowling clubs situated on Council owned parkland with exclusive parking suggests that the proposal from the Auckland bowling club is not unique, and that a request of 15 additional parking spaces is reasonable.

29.     Across Auckland, there are seven bowling clubs on council land that have dedicated parking spaces. (refer to the table below).

30.     Of the seven bowling clubs, the Auckland Bowling club has the least number of dedicated car parks. Note that this excludes the current agreement with the Auckland bowling club to manage the Grafton Mews carpark.

Club

Park

 

No of allocated / exclusive car parks

Method

1

St George Bowling and Sports Club

Stadium Reserve, Papatoetoe

60

Part of leased area

2

Marne Road Papakura Bowling Club

Massey Park Papakura

40

Part of leased area

3

Blockhouse Bay Bowls

Blockhouse Bay Recreation Reserve

25

Part of leased area

4

Riverhead Bowling club

Riverhead War Memorial Park

17

Part of leased area

5

Henderson Bowls

Cranwell Reserve, Henderson

15

Allocation outside leased area

6

Western Indoor Bowling

Olympic Park

12

Informal allocation -Signage indicating it is for club users only

7

Auckland Bowling club

Auckland Domain

7

Within leased area

 

31.     A total of 22 parking spaces in this case is consistent with spaces allocated to other bowling clubs in the Auckland region.

32.     An analysis of community leases on parkland within the Waitemata Local Board area shows that most community lease facilities do not have exclusive parking.

33.     There are however many variables that make any comparison of parking allocation of community leases in central Auckland difficult. Apart from variables such as site-specific characteristics, different parking demands and legacy agreements, there are variables around the availability of Council owned parking. For example, in many cases Council does not have any parking to offer. 

34.     Based on the high-level analysis of parking allocation in the Waitemata local board area, there are seven community lease facilities with exclusive parking. This is a mixture of sporting facilities, kindergartens and community facilities.

Key factors for consideration

35.     Several factors need to be considered when assessing the request from the bowling club for 15 additional parking spaces including;

·     the historical use and management of the carpark by the bowling club.

·     the current Operation and Management Agreement in place between council and the club that allows the bowling club to manage and use the Grafton Mews car park.

·     the upward trend in the participation in bowls

·        the intention of the bowling club to increase capacity through provision of an artificial surface to increase participation.

·        the intention of the Domain Committee to introduce paid parking at the Grafton Mews carpark and for AT to take over the management when the Operation and Management Agreement with the club expires.

·        the high demand for commuter parking in and around the Domain. 

·        settlement of a litigation matter

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

36.     The proposed parking license will have no additional impact on climate change. There is no impact on Green House gas emissions as the proposal does not introduce any new source of emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.     The carpark will be managed by Auckland Transport (AT) as a paid parking area. The effect of this proposal will marginally reduce the revenue generating opportunity when the licence area is being used by the bowling club.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.     A workshop was held with the Waitematā Local Board on 23 February 2021.

39.     Some of the feedback and discussions from the local board included;

·     an understanding of the future usage levels of the proposed 15 car parks is important. This is to ensure that there is a need for the exclusive use by the club on a 24/7 basis. This includes weekend use compared to weekdays.

·     safety issues at the exit of the car park were highlighted. AT will be requested to investigate the potential for any improvements.

·     discussion on the term of the proposed license. It was confirmed that the term would be aligned with the bowling club lease term.

·     consideration should be given to reviewing the usage levels of the licensed car parks on an annual basis

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

40.     An aim of community leasing is to increase targeted support for Māori community development. This proposal seeks to improve access to facilities for all Aucklanders, including Māori living in the Waitemata Local Board and wider areas.

41.     Iwi will be consulted as part of the public notification process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     There may be a small reduction in revenue generated by the pay and display management of the carpark area with the allocation of spaces to the bowling club.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

43.     There is the potential for members of the public parking the Grafton Mews Carpark to be unfamiliar with the arrangement with the bowling club. Signage both on the ground and at each space will need to clearly set out the conditions under which parking is undertaken.

44.     There is a risk of litigation commenced by the bowling club continuing if this matter is not resolved.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

45.     Before granting the licence public notification and consultation with iwi groups with an interest in the area will be undertaken.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Martin van Jaarsveld - Manager Community Parks & Places

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

Classification of Section 1 SO 69238 at 55 West End Road, Herne Bay under the Reserves Act 1977

File No.: CP2021/01522

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to classify a parcel of land at 55 West End Road, Herne Bay (Section 1 SO 69238) as a local purpose (esplanade) reserve, under the Reserves Act 1977.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Section 1 SO 69238 (the reserve) is located at 55 West End Road, Herne Bay and held as an unclassified local purpose (esplanade) reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977 (the Act).

3.       It is legal requirement under the Act that council classify all reserves vested in it. Where a reserve is held by council as an unclassified reserve, council as administering body of such reserve is unable to grant rights over the reserve such as leases, licences and easements until it is classified.

4.       The Scout Association of New Zealand (the Scouts) has a ground lease over part of the reserve. The lease commenced on 1 September 2003, provided for one initial term of
10 years and a right of renewal of five (5) years which finally expired on 31 August 2018. Since expiry, the lease has been holding over on a month-by-month basis, until a new lease is formalised.

5.       Council staff recommend that the Waitematā Local Board classify the reserve as a local purpose (esplanade) reserve under Section 16(2A) of the Act. This classification will enable the council to consider granting a new lease to the Scouts and allow the club to continue with its activities on the reserve.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approve to classify a parcel of land located at 55 West End Road, Herne Bay, legally described as Section 1 Survey Office Plan 69238, pursuant to Section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 as a local purpose (esplanade) reserve.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       As the reserve is held under the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 (the Act), the reserve must be classified for its primary purpose.

7.       Local boards hold delegated authority under Section 16(2A) of the Act to approve classification of council owned reserves, subject to all statutory processes having been satisfied.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Section 1 SO 69238 (the reserve)

8.       The reserve, shown in Attachment A Figure 1, is located at 55 West End Road, Herne Bay. It is legally described as Section 1 Survey Office Plan 69238 comprising approximately 465m². The reserve is held in fee simple by Auckland Council as an unclassified local purpose (esplanade) reserve.

9.       Originally the reserve was an unformed part of Jervois Road. When that portion of Jervois Road was stopped in 2004, the reserve was automatically created pursuant to Section 345(3) of the Local Government Act 1974 and vested in Auckland Council (then Auckland City Council) as an unclassified local purpose (esplanade) reserve subject to the provisions of the Act.

10.     The reserve has not been classified and this must be completed under Section 16(2A) of the Act.

Scout Association of New Zealand (the Scouts)

11.     The Scouts own the building located on the reserve (shown in Attachment A Figure 2). The former Auckland City Council granted Scouts a ground lease for the footprint of the building with curtilage.  The lease commenced 1 September 2003, provided for one initial term of 10 years and a right of renewal of five (5) years which finally expired on 31 August 2018. The lease is holding over on a month-by-month basis on the existing terms and conditions, until a new lease is formalised.

12.     Scouts now wish to enter into a new ground lease for the term of ten years with one right of renewal of ten years. The building is used for teaching children, scouting activities and it is available for hiring by the public for events that align with scouting policies. This will be brought to the Board to resolve on in a subsequent business meeting report.

13.     As the reserve is held under the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 the land must be classified to legally support a lease to be issued for the occupation of the land.

14.     Local Boards hold delegated authority under Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 to classify all council-owned reserves.

15.     Of note is the following:

a)   As the building is lying partially over the foreshore, a coastal permit is required. The permit was issued in 1996 and expires on 31 October 2031.

b)   The piece of land shown in Attachment A Figure 3 is situated on the seaward side of the reserve is part of coastal and marine area.

Reserves Act 1977 (the Act)

16.     The Act came into force on 1 April 1978 and requires all reserves to be classified for their primary purposes.

17.     The parcel outlined in paragraph 8 has remained unclassified and requires classification. For the council to grant a new lease to the Scouts staff recommend that the reserve is classified as local purpose (esplanade) reserve.

18.     Prior to proceeding with the classification, council is required under Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 to engage with local iwi. There is no provision under Section 16(2A) of the Act requiring council to publicly advertise its intention to classify.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     There will be no climate impact as the classification of a reserve is the formalisation of a statutory requirement under the Act.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The proposed classification has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of advice in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     The Waitematā Local Board holds the delegated authority under Section 16(2A) of the Act to resolve to classify the reserve.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori.

23.     Engagement with iwi identified as having an interest in the land was undertaken on 2 December 2020.

24.     Further engagement on the proposal to classify the reserve according to its unclassified status was undertaken by email on 3 December 2020.

25.     No objections to the proposal have been received.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     The cost of classification under the Act will be borne by Auckland Council’s Community Facilities Department.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     It is a statutory requirement that the reserve is classified.

28.     Should the Waitematā Local Board choose not to resolve to classify the reserve, this decision would mean that Auckland Council is in breach of its statutory obligations under the Act. It would also prevent council staff from recommending a grant of any new lease/s.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     Subject to the local board resolving to classify the reserve, council staff will publish a notice in the New Zealand Gazette, so a permanent public record of the classification is held.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Aerial maps of 55 West End Road, Herne Bay

49

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tamara Zunic - Specialist Technical Statutory Advisor

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Stakeholder and Land Advisory

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

Local board input into preparation of the draft 2021 Regional Parks Management Plan

File No.: CP2021/01223

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable local boards to provide formal input into the preparation of the draft Regional Parks Management Plan 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) Committee initiated the 10-year review of the Regional Parks Management Plan (RPMP) in 2020.  Written suggestions from 758 submitters were received on the intention to draft the plan, and in December 2020 a summary was sent to local board members.

3.       The main overarching theme in the suggestions is that people highly value the natural, undeveloped nature of the regional parks, particularly in the face of continuing growth of Auckland’s population and urban area. They want to be able to access and enjoy regional parks while at the same time protecting these natural spaces.

4.       Track closures to prevent the spread of kauri dieback continue to be a source of frustration and the council received numerous requests for it to do more to re-establish access while protecting kauri. Vehicles on Muriwai Beach, dog control, visitor impacts on wildlife, and the need for greater plant and animal pest control were other sources of concern.

5.       People highlighted that regional parks can play a positive role in responding to climate change as natural carbon sinks, with many people suggesting ‘that more trees be planted’. Other suggestions included ways for farming to be more sustainable, regenerative and diverse and for visitor vehicle emissions to be reduced.

6.       Submitters also suggested regional parks play an important role in connecting and educating people about nature, Māori heritage, and farming. They suggested volunteering and partnerships could support this role.

7.       There was both opposition and qualified support for revenue generation from regional parks. Some suggested donations could be sought to support projects in parks.

8.       The next steps are to consider these suggestions in the preparation of the draft RPMP, together with local board input provided through this report, and engagement with mana whenua. Key decisions and issues will be workshopped with the PACE Committee before the draft RPMP is presented for the committee’s adoption and release for public consultation.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      resolve formal feedback to inform the preparation of the draft Regional Park Management Plan 2021.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The regional parks management plan guides the management and use of regional parks. The regional park network has been managed via an omnibus management plan since 2002 and the 2010 version is still operative. Having a management plan is a statutory requirement under the Reserves Act 1977 and the Waitakere Ranges Heritage Area Act 2008.

10.     The PACE Committee initiated the 10-year review of the RPMP[1] in 2020. The review encompasses 28 regional parks comprising approximately 41,000 hectares of park land.

11.     The process for the review is as follows.

12.     On 20 August 2020, Auckland Council notified its intention to prepare a new plan and sought written suggestions from the community and organisations, as required under the Reserves Act 1977.

13.     During an eight-week consultation period from 1 September to 26 October 2020, comments and suggestions were received from 758 people and organisations along with a petition from 3681 petitioners.

14.     Elected members were provided with a summary of the suggestions in December 2020. The summary of suggestions was publicly released in January 2021 and is available on the RPMP review webpage.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Summary of suggestions from organisations and the community

15.     The suggestions ranged from general comments about what people value about regional parks and the role the parks should play, to comments and suggestions about specific regional parks.

16.     Comments included brief suggestions from many different park users, through to multiple-page submissions quoting clauses of the current RPMP and in-depth suggestions from those who have had years of close association with the regional parks. Organisations representing specific recreation, community or conservation interests put forward their members’ views. 

Key themes

·   Almost universally, people told us they love the natural, undeveloped character of regional parks, and value the ability to freely access natural and open spaces as Tāmaki Makaurau continues to grow.

·   Many value native biodiversity for its own sake and want to protect and restore the natural environment.

Issues that the largest numbers of submitters felt strongly about were:

·   The impact of kauri dieback related track closures on wellbeing, with requests to improve access while protecting kauri.

·   Vehicles on beaches, particularly at Muriwai, drew comment about conflicts with other users and concerns about safety and environmental damage.

·   In response to climate change, people saw regional parks as fulfilling the role of a carbon sink. By far the most common suggestion was to ‘plant more trees.’ Other common suggestions were for farming to be more sustainable, regenerative and diverse, and to build cycle trails and bus links between parks and communities so people don’t have to drive.

·   Some requested more spaces to take dogs, while others wanted to keep areas dog-free with a greater focus on enforcing dog bylaws.

·   Many raised concerns about plant and animal pest infestations and suggested priority go to conservation and pest control and suggested actions to reduce visitor impacts on wildlife.

Other key themes raised by the community and organisations included:

·   Requests from many outdoor recreation groups and users (trampers, horse riders, mountain bikers, vehicle-based campers, four-wheel drive recreation, dog walkers and others) for more opportunities to enjoy their activities in more parts of regional parks.

·   Regional parks were viewed as the natural place to educate and build connections to nature including through volunteering, and to learn about farming and provide experiences with animals. Suggestions to provide visitor information, nature education, support volunteers and provide a more visible ranger presence were received.

·   A petition from 3681 people sought an end to the killing of farmed animals for food production at Ambury and other regional parks, on the grounds that animals deserve to live out their full lives.

·   People said they want to understand and connect with the heritage and history of the whenua, particularly its Māori history.

·   Commercial use was both opposed and given conditional support, providing it fits into the natural character of the regional parks. Some suggested donations could help fund projects and volunteering could be increased.

·   The Waitākere Ranges drew the most comment by far of all the regional parks, including comments on kauri dieback and tracks, and the impact of visitor pressures in many areas.

·   The Hūnua Ranges were seen to have considerable untapped potential for active recreation, with many suggestions for horse riding, mountain biking, tramping, day walks and cycle links.

17.     Further detail is available in the Summary of Suggestions, published on the RPMP review webpage.

18.     Staff are seeking formal feedback from local boards by resolution in local board meetings held in February or March 2021 to help inform the draft RPMP preparation.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     Climate change is one of the key topics of the review. We invited comment on the role that regional parks might play in responding to the climate change emergency and many suggestions were received on this topic, as summarised in the section above.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The preparation of the draft RPMP in 2021 involves subject matter experts from many parts of the council including Infrastructure and Environmental Services, Plans and Places, Regional Parks, Community Facilities; as well as council controlled organisations such as Auckland Unlimited, Auckland Transport, and Watercare.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     Following workshops in early 2021 with those local boards who requested it, this report seeks formal feedback from local boards to be considered in preparation of the draft RPMP.

22.     Local boards will have a further opportunity to comment on the draft 2021 RPMP following the public submission process.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     We are engaging with mana whenua during the drafting stage of the RPMP. In addition, we have requested region-wide input through the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum. The forum’s response to this request is being considered in February 2021.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The cost of the plan review will be met within existing Regional Parks and Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships budgets and resources, confirmed in the Emergency Budget 2020/2021.

25.     Revising the RPMP does not commit the council to future expenditure. The feedback received during the review and direction in the RPMP will guide priorities within available funding for regional parks.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     The table sets out risks and mitigations relating to the preparation of a draft RPMP in 2021.

Risk

Mitigation

If there is any move back into a higher level of Covid-19 Emergency during the plan drafting period, direct contact methods of engagement with mana whenua and key stakeholders may be disrupted.

·  Aim to move engagement to remote methods such as Skype, if necessary.

·  Consider moving the deadlines if sufficient engagement cannot be undertaken.

The review may raise expectations for a higher level of facilities or services on regional parks. 

·  Manage expectations regarding the review scope and the relationship between the draft RPMP and the Long-term Plan and annual plan in all communications.

If we do not follow the correct processes under the Reserves Act 1977 and other legislation, the review process could be open to challenge.

·  Confirm the legal status of regional park land holdings and check the statutory and other obligations over each land parcel to ensure compliance.

·  Ensure legal requirements regarding consultation processes are correctly followed.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Analysis of the range of suggestions received from the community, feedback from local boards and mana whenua will help to inform the preparation of the draft RPMP in 2021, which will also draw on extensive staff expertise across the council group.

28.     Key decisions and issues will be workshopped with the PACE Committee before the draft RPMP is presented for the committee’s adoption and release for public consultation.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jo Mackay - Project Manager

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Service Strategy and Integration

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

2021 Local Government New Zealand Conference and Annual General Meeting

File No.: CP2021/02047

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse the process for appointing elected members to attend the Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) conference taking place from 15 to 17 July 2021, appoint delegates to the Annual General Meeting (AGM) and provide process information regarding remits and awards.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2021 LGNZ Conference will be held at the ASB Theatre Marlborough, Blenheim from 15 to 17 July 2021. The conference programme is appended as Attachment A.

3.       Due to reductions in the Emergency Budget (current financial year) and risks associated with uncertainty of alert levels during the COVID-19 pandemic, the number of members who will be able to attend the LGNZ conference this year is limited.

4.       After considering a number of options (detailed in attachment B), staff recommend an option that enables a representative Auckland Council delegation to be funded from the reduced budget as follows:

·   elected members with a formal role as Auckland Council representatives to LGNZ 

·   six additional local board members to be selected from the local board clusters.

5.       The estimated cost of attending the conference (registration, travel and accommodation) is $2,410 per person, bringing the total for the recommended option to $38,560.

6.       As in previous years, elected members may use their Individual Development Budget (IDB) allocation to attend the conference. The IDB allocation has also been reduced under the Emergency Budget to $1,500 per member per electoral term. It is therefore not sufficient to cover the total cost of a member’s attendance. Members who wish to take up this opportunity would need to cover the shortfall themselves, approximately $900.

7.       Auckland Council is entitled to four delegates at the AGM. These delegates are appointed by the Governing Body. Staff recommend that the four delegates include Mayor Phil Goff (as presiding delegate), Chief Executive Jim Stabback, and up to two other Auckland Council conference attendees.

8.       The adoption of remits at the AGM and the 2021 LGNZ Excellence Awards are elements of this event. This report outlines the Auckland Council process for deciding Auckland Council remits and council positions on the conference remit, as well as a consolidated process for Auckland Council entries to the awards. The LGNZ Auckland Zone meeting, which is attended by representatives of local boards and the governing body is the forum that will coordinate these discussions.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      note the budget constraints in the current financial year and the recommended process for the appointment of attendees and delegates to the Local Government New Zealand 2021 Conference and Annual General Meeting in Blenheim from 15 to 17 July 2021

b)      endorse the selection of one local board representative per cluster through the Local Board Chairs’ Forum and agree to put nominations for cluster representatives through the local board chair for consideration at their April 2020 meeting.

c)      note the process to submit remits to the Annual General Meeting and entries for the 2021 Local Government New Zealand Excellence Awards has been communicated to elected members on 2 March 2021 

d)      confirm that conference attendance including travel and accommodation will be paid for in accordance with the current Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy

e)      note that all local board members who are appointed to attend the conference will be confirmed to the General Manager Local Board Services by 15 April 2021 at the latest to ensure that they are registered with Local Government New Zealand

f)       note that any member who wishes to attend the conference using their Individual Development Budget (IDB) allocation will need to subsidise the cost and must contact the General Manager Local Board Services by 8 April 2021 to make the necessary arrangements.

g)      note that the Governing Body will be appointing delegates to the 2021 LGNZ Annual General Meeting at their 25 March 2021 meeting, with the recommendation being to appoint Mayor Phil Goff as presiding delegate, and to appoint Chief Executive Jim Stabback and up to two other Auckland Council conference attendees as delegates.

h)      note that conference attendees can attend the 2021 Local Government New Zealand Annual General Meeting in an advisory capacity provided their names are included on the Annual General Meeting registration form, which will be signed by the mayor.

Horopaki

Context

9.       LGNZ is an incorporated society of local government organisations whose primary objective is to represent and advocate for the interests of local authorities in New Zealand. LGNZ champions policy positions on key issues that are of interest to local government and holds regular meetings and events throughout the year for members. The schedule of meetings includes an annual conference and meetings of local government geographical clusters (known as LGNZ zones) and sectors.

10.     LGNZ is governed by a National Council made up of representatives from member authorities as outlined in the constitution. Some of its work is conducted through committees and working groups which include representatives from member authorities.

11.     Elected members who have been formally appointed to LGNZ roles including members who are involved in advisory groups are:

Name

LGNZ role

Mayor Phil Goff

National Council representative for Auckland

Auckland Council representative on the Metropolitan Sector Group

Councillor Pippa Coom

 

Local Board Chair Richard Northey

National Council representative for Auckland (appointed by Governing Body) and co-chair of the Auckland Zone

National Council representative for Auckland (appointed by local boards) and co-chair of the Auckland Zone

Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore

Auckland Council representative on Regional Sector

Councillor Alf Filipaina

Auckland Council representative on Te Maruata Roopu Whakahaere

Local Board Member Nerissa Henry

Auckland Council representative on Young Elected Members

Councillor Angela Dalton

Local Board Deputy Chair Danielle Grant

Auckland Council representatives on Governance and Strategy Advisory Group

Councillor Richard Hills

Local Board Member Cindy Schmidt

Auckland Council representatives on Policy Advisory Group

Auckland Zone

12.     LGNZ rules were amended in 2019 to allow Auckland Council, with its unique governance arrangements, to be set up as its own Zone, rather than be part of LGNZ Zone 1 with Northland councils.

13.     Auckland Zone meetings are scheduled on a quarterly basis. These meetings are co-chaired by the two Auckland representatives appointed to the LGNZ National Council by the Governing Body (Councillor Pippa Coom) and local boards’ (Chair Richard Northey) and attended by appointed representatives of local boards and members of the Governing Body.

14.     The meetings of Auckland Zone are open to all elected members. The zone meetings receive regular updates from LGNZ Executive as well as verbal reports from Auckland Council elected members who have an ongoing involvement with LGNZ.

15.     The zone meetings provide an opportunity for council to have discussions across governing body and local boards on joint advocacy issues including remits and other shared priorities that fall within LGNZ’s mandate.

LGNZ Annual conference and AGM 2021

16.     The 2021 LGNZ conference and AGM will be held at the ASB Theatre Marlborough, Waiharakeke Blenheim, from 15 to 17 July 2021.

17.     This year, the conference programme has the theme “Reimagining Aotearoa from community up”. The programme is available online on the LGNZ website and is appended as Attachment A.

18.     The AGM takes place on the last day of the conference from 9.30am to 12.30pm. The LGNZ constitution permits the Auckland Council to appoint four delegates to represent it at the AGM, with one of the delegates being appointed as presiding delegate.

19.     Due to the restriction following the COVID-19 crisis, the 2020 conference was postponed and Auckland Council only sent two delegates to the AGM. The two delegates who attended the AGM via remote/electronic attendance were Mayor Phil Goff and Councillor Pippa Coom.

20.     In addition to the official delegates at the AGM, LGNZ allows conference participants to attend the AGM as observers but requires prior notice. Nominated attendees to the conference will be invited to register as observers to the AGM.

Remits (for consideration at the AGM 2021)

21.     LGNZ invites member authorities to submit remits for consideration at the AGM on 17 July 2021 and entries for consideration for the LGNZ Excellence Awards, to be announced at the conference dinner on 16 July 2021.

22.     Proposed remits should address only major strategic ‘issues of the moment’. They should have a national focus, articulating a major interest or concern at the national political level.  They should relate to significant policy issues that, as a council, we have not been able to progress with central government through other means.

23.     On 2 March 2021, elected members were sent detailed information inviting proposals for remits to be discussed at the Auckland Zone meeting on 12 March 2021. Remits that are agreed on at the zone meeting will be submitted by the due date.

24.     The June 2021 meeting of the Auckland Zone will review all the remits that will be discussed at the AGM with a view to recommending a council position that the Auckland Council delegates will advocate at the AGM.

LGNZ Excellence Awards 2021

25.     LGNZ also invites member authorities to submit entries for consideration for the LGNZ Excellence Awards, to be announced at the conference dinner on 16 July 2021.

26.     The LGNZ Excellence Awards recognise and celebrate excellent performance by councils in promoting and growing the well-being of their communities. The awards are judged on a combination of general and specific criteria, incorporating best practice and components from the CouncilMARK™ excellence programme’s four priority areas. The awards categories for 2021 are:

·   Creative New Zealand EXCELLENCE Award for Cultural Well-being

·   Martin Jenkins EXCELLENCE Award for Economic Well-being

·   Air New Zealand EXCELLENCE Award for Environmental Well-being

·   Kāinga Ora Homes and Communities EXCELLENCE Award for Social Well-being

·   In addition, one or more individuals will be awarded the Te Tari Taiwhenua Internal Affairs EXCELLENCE Award for Outstanding Contribution to Local Government, and Fulton Hogan will also select the Local EXCELLENCE Award from among the finalists.

27.     The email to elected members on 2 March 2021 also outlined detailed information inviting potential awards entries to be discussed at the Auckland Zone meeting on 12 March 2021 so that entries from Auckland Council can be coordinated.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Overall costs per attendee

28.     The estimated total cost of attendance to the conference is $2,410 per person, distributed as follows (all costs are GST inclusive):

Registration (early bird)

$1,400

Accommodation* @ $190 per night x 3 nights

$570

Flights**

$280

Miscellaneous***

$160

Total

$2,410

* based on average cost of Blenheim hotels.

** flights may range from $49 one way (take on bag only) to $199 for a 5pm flight (with a checked bag). $280 is as per 2020 budgeting.

*** for travel to and from airport and reasonable daily expenses under the EM Expenses policy

Options

29.     Staff considered several options (Attachment B) that ensure a fair balance of representatives across the Governing Body and local boards while keeping within budget. The key considerations that were applied to selecting the staff preferred option are:

a.   the available budget for the LGNZ conference attendance is only $40,000

b.   the cost of attendance per person (registration, travel, accommodation) is estimated at $2,410

c.   with the uncertainty to public events and gatherings posed by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, there is a possibility the COVID-19 alert levels may not be favourable in July 2021. If this is the case, cancellations will not recoup all monies spent. Staff estimate that although this risk may be lower in July, it will continue to exist

d.   ensure fair representation from local boards given the inability to accommodate 21 representatives

e.   empowering elected members who have a formal involvement with LGNZ to be prioritised for attendance to maximise their ongoing contributions on behalf of Auckland Council

30.     Staff recommend Option B which will cost $38,560 and fund attendance of 16 elected members including:

·   all members who have been formally appointed or nominated to LGNZ National Council, subsidiary bodies and advisory groups (10 members)

·   a representative from each of the 6 local board clusters – North, South, West, Central, Islands and Rural (6 members).

31.     This is not the cheapest option but is the one that enables a wider representation from local boards. The more expensive options which allow for one representative per local board cannot be accommodated as it will exceed the available budget.

32.     Local boards have an existing method for choosing a limited number of representatives. This approach utilises informal cluster groups based on geographic locations and unique characteristics (North, South, West, Central, Island, Rural) and involves local board chairs liaising with and agreeing with others in their cluster on their representative.

33.     There is an opportunity to select local board representatives using this methodology at the Local Board Chairs’ Forum on 12 April 2021.

Use of IDB to fund additional attendees

34.     Elected members who wish to attend the LGNZ conference and are not nominated or appointed can still attend using their IDB. As IDB entitlements are $1500 per elected member per term and the cost of attendance is approximately $2410, these elected members will need to meet the cost difference.

35.     It is recommended that elected members who wish to attend and can pay the difference are included in the group booking for accommodation and travel. Any elected member who wishes to take up this opportunity is encouraged to liaise further with the Kura Kāwana team.

36.     LGNZ are working on introducing some form of virtual attendance to the conference but the details are still to be confirmed.

37.     As per previous years, LGNZ will make some session recordings available online after the conference.

Delegates for the Annual General Meeting

38.     In line with previous years, staff recommend that AGM delegates are appointed from within the attending members as follows:

·   Mayor Phil Goff as presiding delegate

·   Chief Executive Jim Stabback

·   up to two additional delegates.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

39.     This report is procedural in nature, however the key impact on climate is through supporting attendance at a conference by means of air travel. A conservative approach to conference attendance would help reduce this impact.

40.     Estimates for emissions associated with travel to Blenheim or travel within Auckland for local meetings have not been calculated at the time of writing this report. Emissions, when known, can be offset through a verified carbon offset programme at a small cost.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

41.     LGNZ is an incorporated body comprising members who are New Zealand councils.  Council-controlled organisations are not eligible for separate membership. However, remits can cover activities of council-controlled organisations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

42.     LGNZ advocates for issues that are important to local government. Many of these issues are aligned with local board priorities. As such, there is interest from local boards in contributing to the work of LGNZ and in identifying and harnessing opportunities to progress other advocacy areas that local boards may have.

43.     Each local board has a nominated lead who represents them at Auckland Zone meetings and is involved in discussions about LGNZ matters.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     LGNZ advocates on a variety of issues that are important to Māori, including Māori housing, various environmental issues and Council-Māori participation and relationship arrangements. In addition, LGNZ provides advice including published guidance to assist local authorities in understanding values, aspirations and interests of Māori.

45.     The LGNZ National Council has a sub-committee, Te Maruata, which has the role of promoting increased representation of Māori as elected members of local government, and of enhancing Māori participation in local government processes. It also provides support for councils in building relationships with iwi, hapu and Māori groups. Te Maruata provides Māori input on development of future policies or legislation relating to local government. Councillor Alf Filipaina is a member of the sub-committee.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

46.     Staff considered options to reduce the financial impact of the attendance to the conference, in line with the budget restrictions imposed as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic.

47.     The costs associated with conference attendance, travel and accommodation within the recommended option can be met within the allocated Kura Kāwana (Elected Member development) budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     The key risk is of delayed decision-making which can impact costs and registration choices. The sooner the registration for the nominated members can be made, the more likely it is that Auckland Council can take advantage of early bird pricing for the conference, flights and accommodation, all done via bulk-booking.

49.     A resurgence of COVID-19 in the community and a change of alert level might prevent elected members from travelling to attend the conference. LGNZ is keeping an active review on the COVID-19 situation and will update directly to registered participants should a change affect the delivery of the conference. LGNZ is still working through a number of scenarios and how these would affect their decision to proceed as planned, postpone, cancel or switch delegates to virtual attendance, with the final decision resting with the National Council on the basis of the information available at the time.

50.     In the current COVID circumstances, the reputational risk associated with any financial expenditure is heightened and there is high scrutiny from the public on the council’s expenses. The recommendation to limit the number of members attending the conference mitigates this risk to a certain degree.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     Once representatives are confirmed to attend, the Manager Governance Services will coordinate all conference registrations, as well as requests to attend the AGM.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

LGNZ Conference 2021 programme

65

b

Options for attendance

71

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elodie Fontaine - Advisor - Democracy Services

Authorisers

Rose Leonard - Manager Governance Services

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

Waiheke Rāhui by Ngāti Paoa

File No.: CP2021/01572

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable the local board to provide feedback on Ngāti Paoa’s decision to lay a rāhui around Waiheke.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On Sunday 31 January 2021, Ngāti Paoa laid a rāhui around the motu of Waiheke. A rāhui is a customary practice to replenish the pātaka kai and restore the mauri of the moana.

3.       This rāhui:

a)   applies to the whole island, out to nautical mile (~1.825km)

b)   applies to four species: koura / crayfish, tīpa / scallops, pāua, and kūtai / mussels

c)   is for an initial period of 2 years.

4.       Attachment A contains Ngāti Paoa’s media release announcing the rāhui.

5.       Ngāti Paoa contemporaneously filed an application under s186a of the Fisheries Act for consideration of a formal fishery closure by the Minister of Oceans and Fisheries in respect of those four species out to 1 nautical mile from the Waiheke coastline. The Ministry of Primary Industries (MPI) is currently consulting publicly on that with a closing date for submissions of 22 March.

6.       Section 186A of the Fisheries Act 1996 (s186a) provides that the Minister of Fisheries may temporarily close an area, or restrict or prohibit certain fishing methods, for any species of aquatic life, if satisfied that it will recognise and make provision for the use and management practices of tangata whenua in the exercise of customary non-commercial fishing rights by:

·    either improving the availability or size (or both) of the aquatic life in question, or

·    by recognising a customary fishing practice in that area.

7.       In reaching a decision on any application, the Minister is required to:

·    consider the views of representative persons, including tangata whenua, environmental, commercial, recreational, and local community interests; and

·    provide for the input and participation of tangata whenua (with non-commercial interests) in the decision-making process, having particular regard to kaitiakitanga.

8.       Fisheries management is the responsibility of Fisheries New Zealand (Ministry for Primary Industries). Auckland Council is not obliged to make a submission on fisheries management issues but may choose to advocate on behalf of its local community interests.  Attachment B contains the letter from Fisheries New Zealand.

9.       On 3 February 2021 the Waiheke Local Board passed a Notice of Motion (WHK/2021/8) supporting the rāhui and commending the application to MPI.

10.     Amongst others, the Notice of Motion also sought “further support and endorsement for Ngati Paoa’s application for a Rāhui from the Hauraki Gulf Forum, the Governing Body of Auckland Council and the Mayor, Hon Phil Goff.”

11.     Attachment C contains the full set of resolutions of the Waiheke Local Board.

12.     It is noted that Ngāti Hei subsequently submitted to MPI a s186a application for a fishery closure in respect of its rāhui for scallops in its rohe on the eastern shores of the Coromandel. That is now under consideration by MPI as well.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on Ngāti Paoa’s rāhui around the motu of Waiheke

b)        delegate authority to the chair to write in support of the Fisheries Act Section 168a Waiheke closure currently being consulted on by the Ministry of Primary Industries.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ngāti Paoa’s media release

75

b

Fisheries New Zealand letter

77

c

Waikeke Local Board meeting minutes

81

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Carlos Rahman - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

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16 March 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

Local board feedback on the Climate Change Commission’s draft advice to Government

File No.: CP2021/01978

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable the local board to provide feedback on the Climate Change Commission’s draft advice to Central Government.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 31 January 2021, the Commission released a draft of its first package of advice to Government on the actions it must take to reach net-zero by 2050, and ensure a transition to a low-emissions, climate resilient and thriving Aotearoa.

3.       Following public consultation, the Commission will prepare its final advice and provide this to Government by the May 31 2021. The Commission will recommend emissions budgets for the period to 2035 to support Aotearoa’s emissions reduction target of net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

4.       Following advice from the Commission, the Minister must prepare and make publicly available an emissions reduction plan setting out the policies and strategies for meeting the next emissions budget. The first emissions reduction plan must be published by 31 December 2021. This is a requirement of the Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Act 2019.

5.       The Commission’s draft advice is extensive. It consists of a draft advice report that includes 24 consultation questions, and an evidence report made up of 17 chapters, these documents can be found here: https://www.climatecommission.govt.nz/get-involved/our-advice-and-evidence/

6.       Auckland Council is preparing a response to He Pou a Rangi - the Climate Change Commission’s 31 January draft advice to Government and is seeking input from local boards.

7.       The submission will focus on the alignment between the Commission’s draft advice and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which has been adopted by council. It will be informed by Auckland Council’s climate change commitments and previous relevant consultation submissions such as council’s submission on the Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill 2019.

8.       The draft council submission was circulated to elected members on 5 March 2021 for feedback.

9.       The Climate Change Commission has extended the deadline for submissions from 14 March to 28 March 2021.  To meet this timeframe, delegated elected members will approve council’s final submission by 23 March 2021.

10.     Waitematā Local Board feedback approved at its business meeting on 16 March 2021 will be considered for incorporation into the final submission. Local board formal feedback received by the 22 March 2021 will be appended to the final submission.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the Climate Change Commission’s draft advice to Government.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo_Climate Change Commission draft advice_Local Boards

85

b

2021 Draft Advice for Consultation - He Pou a Rangi - Climate Change Commission

89

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Caroline Teh - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

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16 March 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

Chairperson's report

File No.: CP2021/01833

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the opportunity for the local board chair to provide an update on projects, meetings and other initiatives relevant to the local board’s interests.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for the Waitematā Local Board Chair to update the local board on activities he has been involved in since the last meeting.

3.       In accordance with Standing Order 2.4.7, the chair may, by way of report, bring any matter to the attention of a meeting of the local board or its committees that is within their role or function to consider.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Chair’s report for March 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair R Northey report March 2021

279

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Priscila Firmo - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

Board member reports

File No.: CP2021/01834

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the local board’s elected members to update the Waitematā Local Board on matters they have been involved in following the previous month’s meeting and other matters of interest to the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for members of the Waitematā Local Board to provide a written or verbal update on their activities for the month or any other matter they wish to raise with the board.

3.       This is an information item and it is optional for board members to provide a written board member report for inclusion in the agenda.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the written report from members A Bonham and G Gunthorp, and the verbal updates from deputy chair K Leoni, members A A Christie, J Sandilands and S Trotman for March 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Member A Bonham report March 2021

295

b

Member G Gunthorp report March 2021

307

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Priscila Firmo - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

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16 March 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2021/01835

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Waitematā Local Board with the updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Waitematā Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·   clarifying what advice is required and when

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the governance forward work calendar as at 16 March 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar 16 March 2021.

313

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Priscila Firmo - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

Waitematā Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2021/01836

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Waitematā Local Board to receive the records of its recent workshops held following the previous local board business meeting. Attached are copies of the proceeding records taken from the workshops held on:

·   9 February 2021

·   23 February 2021

·   2 March 2021

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance to Standing Order 12.1.4, a record of the proceedings of every Waitematā Local Board workshop held over the past month, including the names of the members attending and the general nature of the matters discussed during the workshop, shall be circulated to the members of the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)   receive the Waitematā Local Board workshop records for the workshops held 9 February, 23 February and 2 March 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā Local Board workshop records

317

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Priscila Firmo - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Presentation - Urban Composting and Community Gardens Project                                             Page 327

Item 8.2      Attachment a    16 February 2021 Waitemata Local Board: Merge Community report.                                         Page 341


Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 














Waitematā Local Board

16 March 2021

 

 

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[1]        The 2010 Regional Parks Management Plan is available online via this link.