I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Franklin Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 4 May 2021

9.30am

The Stevenson Room
Level One Franklin the Centre
12 Massey Ave
Pukekohe

 

Franklin Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Andrew Baker

 

Deputy Chairperson

Angela Fulljames

 

Members

Malcolm Bell

 

 

Alan Cole

 

 

Sharlene Druyven

 

 

Lance Gedge

 

 

Amanda Kinzett

 

 

Matthew Murphy

 

 

Logan Soole

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Denise Gunn

Democracy Advisor

 

28 April 2021

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 295 3706

Email: denise.gunn@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

04 May 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Auckland Transport - Regional Land Transport Programme 2021                          7

12        Auckland Unlimited Quarterly Report Q2 2021                                                        21

13        Franklin Local Board consultation feedback and input into the 10-year Budget 2021-2031                                                                                                                               45

14        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

The Chair will open the meeting and welcome everyone present.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 27 April 2021 as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Franklin Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Franklin Local Board

04 May 2021

 

 

Auckland Transport - Regional Land Transport Programme 2021

File No.: CP2021/04591

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to outline the outcomes of the proposed Regional Land Transport Programme (RLTP) in the local board area and provide an opportunity for the board to resolve feedback for the attention of the Governing Body and the Regional Transport Committee.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report covers:

·    A summary of what the RLTP is and the process of its development.

·    A summary of what projects and programmes are planned for the local board area.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport – Regional Land Transport Programme report

b)      provide feedback on the Regional Land Transport Programme as per Attachment A to this report.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       The RLTP is a 10-year investment programme for transport in Auckland. It includes the activities of Auckland Transport, Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency (Waka Kotahi) and KiwiRail.

4.       It is reviewed and publicly consulted on every three years in a process led by the Auckland Regional Transport Committee (RTC).

5.       The RTC is comprised of members of the AT Board and representatives from Waka Kotahi and KiwiRail. During the review process the RTC seeks the views of Auckland’s elected representatives through the Governing Body. The AT Board is responsible for the final approving of the RLTP.

6.       The RLTP is the end product of a number of different local and central government processes and plans:

·    Auckland Transport Alignment Project (ATAP)

·    The Auckland Plan 2050

·    Auckland Council’s Long-Term Plan (LTP)

·    National Land Transport Programme (NLTP)

·    Government Policy Statement on Land Transport (GPS)

7.       It is worth noting that AT is not a party to ATAP discussions but that the direction expressed in this document is a key driver for outcomes in the RLTP. Likewise, the LTP sets funding levels for key programmes in the RLTP, such as the Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

8.       The current transport programme is set out in the 2018 RLTP. This saw the introduction of the Regional Fuel Tax (RFT), that provided an additional $1.5bn of direct revenue over 10 years. Including the RFT, the 2018 RLTP anticipated a $10 billion capital programme over ten years.

9.       While the 2018 RLTP programme provided a sound investment base there have been an increasing number of challenges requiring attention in the 2021 RLTP. These include:

·     The impact of growth and other demands creating a need for increased investment in upgrading existing infrastructure and for new investment to support growth

·     A need for increased investment to ensure transport plays its role in meeting overall greenhouse gas reduction targets

·     Continuing to invest in public transport and to accelerate cycling network completion to support mode change

·     A need to deliver further investment to support vision zero goals to provide reductions in deaths and serious injuries

·     An increasing need for more responsive investment in the transport network at a local level.

10.     Unfortunately, the response to these challenges is tempered by the impact of Council’s Emergency Budget, the effect of Covid-19 on public transport fares (leading to reduced operational funding for AT), and a strong likelihood that Waka Kotahi funding will not reach previously assumed levels.

11.     It has been assessed that about 95% of the available funding from Council and Government is needed to run the transport system, maintain the quality of the system (renewals and maintenance) and deliver committed/contracted /under construction projects. This means that there is very little headroom for new investment and that there will be hard trade-offs, including the deferring of many important projects. 

12.     At its meeting on 11 March the Planning Committee unanimously endorsed the draft RLTP.  ATAP itself was released on Friday 12 March. The RTC formally approved the draft RLTP for public consultation at its meeting on 23 March 2021.

13.     The current timeline for development of the RLTP is as follows:

Date

Action

23 March

RTC considers draft RLTP for public consultation

29 March-2 May

Proposed dates for public consultation

May

Evaluation of public consultation

27 May

RTC review final draft RLTP

3 June

Governing Body review RLTP for endorsement

June

AT Board reviews RLTP for final approval

01 July

RLTP operational

14.     As a regional programme it is appropriate that the primary engagement focus sits with the Governing Body through the Planning Committee.


 

15.     However, as the RLTP has important local impacts AT recognizes the importance of seeking local board views to ensure these are included in the information given to the RTC and Governing Body to inform their decision making. To this end, AT has the following engagement planned:

Date

LB Engagement

15 Feb

AT attended the Chairs Forum to give an overview on the RLTP process, to outline how the RLTP is put together and finally what the process is for LB input.

29 March – 2 May

Workshops with all local boards to discuss the RLTP.

4 – 18 May

AT will write reports for local boards to pass resolutions to officially record their feedback on the RLTP.

3 June

Local boards could use their statutory input slot at a Governing Body Meeting (Planning Committee) to give their views on the RLTP.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The draft Long Term Plan proposal is to reinstate the Local Board Transport Capital fund back up to $20M per annum for the next ten years. On this basis the proposed RLTP includes $200M for Local Board initiatives. However, it should be noted that this is contingent on the Mayor’s proposed rates increase of 5%.

17.    The below tables summarises projects that are planned to be delivered in the Local Board area and surrounding areas and could be of benefit to residents from Franklin Local Board area.

#

AT Projects

Duration

10 Year Capital Expenditure ($M)

33

Eastern Busway

2021/22 - 2025/26

873.9

43

Airport to Botany Stage 2 Bus Improvements

2023/24 - 2025/26

30.1

44

Ormiston Town Centre Link

2021/22 - 2022/23

16.8

49

Papakura Rail Station Park and Ride           

2021/22 - 2024/25

9.9

52

Drury Local Road Improvements

2027/28 - 2030/31

242.8

71

CRL Day One – Level Crossing Removal

2021/22 - 2026/27

220.0

        


 

18.    The below tables summarises projects within larger programmes, that are planned to be delivered in the Local Board area and surrounding areas and could be of benefit to residents from Franklin.


#

Project from a Programme

Underlying Programme

47

Manurewa (Coxhead Quadrant)

Safety (AT)

48

Popes Porchester Intersection

Safety (AT)

54

Pukekohe Dual Signals (Manukau / Massey / King / Stadium and East / Stadium)

Network Performance (AT)

55

Waiuku Road corridor (Colombo Road to Domain Road)

Safety (AT)

70

Takanini School Road / Manuroa Road Intersection

Safety (AT)

78

Residential Speed Management – Manurewa

Safety (AT)

19.     The below table summarizes projects being delivered by Waka Kotahi that are planned to be delivered in the Local Board area and surrounding areas and could be of benefit to residents from Franklin.

 

Non-AT Projects

Responsible Agency

10 Year Capital Expenditure ($M)

41

Wiri to Quay Park

KiwiRail

209.0

46

Mill Road Corridor

Waka Kotahi

1,354.0

50

State Highway 1 Papakura to Drury South

Waka Kotahi

423.0

51

Drury Stations

KiwiRail

185.0

53

Papakura to Pukekohe Electrification

KiwiRail

338.0

 


 

20.    The below map corresponds to the above tables and shows the location of the projects:

21.    The below table outlines objectives from the local board plan that are approached in the RLTP

Objectives

RLTP outcomes

Make public transport easier for both urban and rural communities to reduce congestion, to live healthy active lives and to adopt changes that benefit the environment.

The rapid transit network (RTN) is a key investment priority and forms the largest category of capital investment in this RLTP.

The proposed transport programme in this RLTP will deliver a step-change in the coverage and performance of the RTN over the next 10 years. This RLTP will also see the RTN continue to diversify away from the City Centre.

Improve existing and design new roads so that they are fit for purpose and safe while enabling environmentally sustainable transport choices.

A ten-year investment of $3.93billion has been included in this RLTP to cover the cost of renewing AT’s asset base. This RLTP has $900 million more in AT renewals than the $3.05 billion included in the 2018 RLTP.

It also includes:

·    Over $650million of AT investment to deliver the AT Safety Programme, which will delver improvements targeted towards s[peed management, high risk intersections, high risk corridors and vulnerable road users.

·    $100 million for minor improvements across the network.

·    $193 million of Waka Kotahi investment to deliver the state highway Safer Networks Programme.

This includes $401 million, with a further $100 million to come direct from Central Government, to support the Auckland Housing Programme in brownfield areas. This will provide for public transport and walking and cycling infrastructure in these areas to encourage sustainable transport behaviour, along with intersection upgrades to minimise impact on the operation of the surrounding road network.

The RLTP programme will also make significant progress towards decarbonising Auckland’s public transport fleet by:

·    Electrifying the rail line to Pukekohe, enabling disposal of Auckland’s remaining diesel passenger trains

·    Funding acceleration of the Low Emissions Bus Roadmap to ensure half of Auckland’s bus fleet is low emissions by 2031

·    Emissions from ferries make up a disproportionately high amount (19 percent) of total emissions from the public transport fleet. Noting that technology is less mature in the development of low emissions ferries, this draft RLTP allocates $30 million to start decarbonisation of the ferry fleet and reduce diesel emissions covered under bus, ferry and multimodal improvements.

It also includes projects such as:

·    $35million for supporting Electric Vehicles

·    $20million for environmental sustainability infrastructure

·    $9million for electric bus trial roadmap

Enable communities to reduce carbon emissions by enabling active transport between towns and villages

Over $300 million is allocated to delivering AT’s On-going Cycling Programme, which is intended to follow the completion of the Urban Cycleways Programme early in the RLTP period. This is in addition to the allocation to cycling included in the Connected Communities programme. This programme is expected to deliver 200km of new and upgraded cycleways and shared paths across the region by 2031, the majority of which is included as part of the strategic cycling network. Between 100km-125km of new cycleways will be generated from AT, 15km from Auckland Council and 59km from Waka Kotahi. Some existing cycle lanes will also be retrofitted with appropriate safety barriers.

There is also:

·    $49 million to continue delivering new footpaths in high priority locations.

·    A new $30 million programme for minor improvements for cycling and micromobility. A key element of this package will be delivering ‘pop up cycleways’ which will retrofit a range of existing painted cycle lanes with appropriate safety barriers. This programme will also address other issues on the existing cycling network to improve useability and enhance safety.

·    Ongoing funding for a programme of tactical urbanism initiatives such as those brought to life through Waka Kotahi’s Innovating Streets Programme.

Local Boards have transport infrastructure funding available for local area improvements that don’t meet regional priorities

This RLTP includes a $200 million Local Board Initiatives fund to be split between Auckland’s 21 local boards, and provide for an ongoing programme of smaller-scale local transport improvements.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     The approach set out in the RLTP conforms with the direction expressed by Council through the Long-Term Plan. However, AT notes that far more needs to be done to reach the Auckland Council climate change emissions targets.

23.     This investment programme is only one of a comprehensive set of measures needed to reduce transport emissions. The RLTP does not exist to set government policy and additional measures are needed that are beyond its scope to implement. A comprehensive approach to emission reduction will therefore require a range of actions from across government and industry sector.

24.     In the context of this challenge, Auckland needs a Climate Plan for its transport system which sets out the preferred pathway to meeting Auckland Councils emissions targets. This plan, along with a Climate Change Programme Business Case will be developed as part of this RLTP.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     The RLTP is the product of several Auckland Council processes and plans including:

·    Auckland Transport Alignment Project (ATAP)

·    The Auckland Plan 2050

·    Auckland Council’s Long-Term Plan (LTP)

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.    Auckland Transport has used local board plans to inform the development of the RLTP.


 

27.    Opportunities for local boards to engage on the RLTP have included:

·      Chair’s Forum on the 15th February 2021

·      A workshop with the Franklin Local Board on the 21st March 2021

·      Highlighting the opportunities for local board feedback to the Governing Body.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     Iwi and mataawaka have been engaged through AT’s Maori engagement team.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     The are no direct financial implications for the local board in receiving this report.

30.     Local board feedback on the RLTP and any changes made as a result of that feedback could have financial implications depending on that feedback. Further information about AT’s priorities for funding and implications of changes to funding levels can be found on page 80 of the RLTP consultation document.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     AT’s capital programme within the RLTP is contingent on the Mayor’s proposed rates increase of 5%. If this is not adopted there will be significant impacts on plan.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Once the local boards have resolved their feedback on the RLTP, AT will review all feedback from local boards and the public. This feedback, and any proposed changes, will be compiled into a feedback report for the consideration of the Governing Body and the Regional Transport Committee. 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Transport - Regional Land Transport Plan feedback template

15

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kenneth Tuai – Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authoriser

Georgina Gilmour – Acting Local Area Manager Franklin, Papakura, Manurewa

 


Franklin Local Board

04 May 2021

 

 

The RLTP has important local impacts and AT recognises the importance of seeking Local Board views. These views will be included in the information given to the Regional Transport Committee and the Governing Body to inform their decision making.

The purpose of this document is to help guide local board feedback into a form that will be aligned with the public consultation and will allow the Regional Transport Committee and the Governing Body to more easily consider and compare feedback.

This document highlights information from the supporting information for the Regional Land Transport plan, referencing where further information in the consultation material is available.

Local Boards are under no obligation to follow this suggested layout and can resolve their feedback in whichever form they consider to be most appropriate.

 

 


1.  Have we accurately identified the issues and challenges facing Auckland?

Focus areas.

Page reference

Local Board Feedback

Climate change.

Emissions and other consequences of Auckland’s transport system today are harming the environment and contributing to the transport system becoming increasingly susceptible to the impacts of climate change. Tackling climate change will require a very significant change to the way we travel around our region.

·    Auckland Transport is proposing investment in projects and programmes that encourage Aucklanders to switch to sustainable travel modes and reduce the increase in private vehicle travel associated with population growth.

 

22-24

 

Impacts of climate change on the transport system.

Auckland needs to focus on managing the current and future impacts of climate change on the transport network. Climate changes are expected to generate seal level rises, more frequent and intense storms and longer, hotter, dry periods. Significant investment will be required to ensure the network remains resilient and adaptable as these changes are magnified.

·    Changes include more green infrastructure – using natural systems to provide shade, and improved connections to storm water.

 

25

 

Travel Choices.

Better and faster public transport options are needed to give Aucklanders more choices in the way they travel. Congestion will continue to get worse if we don’t provide more desirable transport options than the car.

·    Continue improving the public transport customer experience making it simpler and easier to use

·    Continue to serve the growth of the City Centre as an employment destination

·    Extend the catchment of the RTN across Auckland’s urban area and developing greenfield areas

·    Effectively serve a wider range of key destinations beyond the City Centre

·    Improve the coverage of the Frequent Transit Network (FTN) by increasing investment in services

·    Increase the speed and reliability of bus services by moving more of them into dedicated bus and transit lanes, separated from general traffic

·    Continue improving the resilience and reliability of the rail network through the catch-up renewal programmes

·    Replace ageing ferries required to deliver existing ferry services

 

27

 

Active Transport.

There is significant potential for walking and cycling to play a much greater role in meeting Auckland’s transport needs. Past urban development patterns, and a lack of investment in safe environments or facilities, has created barriers to Aucklanders walking and cycling more.

·    Continue the delivery of the Urban Cycleway Programme to progress development of the cycle network

·    Deliver cycleways in areas associated with the Cycling Investment Programme

·    Deliver important travel behaviour change programmes such as Safe Schools and Travelwise to encourage more people to use active transport

·    Continue to develop and improve safe cycling infrastructure on the cycle and micromobility strategic network

·    Increase the comfort and safety of people on bikes across the wider transport system

·    Make some historical cycling infrastructure fit-for purpose and consistent with customer requirements.

 

28

 

Safety.

The transport system has the potential to cause both direct and indirect harm to the people of

Auckland. The most direct form of harm is through Deaths and Serious Injuries (DSI) because of a crash. However, there are also a number of indirect ways in which the transport system impacts on human health. These include harm caused by air and noise pollution originating from the transport system, and chronic health issues which are exacerbated by a transport system that has historically been designed

to prioritise car travel.

Auckland has the highest rate of DSI per kilometre of road when compared to all other New Zealand

regions. While DSI on the Auckland road

network had generally declined over recent decades, this trend reversed in 2013 and there was an alarming increase in road trauma between 2013 and 2017. In response, a significantly enhanced and accelerated safety programme was provided

for in the 2018 RLTP, and Auckland adopted the Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau Transport

Safety Strategy in 2019.

 

29-30. 73

 

Access and connectivity.

Our population and the amount of kilometres we travel in our cars is leading to congested roads and high travel times. Further development of our transport network is needed to increase the use and speed of public transport and walking and cycling facilities as well as improve freight productivity. This is needed to provide better access to employment and social opportunities for more people.

 

31-32

 

Managing transport assets

AT is the regional guardian of $21.1 billion of publicly owned assets. This includes 7638km of arterial and local roads, 7431km of footpaths, 348km of cycleways, a growing fleet of electric trains, rail and busway stations, bus shelters, ferry wharves and two airfields on the Gulf Islands. In addition, Waka Kotahi manages transport assets valued at around $15.9 billion which includes state

highways, bridges, road tunnels and other structures.

Maintaining and renewing these assets is a significant undertaking. The temporary closure of the Auckland Harbour Bridge last year (due to an accident caused by freak wind gusts) and ongoing issues encountered with the rail network clearly demonstrate the importance of ensuring the resilience and reliability of our infrastructure.

Since the last RLTP, a number of factors have placed

increased pressure on the local road and asset network:

·    Auckland’s increasing population and demand for travel, leading to faster deterioration of road pavements

·    Increasing numbers of heavy vehicles operating on the network including growth-related construction,

·    service-related (e.g. waste collection) traffic and heavier axle weights from double decker buses

·    An increasing local network asset base – which is growing by around 1.5 percent every year through

·    the delivery of new transport infrastructure (e.g. roads in new subdivisions, new transport facilities)

·    Significant increases in construction costs and the cost of renewals, in particular road rehabilitation which makes up the largest share of AT’s renewal spend

·    Low renewal expenditure over the 2018-2021 period (including due to budget impacts from Covid-19) which has created a renewal backlog

·    Increased renewal requirements relating to climate resilience, seismic retrofit and slip remediation.

Without action to address the impact of these factors, the local network asset base will fall below standard leading to increased reliability issues and higher costs to resolve over the long-term.

 

34

 

 

2.  Have we allocated available funding to the highest priorities?

Focus areas.

Page reference

Local Board Feedback

Travel choices

·    Rapid transit - fast, frequent, high capacity bus and train services separated from general traffic

·    Additional and more frequent rail services

·    New train stations

·    New and improved bus stations

·    Accessibility improvements at bus, train and ferry facilities

·    New and extended park and ride facilities

 

38-44

 

Walking and cycling

·    New cycleways and shared paths and improved road environments to make cycling safer

·    New or improved footpaths

 

45-46

 

Climate change & the environment

·    Electrifying the rail line to Pukekohe

·    Increasing the number of electric/hydrogen buses

·    Starting decarbonisation of the ferry fleet

·    Funding to support the uptake of electric cars

 

47-51

 

Safety

·    Safety engineering improvements, like red light cameras and safety barriers

·    Ensuring speed limits are safe and appropriate

·    Improving safety near schools

·    Road safety education

 

52-53

 

Access and connectivity

·    Improving the capacity of our roads for people and freight to improve productivity

·    New bus/transit lanes

·    New roads to support housing development

·    Unsealed road and signage improvements

 

53-57

 

Auckland’s growth

·    Providing transport infrastructure for new housing developments and growth areas

·    Improving transport infrastructure in redevelopment locations

 

58-59

 

Managing transport assets

·    Maintaining and fixing footpaths, local roads and state highways

·    Maintaining the rail network

·    Works to address climate change risk e.g. flooding, earthquake and slip prevention requirements

 

60

 

Other

·    Funding for community projects which is shared amongst the 21 local boards. This enables smaller scale transport projects decided upon by each local board.

·    Funding to undertake long-term planning for the future

·    Customer experience and technology improvements – this includes things like AT HOP card and real-time travel information for customers.

 

61

 

 

3.  Have we excluded any projects or activities from the proposed transport programme that should be included?

Local Board Feedback

 

 


Franklin Local Board

04 May 2021

 

 

Auckland Unlimited Quarterly Report Q2 2021

File No.: CP2021/04698

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.         To note the Auckland Unlimited Quarterly Report for Quarter 2, 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.         This report outlines the key performance of Auckland Unlimited, which includes regional facilities, economic development and visitor economy-related activities and investments.

3.         As of 1 December, the legacy organisations of Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) and Regional Facilities Auckland (RFA) merged to form Auckland Unlimited. Work on a Te Reo Māori name is progressing, with involvement from the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum and individual iwi.

4.         This report covers primarily pre-merger activities for Quarter 2020/21. We anticipate reporting more current post and consolidated post-merger Auckland Unlimited activities for the next Quarter. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      note the Auckland Unlimited Quarterly Report for Quarter 2, 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Unlimited Quarterly Report Q2 2021

23

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jan Brown  - Manager, Local Board Engagement, Auckland Unlimited

Authoriser

Georgina Gilmour - Actiong Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Franklin Local Board

04 May 2021

 

 

Quarter 2 Performance Report
For the period ending 31 December 2020
This report outlines the key performance of Auckland Unlimited, which includes regional facilities, economic development and visitor economy-related activities and investments
Auckland Unlimited

Auckland Unlimited (AU) Q2 Overview  

1.   Context

·      As of 1 December, the legacy organisations of ATEED and RFA merged to form Auckland Unlimited. Work on a Te Reo Māori name is progressing, with involvement from the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum and individual iwi.

·      This report covers primarily pre-merger activities for Quarter 2020/21. We anticipate reporting more current post and consolidated post-merger Auckland Unlimited activities for the next Quarter

                     i. 

2.   AU Amalgamation Update

·      Amalgamation savings are planned however these savings will not be identified until the completion of the AU Organisation Structure Design project which is currently in progress.

·      Based on advice received from Simpson Grierson Auckland Unlimited Limited (the Amalgamation Company) will be legally required to maintain a strict separate of its non-trustee and trustee operations. Therefore, Regional Facilities Auckland’s assets/funds will not be permitted to intermingle with Auckland Unlimited Limited’s assets/funds to enable Regional Facilities Auckland to retain its charitable and tax-exempt status.

·      Consequently, in addition to the consolidated financials provided on the next page as part of the summary of the report (refer to page 3), the report also includes the separate financial performance of AUL and RFA.

                   ii. 

 

3.   Looking Forward                            

·      Auckland Unlimited continues the work required to identify and realise the benefits of the merger.  This includes conducting a reset of our operating model to drive the transformation of the organisation

·      Our core strategy to deliver cultural and economic outcomes for Tāmaki Makaurau is also undergoing a reset, and will be expressed in a new Statement of Intent for the coming financial year

·      We remain in a highly dynamic environment related to Covid 19 and the impacts of lockdowns in Auckland.  Accordingly, we continue to operate in a highly agile manner, proactively confronting emerging challenges and responding by allocating budgets, adjusting operations, and prioritising programs as necessary to meet the need.                                         

 

Auckland Unlimited (AU) Q2 summary                                                                               

Financials

Financials Combined ($m) 	YTD actual 	YTD budget 	Actual vs Budget 
 Capital delivery 	17.5 	30.0 	(12.5) 
Direct revenue 	40.4 	33.4 	7.0 
Direct expenditure 	78.6 	89.3 	10.7 
Net direct expenditure 	38.2 	55.9 	17.7 

•	A very favourable performance in the first six months reflect:
o	receipt of unbudgeted grants.
o	earlier receipt than planned of budgeted grants.
o	tight expenditure control including deferral of maintenance programmes, freeze on recruitment along with staff taking annual leave and reduced hours. 

•	This will in part be offset in the second half of the year as we 
o	incur expenditure relating to the grants received in the first half of the year
o	fund deferrals from the first six months
o	fund unbudgeted merger costs.

Highlights, issues and risks as at the end of Q2

 

 

·      The Prada America’s Cup World Series Auckland and Prada Christmas Race ran successfully mid-December.

·      The Pacific Skills Shift Initiative contract with central government was signed in December; and Auckland Unlimited funding for the Tāmaki Innovation Hub was released in December 2020 spearheading the Tāmaki Regeneration Company innovation initiative.

·      Local production Mary Poppins had a very successful run in The Civic, from 2-16 Oct; the largest capacity musical production to open worldwide since the Covid outbreak. From 1 Nov-15 Dec, Auckland Live and Conventions hosted around 200 ticketed and free events. Concerts featuring NZ artists saw over 13,777 people in The Civic and Great Hall. Summer in the Square returned in December, with free events and live screenings of America’s Cup action.

·      Auckland Live received the HPA Innovation Award at the EVANZ national conference and was recognised for its work with PANNZ during lockdown at the Wellington Theatre Awards.

·      The landmark Toi Tū Toi Ora: Contemporary Māori Art at Auckland Art Gallery opened on 6 Dec, the largest ever undertaken by the Gallery. Over 6,000 attended the opening weekend.

·      Three stadium-promoted events were this quarter; and Auckland Stadiums also hosted over 10,000 athletics competitors and attendees during November.

·      The Zoo’s orangutans accessed their high canopy aerial pathways, with widespread media coverage.

·      NZ Maritime Museum held a special exhibition, NZ Geographic Photographer of the Year 2020, and launched its first publication – Endless Sea: Stories told through the taonga of the New Zealand Maritime Museum Hui te Ananui a Tangaroa. The Blue Water Black Magic exhibition reopened, the Museum’s largest gallery

·      Auckland region closed the year on a path towards recovery and the region’s economy has done much better than anticipated. However, with no external boost from inbound tourism or migration, and many of our investment and trading partners tightening COVID-19 restrictions, the Auckland region will continue to be heavily affected by the pandemic. Including the recent increase in Alert levels for Auckland which will impact business and economic activity.

Issues/Risks:

·      The decision to rehome the Zoo’s elephants was announced, with predominantly positive feedback.

·      Negotiations with accredited zoos continue.

      iii. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Strategic focus area – Economic Development                                            

 

Key commentary

Strategic context

For the 6 months to 31 December 2020, total net direct expenditure of $6.4m was spent on Economic Development against a budget of $10.5m (including associated operational support costs and excluding depreciation and divestment). Highlights:

·      The Pacific Skills Shift Initiative contract with central government was signed in December

·      Auckland Unlimited funding for the Tāmaki Innovation Hub was released in December 2020 spearheading the Tāmaki Regeneration Company innovation initiative.

 

Auckland Unlimited’s Economic Development division supports the growth of quality jobs. The division does this by working with industry across business support, business, talent and investment attraction, workforce and sector development. The COVID-19 response focussed on SMEs support, plus convening various sectors to develop a recovery plan for Auckland. The health of the economy reinforces Auckland as a destination creating international links and driving international investment.

 

Key programme of works

Description

Outlook

Skills and workforce

Working with employers and the Government to better understand key skill challenges and workforce development needs and enable business to attract the right talent. Partner to develop pathways for high-value industries.

The Pacific Skills Shift (PSSI) initiative will allow Auckland Pacific workers in lower-skilled roles to develop future-ready skills that support progression and resilience in the labour market. The contract has been executed and signed with the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment. Delivery planning and recruitment is underway.

Brinks Chicken completed its pilot of the PSSI programme and held a graduation for participants. Filming of the other pilot firm, Sanford, is complete, and joint marketing communication will go live in 2021.

Investment attraction and international partnerships

Attracting high-value business and investment to the city to maximise economic opportunities associated with infrastructure investment for long-term impacts at a local and regional level.

As one of the key actions from Auckland’s Future Now, a steering group has been created to coordinate the private sector response and advocate for increased capacity in MIQ for vital foreign nationals. The group now includes 30 members across business as well as the Christchurch and Wellington EDAs. An economic analysis was developed by Sense partners on the impact of the current border settings and the opportunities created by an increase in border MIQ capacity. The team has supported 4 investment deals with a total value of $203.5m.

Screen Auckland

Screen infrastructure, attraction, facilitation and strategy

Screen production is busy with 527 film permits issued and 367 enquiries YTD. An MOU with NZ Film Commission for external funding for the Screen Creative Careers Research project has been executed and another with Screen Wellington. The Reboot Creative Industries Conference is New Zealand’s largest creative industry conference. ‘Semi-Permanent’ was livestreamed for free from Auckland on 12 November from the Aotea Centre.

Local economic development

Providing guidance to support local initiatives and focusing future investment on enhancing economic outcomes for south and west Auckland.

The South Auckland Drury Land Use study has been awarded to Martin Jenkins and Colliers and is co-funded by NZTE. Stakeholders include Auckland Council, Kāinga Ora, Ministry of Housing and Urban Development, Ministry of Health, NZTE and Developers in Drury. The 2020 Prosperity Index reports on prosperity across six indicators, and was completed, now available on the Auckland Unlimited website.

Innovation

Supporting innovation. Leveraging Auckland Unlimited’s role to grow Auckland's innovation ecosystem, including the ongoing development of GridAKL.

GridAKL Q2 stats - 134 resident businesses, 755 individuals; and 218 events have been hosted, with 11,500 attendees (as at 31 January for YTD). Tāmaki Innovation Hub: This project seeks funding to pilot an innovation hub in Tāmaki for an 18-month period. The funding agreement has been executed and the first funding payment was made in December.

Business growth

An enhanced focus on existing small businesses, raising their capability, encouraging business networking, connecting them to talent and facilitating access to export markets.

Q2: NZTE capability and COVID-19 vouchers issued worth $16.3m YTD with an annual target of $1.7m. 4295 new client registrations YTD. The COVID-19 Business Advisory funding has been exhausted, and extra business advisors have been released back to their core roles, except for the Business Programmes team. The migration to the new RBP platform has led to processing delays for course bookings but will lead to a better customer experience once teething problems are overcome. 


Strategic focus area – Destination                                                  

 

 

 

Key commentary

Strategic context

 

For the 6 months to 31 December 2020, total net direct expenditure of $10.1m was spent on Destination activity against a budget of $16.9m (including associated operational support costs and excluding depreciation and divestment). Highlights:

·      Auckland Unlimited developed a city-wide events and activations programme, Summernova Festival Series, designed to wrap around the 36th America’s Cup, and encourage greater dispersal of people and economic benefits across the Auckland region. December Summernova activity included: Satellite Show of Toi Tū Ora, Love Your Maunga ki Maunguika, I love Takapuna Beachside Grandstand, and Summer Fun at the Village. 

·      Since changing focus after the pandemic hit, Go with Tourism (GWT) has helped more than 880 displaced sector workers find alternative employment, bringing the number of people assisted into employment since GWT’s initial launch to over 2100

·      Auckland Unlimited led the development of a Briefing to the Incoming Minister of Tourism on behalf of the Destination AKL Industry Leaders Group (ILG).  There has been positive engagement with the Minister since, including attendance at the ILG December meeting.

·      The Investment Plan for the Regional Events Fund was submitted and has subsequently been approved.  Auckland will receive a $17m allocation from the $50m fund over the next 4 years.  The fund is designed to provide additionality and stimulate domestic tourism and travel between regions through holding events.  

​Normally, the Destination division supports the sustainable growth of Auckland’s visitor economy, so that the region is better off economically, socially and environmentally. Post COVID-19 the Destination division sees its role as a facilitator and partner with industry and government to support the recovery and re-activation of Auckland’s visitor economy through the implementation of the Destination AKL Recovery Plan.

 

Key programme

Description

Outlook

 

Tourism

Auckland Unlimited’s Tourism team has two key areas of focus: leading and partnering in destination marketing and advocating or co-ordinating in destination management.

The domestic marketing campaign, Dear NZ, Love AKL was rolled out regionally on 5 October across our key fly and drive markets through social/print/digital/radio and national content partnerships. ATEED secured the entire travel insert in the New Zealand Herald for 13 October, which solely featured Auckland content.  The special October issue showcased all there is to know about Auckland and the insert also featured in some of our key drive markets. The Discover Auckland Travel Expo, was held in Q2 to get our industry in front of potential customers, showcasing the variety of experiences we have direct to Aucklanders ahead of the summer period.  Activity to promote all 100 Iconic Eats ran in December and finishes mid-January.

 

Business Events

Sales and marketing activity to grow the value and volume of business events in Auckland, and position Auckland as a premium business destination.

Auckland Convention Bureau's (ACB) business events opportunities supported YTD December FY20/21 have resulted in 30 wins, with a future Total Impact Estimated Value of $10.7m, generating 28,401 visitor nights from a total of 7078 attendees. The estimated visitor spend of these opportunities will be $10.1m. As at end 2020, ACB has accumulated total of 107 opportunities which were won for Auckland which will take place until 2027. Auckland’s business events ambassador programme, the Auckland Advocate Alliance, which has helped to inject $40m into the city’s economy – has welcomed its 50th member.

 

Major Events

Auckland Unlimited intervenes in the events landscape through strategic influencing, investment in major events, production, activation, leverage and marketing.

Q2 events included Elemental AKL, the Auckland Diwali Festival – delivered via a community-based programme held in multiple locations across the Auckland region, the NZRL Festival of League, the City of Auckland Rally and Battle of Jack’s Ridge races, the All-Star Celebrity Slam and the rugby union triple header at Trusts Stadium. Auckland also led the world’s New Year’s Eve celebrations with live broadcast on TVNZ around New Zealand and the world. An estimated 13,000 people convened as midnight arrived. Badminton Junior World Champs were originally scheduled to take place in 2021 now confirmed for 2024.  2024 World Choir Games was officially announced on 10 December 2020.

 

 

International student attraction and retention

Growing Auckland’s reputation as an innovative international education hub through ensuring students access high-value tourism services and experiences.

The website www.bekiwi.nz/auckland officially launched in partnership with Northland Inc, receiving a huge amount of positive feedback from our tourism and education partners. It focuses on unique tourism experiences that appeal to the Gen Z student travel market.  40 Auckland tourism businesses and voluntourism partners are now on board with more to come. Digital promotional campaigns ran through the 2021 summer holiday season; including via an Auckland Advent Calendar campaign on Study AKL’s Facebook and Instagram pages.

 

Strategic focus area – Stadia

 

Key commentary

 

Strategic context

For Q2 ending 31 December 2020, a total of $2.0m has been spent towards stadia against an allocated FY21 capital budget of $5.6m.

 

Highlights

1.     Western Springs Stadium: A multi-year $12.7m programme of major renewal works has been completed and several new facilities were opened in time for the new Speedway season in November.

2.     Mount Smart Stadium:  A programme of minor renewal and infrastructure improvements are underway at Mount Smart.  In addition, several Level of Service initiatives are currently being investigated and planned which will see improvements to customer experience, increases in advertising revenue and an improvement in the quality of the facilities we can provide to our commercial partners.

3.     North Harbour Stadium:  The FY21 Capital Programme is centred around investigation and remedial works to the main grandstand roof which was delayed from FY20 due to COVID along with some minor renewal works.

4.     All Venues:  A structural condition assessment of all freestanding Stadia assets has been completed and will result in a programme of asset improvements that focus on Health & Safety.

 

Issues/Risks

1.     There are no significant risks associated with the delivery of the FY21 Stadiums Programme aside from the risk of another Level 4 COVID-19 alert level.

 

 

Much of Auckland’s network of stadia are aging and do not respond to the evolving interests of Aucklanders, including the growth of interest in a wider range of sports.

 

Ex-RFA is working to improve the amenity and health and safety standards in the stadia under its stewardship, in order to improve their financial sustainability and provide better facilities for both community sports activities and professional sports teams and their fans. RFA also aims to provide venues to support Auckland’s emerging sports.

 

 

Key programme of works

Status

Description

Outlook

Mount Smart Renewals Programme

Delivery Phase

A programme of minor renewals and infrastructure upgrades

Progressing well

North Harbour Stadium – main stand roof renewal

Plan Phase

To evaluate and renew the main grandstand roof

This project was put on hold last financial year but investigation and assessment has resumed and physical works are expected to start in Q4.

Western Springs Stadium renewals

Close Phase

Delivery of a new toilet block, gate entry building, maintenance shed, concourse, and an upgrade to Stadium Road are complete.

 

Works completed in November 2020.

Strategic focus area – Auckland Zoo development

 

Key commentary

 

Strategic context

For Q2 ending 31st December 2020, a total of $5.7m has been spent at Auckland Zoo against an allocated FY21 budget of $15m.

 

Highlights

1.     A revised South East Asia Jungle Track (SEAJT) construction programme, that addresses the impacts from the COVID -19, has been implemented.  The remaining construction of SEAJT has been identified as Phase 2 and is comprised of the O-line aerial pathway, Tiger Lowlands, and the Swamp Forest and due for completion November 2021.

2.     The updated cost estimate to complete the SEAJT scope is within the approved $62m project budget; the elongation of the programme to November 2021 spreads the remaining project costs over the next two financial years (FY21 & FY22).

3.     In addition to the SEAJT Project, a $7m programme of Infrastructure and General Renewals is planned for this financial year and is currently underway.

4.     The Café, The High Canopy Aerial Pathway and the staff quarters in the Tiger Care facility are all now open.

i.             

Issues/Risks 

There is potential for future disruptions by Covid-19 to labour and materials and the additional time and costs associated with these delays.

 

Ex-RFA is continuing with development of a world-class zoo and wildlife conservation facility by addressing aging infrastructure at Auckland Zoo and long-term under-investment through a phased programme of works.

 

These works constitute essential renewals aimed at ensuring Auckland Zoo meets the modern standards of animal welfare, visitor amenity, wildlife exhibition and health and safety obligations.

 

Key programme of works

Status

Description

Outlook

South East Asia Precinct development

Delivery Phase

 

Redevelopment of the central area within the Zoo to provide modern standards of housing and care for the Zoo’s South East Asian species, and new catering facilities for zoo visitors

The revised delivery programme, developed post COVID19, is meeting planned timelines and cost to complete estimates.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Strategic focus area – Aotea precinct development

 

 

 

Key commentary

 

Strategic context

 

For Q2 ending 30 December 2020, a total of $4.8m has been spent against an allocated FY21 budget of $13.4m

 

Highlights

1.     The Weathertightness improvement phase of the Aotea Centre Refurbishment Programme is progressing at a steady rate and scheduled to be completed in August 2021. 

2.     The fly-tower cladding, and roof asphalting is complete and the shrink-wrapping has been removed from the upper levels.

Issues/Risks

The Aotea Centre weathertightness works were substantially disrupted during the Covid-19 lockdown and post-lockdown periods. The programme is now expected to extend into Q4 of FY21 and risk being impacted further if future lockdowns occur.

 

The refurbishment and further proposed development and expansion of the Aotea Centre are aimed at creating a vibrant cultural and civic centre for Auckland focussed on the Aotea Square precinct and as part of a wider Aotea Arts Quarter.

 

This will include a significantly upgraded and expanded Aotea Centre and integrated Aotea Square, providing a home for the development and presentation of performing arts in Auckland.

 

 

 

 

Key programme of works

Status

Description

Outlook

 

 Aotea refurbishment

Delivery Phase

The first significant refurbishment of the 30-year-old Centre, aiming to upgrade foyer and functions spaces and address long-standing weather-tightness issues 

 

Internal refurbishment works are complete.

Exterior weathertightness works are scheduled for completion in Q1 FY22.

 

 Aotea Studios – Nga Kakano a Rehia Preliminary Design

Completed

Major expansion of the current Aotea Centre to provide a home for performing arts organisations and to foster the work of performing arts groups 

Endorsement of the Preliminary Design by Mana Whenua and the Auckland Urban Design Panel marks the completion of this phase of the Project.  Continuation from this point will be subject to LTP funding.


Other Statement of Intent focus areas

Local board engagement

Representatives have fed into and participated in the Council-led CCO Engagement Plan review workshops, and the Elected Member survey workshops. 
Local board-specific newsletters have continued to be published and are being adapted to include broader Auckland Unlimited content.

 

The Auckland Council Seniors Panel was hosted at Aotea Centre on 16 November, the panel was shown the work of Lisa Reihana and given background information about the installation prior to a presentation providing information about the former RFA and the various arts, environment, sporting and events it delivers. 

 

Data was extracted from all former RFA venues (and MOTAT and the Auckland War Memorial Museum) of the number of students that benefitted from free or subsidised access to venues.  These were presented in person to 11 local boards with the balance preferring not to have a personal presentation, but the information sent together with a memo.  All were well received.

 

Worked with Auckland Council Local Board Services and attended workshops in response to the recommendations of the CCO review which were:

·      To develop a more meaningful way for CCO’s and local boards to work together

·      The preparation of joint CCO engagement plans for each local board

·      More initiative by local board in integrating their own planning with CCO planning

·      Liaison between CCO’s and local boards at a more senior level so CCO’s can quickly remedy local board concerns

·      The preparation of joint six-monthly reports for local boards

·      The communication of clear, up-to-date information from CCO’s to local Boards on projects in their area

·      CCO’s make more effort to co-ordinate how they consult the community on and implement local projects.

 

 

 

Climate Change and Sustainability

Pre-amalgamation, ATEED’s climate change and sustainability inaugural report was published in October 2020.  Writing in the report’s foreword, ATEED Chief Executive Nick Hill says the report “is a bold step in our journey as an organisation that is committed to being as sustainable and climate proof as possible.” This report was structured in accordance with our approach to climate change and sustainability as an organisation and informs ATEED’s external stakeholders about the organisations commitments to being sustainable and climate-proof.

 

Development continued on a series of learning modules that cover topics of climate change, sustainability, greenhouse gas emissions, corporate sustainability and taking action as a collective and individual. These modules are for internal use only and will be utilised as a capability building tool for the new entity. The learning modules will be available for Auckland Unlimited staff from Jan/Feb.

 

The team is developing climate change and sustainability actions for the Destination AKL Recovery Plan. We have started to engage with key experts who will support building the evidence base and a series of recommended actions. These recommendations will then be worked through by an internal working group to identify actions that are within the organisations control and responsibility, and those that will need further external engagement. The final report will include the evidence base, the key high-level actions, organisation’s specific actions, and recommended next steps.

 

We have started to work with key partners on establishing a climate innovation hub to address climate challenges for industry, and Auckland region. The initial focus of the hub will be on 4 challenges needing innovative solutions as identified in the Emissions Reduction Pathway for Auckland’s key sectors. These 4 challenges include:  process heat, transport (logistics), construction & demolition, and commercial & residential retrofits. Terms of Reference for the Climate Innovation Leadership Working Group have been finalised and sent to members. This includes a shared purpose, objectives, and key work programmes.

 

Auckland Council and CCOs have committed to reduce their emissions by 50% by 2030.  Auckland Unlimited is commencing work on Toitū Carbon Zero for Lantern Festival 2021. This will be the organisation first delivered cultural festival to go through Toitū Carbon Zero programme which includes measuring, reducing and offsetting emissions.

i.             

Prior to amalgamation,

 RFA recently underwent third party carbon emissions auditing and was successful in retaining its status Toitū carbon reduce certification.  The audit report cited:

“…RFA meets the requirements of Toitū carbon reduce certification having measured its greenhouse gas emissions in accordance with ISO 14064-1:2006 and committed to managing and reducing its emissions in respect of the operational activities of its organisation…”

 

Other Statement of Intent focus areas

Contribution towards Māori outcomes

A new Māori Outcomes plan for Auckland Unlimited (draft) is being developed This aligns with the RFA Plan which was also due for review in 2021.

 

Current objectives of the plan

·      Grow the institutions knowledge base and expertise in being responsive to Māori

·      Build staff capability in te ao Māori, tikanga Māori and te reo Māori

·      Increase the prominence of te ao Māori and te reo Māori within its facilities

·      Establish and support internal Māori advisory groups and Māori specialists

·      Create partnership opportunities with Māori stakeholders

·      Foster effective Māori engagement

·      Proudly showcase Māori works, narratives and identity

·      Strengthen Māori outreach and learning opportunities

The new plan will consider the new SOI of Auckland Unlimited and the updated Kia ora Tāmaki Framework from Council.

Key deliverables from Q2

·      Launch of Toi Tū Toi Ora art exhibition, continued appointments of new fixed term roles (11 gallery guides, 2 internships) with competency in kaupapa Māori

·      Completion of the draft Te Reo language plan for Auckland Zoo

·      Confirmation of funding to undertake bilingual signage and wayfinding for all RFA facilities over the current and next financial year

·      Training and advice to build the cultural capability and engagement of RFA with Mana Whenua and Mataawaka communities.

·      Planning for the successful launch event of Auckland Unlimited – Te Hononga, guided by RFA Kaumatua, occurred as a signature event showcasing RFA’s commitment to Kaupapa Māori.

Māori Outcomes – AKL 2021

·      Tāmaki Makaurau Taki Hua - the Māori Economic Summit 2020 took place on 23 and 24 November at Aotea Centre. The programme attracted strong attendance, as well as ministerial representation.     

·      Continued to identify and share procurement opportunities during Q2 for Māori businesses via the AC36 event. Also working with Mana Whenua on cultural and commercial activations in the AC36 Race Village.

·      Worked with Mana Whenua on the design and naming of Te Pou (NZ House) in the AC36 Race Village. Also commissioned a Mana Whenua artist to design the dressing for Silo 117 in the Race Village. Both these activities, alongside various other pieces of work, creates a distinctly Māori footprint in the CBD area.

Māori business

1. As at 31 December, 503 Māori businesses engaged in the RBPN programme YTD.

 

 

Arts & Culture Strategy

Toi Tū Toi Ora: Contemporary Māori Art is the largest ever undertaken by the Gallery, including numerous new commissions. Seven new Kaiārahi were appointed to the Visitor experience team to provide guided tours of Toi Tū Toi Ora in Te Reo Māori to Kura Kaupapa and iwi groups.

 

Auckland Live’s first investment residency is underway. Live has invested to develop a season of Garage Party by Modern Maori Quartet. This residency in the Wintergarden also allows Live to bring NZ arts-led content to the conventions market.

 

NZMM’s education programme performed well, with 1,643 students and 374 adults over the period. The pilot outreach programme Aramoana visited 412 students and 48 adults in schools in the Waikato.

 

Partnership with the America’s Cup teams for race day activations in Aotea Square has created opportunities for family friendly activity including live music, showcasing Auckland’s UNESO City of Music designation.

 

Auckland investment story: Invest AKL

The site is now operational and generating new leads, there are now 35 live investment opportunities on the site.

 

 

      ii. 

 

 

 


Auckland Unlimited – Company Q2 financials

 

Coins Direct operating performance

 

Piggy BankFinancial Commentary

($ million)

 

FY 20

FY 21 Quarter 2 YTD

FY 21

 

 

A: Net Direct Expenditure variance to Budget for Q2 YTD with Auckland Unlimited taking a tighter cost approach due to COVID-19.

 

B: Increase in operating grants & subsidies due to receiving additional external funding from Government in relation to COVID-19.

 

C: Lower Staff Costs relates to timing of recruitment and various unfilled positions being put on hold.

 

D: Underspend of expenditure due to reprioritisation and rephasing of activities to focus on recovery activities across Auckland Unlimited workstreams.

 

E: Underspend of expenditure due to reprioritisation and rephasing of activities to focus on recovery activities across Auckland Unlimited workstreams.

 

Notes

Actual

Actual

Budget

Variance

Budget

 

Net direct expenditure

A

40.9

16.5

27.4

10.9

57.0

 

Direct revenue    

B

28.0

17.3

13.2

4.1

26.8

 

Fees & user charges

 

0.5

0.1

0.1

0.0

0.5

 

Operating grants and subsidies

 

5.7

6.9

2.3

4.6

9.0

 

Other direct revenue

 

21.8

10.3

10.8

-0.5

17.3

 

Direct expenditure

 

68.9

33.8

40.6

6.8

83.8

 

Employee benefits

C

23.9

12.7

13.5

0.8

23.9

 

Grants, contributions & sponsorship  

D

7.3

2.5

5.4

2.9

10.3

 

Other direct expenditure

E

37.7

18.6

21.7

3.1

49.6

 

Other key operating lines

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AC operating funding

 

40.9

16.5

27.4

-10.9

57.0

 

AC capital funding

 

0.0

0.0

0.1

-0.1

0.2

 

Vested assets

 

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

 

Depreciation

 

3.0

1.3

1.5

0.2

3.0

 

Divestment of other assets

 

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

 

 

Net interest expense

 

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

RFA Trust Financials

 

Coins Direct operating performance

 

Piggy BankFinancial Commentary

 

($ million)

 

FY20

FY21 YTD

FY21

 

A: The $6.8m favourable variance reflects the receipt of unbudgeted central government grants and tight control over expenditure.

 

B: Direct revenue favourable variance is due primarily to RFA receiving the two week extension of the Government Wage Subsidy of $1.1m and the first tranche of $0.75m Strategic Tourism Assets Protection Programme grant which were both unbudgeted, as well as an increase in Zoo attendance and the popular Mary Poppins show.

 

C: Direct expenditure favourable variance due primarily to a tight control over expenditure including a staff recruitment freeze, reduced staff hours, annual leave being taken by staff and reduced cost of goods and services, offset by additional payments to casual staff in relation to the unbudgeted Government Wage Subsidy grant.

 

D: Capital funded grants of $0.7m paid RFA partners including Trust Arena, Eventfinda Stadium, Stardome and MOTAT. The funding was budgeted through Auckland Council Capital funding.

 

Notes

Actual

Actual

Budget

Variance

Budget

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net direct expenditure

A

48.49

21.7

28.5

6.8

57.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Direct revenue

B

55.5

23.1

20.2

2.9

41.2

 

Fees & user charges

 

34.4

11.0

9.6

1.4

23.0

 

Operating grants and subsidies

 

7.1

7.3

5.9

1.4

6.7

 

Other direct revenue

 

14.0

4.8

4.7

0.1

11.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Direct expenditure

C

103.9

44.8

48.7

3.9

98.2

 

Employee benefits

 

50.4

27.7

27.5

(0.2)

50.7

 

Grants, contributions & sponsorship  

 

1.3

1.4

1.4

-

2.8

 

Other direct expenditure

 

52.2

15.7

19.8

4.1

44.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other key operating lines

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AC operating funding

 

42.7

28.4

28.4

-

57.0

 

AC capital funding

D

75.9

17.5

29.9

12.4

50.1

 

Holiday Act remediation payments

 

2.0

-

-

-

-

 

Capital Grants paid to RFA Partners

D

1.7

0.7

-

(0.7)

-

 

Living wage payment

 

-

0.3

-

(0.3)

-

 

Depreciation

 

35.3

17.3

16.9

(0.4)

35.8

 

 

Net interest revenue

 

 

0.6

 

0.1

 

0.1

 

-

 

0.2

 

Auckland Unlimited Q2 performance measures

Out of a total of 21 KPIs, 11 KPIs have been met, 8 KPIs results are not available this quarter or have not yet been set, 2 KPIs have not been met.

LTP Key performance indicators

2020/21

Q1 -Result

FY 20 Quarter 2

Comments

Q2 Actual

Annual Target

Achieved?

Provide experiences and opportunities for all

The number of people who experience Regional Facilities Auckland's arts, environment and sports venues and events**

 

2,790,600

858,151

1,200,000

Not met (COVID 19 impacts)

The COVID-19 lockdown resulted in all RFA venues closed from 13 August during Alert Level 3 which has impacted visitors.

 

The net promoter score for Regional Facilities Auckland's audiences and participants**

45

55

20

Met

 

 

Percentage of Auckland residents surveyed who consider that RFA programmes, events and exhibition enrich their lives**

73%

Not measured

This quarter

                   i.            70%

-

Community survey on hold until return of programming across Auckland Live and Auckland Stadiums

 

Number of people experiencing RFA’s free or subsidised programmes, events and exhibitions

Not measured

496,739

Baseline to be set

Met

 

 

Number of people who experience RFA’s outreach programmes**

Not measured

495

Baseline to be set

-

 

 

RFA website and social media following (number of visits/followers)**

Not measured

2,459,618

 

Baseline to be set

Met

Actual result includes visitors to the various websites under the RFA brands.

 

Number of programmes contributing to the visibility and presence of Māori in Auckland, Tāmaki Makaurau**

44

43

9

Met

 

 

Number of school children who attend RFA’s schools programmes**

Not measured

40,353

Baseline to be set

Met

 

 

Value of capital improvements to RFA venues**

$75.9m

$17.5m

$29.91m

Not met

Capital project work will be completed to budget later in the financial year.

 

Number of staff hours on conservation activities at Auckland Art Gallery, Auckland Zoo and NZMM**

Not measured

7,745

Baseline to be set

Met

 

 

Percentage of operating costs funded through non-rates revenues**

52%

51%

42%

Met

 

 

 

*These KPIs represent Q1 (this year) results

** These KPIs represent final last year results

 

 

 

LTP Key performance indicators

2020/21

Q1 -Result

FY 20 Quarter 2

Comments

Q2 Actual

Annual Target

Achieved?

Driving Investment into Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland and support Auckland businesses to innovate and thrive

Value of central government investment into Auckland facilitated by Auckland Unlimited*[1]

$11.2m

$33.3m

$20m

Met

Result to date reflects $16.3m of COVID-19 vouchers through RBP programme and $17m through the Regional Events Fund in Q2

 

Attributable value of private sector investment secured over the year*

N/A

N/A

$100m

N/A

YTD results not available

 

The contribution to regional GDP from major events and business events attracted or supported (LTP measure)*

N/A

$1.56m

$66.5m - original target

$25m - Targets Revised in Q1- 2020[2]

N/A

Based on results available to date for three major events only and no business events

 

Number of businesses that have been through an Auckland Unlimited programme or benefited from an Auckland Unlimited intervention*

3,876

5,584

3,000

Met

YTD results have already exceeded the yearly target due to the increased demand for RBP due to COVID-19.

 

Customer satisfaction of customers, partners and stakeholders who have interacted with Auckland Unlimited*

N/A

91%

85%

Met

Based on 99 Interaction and Relationship surveys completed over Q2

 

Tell the Auckland Story

Number of visitor nights resulting from an Auckland Unlimited intervention (LTP measure)*

N/A

18,395

435,000 – original target

125,000 Revised1

N/A

Based on results available to date for three major events only and no business events.

 

Uptake of Auckland Play-Book and associated brand assets from aucklandnz.com brand hub*

New KPI

N/A

Benchmark to be set

N/A

Benchmark will be set at the end of FY2020/21

 

Provide experiences and opportunities for all

Number of Māori businesses that have been through an Auckland Unlimited programme or benefitted from an Auckland Unlimited intervention*

361

460

120

Met

YTD results have already exceeded the yearly target due to the increased demand for RBP due to COVID -19.

 

Climate change and sustainability

 

 

 

 

 

 

Auckland Unlimited delivered events (Diwali, Lantern, Pasifika and Tāmaki Herenga Waka Festivals)*

·      Diversion of landfill waste

No. events achieve Carbon Zero*

New KPI

NA

70%

 

1/4

N/A

As a result of COVID, the delivery format of Diwali was changed to a more dispersed/community model which did not allow the measurement of waste diversion.

 

Carbon emission reductions (year-on-year % change)**

Not measured

Baseline to be set

--

 

 

 

 

 

 

CCO review implementation

Context  

Q2 implementation progress  

 

ATEED – RFA Merger 

On December 1, ATEED and RFA formally merged to become Auckland Unlimited.  Key achievements over Q2 in the lead up to and subsequent to the merger included: 

·      Appointment of Chief Executive, Nick Hill 

·      Development and approval by Auckland Council of the new name – Auckland Unlimited 

·      Approval of the new Auckland Unlimited Statement of Intent 

·      Transference of staff contracts to the new entity 

·      Development of a new Auckland Unlimited website and intranet

·      Appointment of Auckland Unlimited Chief Financial Officer and Chief People Officer

 

Other Actions 

·      Ernst and Young appointed to lead the development of the target operating model (TOM) for     Auckland Unlimited 

·      Transition management team announced for Auckland Unlimited.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outlook

 

ATEED-RFA Merger and Transition Update: 

Key merger related milestones include: 

·      Over Q3 and beyond, Auckland Unlimited staff will work with Ernst and Young on the target operating model for Auckland Unlimited.  

 

·      The design of Auckland Unlimited future operating model, that will enable the organisation to achieve its goals is being developed.  

 

 

 Accountability & Culture 

 

·      Needs analysis and initial research being completed on suitable engagement tool to roll out across whole of Auckland Unlimited to seek wider and consistent view and feedback from our people.  Legacy office vibe tool still operating for legacy ATEED and engagement remains consistent at 7.6.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Franklin Local Board

04 May 2021

 

 

Franklin Local Board consultation feedback and input into the 10-year Budget 2021-2031

File No.: CP2021/04883

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive consultation feedback from the Franklin Local Board area on:

·    proposed priorities, activities and advocacy initiatives for the Franklin local board agreement 2021/2022. 

·    regional topics for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

2.       To recommend any local matters to the Governing Body, that they will need to consider or make decisions on in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 process.

3.       To provide input on the proposed regional topics in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

4.       Local board agreements set out annual funding priorities, activities, budgets, levels of service, performance measures and advocacy initiatives for each local board area. Local board agreements for 2021/2022 will be included in the Council’s 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

5.       Auckland Council publicly consulted from 22 February to 22 March 2021 to seek community views on the proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031. This included consultation on the Franklin Local Board’s proposed priorities for 2021/2022, and advocacy initiatives for 2021-2031 to be included in their local board agreement.

6.       Auckland Council received 19,965 people in the consultation period. 771 submissions were from people living in the Franklin Local Board area.

7.       Of the 541 people in Franklin who gave feedback on proposed local priorities and advocacy initiatives:

·      59% support most or all priorities and advocacy initiatives,

·      26% did not support most or any priorities and advocacy initiatives and

·      15% did not know or had other comment on priorities and advocacy initiatives.

8.       In the 10-year Budget process there are matters where local boards provide recommendations to the Governing Body, for consideration or decision-making. This includes:  

·    any new/amended business improvement district targeted rates

·    any new/amended local targeted rate proposals 

·    proposed locally driven initiative capital projects outside local boards’ decision-making responsibility

·    release of local board specific reserve funds

·    any local board advocacy initiatives.

The Governing Body will consider these items as part of the 10-year Budget decision-making process in May/June 2021.

9.      Local boards have a statutory responsibility to provide input into regional strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. This report provides an opportunity for the local board to provide input on council’s proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive consultation feedback on the proposed Franklin Local Board priorities and activities for 2021/2022 and key advocacy initiatives for 2021-2031.

b)      receive consultation feedback on regional topics in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 from people and organisations based in the Franklin local board area.

c)      approve its advocacy initiatives for inclusion (as an appendix) to its 2021/2022 Local Board Agreement

d)      recommend the release of local board specific reserve funds to the Governing Body.

e)      provide input on regional topics in the proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031 to the Governing Body.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     Each financial year Auckland Council must have a local board agreement (as agreed between the Governing Body and the Franklin Local Board) for each local board area. This local board agreement reflects priorities in the Franklin Local Board Plan 2020 through local activities, budgets, levels of service, performance measures and advocacy initiatives.

11.     The local board agreements 2021/2022 will form part of the Auckland Council’s 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

12.     Auckland Council publicly consulted from 22 February to 22 March 2021 to seek community views on the proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031, as well as local board priorities and proposed advocacy initiatives to be included in the local board agreement 2021/2022.

13.     Due to the impacts of the ongoing COVID-19 global pandemic, significant pressure has been placed upon the council’s financial position. This has created significant flow on effects for the council’s proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031, in particular in the first three years.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

This report includes analysis of consultation feedback, any local matters to be recommended to the Governing Body and seeks input on regional topics in the proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031. Consultation feedback overview 

14.     As part of the public consultation Auckland Council used a variety of methods and channels to reach and engage a broad cross section of Aucklanders to gain their feedback and input into regional and local topics.    

15.     In total, Auckland Council received feedback from 19,965 people in the consultation period. This feedback was received through:

·      written feedback – 18,975 hard copy and online forms, emails and letters.

·      in person – 607 pieces of feedback through 61 Have Your Say events (38 in person and 23 online webinars), 4 of which were held in the Franklin local board area (2 formal and 2 informal), and two independently managed phone interviews. Due to the Covid-19 lockdowns 26 events were affected (either cancelled, postponed or moved to an online platform).

·      social media – 78 pieces of feedback through Auckland Council social media channels

16.     All feedback will be made available on an Auckland Council webpage called “Feedback submissions for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031” and will be accessible from 3 May 2021 through the following link: akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/submissions-budget-2021-2031.

 

Feedback received on the Franklin Local Board’s priorities for 2021/2022 and key advocacy initiatives

17.     The Franklin Local Board consulted on the following priorities for 2021/2022:

·    Priority 1: Support and develop community-led environmental restoration initiatives, including those led by mana whenua e.g. Te Korowai o Papatūānuku stream restoration, the C.R.E.S.T project and pest free Franklin.

·    Priority 2: Fund a local economic developer broker to support local businesses to leverage and grow economic development opportunities.

·    Priority 3: Review our community partnerships and community grants programme to ensure the community is empowered to deliver local outcomes e.g. support rural halls committee to develop five-year operational plans and three-year funding agreements with local service agencies. We will also review the event and ecological partnership funding approach

18.     The Franklin Local Board also consulted on the following key advocacy initiatives:

·    Initiative 1: Reinstate local board transport funding to pre- COVID 19 levels

·    Initiative 2: Increase the AT 2021/ 2024 budget for renewal, rehabilitation and maintenance and prioritise rehabilitation of Whitford-Maraetai Road, Papakura- Clevedon Road, Alfriston- Brookby Road, Glenbrook Road, Hūnua Road and the Pukekohe Ring Road

·    Initiative 3: Fund AT to provide a bus service connecting Wairoa sub-division communities to transport nodes at Papakura Train Station, Pine Harbour and Botany to allow for environmentally sustainable transport choices and access to council services and facilities

·    Initiative 4: Allocate $23 million for the development of Karaka Sports Park and community hub

19.    541 submissions were received on Franklin Local Board’s priorities for 2021/2031 and key advocacy initiatives. 59% support most or all priorities and advocacy initiatives, 26% did not support most or any priorities and advocacy initiatives and 15% did not know or had other comment on priorities and advocacy initiatives.

 

20.     Six mana whenua iwi gave feedback on the local priorities.  All were in support of most or all of the local priorities.

21.     Consultation feedback on local board priorities will be considered by the local board when approving their local board agreement between the 14-18 June 2021. Local board key advocacy initiatives will be considered in the current report.

Information on submitters

22.     The tables and graphs below indicate the demographic categories people identified with. This information only relates to those submitters who provided demographic information.

 

Key themes

23.     Key themes of note across the feedback received (through written and in-person channels) included:

·    on-going support for environmental initiatives, including from mana whenua and mataawaka

·    support for funding a local economic broker, with particular interest from mana whenua and mataawaka in terms of possible opportunities to promote opportunity for māori through this initiative

·    transport options remain of high importance to Franklin submitters, particularly in the east where better ferry services and connections to transport hubs are requested

·    investment in fit for purpose roading, to meet the demands of current and future is considered important in the context of local and regional growth

·    In the context of the recovery budget, the proposal to advocate for regional investment in Karaka Sports Park and community hub received mixed feedback

·    ongoing concern regarding the timing for the delivery of infrastructure and services as the south experiences significant development.

 

Requests for local funding

24.     Requests for local funding through the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 consultation included:

·    Request 1: extension of the footpath from 176 Waiuku-Otaua Road

·    Request 2: a pool and recreation centre for Waiuku

·    Request 3: investment in initiatives that support the Kawakawa Bay community, noting that the Kawakawa Bay is home to the busiest boat ramp in Auckland

 

·    Request 4: investment in initiatives that remove and manage weed along the Pukekohe to Papakura train-line

·    Request 5: more off-lead dog facilities

·    Request 6: places for children to ride bikes safely

·    Request 7: more recreation facilities for young people in Beachlands e.g. skatepark and swimming pool

Overview of feedback received on regional topics in the 10-year Budget from the Franklin Local Board area

25.     The proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031 sets out Auckland Council’s priorities and how to pay for them. Consultation on the proposed 10-year Budget asked submitters to respond to five key questions on:

1.     The proposed investment package

2.     Climate change

3.     Water quality

4.     Community investment

5.     Rating policy.

26.     The submissions received from the Franklin Local Board area on these key issues are summarised below, along with an overview of any other areas of feedback on regional proposals with a local impact.

Key Question 1: Proposed investment package

27.     Aucklanders were asked about a proposed $31 billion capital investment programme over the next ten years, allowing the council to deliver key services and renew our aging assets. The proposal includes a one-off 5 per cent average general rates increase for the 2021/2022 financial year, rather than the previously planned 3.5 per cent increase, before returning to 3.5 per cent increases over the remaining years.

28.     The proposal also includes higher borrowings in the short term, a continuation of cost savings and the sale of more surplus property. Without the greater use of rates and debt, around $900 million of investment in Auckland would be delayed from the next three years.

29.     In the Franklin Local Board area, of the 706 people who gave feedback on this question, 34% are in support and 54% do not support. The graphs below give an overview of the responses from the Franklin Local Board area.

 

 

 

Key Question 2: Climate Change

30.     Aucklanders were asked about a proposal to provide additional investment to respond to climate change challenges. This includes enabling a quicker transition from diesel to cleaner electric and hydrogen buses, diverting more waste from landfill and enabling significant planting initiatives.  

31.     In the Franklin Local Board area, of the 593 people who gave feedback on this question 52% are in support and 34% do not support. The graphs below give an overview of the responses from the Franklin Local Board area.

 

 


 

Key Question 3: Water quality

32.     Aucklanders were asked about a proposal to extend and increase the Water Quality Targeted Rate for another three years – from 2028 until 2031 – as well as increasing the targeted rate annually in line with proposed average increases in general rates. The Water Quality Targeted Rate funds projects to improve water quality in Auckland’s harbours, beaches and streams.  

33.     In the Franklin Local Board area, of the 584 people who gave feedback on this question,  41% support extension and increase,  26% support extension only and 20% do not support. The graphs below give an overview of the responses from the Franklin Local Board area.

 

 

 

Key Question 4: Community investment

34.     Aucklanders were asked to provide feedback on a proposal that would see council adopt a new approach for community services to enable them to reduce building and asset maintenance related expenditure. The proposal involves consolidation of community facilities and services, increased leasing or shared facility arrangements, and an increased focus on providing multi-use facilities and online services in the future.

35.     In the Franklin Local Board area, of the 579 people who gave feedback on this question 55% are in support and 28% do not support. The graphs below give an overview of the responses from the Franklin Local Board area

 

 

 

Key Question 5: Rating policy

36.     Aucklanders were asked for their feedback on a raft of proposed rating changes impacting different properties across Auckland differently. Proposed changes also included, for example, the extension of the Natural Environment Targeted Rate until June 2031, along with options to extend the Urban Rating Area and reinstatement of the Accommodation Provider Targeted Rate.

37.     In the Franklin Local Board area, the response to proposed changes were as follows;

i.    extension of the Natural Environment Targeted Rate until June 2031 - of the 489 submissions on this question 59% are in support and 30% do not support.

ii.   extending the Urban Rating Area – of the 498 responses to this proposal, 49% of were in support of the proposal, with 36% not in support

iii.  proposal to charge residential rates on farm and lifestyle properties within the Urban Rating Area – of the 495 responses to this proposal, 36% were in support of the proposal, while 53% do not support

iv.  extending the City Centre Targeted Rate – of the 481 responses to this proposal, 49% were in support and 37% did not support

v.   proposal to introducing the Rodney drainage rate – of the 483 responses to this proposal, 46% were in support, 18% did not support and 35% did not know

vi.  proposal on the accommodation provider targeted rate – of the 8 responses to this proposal, 1 supported option 2 with the rest either objecting entirely to the rate or suggesting alternative approaches

vii. proposal on the electricity network resilience targeted rate – of the 24 responses to this proposal, 21% supported the proposal, 42% did not support and 38% selecting ‘other’. Of those that selected other, some suggested the focus should be on under-grounding, others noted a focus on planting rules would be more proactive and others noted that Vector does not operate for large parts of the Franklin Local Board area.

viii. proposal on the Clevedon water connection targeted rate – of the 2 responses to this proposal, 1 was in support and 1 selected other, commenting that the water connection process and cost is too vague to enable responsible consideration by existing residents.

ix.  there was no feedback on the Waitakere rural sewerage targeted rate.


 

Recommendations on local matters 

38.     This report allows the local board to recommend local matters to the Governing Body for consideration as part of the 10-year Budget process, in May 2021. This includes:

·    any new/amended business improvement district targeted rates

·    any new/amended local targeted rate proposals 

·    proposed locally driven initiative capital projects outside local boards’ decision-making responsibility

·    release of local board specific reserve funds.

·    approve its advocacy initiatives for inclusion (as an appendix) to its 2021/2022 Local Board Agreement

Funding for Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

39.     Local boards are allocated funding for local driven initiatives (LDI) annually, to spend on local projects or programmes that are important to their communities. Local boards have decision-making over the LDI funds but need approval from the Governing Body where:

·    operational LDI funding is to be converted into capital LDI funding.

·    the release of local board specific reserve funds is requested, which are being held by the council for a specific purpose.

·    a LDI capital project exceeds $1 million.

          These conditions do not apply to the Franklin local board for the 2021/2022 financial year.

Local board advocacy

40.     Local boards are requested to approve any advocacy initiatives for inclusion (as an appendix) to their 2020/2021 Local Board Agreement, taking into account the consultation feedback above. This allows the Finance and Performance Committee to consider these advocacy items when making decisions on the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 in May/June. 

Local board input on regional topics in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031

41.     Local boards have a statutory responsibility for identifying and communicating the interests and preferences of the people in its local board area in relation to Auckland Council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws, and any proposed changes to be made to them. This report provides an opportunity for the local board to provide input on council’s proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

42.     Local board plans reflect community priorities and preferences and are key documents that guide the development of local board agreements (LBAs), local board annual work programmes, and local board input into regional plans such as the 10-year Budget.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

43.     The decisions recommended in this report are part of the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 and local board agreement process to approve funding and expenditure over the next 10 years.

44.     Projects allocated funding through this 10-year Budget process will all have varying levels of potential climate impact associated with them. The climate impacts of projects Auckland Council chooses to progress, are all assessed carefully as part of council’s rigorous reporting requirements

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

45.     The 10-year Budget 2021-2031 is an Auckland Council Group document and will include budgets at a consolidated group level. Consultation items and updates to budgets to reflect decisions and new information may include items from across the group

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

46.     The local board’s decisions and feedback are being sought in this report. The local board has a statutory role in providing its feedback on regional plans.

47.     Local boards play an important role in the development of the council’s 10-year Budget. Local board agreements form part of the 10-year Budget. Local board nominees have also attended Finance and Performance Committee workshops on the 10-year Budget.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

48.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the 10-year Budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate the council’s responsiveness to Māori.

49.     Local board plans, developed in 2020 through engagement with the community including Māori, form the basis of local board area priorities. There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and the wider Māori community.

50.     Analysis provided of consultation feedback received on the proposed 10-year Budget includes submissions made by mana whenua and the wider Māori community who have interests in the rohe / local board area.

51.     Ongoing conversations between local boards and Māori will assist to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

52.     Some projects approved for funding could have discernible impacts on Māori. The potential impacts on Māori, as part of any project progressed by Auckland Council, will be assessed appropriately and accordingly as part of relevant reporting requirements.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

53.     This report is seeking the local board’s decisions on financial matters in the local board agreement that must then be considered by the Governing Body.

54.     The local board also provides input to regional plans and proposals. There is information in the council’s consultation material for each plan or proposal with the financial implications of each option outlined for consideration.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

55.     The council must adopt its 10-year Budget, which includes local board agreements, by 30 June 2021. The local board is required to make recommendations on these local matters for the 10-year Budget by mid May 2021, to enable and support the Governing Body to make decisions on key items to be included in the 10-year Budget on 25 May 2021.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

56.     The local board will approve its local board agreement and corresponding work programmes in June 2021.

57.     Recommendations and feedback from the local board will be provided to the relevant Governing Body committee for consideration during decision making at the Governing Body meeting.

58.     The final 10-year Budget 2021-2031 (including local board agreements) will be adopted by the Governing Body on 22 June 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lucy Stallworthy – Engagement Advisor

Authoriser

Georgina Gilmour -Acting Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 



[1] Includes contracted central government grants and funding directly to AUCKLAND UNLIMITED, administered by AUCKLAND UNLIMITED and directly to activity facilitated by AUCKLAND UNLIMITED in the year that it occurs

[2] Targets were originally set in 2018 and have been revised down to reflect the impact of COVID-19 on international travel, the subsequent suspension of the APTR and the impact of the delay in the opening of the NZICC.  The revised targets are based on the assumption that international borders will not open in full for the duration of FY 2020/21