I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Environment and Climate Change Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 15 April 2021

10.00am

Reception Lounge
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Kōmiti Mō Te Hurihanga Āhuarangi me Te Taiao / Environment and Climate Change Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Richard Hills

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Pippa Coom

 

Members

Cr Josephine Bartley

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Deputy Mayor Cr Bill Cashmore

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Angela Dalton

Cr John Watson

 

Cr Chris Darby

IMSB Member Glenn Wilcox

 

Cr Alf Filipaina

IMSB Member Karen Wilson

 

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

Cr Paul Young

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

 

 

Cr Shane Henderson

 

 

Cr Tracy Mulholland

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

Suad Allie

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua /

Senior Governance Advisor

 

12 April 2021

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 977 6953

Email: suad.allie@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

Terms of Reference

 

Responsibilities

 

This committee deals with the development and monitoring of strategy, policy and action plans associated with environmental and climate change activities.   The committee will establish an annual work programme outlining key focus areas in line with its key responsibilities, which include:

 

·         climate change mitigation and adaptation policy, and implementation (with other committee chairs where cross over of responsibilities exists)

·         coastal renewals, slips and remediation

·         Auckland’s Climate Action Framework

·         natural heritage (including ecology, biodiversity and biosecurity matters, such as kauri dieback)

·         protection and restoration of Auckland’s ecological health

·         water, including Auckland’s Water Strategy

·         waste minimisation

·         acquisition of property relating to the committee’s responsibilities and in accordance with the LTP

·         grants for regional environmental outcomes.

 

Powers

 

(i)      All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities, including:

(a)     approval of a submission to an external body

(b)     establishment of working parties or steering groups.

(ii)      The committee has the powers to perform the responsibilities of another committee, where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee.

(iii)     If a policy or project relates primarily to the responsibilities of the Environment and Climate Change Committee, but aspects require additional decisions by the Planning Committee and/or the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee, then the Environment and Climate Change Committee has the powers to make associated decisions on behalf of those other committee(s). For the avoidance of doubt, this means that matters do not need to be taken to more than one of these committees for decisions.

(iii)     The committee does not have:

(a)     the power to establish subcommittees

(b)     powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2).

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·           Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·           Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·           Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·           In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·           The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·           However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·           All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·           Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·           Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·           All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·           Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·           Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·           Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

15 April 2021

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          7  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    7

5.1     Public Input:  Annalily van den Broeke                                                             7

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          7

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                8

8          CCO quarterly update - Auckland Unlimited                                                              9

9          Water Strategy: Water Consumption Targets                                                          11

10        Summary of Environment and Climate Change Committee information memoranda and briefings - 15 April 2021                                                                                       23

11        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 11 February 2021, as a true and correct record.

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

5.1       Public Input:  Annalily van den Broeke

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Annalily van den Broeke will be in attendance to address the meeting regarding the importance of topic of wetland conservation in Auckland.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      receive the presentation from Annalily van den Broeke and thank her for attending.

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Environment and Climate Change Committee

15 April 2021

 

CCO quarterly update - Auckland Unlimited

File No.: CP2021/03906

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Environment and Climate Change Committee on the Auckland Unlimited climate change work programme.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      receive the presentation from Auckland Unlimited and thank them for their attendance.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Suad Allie - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

15 April 2021

 

Water Strategy: Water Consumption Targets

File No.: CP2021/03257

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To recommend targets for long term water consumption as part of Auckland Council’s Water Strategy development.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is developing a Water Strategy that will enable all council decisions and investments to contribute to improving te mauri o te wai / the life-supporting capacity of Auckland’s waters. The Strategy is intended to direct investment and action in the water space across the council group. It will articulate a vision, targets and the approaches required to achieve them.

3.       Water supply and demand is one Strategy workstream. This report focuses on long-term demand for potable water (high-quality drinking water) and recommends targets for water consumption for 2025, 2030 and 2050.

4.       The 2025 targets are a reiteration of current, committed, Watercare Water Efficiency Strategy targets. The 2030 and 2050 targets and a set of initiatives to achieve them have been jointly modelled with Watercare and are considered plausible demand management interventions.

5.       The recommended pathway to achieve the targets has been optimized for Auckland council group costs and is able to be funded inside the 2021-31 LTP.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)   note that Watercare is committed to achieving the current 2025 target of 253L gross per capita potable water consumption per day through investments in education and partnering with commercial customers (including through a commercial smart meter programme).

b)   note that Auckland Council parent is on track to achieve a reduction in its own water use of 30% on 2015 levels by 2025 as part of the committed 2025 target.

c)   note Watercare’s 2020 application to the Board of Inquiry process to take water from the Waikato Awa and that the proposed water consumption targets and Water Strategy do not negate the need to secure additional water for Auckland.

d)   adopt the following stepped targets for potable water consumption with immediate effect, expressed as ‘equal or better than’:

i)        by 2030: 247L gross per capita per day, made up of 155L residential per capita per day, 57.7L commercial per capita per day, 11% or less network leakage (with 13% maximum level of service).

ii)       by 2050: 225L gross per capita per day, made up of 130L residential per capita per day, 53L commercial per capita per day, 11% or less network leakage.

 

e)   note that Watercare is committed to achieving the 2030 and 2050 targets and that key investments towards the 2030 targets are a residential smart meter programme and reducing leakage below the current target of 13%, aiming for 11%.

f)     direct Watercare to report to the Committee on estimated permanent water consumption savings as a result of actions taken by customer and Watercare because of the drought.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Auckland Council is developing a Water Strategy that will enable all council decisions and investments to contribute to improving te mauri o te wai / the life-supporting capacity of Auckland’s water. The Strategy is intended to direct investment and action in the water space across the council group. It will articulate a vision, targets and the approaches required to achieve them, as endorsed by Committee in November 2020.

7.       The vision of the Water Strategy is to protect and enhance te mauri o te wai / the life-supporting capacity of water in Tāmaki.

8.       As areas of the Water Strategy framework progress at different rates, council is following a multi-stage process of endorsing strategic direction within the strategy as it is developed (Resolution number ECC/2020/58).

9.       This report focuses on long-term demand for reticulated water and recommends targets for water consumption for 2025, 2030 and 2050. These targets are one part of the ‘supply and demand’ area of the Water Strategy.

10.     Staff were asked to prioritise this aspect of the Water Strategy development (the modelling for the long-term targets and initiatives recommended in this report) to enable that strategic direction to be reflected in the proposed 2021 Long Term Plan.

11.     The timing for establishing long-term targets for water consumption is also appropriate as Auckland and Aucklanders experience the current drought. By endorsing targets, Council signals its intention to invest in demand management over time and capitalise on increasing awareness by Aucklanders of the water they use.

12.     The recommended targets are for residential and commercial demand as well as the water lost through leakage on the network.

13.     The 2025 targets are a reiteration of current, committed, Watercare Water Efficiency Strategy targets. The 2030 and 2050 targets and a set of initiatives to achieve them have been modelled by water strategy staff as part of a joint Watercare and Auckland Council working group.

14.     Targets are expressed as ‘equal to or better than.’ This encourages council to exceed the target and provides for innovation and improvement over time to influence the strategic direction set out in this report. Monitoring the impact of, and refining, council group activities over time is a key part of delivering against this strategic direction.

15.     Targets are measured as per capita potable water residential use, commercial use, and leakage on the reticulated network. They have been benchmarked against internationally comparable major cities. The proposed water consumption targets presented are for all Aucklanders on the network. They are also a guide for rural users who manage their own water. Water efficiency is a shared issue for all Aucklanders, particularly as rural users are supplied with network water should they need it.

 


 

Why manage demand for potable water?

16.     Empowering Aucklanders to manage their demand for water takes a values-based approach to water management. Council identified the need for water consumption targets to drive reduced water use per capita in recognition of Aucklanders’ desire to treasure water/wai as a taonga. This was clear feedback from mana whenua and the public in 2019 to the discussion document Our Water Future / Tō tātou wai ahu ake nei. Demand management is a core component to demand and supply planning for our collective future.

17.     Council currently does not have long-term targets for per person potable water consumption. Agreeing such targets would be a significant milestone in signaling a long-term shift in thinking, by actively treasuring water.

18.     Supplying water has environmental and cultural impacts. Managing demand promotes sustainable use of resources. Taking, cleaning and conveying water to homes and businesses uses resources and produces greenhouse emissions. Managing demand can reduce those impacts on a per-capita basis and increase water security in the face of uncertainty. Reducing water use also reduces wastewater produced. Cleaning and conveying wastewater requires more resources and produces more greenhouse gas emissions than providing drinking water.

19.     The Auckland Water Strategy must be cognisant of the twin challenges of adapting to our changing water future because of climate change and mitigating further climate impacts through emissions reductions. Lowering per-capita demand for water is one mitigation against the increased risk of water insecurity.

20.     The Auckland Plan 2050 estimates that over the next 30 years the region’s population could grow by another 720,000 people to reach 2.4 million. This rapid growth represents an opportunity for a step-change in how Aucklanders of the future will live. Being more efficient with water and achieving lower per-capita demand for reticulated water as Auckland’s population grows is an important part of accommodating that growth by being more efficient with the water Auckland uses and it will also make each new source more efficient.

21.     Over the long-term, managing demand can be cost-effective. Supply planning and subsequent investment is influenced by expected peak total demand. Higher demand or more conservative planning over the long-term will require more, or larger, supply augmentation sooner. Lower demand will require less, or smaller or later supply augmentation. The timing of investment has implications for council group spending. The recommended approach in this report is optimised for cost to the Auckland Council group.

How can we reduce demand for water?

22.     We can reduce demand - the volume of reticulated drinking water required - by reducing commercial customer demand, reducing residential customer demand, and reducing network leakage.

23.     Efficiencies in water can come from changes in behaviour – like shorter showers or turning the tap off when we brush our teeth. These changes are attributed to increased awareness of water (‘water literacy’). Efficient fittings like shower heads can also reduce water consumption. In commercial settings there may be opportunities to make processes that require lots of water more efficient. 

24.     Another way to reduce demand for reticulated water is to use non-potable water for some uses instead. Rain tanks capture non-potable water onsite which can then replace potable water used for things like watering the garden. There was strong feedback to the 2019 discussion document from the public that rain tanks should play a larger role in Auckland’s future. Council has responded to this by removing barriers (such as consenting costs) to encourage Aucklanders to install rain tanks.

25.     Water captured in rain tanks and detention tanks can also be plumbed into the home and used for toilets and washing machines, again replacing treated water consumption. In this way Aucklanders may use a similar amount of water overall and reduce use of treated water (measured by the recommended targets).

26.     Another significant way to reduce the amount of water required is to reduce leakage on the network. Water utilities have been managing leakage for many years. The reality is that some leakage will always occur. Water that leaks is non-revenue generating, reducing leaks may ultimately save Watercare money (and therefore Aucklanders who fund Watercare). When the level of effort to reduce leaks is less than the water saved this is called the ‘economic level of leakage’, this is a balance Watercare is working to understand.

27.     Water consumption can also be reduced by increasing the price of water. There are equity and other issues with this demand management approach. Please note staff have not modelled price as a mechanism for demand reduction. Pricing water as a mechanism for demand management does not form part of the recommended pathway.

 

Drought Context

28.     During the 1993/94 drought Aucklanders reduced water consumption by around 65-70L per person per day or around 20%. Mandatory restrictions were used at the time. After the 1993/94 drought consumption rebounded, but not to pre-drought levels. Aucklanders’ permanently reduced per capita consumption by at least 7%. In addition to a drought drawing attention to water use, Aucklanders were also becoming more water literate due to water and wastewater charging.

29.     During the recent drought, Aucklanders have again been made aware of their water consumption and restrictions were put in place in May 2020. As a result, Aucklanders have reduced their use of water. Individuals and businesses have made investments (such as small-scale non-potable supply) to increase their resilience to drought. Many of these investments will enable ongoing reduction in reticulated drinking water consumption. Watercare is doing work to estimate what consumption savings Aucklanders may be able to ‘lock in’ from those investments and sustained behaviour change. 

30.     Recommendation g) directs Watercare to report to the Committee at its next meeting on estimated permanent water consumption savings as a result of actions taken by customer and Watercare because of the drought.

31.     The recent drought highlights the importance of ensuring secure, resilient water supply into the future. Achieving this will require change in the way we value, use, and take care of water. Now is the time to take the first steps on this pathway for a new relationship with water in Tāmaki Makaurau.

 

Board of Inquiry application for Waikato River take context

32.     The current demand for water in Auckland, pre-drought, is near the system capacity. Accordingly, a new source of water is required within the decade to service peak and safeguard against drought. After an extensive options analysis, and consideration of effects of each option, Watercare determined that the Waikato River is its preferred next source.

33.     It is important to note that planning for future sources uses peak demand and drought security standard. Peak daily demand is higher than the daily average demand. This report discusses average demand and recommends targets for gross average consumption per capita.

34.     An application to take additional water from the Waikato River was lodged with the Waikato Regional Council in 2013. This application has now been recognised as a proposal of national significance to be heard independently by a Board of Inquiry.

35.     The proposed water consumption targets and Water Strategy work do not negate the need to secure additional water for Auckland. As part of the application Watercare recognised the need to be sustainable and to reduce water consumption over time. The targets in this report and the Water Strategy work are complementary to the Board of Inquiry application. They will ensure that the additional water sought is used efficiently.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

36.     Council does not have long-term water consumption targets. Were council to agree long term targets and an identified pathway of initiatives to meet those targets, those targets would direct council group investment to initiatives that help Aucklanders save water and for Watercare to invest in network leakage management.

37.     Gross water demand is projected to increase from about 450 megalitres per day (MLD) pre-drought on average to more than 600 MLD by 2050, in the absence of additional targeted demand management interventions, (see Figure 1). The projected increase in gross water demand is driven by projected population growth 2020-2050.

 

Figure 1: Concept Diagram: the scope of opportunity for long-term water efficiency

from Watercare’s 2020 Board of Inquiry Application

 

38.     The Watercare and Auckland Council joint working group identified all plausible demand management interventions that could achieve reductions in per capita residential water demand, such as water efficient shower heads, smart meters, education and water tank use. Estimates for commercial water efficiency were used based on Watercare’s existing programmes. Network leakage rates were also modelled based on Watercare estimates.

39.     This enabled the working group to model multiple plausible demand management pathways (groups of interventions through time) that reduced per capita water demand out to 2050. The working group deliberately limited itself to modelling existing technology despite a 30-year time horizon, intentionally taking a conservative view of the future. Staff anticipate more effective interventions may become available over the period shown and that these interventions would allow greater water savings per person over time.

40.     The working group started by looking at plausible upper and lower bound to water demand reductions over time (see Figure 1). The yellow wedge represents the ‘demand management’ opportunity potential range. The group then tested multiple pathways that were in between these upper and lower bounds.


 

 

41.     We used the following criteria to identify a long-list of interventions / features to model:

·   possible with current technology.

·   signalled as likely to be implemented.

·   least impact on water users (changing the water system, not taking a restrictive approach).

·   ease of implementation.

·   lowest cost option that has an impact on the timing of the next large source.

·   conservative estimates for uptake of initiatives.

·   no higher customer prices to drive down demand for water.

42.     The long-list of water efficiency mechanisms modelled included network leakage, non-potable water for irrigation, non-residential efficiency, smart meters (residential and non-residential), washing machines, toilets, shower heads, dishwashers, rain tanks, greywater, education, outdoor hose nozzles and other fittings. We also accounted for natural improvement without intervention (some people will buy an efficient washing machine when they upgrade), and that the benefits of water efficiency grows over time. We were conservative in our estimates of uptake, did not use price mechanisms to reduce demand, and no assumption of annual or on-going water bans or restrictions. We did this by modelling the demand savings of various initiatives and assumed varying levels of uptake of those initiatives over time.

43.     The yellow wedge (see Figure 1) represents the ‘demand management’ opportunity, or the potential range of total demand. We modelled multiple different pathway options that fall between the upper and lower boundaries shown.

Options assessment

44.     Many variations of targets and pathways were considered. This report describes three pathway options:

·        An ‘Upper Range of Potential Demand’ pathway: no further demand management initiatives beyond those committed to. This pathway sees water demand increase to over 600 MLD by 2050 as noted above (upper range of potential demand in Figure 1).

·        A Recommended Pathway that includes a residential smart meter programme, commercial smart meter programme, increased water efficiency education, water efficient homes from 2025, new homes currently required to have stormwater tanks also be required to plumb into home for internal and external non-potable use from 2025, and a smart, efficient network to manage network leakage at 11% or lower by 2050.

·        A ‘Lower Range of Demand’ pathway: as above in the recommended pathway, with higher uptake of rain tanks by Aucklanders and subsidised efficient fittings to further reduce demand on reticulated network. This pathway sees water demand remain relatively stable to 2050, even as Auckland’s population continues to increase as projected.

45.     Table One shows a high-level comparison of the upper range, recommended and lower range pathways. Costs to Auckland Council group have been estimated for the three pathways based on their assumptions.

·        in the Upper Range pathway this is the indicative cost of additional sources.

·        in the Recommended pathway this includes the capital cost of interventions (e.g. smart meters) and the operating costs of programmes (such as education).

·        for the Lower Range pathway costs also include indicative costs to subsidise initiatives (for example a showerhead subsidy programme).

 

Table One: 2050 Target and Pathway Options

 

Gross per day consumption at 2050

% reduction on gross 2020

Cost impacts

2021-2031 LTP

2032-2050

Upper Range of Potential Demand

286

(L per capita)

no change

 

Possible next source after Waikato (such as purified wastewater for direct potable)

Recommended

225

(L per capita)

15-20%

Able to be funded

Completion of residential smart meter programme (~2034)

 

Leakage investment to <11% (at the economic level of leakage)

Lower Range of Potential Demand

213

(L per capita)

20-30%

(in addition to recommended)

 

Estimated to be >$500m over 30 years for subsidy programmes, beginning ~2025

 

 

46.     The joint working group used a high-level assessment of each pathway against non-financial factors to assess the pathways and determine the relative benefits of each pathway for Auckland. The assessment was not intended to be exhaustive or definitive. Pathways were scored relative to the other pathways developed (i.e. not an absolute assessment). Table Two presents the resulting assessment of the upper range of potential demand (no additional demand management) against the recommended pathway and the lower range of potential demand.

Table Two: High-Level assessment of non-financial benefits

Criteria

Upper Range of Potential Demand

Recommended Pathway

Lower Range of Potential Demand

Increases resilience to drought

+

++

+++

Increases resilience to natural hazards (distributed collection, etc)

- -

++

+++

Flexibility/adaptive system (avoid lock in)

- -

+

+++

Ease of implementation (for Council group)

+++

++

- -

Confidence intervention will realise the benefits

NA

+++

-

Aligns to feedback from Our Water Future consultation

- -

++

+++

Integrated benefits to other infrastructure (WW and SW)

- -

++

+++

Contributes to operational emissions reduction

- -

++

+++

Increases customer savings on water

- -

++

+++

 

Recommended targets and pathway

47.     This section details the recommended targets and identified interventions (a ‘pathway’). The recommended targets and pathway are designed to achieve a 15% or better reduction in per-capita water use over 30 years.

48.     The key components of the recommended 2021-2050 pathway are:

1.       smart metering in all homes by ~2034 – informing and empowering Aucklanders to contribute to reducing demand

2.       increased water efficiency education with residential and commercial customers (including best-practice guidance)

3.       require new homes to be water efficient from 2025

4.       new homes currently required to have stormwater tanks required to plumb into home for internal and external non-potable use from 2025

5.       a smart, efficient network (to monitor and reduce network leaks and better manage peak demand)

49.     Table Three illustrates the ‘current state’ for Auckland in 2020

 

Table Three: Current state

Indicator

Auckland 2020

Gross Per capita consumption

286 Litres per day

Residential use per capita

168 Litres per day2

Commercial use per capita

60 Litres per day

Network leakage percentage

13.47 %

 

50.     Table Four illustrates the recommended water consumption targets. The recommended pathway is a step up in water efficiency across the city using tools/levers that are ready to implement now and meet the guidelines above. Targets are expressed as three steps:

·      the 2025 target which is committed

·      a 2030 target which is what we need to achieve by this date to stay on track to the 2050 target, and is within Council’s Long-Term Plan time horizon

·      a 2050 target which is the period of the Water Strategy

 

Table Four: Recommended Water Consumption Targets

 

2025

(committed)

2030

Target 2050

(= or better than)

Gross per capita consumption

253 Litres per day

247 Litres per day

225 Litres per day

 

Gross consumption targets are made up of the following targets for water use components:

 

Residential use per capita

Not determined

155 Litres per day

130 Litres per day

Commercial use per capita

Not determined

57.7 Litres per day­

53 Litres per day­

Network leakage percentage

13%*

11-13%*

11 % or less

*The level of service for leakage is 13% for the LTP period (2021-31). Current leakage detection activities are showing promising results. A review into the economic level of leakage target – where the level of effort to reduce leaks is less than the water saved - will take place by June 2021. 11-13% is used here as a proxy for an economic level of leakage, the economic level may be lower and, in the future, may be presented using a metric other than percentage, in line with international best practice.

51.     Staff benchmarked the recommended targets against international practice (targets and signalled targets). Broadly comparable cities such as Sydney, Melbourne, Singapore and water services providers such as Scottish Water, Anglian Water, and Thames Water were assessed. Consumption can vary by location due to rainfall, land use patterns, local behaviour, and geology so it is helpful to consider a range of comparators. These comparators have set or signalled targets for this decade that are between 235L and 250L gross per capita consumption per day (including residential targets between 120L and 155L). The recommended targets for Auckland fall within the range that comparator cities have set targets for this decade: 

·        by 2030: 247L gross per capita per day (including 155L residential)

the Water Sensitive Cities Index recommends 200L gross per capita per day as global best-practice. The recommended 2050 target is:

·        by 2050: 225L gross per capita per day (including 130L residential)

52.     The recommended pathway takes into account costs and savings to council group. The initial investment for the recommended pathway can be funded within the current 2021-31 LTP funding envelope (the Recovery Budget).

53.     The recommended pathway includes demand management levers that are council-controlled. This has the added benefit that council can monitor delivery and benefits as well as refine pathway planning accordingly.

54.     A key feature is the smart meter programme and its associated data / insights to help us understand what further investment may be appropriate and how best to target that investment.

55.     As Council does not have targets, the recommended pathway targets are a first step. Staff anticipate their revision over time, particularly as the assumptions used in modelling are conservative (current funding mechanisms, conservative uptake of initiatives, lower bounds of savings estimates etc.).

56.     Water Strategy staff advise a more ambitious set of targets and associated pathway is possible. Achieving greater water savings than the recommended targets would require additional funding (see Table One). There are also costs and benefits for Aucklanders from additional demand management initiatives, which are yet to be quantified, but would be important to understand.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

57.     Water and climate change are intrinsically linked.

 

58.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan acknowledges that as our climate changes, these events will increase in severity. Changes in the volume and location of rainfall will mean we have to rethink how we manage water and deal with issues from flooding and coastal inundation, to drought and scarcity. The physical impacts of climate change will lead to a broader range of implications both specifically for water management in Auckland, as well as for related issues such as energy supply, social welfare, food security and Māori land and water rights. The water infrastructure that is built in future may also include significant embodied emissions depending on its nature and form.

59.     The projected impacts of climate change on Auckland’s aquatic environments, and the associated risks are detailed in two key report series: the Auckland Region Climate Change Projections and Impacts (http://www.knowledgeauckland.org.nz/publication/?mid=1747&DocumentType=1&) and the Climate Change Risk in Auckland technical report series (http://knowledgeauckland.org.nz/publication/?mid=2807).

60.     As discussed in the context section, managing demand promotes more sustainable use of resources. Taking, treating and conveying water to homes and businesses uses resources and produces greenhouse emissions. Managing demand can reduce those impacts on a per-capita basis and increase water security in the face of uncertainty. Reducing water use also reduces wastewater produced. Treating and conveying wastewater requires more resources and produces more greenhouse gas emissions than providing drinking water.

61.     The Auckland Water Strategy must be cognisant of the twin challenges of adapting to our changing water future as a result of climate change and mitigating further climate impacts through emissions reductions. Lowering per-capita demand for water is one mitigation against the increased risk of water insecurity.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

62.     The Auckland Water Strategy will direct action, including investment decisions, policies and approaches, across the council group. This includes those of the CCOs. Council group staff have worked collaboratively to develop the inputs to the recommended advice in this report.

63.     The recommended targets require investment and action from the council group. The impact of endorsing the recommended targets would be primarily on the activities of Watercare as drinking and wastewater provider. The recommended pathway has been optimized for Auckland Council group costs and is able to be funded within the 2021-31 LTP. We note Watercare’s commitment to on-going leak detection and leak management through a network leak programme which is showing promising results.

64.     We also note Watercare’s committed smart meter programme, shown in Table Five.

 

Table Five: Smart meter roll out ramping up from 2022-2023 financial year

 

Financial Year

Description of activities

Total # smart meters per year

2021-22

-      Build capability for data ingestion, customer dashboards and business reporting,

-      Completing roll-out of 1,600 commercial customer meters and 500 smart meters to all Auckland schools.

2100

2022-23

-      Roll out remaining high use non-res = 2000

-      All new connections = 7,000 pa

-      Negotiate KO new connections = ~2000

-      Replacements - High consumption residential = ~10,000

Approx. 20,000

2023-24

-      All new connections and on-going replacement programme (residential and commercial)

Approx. 25,000

2024-25 onwards

-      All new connections and on-going replacement programme (residential and commercial)

-      Approximate roll out complete by 2034

Approx. 30,000

 

65.     Also note that Central Government’s Three Waters Reform programme and development of future institutional arrangements for delivery of water services are on-going. Adopting these consumption targets and pathway will signal that efficient water management is important for Auckland Council and Aucklander’s and would provide a quantified set of targets for any new entities to work from.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

66.     Water is a significant issue at a national, regional and local scale. The targets and approaches determined through the Auckland Water Strategy will sit at a regional level.

67.     Local board chairs have been invited to Water Strategy workshops and any material will also be shared. Going forward with the other workstreams, the intention is to provide local board agenda reports that will be prepared ahead of E&CC decision making.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

Significance of water to Māori 

68.     Every iwi and hapū has associations with particular waterbodies – streams, springs, rivers, lakes, wetlands, groundwater, estuaries, harbours – that are reflected in their whakapapa, waiata, and whaikorero tuku iho (stories of the past). Protecting the health and mauri of our freshwater ecosystems is also important for food, materials, customary practices, te reo Māori, and overall well-being.

Mana Whenua engagement approach for the Water Strategy

69.     The Water Strategy project will engage both at te Taiao Pou (the environment sub-committee of the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum) and Iwi Chairs level. This engagement is not limited to the content of this report – engagement is on the Water Strategy as a whole, throughout its development.

70.     Water is recognised as a significant issue in the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum’s 10-year Strategic Plan, particularly objectives relating to fulfillment of member iwi’s roles as kaitiaki, and that te mauri o te wai be improved and enhanced. Involvement in the Auckland Water Strategy also features in the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum’s Annual Plan for FY21.

71.     Mana whenua priorities were incorporated into the Our Water Future - Tō Tātou Wai Ahu Ake Nei framework that now guides strategy development. In particular, the vision ‘te mauri o te wai’ which was gifted to this kaupapa by the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum.

72.     The Water Strategy project has presented to te Taiao Pou and received clear feedback from the Pou regarding the Water Strategy framework. Based on this feedback work is underway on the Water Strategy framework and staff will report on its development to the Pou at its May hui.

Feedback from mana whenua

73.     Staff presented the content of this report to the Natural Environment Pou on the 7th of April 2021. Feedback received included that water literacy must increase for those who are on the Watercare network because they don’t know where their water is coming from; Council and Watercare must consider water from every source so that Auckland can build its own resilience; and that rain tanks are an essential part of that resilience and can serve to replenish our water resource(s) with rainwater.

74.     We were also cautioned that decisions about the use of water can impact our most vulnerable Aucklanders and may be opportunities for positive outcomes. For example, small investments such as an initiative to send plumbers out to fix leaks have very small costs to the water provider compared to the benefits gained from both the bill payer paying less, and the overall water system being more efficient (less leaky).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

75.     Staff have prioritised the modelling for the long-term targets and initiatives recommended in this report so as to enable that strategic direction to be reflected in the 2021 Long-Term Plan.

76.     The decisions in this paper do not have any direct immediate financial impacts other than what is reflected in the 2021 Long-Term Plan. Subsequent Long-Term Plan decision making will be opportunities to continue to meet or exceed the targets proposed.

77.     It is recommended that the Committee note both Watercare’s commitment to investing in those initiatives required (as part of the proposed 2021 LTP) and Council’s commitment to the policy work programme required to implement the recommended pathway.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

78.     There is a risk over the long-term that more bulk supply of water is required sooner, at higher cost, without water consumption targets and subsequent investment.

79.     There is also a risk that targets are endorsed but not met. Mitigation would be ongoing monitoring of delivery, ongoing reporting against targets and subsequent investment decision making to deliver against targets.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

80.     Watercare to report to the Committee on estimated permanent water consumption savings as a result of actions taken by customer and Watercare because of the drought.

81.     Ongoing development of the Water Strategy.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Toby Shephard - Strategist

Greer Lees, Principal Advisor Infrastructure Strategy

Authorisers

Jacques Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

15 April 2021

 

Summary of Environment and Climate Change Committee information memoranda and briefings - 15 April 2021

File No.: CP2021/02062

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A.

2.       To receive a summary and provide a public record of memos or briefing papers that have been held or been distributed to committee members.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This is a regular information-only report which aims to provide greater visibility of information circulated to the Environment and Climate Change Committee members via memoranda/briefings or other means, where no decisions are required.

4.       The following memos were circulated to members of the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

Date

Memo

10/02/2021

Regional Pest Management Plan Operational Plan

17/02/2021

Coastal Erosion

8/03/2021

Auckland Council Watercare Water Services Bill submission

29/03/2021

Submission Climate Change Commission's draft advice to Government

 

5.       The following workshops/briefings have taken place:

Date

Workshop/Briefing

15/02/2021

Climate Action Political Reference Group - confidential

17/02/2021

Workshop – Coastal Erosion – Regional Scale Hazard Report - confidential

24/02/2021

Workshop – State of Environment Reporting - confidential

16/03/2021

Waste Political Advisory Group – confidential

24/03/2021

Workshop – Water strategy – confidential

31/03/2021

Workshop – Water strategy – confidential

 

6.       These documents can be found on the Auckland Council website, at the following link:

http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

at the top left of the page, select meeting/ Kōmiti Mō Te Hurihanga Āhuarangi me Te TaiaoEnvironment and Climate Change” from the drop-down tab and click “View”.

under ‘Attachments’, select either the HTML or PDF version of the document entitled ‘Extra Attachments’.

7.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary.  Governing Body members should direct any questions to the authors.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A of the agenda report

b)      receive the Summary of Environment and Climate Change Committee information items and briefings – 15 April 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Forward Work Programme

25

b

Regional Pest Management Plan Operational Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Coastal Erosion (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Auckland Council Watercare Water Services Bill - submission (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Submission Climate Change Commission's draft advice to Government (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Suad Allie - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

15 April 2021

 

 

Kōmiti Mō Te Hurihanga Āhuarangi me Te Taiao / Environment and Climate Change] Committee
Forward Work Programme 2021

This committee deals with the development and monitoring of strategy, policy and action plans associated with environmental and climate change activities. The full terms of reference can be found here:[i Terms of reference].

This committee will meet bi-monthly commencing February 2021

 

 

Area of work and Lead Department

Reason for work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Expected timeframes

Highlight the month(s) this is expected to come to committee in 2020

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Strategic approach to Climate Change: - Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan

Chief Sustainability Office

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019] Link to decision

 

To provide a pathway to zero emissions by 2050 and ensure the region is prepared for the impacts of climate change.  This addresses Council’s commitments to develop a plan to keep within 1.5 degrees of warming and the Climate Emergency declaration.

 

Consultation on the Climate Change Commission’s draft advice to government

Progress to date:

11 February 2021

·    C40 Update.  Link to decision

·    Consultation on the Climate Commission draft advice to Government.  Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Council Controlled Organisation’s Climate Change Update

 

To give elected member’s visibility of the work undertaken by CCOs to adapt & mitigate the impacts of climate change.

For information: Currently providing CCO performance updates to the CCO Oversight Committee. The plan is for 1-2 CCOs to come present at this Committee meeting on their climate actions/programs.

Progress to date:

Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coastal renewals, slips and remediation

Coastal Management Framework and delivery of individual coastal compartment management plans

Engineering and Technical Services

 

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

 

Coastal compartment management plans will apply a long term, sustainable approach to management of our coast over the next 100 years. Adaptive management plans will be developed in collaboration with mana whenua and communities. Plans will consider the experiences and values we place on the coast and how these may change over time due to coastal hazards and climate change.

 

 

 

 

 

ECC to approve all Coastal Management Plans following endorsement via the respective the Local Boards. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Waste Minimisation

Review of the Waste Minimisation and Innovation fund

Waste Solutions

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

Review the Fund, in line with the recommendations of the S17A Value for Money review.

To approve any significant changes to the grant framework arising from the review.

Memorandum to be sent to committee in Q3.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Waste Political Advisory Group

Waste Solutions

To provide feedback and guidance on implementation of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018.

Waste Political Advisory Group meetings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Implementation of waste disposal levy changes

Waste Solutions

Implementation of changes to the waste disposal levy (including data and compliance) coming into effect nationally July 2021

To approve any significant changes to data collection, compliance and resource recovery systems arising from changes to the waste levy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consultation on container return scheme design

Waste Solutions

Ministry for the Environment consultation on design for national container return scheme design – Auckland Council submission

To approve the Auckland Council submission on Ministry for the Environment consultation on container return scheme design

[according to latest information on MfE proposed timetable]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water

Auckland’s Water Strategy

Chief Planning Office

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

*ENV/2019/75

The health of Auckland’s waters is a critical issue. Both freshwater and marine environments in Auckland are under pressure from historic under-investment, climate change and rapid growth. The draft Auckland Plan 2050 identifies the need to proactively adapt to a changing water future and develop long-term solutions.

Series of workshops scheduled for 2021

Progress to date:

Report April 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed Auckland Council submission on Water Services Bill

 

 

Auckland Plan, Strategy and Research (Natural Environment Strategy)

Auckland Council made submission on Taumata Arowai Water Regulator Bill in March 2020. Subsequent Bill extends regulatory regime to all drinking water suppliers (other than domestic self-supply) and increased requirements to manage risks to drinking water sources. Implications for council roles in being a drinking water supplier, and planning and regulatory functions.

To approve substance of proposed Auckland Council submission on Water Services Bill, with final approval delegated to Chair and other members of ECC Committee prior to 2 March 2021 central government deadline.

 

Progress to date:

Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Environment Standards for human drinking water and wastewater discharges and overflows

 

 

 

 

 

 

Auckland Plan, Strategy and Research (Natural Environment Strategy, Infrastructure Strategy)

 

National Environmental Standard for Sources of Human Drinking Water

National Environmental Standard for Wastewater Discharges and Overflows.

The National Environmental Standards will have a significant impact on the council family and so the council will provide input into these. Further detailed opportunity to provide Auckland Council input on specific regulatory proposals, probably through Planning Committee, awaiting advice from MFE, likely in 2021.  Not linked to release of Water Services Bill in mid-2020.

Dates for the release of these NES are anticipated to be in the second half of 2021 at earliest.

Note: Overlap with Planning Committee

For information: Decision to provide feedback on the Water Services Bill and other reforms noted at Planning Committee in early 2020. The Natural Environment Strategy Unit (APRSR) provided proposed council submission on the Taumata Arowai Water Regulator Bill to Environment and Climate Change Committee in March 2020. Status of proposed NES for human drinking water and wastewater discharges and overflows will be provided to relevant committees when more is known about central government process.

 

Link to decision – September 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Healthy Waters Portfolio

Healthy Waters

 

 

There are several work programmes that require decisions from other committees but are relevant to the E&CC Committee.

 

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

Waitākere Ranges septic tank pump out scheme. Options are being consulted on as part of the Annual Budget. Decisions with the Finance and Performance Committee.

Rodney Drainage districts. Managing land drainage assets within Rodney and funding and responsibility for these assets. Decision making sits with Rodney Local Board and Finance and Performance Committee.

Clevedon wastewater. Possible opt-in targeted rate being proposed to the Governing Body as part of Annual Plan, decisions with the Finance and Performance Committee

For information: No decisions are required from Environment and Climate Change Committee at this stage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management (NPSFM)

Plans and Places

Healthy Waters

Natural Environment Strategy

 

The NPSFM being implemented, with periodic reporting to council committees on progress, and responding to ongoing central government refinement of the framework for achieving water outcomes. Decision making for this area of work will be split between the Planning Committee (for planning decisions such as Plan Changes) and Environment and Climate Change for non-statutory functions

To provide guidance on the council’s implementation of non-statutory functions under the National Policy Statement.

 

For Information: Planning Committee agenda report scheduled for March 2021 setting out proposed Auckland Council approach to implement the NPSFM 2020, as driven from a planning approach.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water Quality Targeted Rate Programme

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Healthy waters and streams projects supported by the water quality targeted rate for projects that will ensure cleaner beaches, streams and harbours across the region

For information: Currently providing quarterly updates to the Finance and Performance Committee. End of year report will be provided to this Committee in September.

 

Link to decision – September 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Too Much Water Policy

 

Timeframe to be confirmed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants

Allocation of the Regional Natural Heritage Grant

Environmental Services

 

 

Decision-making over regional environment fund as per the grants funding policy and fund guidelines. Funds to contribute to the council’s goals related to protecting our natural environment.

 

Decision to confirm allocation of grants for the 2021/2022 funding round. Decision report December 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Allocation of Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund 2021

Decision making over medium and large funds from the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund in line with the fund’s adopted policy. Funds to contribute towards the council’s aspirational goal of zero waste to landfill by 2040.

 

Decision to confirm allocation of grants for the 2021/2022 funding round. Decision report December 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natural Heritage

Review of Auckland Council’s Regional Pest Management Plan

 

Environmental Services

Council has statutory obligations under the Biosecurity Act to control weeds and animal pests. The purpose of work in 2020 will be to resolve any remaining appeals against the plan and complete final steps required for it to become operative.

To update the committee when the plan becomes operative.

Memorandum regarding operative in part as part of items for information in February 2021. No further decisions for 2021

Progress to date:

Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inter-regional marine pest pathway management plan

Environmental Services

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

A Pathway Management Plan is a statutory plan under the Biosecurity Act.  Council is working with MPI, DOC and neighbouring councils (a group known as Top of the North) to develop one to manage the spread of marine pests to avoid or minimise their negative impacts on the environment.

 

To endorse Top of the North to undertake consultation on a proposed pathway management plan.

To subsequently approve a preferred option for management of marine pests and development of a plan under the Biosecurity Act. Decision to approve draft proposal for consultation expected August 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natural Environment Targeted Rate Programme

Natural environment projects supported by the natural environment targeted rate will help protect the environment and tackle the pests, weeds and diseases that are threatening the native species

For information: Currently providing quarterly updates to the F&P Committee. End of year report will be provided to this Committee in October.

 

Link to decision – September 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kauri dieback work programme update

Environmental Services

 

The natural environment targeted rate included a $100m package to improve the protection of kauri in Auckland.  The work programme includes a significant track upgrade package to reduce the spread of kauri dieback, as well as funding for education, enforcement, monitoring, treatment and research.

 

To update the committee on ongoing regional kauri dieback management work programme

 

Memo sent November 2020, link found here

the annual update for 2021/2022 will be sent approximately October 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Biodiversity Strategy and National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity

Environmental Services and Natural Environment Strategy

Government is launching these two programmes. 

To endorse council’s approach to responding to the strategy and policy?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

State of Environment Report

 

Monitoring and reporting on the state of all or part of the environment is required under section 35 of the Resource Management Act 1991.  As part of meeting our reporting obligations, the Research and Evaluation Unit (RIMU) is releasing a suite of technical reports accompanied by a simplified synthesis report on 11 February 2021 when high level results will be presented to the Environment and Climate Change Committee.

For information only. As part of meeting council’s RMA obligations, the synthesis report that brings together information from 13 new and recent technical reports on the state and trends for the air, land, and water domains in the Tāmaki Makaurau/Auckland was considered significant enough to warrant an information item on the agenda.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weed Management Political Advisory Group

 

 

Community Facilities

Resolution number ECC/2020/13. Implementing this resolution will include engagement with local boards from September – November

Oversee the implementation and delivery of the Weed Management Policy, taking into account both community and technical considerations.

This year will have a focus on providing oversight over the implementation Resolution number ECC/2020/55 relating to the standardisation of funding for weed management within the urban road corridor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Project Streetscapes – Regional Review of Weed Management in the Road Corridor

 

Community Facilities

Resolution number ECC/2020/55 f)

Consideration of engagement of with mana whenua, the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum and the IMSB

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Completed

Lead Department

Area of work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Decision

 

Update to the Resource Recovery Network Strategy

Waste Solutions

[From the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee 2013-2016]

Options for a new operating and governance model for the Resource Recovery Network

To approve the recommended option for a new operating and governance model for the Resource Recovery Network

 

Decision can be found here