I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Manurewa Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 6 May 2021

6.00pm

Manurewa Local Board Office
7 Hill Road
Manurewa

 

Manurewa Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Joseph Allan

 

Deputy Chairperson

Melissa Atama

 

Members

Anne Candy

 

 

Tabetha Gorrie

 

 

Rangi McLean

 

 

Glenn Murphy

 

 

Ken Penney

 

 

Dave Pizzini

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Rohin Patel

Democracy Advisor

 

30 April 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 914 618

Email: rohin.patel@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Manurewa Local Board

06 May 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                             5

2          Apologies                                                                                                           5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                   5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                             5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                     5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                     5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                 5

11        Endorsing the expansion of the Manurewa Business Improvement District (BID) programme 2021/2022                    7

12        Manurewa Local Board consultation feedback and input into the 10-year Budget 2021-2031                                                    59

13        Auckland Transport – Regional Land Transport Programme 2021                                                                                                77

14        Approval for a new public road name at 172 Roscommon Road, Manurewa                                                                           91

15        Manurewa Local Board Grants Programme 2021/2022           97

16        Decision-making responsibilities policy                                 103

17        Animal Management Bylaw Statement of Proposal Attachment Update                                                                    125

18        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

A board member will lead the meeting in prayer.

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Manurewa Local Board:

confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 15 April 2021, as true and correct.

 

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Manurewa Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Manurewa Local Board

06 May 2021

 

 

Endorsing the expansion of the Manurewa Business Improvement District (BID) programme 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/04233

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To approve the expanded Manurewa Business Improvement District (BID) programme and boundary map.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Business Improvement Districts (BID) are areas within Auckland where local business and property owners have agreed to work together to improve their business environment and attract new businesses and customers.

3.      Auckland Council supports business associations operating BID programmes by collecting a targeted rate from commercial properties within a defined geographical area. The funds from the targeted rate are then provided by way of a BID grant to the relevant business association.

4.      Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BIDs. This includes:

·    The establishment of new BID programmes,

·    Changes to existing BID programme maps; and

·    Recommends the BID programmes targeted rate to the governing body

5.      The business associations operating BID programmes are incorporated societies that are independent of council.

6.      Auckland Council Business Improvement District (BID) Policy 2016 (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi), known as the BID Policy, sets out the requirements to expand a BID programme and boundary area, and the governance and reporting requirements of an operational BID programme.

7.      In 2019/2020 Manurewa Business Association (MBA) planned to expand their BID programme, with the ballot surpassed the BID Policy requirements of returned votes of 25 per cent and 51 per cent of those returned in support of the BID expansion. Unfortunately, due to incorrect information contained in the ballot pack the result could not be considered and the BID expansion project could not proceed to local board approval.

8.      Since then MBA has continued to positively build membership and support for expanding their BID programme with ongoing engagement and communication with eligible voters.

9.      The Manurewa Local Board approved to include the proposed Manurewa BID programme expansion and map, (Attachment A), at its business meeting held on 17 December 2020 (resolution number MR/2020/195).

10.    The Manurewa Local Board also included the BID expansion proposal in its local priorities for 2021/2022 as part of the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 consultation documents (resolution number MR/2020/180). This gave members of the public the opportunity to provide feedback on the proposal.

11.    If the expansion proceeds, the Manurewa BID programme will represent 616 business ratepayers and owners and continue with a proportional value method mechanism to raise the BID targeted rate grant of $315,000, effective from 1 July 2021.

12.    Staff propose the local board approves the expansion of the Manurewa BID programme and amended boundary map (Attachment A). A separate report will be provided which recommends the striking of the targeted rate to the Governing Body. Staff are satisfied the Manurewa Business Association has complied with the BID Policy to expand the Manurewa BID programme.

13.    Staff will advise the Governing Body of the local board’s decision as part of the 10-Year Budget 2021-2031 deliberations in June 2021.

14.    After the 10-Year Budget 2021-2031 is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly BID grant payments, effective from 1 July 2021, to allow MBA to implement programmes that improve the local business environment.

15.    If the expansion of the BID programme is approved, council staff will regularly monitor BID Policy compliance, and provide assistance to MBA as part of an active risk management programme to minimise the risk of inappropriate use of funds.

16.    MBA, like all BID-operating business associations, will play an important role in helping local businesses recover from the on-going economic impact created by the COVID-19 lockdowns.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      approves the expansion of the Manurewa Business Improvement District (BID) programme and boundary map as shown in Attachment A.

Horopaki

Context

17.    Tāmaki Makaurau is projected to attract another one million people in the next 30 years. This level of growth will present challenges and opportunities for Auckland town centres and commercial precincts.

18.    Business Improvement Districts (BID) are areas within Auckland where local businesses and property owners have agreed to work together, with support from the council, to improve their business environment and attract new businesses and customers.

19.    BID programmes are operated by independent business associations (incorporated societies), their programmes and services are provided according to their members’ stated priorities. In recognition of their independent status, the BID Policy does not prescribe standards for programme effectiveness. That is a matter for the business association members to determine. Staff, therefore, have no view on these factors. Staff assess whether the BID programme meets the BID Policy’s requirements.

20.    BID programmes provide the opportunity for the council family to partner with business associations to seize on the opportunities from Auckland’s growth and respond locally to changing economic conditions.

21.    BID programmes encourage collaboration to achieve greater local outcomes. They provide a mechanism to enable local boards to engage with the business sector in local town centres and business areas in a co-ordinated way.

The BID Policy sets out the process for expanding a BID programme

22.    The BID Policy outlines the principles behind the council’s BID programme; creates the process for establishing new programmes, expanding, amalgamating and disestablishing existing BIDs; determines rating mechanisms; prescribes operating standards and guidelines; and sets accountability requirements.

23.    Included in the BID expansion process the business association must develop and agree on:

·   a list of eligible BID voters

·   a BID business plan and operating budget, including the annual BID grant income needed to deliver the BID programme to the expanded BID area and BID members,

·   the expanded BID boundary map area

·   the rating mechanism to be used to calculate the targeted rate

·   they must also host at least three public meetings encouraging eligible voters to attend and take part in an information briefing and question-and-answer session

·   hold an independent postal ballot to determine the level of support for the BID programme and targeted rate.

24.    The BID Policy sets out the mandate for a successful ballot; ballots must achieve a threshold of at least 25 per cent of the total voting forms returned. Of the returned votes, at least 51 per cent of the voters must support the proposition raised on the voting form.

BIDs are funded by a targeted rate on commercial ratepayers

25.    BID programmes are funded by a targeted rate applied to all commercial rated properties within a designated area around a town centre or commercial precinct.

26.    Auckland Council supports business associations operating BID programmes by collecting the targeted rates and providing these funds, in their entirety, by way of a BID grant to the business association.

27.    This revenue is paid to the business associations every quarter to provide a regular and sustainable income stream to implement an agreed work programme.

28.    Manurewa Business Association Inc (MBA) has been a registered incorporated business association since May 2006 and operating a Business Improvement District (BID) programme since 2005.

The Governing Body sets the targeted rate when it approves the Annual Budget

29.    In accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, the Governing Body is authorised to make the final decisions on BID programme targeted rates.

Manurewa BID programme expansion 2019/2020 does not proceed

30.    MBA moved to expand their BID programme in 2019/2020 with a successful ballot in March 2020. The ballot surpassed the BID Policy requirements of returned votes of 25 per cent and 51 per cent of those returned in support of the BID expansion. Unfortunately, due to incorrect information contained in the ballot pack the result could not be considered and the BID expansion project could not proceed to Local Board approval.

31.    The BID Policy requires there to be a two-year stand down period between ballots. After careful consideration and review of the 2019 events, staff agreed for this two-year requirement to be waivered.

Manurewa Business Association Inc progress in expanding their BID programme 2020/2021

32.    In May 2020 MBA met with the council’s BID team to discuss revisiting the BID expansion proposal and their plan towards a ballot before 30 March 2021. MBA confirmed there would be no change from the 2019/2020 proposed BID expansion map and BID programme proposal for the 2020/2021 BID expansion ballot.

33.    MBA presented and received membership approval to progress with the 2020/2021 BID expansion at the 2020 MBA AGM held on 12 October 2020.

Local boards have allocated authority

34.    Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BIDs. In the case of the expansion of an existing BID programme the local board:

·        approves the expansion of BID programmes, including BID programme boundary maps

·        recommends the BID programmes targeted rate to the Governing Body.

35.    The Manurewa Local Board approved the proposed 2020/2021 Manurewa BID programme expansion and map at its meeting held on 17 December 2020 (resolution number MR/2020/195).

36.    All BID expansion projects require further local board approval after the BID expansion project, voter engagement and ballot have been completed. This ensures the local board has the opportunity to see the final outcome of the establishment project, review the ballot results and are satisfied the criteria for a BID establishment has been completed against the BID policy.

37.    This report provides a summary of the completed MBA 2020/2021 BID expansion process, provides information on any subsequent changes to the BID ballot documents and confirms if all aspects of the BID Policy have been successfully completed.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The Manurewa Business Association BID expansion project

38.    The MBA will play a significant role in facilitating and creating local economic development in the Manurewa Local Board area and in particular will provide essential support aiding in business recovery to deal with the flow-on effects from the COVID-19 lockdowns.

39.    The decision to progress a BID expansion followed growing interest from business located within the proposed expansion area including Clendon, Southmall and surrounding business clusters.

40.    The MBA successfully executed a comprehensive project plan to engage with all eligible voters. The plan included:

·        a communications programme to highlight the opportunities, and benefits of a BID programme to those businesses located within the proposed BID expansion area

·        a detailed database of eligible voters (business owners and property ratepayers) located within the proposed BID programme expansion boundary area 

·        consultation with council staff regarding the approach to the expansion project and ballot

·        holding the required number of public meetings, encouraging eligible voters to attend and take part in an information briefing and question-and-answer session.

Full details of the project are outlined in the MBA report (Attachment B).

The MBA sets the BID expansion boundary map, BID targeted rate mechanism and the BID grant amount needed to deliver its work programme

41.    The MBA board (executive committee) prepares the information for the expanded BID programme and boundary map, the BID plan and operating budget for the following financial year, based on the feedback collected from those local businesses and property owners who qualify as eligible BID voters.

42.    Staff worked within the BID Policy to help MBA to identify the BID expansion boundary map (Attachment A) which defines the BID programme and targeted rate area at the time of expansion. The purpose of the BID map is to capture:

·    the geographical area that defines the collection of the BID targeted rate

·    the ratable properties for striking the BID targeted rate – these are the properties currently zoned business/industrial who will be paying a business rate at the time of the BID ballot

·    the BID eligible voter – being business/industrial zoned ratepayer and business owner only

·    the delivery area of the BID programme.

43.    Once the expansion map was agreed staff provided MBA with a rate modelling spreadsheet to help with their budget decision-making and identify the BID grant amount needed to deliver its work programme. The spreadsheet models the BID targeted rate collection, it includes options for changing the rating mechanism to see how each option influence the BID targeted rate for the BID ratepayer who will pay it. When considering a BID grant amount and rating mechanism, the MBA must take into account:

·    a fair and reasonable share of the targeted rate

·    the benefit each BID member will receive from the BID programme spend

·    what the local business and property owners can reasonably afford.

44.    The expanded MBA BID programme will represent about 616 (from 335) business ratepayers and owners, made up of 226 rateable properties and 390 business owners. There will be no change to the rating option used for the collection of the Manurewa BID targeted rates. Manurewa BID programme will continue to use proportional value method and collect a BID grant of $315,000 excluding GST, effective from 1 July 2021.

The voting results achieved the required mandate supporting the expansion the Manurewa BID programme and targeted rate

45.    The MBA association was responsible for distributing, sharing all relevant BID information and manage the engagement process with all eligible voters to ensure they have the information to make an informed voting decision. 

46.    Election Services Ltd, the independent polling service provider, was commissioned by the MBA to undertake the ballot. The ballot was held between 22 February and 31 March 2021.

47.    A total of 258 envelopes, representing all eligible voters, were lodged with NZ Post on 19 February 2021.

48.    Each envelope contained the following:

·        an MBA BID programme information booklet (Attachment C) highlighting:  

o   the purpose of the ballot and the benefits of being part of the BID programme

o   BID programme targeted rate information, the rating mechanism (a proportional value method per rateable property) and draft 2021/2022 budget (Attachment D)

o   map of the Manurewa BID expansion (Attachment A)

·        voting form

·        information on voting online and a prepaid envelope for returning the ballot form

·        contact details for eligible voters to seek further information.

49.    The question on the MBA voting form asked: Do you support the expansion of the Manurewa Business Improvement District (BID) programme delivered by the Manurewa Business Association Inc and accordingly support the paying of a targeted rate?

50.    The result of the BID expansion ballot when voting closed at midday on 31 March 2021 showed that of a total of 258 eligible voters, 86 (33.33 per cent) returned their vote. Sixty-seven (77.91 per cent) voted yes to the question. Nineteen (22.09 per cent) voted no.

51.    Election Services Ltd has provided a report (Attachment E) outlining the ballot process, results and voting documents.

MBA member approval

52.    Following the close of the ballot, MBA is planning to a Special General Meeting (SGM)
on 27 April 2021 to present to the MBA members, for their approval, the ballot results and any amendments to the BID programme, the BID boundary map (Attachment A) and the budget (Attachment D).

53.    The SGM agenda included special resolutions approving:

·        the BID expansion boundary map (Attachment A)

·        the 2021/2022 budget (Attachment D)

·        the BID rating mechanism at proportional value method per rateable property

·        the ballot results

·        the BID programme supporting documents.

54.    A copy of the MBA SGM minutes (Attachment F) will be available and presented to the Manurewa Local Board ahead of the local board May 6 meeting.

55.    The results of the MBA BID establishment ballot has identified there is a sufficient level of support from local businesses and property owners to expand the Manurewa BID programme and targeted rate.

56.    Staff are satisfied MBA has sufficiently met the requirements of the BID Policy, including achieving both the required mandate and an overwhelming BID ballot result, and advise the local board to recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rate.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

57.    There are no impacts on emissions or increase in resilience of communities to climate change resulting from the decision to expand this BID.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

58.    Advocacy is a key service provided by business associations and those with BID programme-funded personnel are at an advantage. MBA BID programme will ensure the views of its members are provided to council teams, including CCOs, on those plans and programmes that impact them.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

          Local impacts and local board views

59.    The expanded BID programme supports the Manurewa Local Board Plan 2020 and will contribute, specifically Outcome: Our prosperous local economy supports local people.

60.    The Manurewa BID expansion information was included in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 consultation documents.

61.    The Manurewa Local Board approved the proposed Manurewa BID expansion map at its business meeting on 17 December 2020 (resolution number MR/2020/195).

62.    The local board’s views will be expressed by its appointed representative on the board (executive committee) of the MBA. This liaison board member attends BID board meetings to ensure there is a direct link between the council and the operation of the BID programme.

63.    Manurewa Local Board has previously supported BID programmes, as it brings together local businesses to invest collectively in improvements that enhance the local business environment, such as improved security for business centres. A BID can also advocate to, and collaborate with, the council on behalf of local businesses.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

64.    Approving the new BID programme will have no adverse effects on, or particular benefits to, the Māori population.

65.    Māori make up more than 26 per cent of the population living in the Manurewa Local Board area, compared to 11.5 per cent of Auckland (SOURCE: 2018 CENSUS)Individual business associations may, through operating their BID programme, identify opportunities for niche support or development of any Māori business sector in their role.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

            Financial implications

66.    There are no financial implications for the local board. Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from commercial ratepayers in the district and used by the business association for improvements within that area. The council’s financial role is to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the association every quarter.

67.    The targeted rate is payable by the owners of the commercial properties within the geographic area of the individual BID programme. In practice, this cost is often passed on to the business owners who occupy these properties. 

68.    This cost may be harder to meet at a time when businesses continue to be financially impacted by the flow-on effects of the COVID-19 lockdown restrictions. 

69.    The council last year extended its Rates Remission and Postponement Policy to commercial property owners as part of the Annual Budget 2020/2021 to help mitigate the impact of the targeted rate on those who are struggling financially. This policy will continue for the 2021/2022 rating year.

70.    If the Governance Body agrees with the BID targeted rates proposed by the local boards, the cost of grants will be met from the existing operational budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

71.    There are no direct financial risks to the local board or council that could result from this recommendation.

72.    The governance and operation of the MBA BID programme will be subject to the BID Policy. The annual requirements of the BID Policy are intended to help minimise the potential for BIDs to misuse funds, by requiring each BID to plan for the intended use of funds, report on its activities to its members and to have its account audited.

73.    The council staff will regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy and provide an annual report to the local board as part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds.


 

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

74.    If the local board supports the expansion of the Manurewa BID programme and boundary area, they will consider a separate report to endorse that the BID targeted rate be set as part of the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

75.    After the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly BID grant payments, effective from 1 July 2021, to the MBA. This allows the MBA to implement programmes that improve the local business environment and support businesses.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manurewa BID exp map

15

b

Manurewa BID exp report April 2021

17

c

Manurewa BID booklet

41

d

Manurewa budget 2021/2022

45

e

Manurewa ELS BID ballot report

47

f

Manurewa Business Association Special General Meeting

57

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Siddens - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

06 May 2021

 

 

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06 May 2021

 

 

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06 May 2021

 

 

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06 May 2021

 

 

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06 May 2021

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

06 May 2021

 

 

Manurewa Local Board consultation feedback and input into the 10-year Budget 2021-2031

File No.: CP2021/04859

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To summarise consultation feedback from the Manurewa Local Board area on:

·    proposed priorities, activities and advocacy initiatives for the Manurewa local board agreement 2021/2022

·    regional topics for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

2.      To recommend any local matters to the Governing Body, that they will need to consider or make decisions on in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 process.

3.      To seek input on the proposed regional topics in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

4.      Local board agreements set out annual funding priorities, activities, budgets, levels of service, performance measures and advocacy initiatives for each local board area. Local board agreements for 2021/2022 will be included in the council’s 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

5.      Auckland Council publicly consulted from 22 February to 22 March 2021 to seek community views on the proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031. This included consultation on the Manurewa Local Board’s proposed priorities for 2021/2022, and advocacy initiatives for 2021-2031 to be included in their local board agreement.

6.      Auckland Council received 19,965 submissions in total across the region and 407 submissions from the Manurewa local board area. Fifty-four per cent of local submitters support all or most of the Manurewa local board local priorities and advocacy items for 2021/2022. Six mana whenua iwi gave feedback on the Manurewa local board priorities, all in support.

7.      In the 10-year Budget process there are matters where local boards provide recommendations to the Governing Body, for consideration or decision-making. This includes:  

·    any new/amended business improvement district targeted rates

·    any new/amended local targeted rate proposals 

·    proposed locally driven initiative capital projects outside local boards’ decision-making responsibility

·    release of local board specific reserve funds

·    any local board advocacy initiatives.

The Governing Body will consider these items as part of the 10-year Budget decision-making process in May/June 2021.

8.      Local boards have a statutory responsibility to provide input into regional strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. This report provides an opportunity for the local board to provide input on the council’s proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive consultation feedback on the proposed Manurewa Local Board priorities and activities for 2021/2022 and key advocacy initiatives for 2021-2031

b)      receive consultation feedback on regional topics in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 from people and organisations based in the Manurewa local board area

c)      recommend any new or amended Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rates to the Governing Body

d)      recommend any new or amended local targeted rate proposals to the Governing Body

e)      recommend that the Governing Body approves any proposed locally driven initiative (LDI) capital projects, which are outside local boards’ allocated decision-making responsibility

f)       approve its advocacy initiatives for inclusion (as an appendix) to its 2021/2022 Local Board Agreement

g)      recommend the release of local board specific reserve funds to the Governing Body.

h)      provide input on regional topics in the proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031 to the Governing Body.

Horopaki

Context

9.      Each financial year Auckland Council must have a local board agreement (as agreed between the Governing Body and the Manurewa Local Board) for each local board area. This local board agreement reflects priorities in the Manurewa Local Board Plan 2020 through local activities, budgets, levels of service, performance measures and advocacy initiatives.

10.    The local board agreements 2021/2022 will form part of the Auckland Council’s 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

11.    Auckland Council publicly consulted from 22 February to 22 March 2021 to seek community views on the proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031, as well as local board priorities and proposed advocacy initiatives to be included in the local board agreement 2021/2022.

12.    Due to the impacts of the ongoing COVID-19 global pandemic, significant pressure has been placed upon the council’s financial position. This has created significant flow on effects for the council’s proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031, in particular in the first three years.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.    This report includes analysis of consultation feedback, any local matters to be recommended to the Governing Body and seeks input on regional topics in the proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

Consultation feedback overview 

14.    As part of the public consultation Auckland Council used a variety of methods and channels to reach and engage a broad cross section of Aucklanders to gain their feedback and input into regional and local topics.    

15.    In total, Auckland Council received feedback from 19,965 people in the consultation period. This feedback was received through:

·    written feedback – 18,975 hard copy and online forms, emails and letters.

·    in person – 607 pieces of feedback through 61 Have Your Say events (38 in person and 23 online webinars), one of which was held in the Manurewa local board area. Due to the Covid-19 lockdowns 26 events were affected (either cancelled, postponed or moved to an online platform).

·    telephone interviews – two people made submission via our telephone interview option.

·    social media – 78 pieces of feedback through Auckland Council social media channels.

16.    All feedback will be made available on an Auckland Council webpage called “Feedback submissions for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031” and will be accessible from 3 May 2021 through the following link: https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/submissions-budget-2021-2031.

Feedback received on the Manurewa Local Board’s priorities for 2021/2022 and key advocacy initiatives

17.    The Manurewa Local Board consulted on the following priorities for 2021/2022:

·    Priority 1: Fund youth and community groups to lead initiatives that:

Deliver vibrant, multicultural arts, events and festivals

Strengthen community and cultural connections

Delivery placemaking activities

Improve wellbeing

·    Priority 2: Partner with mana whenua and mataawaka on cultural storytelling and participation in local planning and delivery of local economic benefits

·    Priority 3: Renew more play spaces that build the play network, ensuring children of different ages and abilities are challenged, and families have comfortable and accessible places to spend time at

·    Priority 4: Work with our sports and recreation partners to progress works at War Memorial Park, Netball Manurewa, Gallaher Park and Totara Park

·    Priority 5: Support initiatives that improve our environment, clean our waterways and prepare our diverse communities for disasters and climate change

·    Priority 6: Support the expansion of the Manurewa Business Improvement District.

18.    The Manurewa Local Board also consulted on the following key advocacy initiatives:

·    Initiative 1: Retention of funding in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 to progress work at War Memorial Park, to be completed in stages that includes sports field improvements, floodlighting and a multi-purpose community facility

·    Initiative 2: Reinstatement of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund to pre-Emergency Budget levels

·    Initiative 3: Funding in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 to create a community recycling centre in Manurewa, plus a recycling centre and a resource recovery park for the south in partnership with other local boards.

19.    318 submissions were received on Manurewa Local Board’s priorities for 2021/2031 and key advocacy initiatives. The majority of local respondents supported either most of the priorities (31 percent) or all of the priorities (24 per cent).

20.    Six mana whenua iwi gave feedback on the local priorities.  All were in support of the local priorities.

21.    Mana whenua iwi feedback was as follows:

Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust

·    supports all priorities

Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

·    supports all priorities

Ngaati Whanaunga Incorporated Society

·    supports all priorities

·    particular support for ‘partnering with mana whenua and mataawaka on cultural storytelling and participation in local planning and delivery of economic benefits’ as this aligns with their Hapuu & Whanau Plan

·    particular support for ‘initiatives that improve our environment, clean our waterways, and prepare our diverse communities for disasters and climate change’ as this aligns with their Environmental Management Plan

·    requested opportunities to utilise cultural monitoring indices, or to enhance education and training opportunities

·    queried how success will be measured and requested adequate provision of feedback mechanisms to inform effectiveness of strategies

Ngāti Te Whakakitenga o Waikato Incorporated

·    supports all priorities

Ngāti Tamaoho Trust

·    supports all priorities

·    requested more information on Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau (Māori outcomes framework) and where this has got to

Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority

·    supports all priorities

·    described ‘partner with mana whenua and mataawaka on cultural storytelling and participation in local planning and delivery of economic benefits’ as a ‘fabulous initiative’

·    would like the local board to prioritise initiatives that:

help whanau produce their own food

provide everyone with access to digital technology

provide opportunities for education, training and employment

·    requested more information about how success is measured, how progress evaluated, what is meant by ‘support’, and how applications for support evaluated.

22.    All mana whenua iwi requested follow up contact to discuss opportunities for working together to achieve mutually beneficial outcomes.

23.    Six mataawaka organisations gave feedback on the local priorities.  Key points from their submissions included:

Auckland Mataatua Society (Mataatua Marae)

·    supports local priority ‘partner with mana whenua and mataawaka on cultural storytelling and participation in local planning and delivery of economic benefits’

Te Kotahi a Tāmaki

·    supports local priority ‘partner with mana whenua and mataawaka on cultural storytelling and participation in local planning and delivery of economic benefits’

Te Pua Ngā Maara

·    supports most local priorities

·    would like council to prioritise:

free/affordable public transport

more regular water quality monitoring that is including of te ao māori indicators

planning in advance to conserve water eg harvest rainwater from rooftops

·    suggestion to reflect history of the past while providing safe and fun environments for whanau and wider community

·    suggestion that by investing in parks, people will take pride in them (better playgrounds, rubbish/recycling bins, BBQs, lighting, courts, gardens)

·    support for a recycling centre and kerbside compost

·    other themes included:

climate change is inevitable and we need to be future thinking – 100 year plan to address environmental changes due to climate change

intensified housing has negative social and environmental impacts

investment in community means investing in both people and places as both make up the community

the need for a holistic approach to water quality – mountains to the sea.

Te Roopu Waiora

·    requested the local board develop a strategy to ensure whanau haua (whanau with disabilities) can access the communications, forums and community services and facilities that the local board is responsible for

·    ensure cultural views and approaches are explored and adopted to ensure diverse communities with disabilities are considered in local board planning

·    encourage improvements to social procurement to encourage improved cultural and disability competence of local businesses, suppliers and government agencies.

The Cause Collective

·    supports all local priorities

·    requests council owned land is set aside for regenerative urban farming

·    requests support for marae led initiatives into the circular economy and technology spaces

·    requests social procurement pipelines from neighbourhoods to local industry – connecting local talent to jobs of the future

·    requests revitalisation of local green and blue spaces and a regenerative local food system

Whenua Warrior

·    supports most local priorities

·    supports recycling centre however more needs to be done to change the way people think about waste

·    would like more focus on food poverty, cultural inclusion, and food system changes, such as supporting families with gardens and supporting children, men and women.

24.    Consultation feedback on local board priorities will be considered by the local board when approving their local board agreement between 14-18 June 2021. Local board key advocacy initiatives will be considered in the current report.

Information on submitters from the Manurewa Local Board area

25.    The graphs below indicate the demographic categories people identified with. This information only relates to those submitters who provided demographic information.

 

Key themes on local priorities

26.    Key themes of note across the feedback received (through written and in-person channels) included:

·    support for:

cleaning waterways

upgrading play spaces

community activities and events

·    perceived ethnic bias towards European and Māori – would like to see all cultures recognised

·    more focus needed on:

health and wellbeing

employment generation, particularly for youth

ensuring Manurewa receives the same level of service as other areas

Feedback on other local topics

27.    Key themes across feedback received on other local topics included:

·    Theme 1: Requests relating to transport: addressing speeding cars and motorbikes, access to public transport, dissatisfaction with speed calming/traffic humps, support for cycle infrastructure

·    Theme 2: Safety is important, and people want to feel safe walking the streets

·    Theme 3: Manurewa central business district is unappealing and needs work, so people feel safe and want to go there to shop

·    Theme 4: General feeling that the local priorities are lightweight and vague ‘feel good’ initiatives that don’t address the real issues in Manurewa

·    Theme 5: General feeling that Manurewa is neglected, and people want the area to be ‘looked after’ and to receive the same level of service and funding as other ‘richer’ areas.

Requests for local funding

28.    There were no requests for specific local funding, however local organisations requested support as follows:

All Seasons Community Trust

·    requesting funding for improvements at Gallaher Park – field and facility

Netball Manurewa

·    requesting support for covering the netball courts at a cost of $1.2-1.4 million

·    would like to partner with Manurewa Local Board on this as per previous commitment of $553,000 funding contribution

Friends of Totara Park

·    requesting capital investment (fences, signage, anti-slip matting)

·    requesting better weed management by contractors

·    would like to see more public art in the park

Totara Park Mountain Bike Club

·    requesting redevelopment of Redoubt Rd carpark and toilets

Manurewa Association Football Club

·    requesting investment in War Memorial park – priority is lighting to enable more utilisation, followed by improvements to the field quality

·    lowest priority is improvements to the facility

Manurewa Rugby Club

·    requesting better field conditions and improved lighting at Mountfort Park to extend amount of training time available

Manurewa Tennis Club

·    requesting assistance with fixing fences around the courts

·    requesting green space next to the club to be retained

Manurewa Cricket Club

·    support investment at War Memorial Park

·    requesting improvements to the practice nets that have suffered vandalism in the past

·    ideally would like indoor practice facility

·    requesting maintenance of pitches (levelling out)

Totara Heights Bush Guardians

·    requesting native bush reserves be reclassified as high value to enable more regular pest plant and animal control

Manukau Concert Band

·    requesting space in Manurewa to rehearse and store instruments.

Overview of feedback received on regional topics in the 10-year Budget from the Manurewa Local Board area

29.    The proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031 sets out Auckland Council’s priorities and how to pay for them. Consultation on the proposed 10-year Budget asked submitters to respond to five key questions on:

1.   The proposed investment package

2.   Climate change

3.   Water quality

4.   Community investment

5.   Rating policy.

30.    The submissions received from the Manurewa Local Board area on these key issues are summarised below, along with an overview of any other areas of feedback on regional proposals with a local impact.

Key Question 1: Proposed investment package

31.    Aucklanders were asked about a proposed $31 billion capital investment programme over the next ten years, allowing the council to deliver key services and renew our aging assets. The proposal includes a one-off 5 per cent average general rates increase for the 2021/2022 financial year, rather than the previously planned 3.5 per cent increase, before returning to 3.5 per cent increases over the remaining years.

32.    The proposal also includes higher borrowings in the short term, a continuation of cost savings and the sale of more surplus property. Without the greater use of rates and debt, around $900 million of investment in Auckland would be delayed from the next three years.

33.    The graph below gives an overview of the responses from the Manurewa Local Board area.

34.    Key themes from those in support included:

·    investment in infrastructure is necessary

·    the impact on the community would be worse without investment

·    represents a balanced approach.

35.    Key themes from those not in support included:

·    council should focus on core services and not ‘nice to haves’

·    council needs to improve efficiency and reduce salaries

·    perceived lack of accountability, and lack of trust that rates will reduce to 3.5 per cent

·    rate rise is unaffordable, particularly for people with limited incomes and businesses struggling with the impact of COVID-19

·    lack of detail in proposed savings and impact on local areas

·    disagree with selling surplus property

·    perceived inequity in location of infrastructure spend with Manurewa not receiving same level of investment as Auckland’s central business district and higher socioeconomic areas.

Key Question 2: Climate Change

36.    Aucklanders were asked about a proposal to provide additional investment to respond to climate change challenges. This includes enabling a quicker transition from diesel to cleaner electric and hydrogen buses, diverting more waste from landfill and enabling significant planting initiatives.  

37.    The graph below gives an overview of the responses from the Manurewa Local Board area.

 

38.    Key themes from those in support included:

·    climate change is the most important issue we are facing

·    need to do more – support more investment

·    particular support for hydrogen buses and public transport options, including alternative ‘on demand’ services

39.    Key themes from those not in support included:

·    climate change denial

·    responding to climate change is a central government issue

·    expressions of futility given New Zealand is such a small country and Auckland just one city

·        now is not the right time for this investment given the impacts of COVID

40.    Submitters also suggested that the council’s actions were inconsistent with its own climate change goals:

·    allowing mature trees to be cut down

·    supporting new roads and greenfield subdivisions

·    requiring resource consent for rainwater tanks

Key Question 3: Water quality

41.    Aucklanders were asked about a proposal to extend and increase the Water Quality Targeted Rate for another three years – from 2028 until 2031 – as well as increasing the targeted rate annually in line with proposed average increases in general rates. The Water Quality Targeted Rate funds projects to improve water quality in Auckland’s harbours, beaches and streams.  

42.    The graph below gives an overview of the responses from the Manurewa Local Board area.

 

43.    Key themes included:

·    needing to take more action, right now

·    rate should be more to get water quality improvements more quickly

·    seeing improvements already with people using local beaches, collecting shellfish and fishing, however also comments about not seeing any changes yet

·    conditional support provided the rate is used to address Manukau Harbour water quality and that the Manukau Harbour receives the same support as the Waitemata Harbour

·    conditional support, only for initiatives that investigate and target causes of water quality issues and implement legislation and rules

44.    Comments from submitters indicated some confusion about meaning of ‘water’.  Many submitters made reference to the current water shortage and the need to focus on water quantity before improving water quality.  Others made reference to Watercare, their drinking water, and being on tank water so the question being irrelevant to them.

Key Question 4: Community investment

45.    Aucklanders were asked to provide feedback on a proposal that would see the council adopt a new approach for community services to enable them to reduce building and asset maintenance related expenditure. The proposal involves consolidation of community facilities and services, increased leasing or shared facility arrangements, and an increased focus on providing multi-use facilities and online services in the future.

46.    The graph below gives an overview of the responses from the Manurewa Local Board area.

 

47.    Comments from those in support included:

·    many buildings are not well utilised now

·    keep parks in residential areas, with multi-purpose facilities in larger areas

·    marae should be considered as community facilities as they are delivering services to the community

·    investing in community facilities can lead to rejuvenation of local areas

·    advantages of having services together for seniors, disabled, and those without transport

·    need to consult with the community before closing any facilities

·    disappointment that facilities have not been maintained

·    priority must be given to lower socio-economic communities, and that council has a role to play in alleviating the rift between rich and poor

·    community places bring people together and are needed – libraries in particular are seen as the heart of the community

·    support for multi-use combined facilities, shared facilities and leasing facilities to community groups

·    social benefits of community spending

·    council needs to co-ordinate with central government to meet needs of communities, especially where intensification is happening

·    well maintained facilities lead to safe, secure and happy communities.

48.    Of those not in support, comments included:

·    lower socio-economic communities need community facilities

·    council needs to provide access for all – including those without transport or digital/online access

·    concerns about equity – that investment will be in higher socio-economic areas at the expense of poorer areas

·    council need to focus on basic needs ‘not arts facilities’

·    council needs to manage it’s facilities better including concern that maintenance has not been happening, leading to a lack of trust in council

·    concern about loss of services, or council delivering ‘minimum’ services

·    the importance of access to local meeting rooms for local groups

·    that sports facilities and arts facilities have different requirements and should not be lumped together

·    council needs to consider how to make community facilities ‘income producing’

·    need to re-budget to invest more in upgrading community facilities.

49.    Other comments included:

·    cost is the biggest barrier to using council assets

·    suggestion that community groups should manage facilities based on what people can pay because the current charging system has an unconscious bias against lower socio-economic communities

·    support proposed approach in higher socio-economic areas areas, however there is a need to maintain free facilities (pools, sports facilities) in other areas

·    facilities represent ‘space’ for future new facilities – selling them means we won’t have space for new facilities in the future

·    as houses and living spaces become smaller and housing intensifies, community facilities and services are needed more to ensure a community feel

·    need for a central/local government accord to meet community needs and deal with migration to Auckland, pressure on facilities, infrastructure and housing.

Key Question 5: Rating policy

50.    Aucklanders were asked for their feedback on a raft of proposed rating changes impacting different properties across Auckland differently. Proposed changes also included, for example, the extension of the Natural Environment Targeted Rate until June 2031, along with options to extend the Urban Rating Area and reinstatement of the Accommodation Provider Targeted Rate.

51.    The graphs below give an overview of the responses from the Manurewa Local Board area.

Natural Environment Targeted Rate proposal

 

 

 

Proposal to extend the Urban Rating Area

 

Proposal to charge farm and lifestyle properties in the Urban Rating Area residential rates

 

Proposal to extend the City Centre Targeted Rate

 

Proposal to introduce the Rodney Drainage Targeted Rate

 

52.    In relation to the two proposed changes to the Urban Rating Area, submitters indicated confusion over the meaning of ‘service’.  Submitters understood this to mean street lights, footpaths, reticulated water and waste water and other such infrastructure.

53.    Those not in support commented that the proposal was unfair as farm and lifestyle properties did not have the ‘services’ as urban properties.

54.    Only five submitters in the Manurewa local board area gave feedback on the proposal to reinstate the Accommodation Provider Targeted Rate.  Of these, one supported option 2, one supported Option 3, while the other three either did not support or made ‘other’ comments.

55.    Of the eight submitters in the Manurewa local board area who gave feedback on the proposal to introduce the Electricity Network Resilience Targeted Rate, six did not support, and two made ‘other’ comments.

56.    There was no feedback on the proposed Waitakere rural sewerage targeted rate, or the Clevedon water connection targeted rate.

57.    218 submitters gave feedback on the proposal to introduce the Paremoremo targeted rate, with 41 per cent overall in support of either option 1 or 2, with 35 per cent not supporting either option, and the remaining 24 per cent indicating they ‘don’t know’. 

Recommendations on local matters 

58.    This report allows the local board to recommend local matters to the Governing Body for consideration as part of the 10-year Budget process, in May 2021. This includes:

·    any new/amended business improvement district targeted rates

·    any new/amended local targeted rate proposals 

·    proposed locally driven initiative capital projects outside local boards’ decision-making responsibility

·    release of local board specific reserve funds

·    approval of its advocacy initiatives for inclusion (as an appendix) to its 2021/2022 Local Board Agreement.

Local targeted rate and business improvement district (BID) targeted rate proposals

59.    Local boards are required to endorse any new or amended locally targeted rate proposals or business improvement district (BID) targeted rate proposals in their local board area. Note that these proposals must have been consulted on before they can be implemented.

60.    Local boards then recommend these proposals to the Governing Body for approval of the targeted rate.

61.    The Manurewa Business Association (MBA) is proposing to expand the boundary of the Manurewa Business Improvement District (BID) programme.

62.    The community was consulted as part of the local priorities for 2021/2022. Two hundred and fifty three submitters gave feedback on this question, of which 26 per cent were in support.

63.    The graph below gives an overview of the responses from the Manurewa Local Board area.

64.    Comments from those in support include:

·    as the area that businesses operate in changes the BID boundary needs to change

·    more funding overall will provide extra funding for needed projects

·    support anything that will bring employment to the area

·    the Business Association provides a helpful vehicle for businesses and potentially the community to adapt and create positive change

·    extending the benefits of the BID to wider Manurewa eg Clendon.

65.    Comments from those not in support include:

·    not supporting business development in general due to the traffic congestion it generates

·    should focus on the BID area at present and look to complete the priorities already put forward for the current area

·    suggestions to improve the appearance of the town centre to make it more attractive so people want to do business there.

66.    The Manurewa BID expansion project has met all required criteria.

67.    The MBA have set out the expansion boundary map, BID targeted rate mechanism and BID grant amount needed to deliver its work programme. There will be no change in the rating option used for collection of the Manurewa BID targeted rate, it will remain as the proportional value method. The expanded MBA BID programme will represent about 616 (from 335) business ratepayers and owners, made up of 226 rateable properties and 390 business owners. The targeted rate will collect a BID grant of $315,000 excluding GST, effective from 1 July 2021.

68.    The MBA have achieved the required mandate of support through voting results. The result of the BID expansion ballot when voting closed at midday on 31 March 2021 showed that of a total of 258 eligible voters, 86 (33.33 per cent) returned their vote. Sixty-seven (77.91 per cent) voted yes to the question. Nineteen (22.09 per cent) voted no.

69.    The MBA have met the BID Policy requirements. They held a Special General Meeting on 27 April 2021 to approve the ballot results, BID programme, BID boundary map and amended budget. They have informed the local board of this result.

70.    A separate report will be provided outlining additional detail on the process and results of the BID expansion ballot run by the business association and allow for local board decision-making on whether to approve the BID expansion.

71.    This report allows for the local board to endorse the amended BID targeted rate proposal and recommend it to the Governing Body for approval of the targeted rate. 

Funding for Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

72.    Local boards are allocated funding for local driven initiatives (LDI) annually, to spend on local projects or programmes that are important to their communities. Local boards have decision-making over the LDI funds but need approval from the Governing Body where:

·    operational LDI funding is to be converted into capital LDI funding.

·    the release of local board specific reserve funds is requested, which are being held by the council for a specific purpose.

·    a LDI capital project exceeds $1 million.

73.    These conditions do not apply to the Manurewa Local Board for the 2021/2022 financial year.

Local board advocacy

74.    Local boards are requested to approve any advocacy initiatives for inclusion (as an appendix) to their 2020/2021 Local Board Agreement, taking into account the consultation feedback above. This allows the Finance and Performance Committee to consider these advocacy items when making decisions on the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 in May/June. 

Local board input on regional topics in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031

75.    Local boards have a statutory responsibility for identifying and communicating the interests and preferences of the people in its local board area in relation to Auckland Council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws, and any proposed changes to be made to them. This report provides an opportunity for the local board to provide input on the council’s proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

76.    Local board plans reflect community priorities and preferences and are key documents that guide the development of local board agreements (LBAs), local board annual work programmes, and local board input into regional plans such as the 10-year Budget.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

77.    The decisions recommended in this report are part of the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 and local board agreement process to approve funding and expenditure over the next 10 years.

78.    Projects allocated funding through this 10-year Budget process will all have varying levels of potential climate impact associated with them. The climate impacts of projects Auckland Council chooses to progress, are all assessed carefully as part of council’s rigorous reporting requirements.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

79.    The 10-year Budget 2021-2031 is an Auckland Council Group document and will include budgets at a consolidated group level. Consultation items and updates to budgets to reflect decisions and new information may include items from across the group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

80.    The local board’s decisions and feedback are being sought in this report. The local board has a statutory role in providing its feedback on regional plans.

81.    Local boards play an important role in the development of the council’s 10-year Budget. Local board agreements form part of the 10-year Budget. Local board nominees have also attended Finance and Performance Committee workshops on the 10-year Budget.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

82.    Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the 10-year Budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate the council’s responsiveness to Māori.

83.    Local board plans, developed in 2020 through engagement with the community including Māori, form the basis of local board area priorities. There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and the wider Māori community.

84.    Analysis provided of consultation feedback received on the proposed 10-year Budget includes submissions made by mana whenua and the wider Māori community who have interests in the rohe / local board area.

85.    Ongoing conversations between local boards and Māori will assist to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

86.    Some projects approved for funding could have discernible impacts on Māori. The potential impacts on Māori, as part of any project progressed by Auckland Council, will be assessed appropriately and accordingly as part of relevant reporting requirements.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

87.    This report is seeking the local board’s decisions on financial matters in the local board agreement that must then be considered by the Governing Body.

88.    The local board also provides input to regional plans and proposals. There is information in the council’s consultation material for each plan or proposal with the financial implications of each option outlined for consideration.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

89.    The council must adopt its 10-year Budget, which includes local board agreements, by 30 June 2021. The local board is required to make recommendations on these local matters for the 10-year Budget by mid May 2021, to enable and support the Governing Body to make decisions on key items to be included in the 10-year Budget on 25 May 2021.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

90.    The local board will approve its local board agreement and corresponding work programmes in June 2021.

91.    Recommendations and feedback from the local board will be provided to the relevant Governing Body committee for consideration during decision making at the Governing Body meeting.

92.    The final 10-year Budget 2021-2031 (including local board agreements) will be adopted by the Governing Body on 22 June 2021.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lucy Stallworthy - Local Board Engagement Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

06 May 2021

 

 

Auckland Transport – Regional Land Transport Programme 2021

File No.: CP2021/03957

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      The purpose of this report is to outline the outcomes of the proposed Regional Land Transport Programme (RLTP) in the local board area and provide an opportunity for the board to resolve feedback for the attention of the Governing Body and the Regional Transport Committee.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      This report covers:

·    a summary of what the RLTP is and the process of its development

·    a summary of what projects and programmes are planned for the local board area.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport – Regional Land Transport Programme report

b)      provide feedback on the Regional Land Transport Programme as per Attachment A to this report.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.      The RLTP is a 10-year investment programme for transport in Auckland. It includes the activities of Auckland Transport, Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency (Waka Kotahi) and KiwiRail.

4.      It is reviewed and publicly consulted on every three years in a process led by the Auckland Regional Transport Committee (RTC).

5.      The RTC is comprised of members of the AT Board and representatives from Waka Kotahi and KiwiRail. During the review process the RTC seeks the views of Auckland’s elected representatives through the Governing Body. The AT Board is responsible for the final approving of the RLTP.

6.      The RLTP is the end product of a number of different local and central government processes and plans:

· Auckland Transport Alignment Project (ATAP)

· The Auckland Plan 2050

· Auckland Council’s Long-Term Plan (LTP)

· National Land Transport Programme (NLTP)

· Government Policy Statement on Land Transport (GPS).

7.      It is worth noting that AT is not a party to ATAP discussions but that the direction expressed in this document is a key driver for outcomes in the RLTP. Likewise, the LTP sets funding levels for key programmes in the RLTP, such as the Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

8.      The current transport programme is set out in the 2018 RLTP. This saw the introduction of the Regional Fuel Tax (RFT), that provided an additional $1.5bn of direct revenue over 10 years. Including the RFT, the 2018 RLTP anticipated a $10 billion capital programme over ten years.

9.      While the 2018 RLTP programme provided a sound investment base there have been an increasing number of challenges requiring attention in the 2021 RLTP. These include:

·      the impact of growth and other demands creating a need for increased investment in upgrading existing infrastructure and for new investment to support growth

·      a need for increased investment to ensure transport plays its role in meeting overall greenhouse gas reduction targets

·      continuing to invest in public transport and to accelerate cycling network completion to support mode change

·      a need to deliver further investment to support vision zero goals to provide reductions in deaths and serious injuries

·      an increasing need for more responsive investment in the transport network at a local level.

10.    Unfortunately, the response to these challenges is tempered by the impact of Council’s Emergency Budget, the effect of Covid-19 on public transport fares (leading to reduced operational funding for AT), and a strong likelihood that Waka Kotahi funding will not reach previously assumed levels.

11.    It has been assessed that about 95% of the available capital funding from Council and Government is needed to run the transport system, maintain the quality of the system (renewals and maintenance) and deliver committed/contracted /under construction projects. This means that there is very little headroom for new investment and that there will be hard trade-offs, including the deferring of many important projects. 

12.    At its meeting on 11 March the Planning Committee unanimously endorsed the draft RLTP.  ATAP itself was released on Friday 12 March. The RTC formally approved the draft RLTP for public consultation at its meeting on 23 March 2021.

13.    The current timeline for development of the RLTP is as follows:

Date

Action           

23 March

RTC considers draft RLTP for public consultation

29 March-2 May

Proposed dates for public consultation

May

Evaluation of public consultation

27 May

RTC review final draft RLTP

3 June

Governing Body review RLTP for endorsement

June

AT Board reviews RLTP for final approval

01 July

RLTP operational

14.    As a regional programme it is appropriate that the primary engagement focus sits with the Governing Body through the Planning Committee.

15.    However, as the RLTP has important local impacts AT recognizes the importance of seeking local board views to ensure these are included in the information given to the RTC and Governing Body to inform their decision making. To this end, AT has the following engagement planned:

Date

LB Engagement

15 Feb

AT attended the Chairs Forum to give an overview on the RLTP process, to outline how the RLTP is put together and finally what the process is for LB input.

29 March – 2 May

Workshops with all local boards to discuss the RLTP.

4 – 18 May

AT will write reports for local boards to pass resolutions to officially record their feedback on the RLTP.

3 June

Local boards could use their statutory input slot at a Governing Body Meeting (Planning Committee) to give their views on the RLTP.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.    The draft Long Term Plan proposal is to reinstate the Local Board Transport Capital fund back up to $20M per annum for the next ten years. On this basis the proposed RLTP includes $200M for Local Board initiatives. However, it should be noted that this is contingent on the Mayor’s proposed rates increase of 5%.

17.    The below tables summarises projects that are planned to be delivered in the Local Board area and surrounding areas and could be of benefit to residents from the Manurewa Local Board area.

#

AT Projects

Duration

10 Year Capital Expenditure ($M)

38

Mangere Cycleways (Airport Access)

2021/22 - 2022/23

11.6

40

Smales Allens Road Widening and Intersection Upgrade

2025/26 - 2027/28

23.4

43

Airport to Botany Stage 2 Bus Improvements

2023/24 - 2025/26

30.1

44

Ormiston Town Centre Link

2021/22 - 2022/23

16.8

49

Papakura Rail Station Park and Ride          

2021/22 - 2024/25

9.9

52

Drury Local Road Improvements

2027/28 - 2030/31

242.8

71

CRL Day One – Level Crossing Removal

2021/22 - 2026/27

220.0

18.    The below tables summarises projects within larger programmes, that are planned to be delivered in the Local Board area and surrounding areas and could be of benefit to residents from Manurewa.

#

Project from a Programme

Underlying Programme

39

Mangere Spatial Priority Area

Projects Supporting Auckland Housing Programme (AT)

42

East Tamaki Road/Ormiston Road/Preston Road

Network Performance (AT)

47

Manurewa (Coxhead Quadrant)

Safety (AT)

48

Popes Porchester Intersection

Safety (AT)

70

Takanini School Road / Manuroa Road Intersection

Safety (AT)

78

Residential Speed Management – Favona, Mangere East, Middlemore, Papatoetoe, Manurewa

Safety (AT)

19.    The below table summarizes projects being delivered by Waka Kotahi that are planned to be delivered in the Local Board area and surrounding areas and could be of benefit to residents from Manurewa.

 

Non-AT Projects

Responsible Agency

10 Year Capital Expenditure ($M)

37

Old Mangere Bridge Pedestrian & Cycling Link

Waka Kotahi

12.6

41

Wiri to Quay Park

KiwiRail

209.0

46

Mill Road Corridor

Waka Kotahi

1,354.0

50

State Highway 1 Papakura to Drury South

Waka Kotahi

423.0

51

Drury Stations

KiwiRail

185.0

53

Papakura to Pukekohe Electrification

KiwiRail

338.0

20.    The below map corresponds to the above tables and shows the location of the projects:

21.    The below table outlines objectives from the local board plan that are approached in the RLTP

Objectives

RLTP outcomes                 

Local boards have transport infrastructure funding available for local area improvements that don’t meet regional priorities.

This RLTP includes a $200 million Local Board Initiatives fund to be split between Auckland’s 21 local boards, and provide for an ongoing programme of smaller-scale local transport improvements.

Our streets are safe and easy to use.

The RLTP includes:

·    Over $650million of AT investment to deliver the AT Safety Programme, which will delver improvements targeted towards s[peed management, high risk intersections, high risk corridors and vulnerable road users.

·    $100 million for minor improvements across the network.

·    $193 million of Waka Kotahi investment to deliver the state highway Safer Networks Programme.

Transport options are easy to access and meet diverse community needs

A ten-year investment of $3.93billion has been included in this RLTP to cover the cost of renewing AT’s asset base. This RLTP has $900 million more in AT renewals than the $3.05 billion included in the 2018 RLTP.

The rapid transit network (RTN) is a key investment priority and forms the largest category of capital investment in this RLTP.

The proposed transport programme in this RLTP will deliver a step-change in the coverage and performance of the RTN over the next 10 years. This RLTP will also see the RTN continue to diversify away from the City Centre.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.    The approach set out in the RLTP conforms with the direction expressed by Council through the Long-Term Plan. However, AT notes that far more needs to be done to reach the Auckland Council climate change emissions targets.

23.    This investment programme is only one of a comprehensive set of measures needed to reduce transport emissions. The RLTP does not exist to set government policy and additional measures are needed that are beyond its scope to implement. A comprehensive approach to emission reduction will therefore require a range of actions from across government and industry sector.

24.    In the context of this challenge, Auckland needs a Climate Plan for its transport system which sets out the preferred pathway to meeting Auckland Councils emissions targets. This plan, along with a Climate Change Programme Business Case will be developed as part of this RLTP.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.    The RLTP is the product of several Auckland Council processes and plans including:

·        Auckland Transport Alignment Project (ATAP)

·        The Auckland Plan 2050

·        Auckland Council’s Long-Term Plan (LTP).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.    Auckland Transport has used local board plans to inform the development of the RLTP.

27.    Opportunities for local boards to engage on the RLTP have included:

·        Chair’s Forum on the 15th February 2021

·        A workshop with the Manurewa Local Board on the 15th April 2021

·        Highlighting the opportunities for local board feedback to the Governing Body.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.    Iwi and mataawaka have been engaged through AT’s Maori engagement team.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.    The are no direct financial implications for the local board in receiving this report.

30.    Local board feedback on the RLTP and any changes made as a result of that feedback could have financial implications depending on that feedback. Further information about AT’s priorities for funding and implications of changes to funding levels can be found on page 80 of the RLTP consultation document.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.    AT’s capital programme within the RLTP is contingent on the Mayor’s proposed rates increase of 5%. If this is not adopted there will be significant impacts on plan.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.    Once the local boards have resolved their feedback on the RLTP, AT will review all feedback from local boards and the public. This feedback, and any proposed changes, will be compiled into a feedback report for the consideration of the Governing Body and the Regional Transport Committee. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

RLTP Local Board Feedback template

85

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bruce Thomas – Elected Member Relationship Partner, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Hamish Bunn - GM Investment, Planning & Policy, Auckland Transport

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

06 May 2021

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

06 May 2021

 

 

Approval for a new public road name at 172 Roscommon Road, Manurewa

File No.: CP2021/04343

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek approval from the Manurewa Local Board to name a new public road, created by way of a subdivision development at 172 Roscommon Road, Manurewa.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

3.      On behalf of the developer and applicant, NZ Cleanfill Limited, agent Emma Bayly of Civilplan Consultants Limited has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the local board.

4.      The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana Whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines.

5.      The proposed names for the new public road at 172 Roscommon Road are:

·    Basalt Rock Way (Applicant Preferred)

·    Matukutūruru Road (suggested and preferred name by Ngāti Te Ata – Applicant’s Alternative 1)

·    Rocksolid Way (Alternative 2)

·    Rock Way (Alternative 3).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      approves the name Basalt Rock Way (applicant’s preferred name) for the new public road created by way of subdivision at 172 Roscommon Road, Manurewa, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60354024 and SUB60344363).

Horopaki

Context

6.      Resource consent reference BUN60354024 (subdivision reference number SUB60344363) was issued in May 2020 for the creation of 12 vacant lots, one public road and two commonly owned access lots (COAL).

7.      Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachment A.

8.      In accordance with the Standards, any road including private ways, COALs, and right of ways, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

9.      Therefore, in this development, only the new public road requires a road name. The two COALs are serving less than five lots each. This can be seen in Attachment A, where the public road that requires a name is highlighted in yellow.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.    The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

11.    The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Maori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

12.    Theme: The names have been chosen by the Applicant to reflect the basalt rock resource that has been quarried from the site over past years, and which remains in the unquarried parts of the site. For this reason, the Applicant chose names to complement the existing features of the site, as detailed in the table below:

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Basalt Rock Way

(Applicant preferred)

Basalt is a dark-coloured, fine-grained, igneous rock formed from the rapid cooling of low-viscosity lava rich in magnesium and iron. More than 90% of all volcanic rock on Earth is basalt.

Basalt is used in construction, for example as building blocks, on in the ground work, making cobblestones and in making statues.

Matakutūruru Road

(suggested and preferred name by Ngāti Te Ata – Applicant’s Alternative 1)

Matukutūruru reflects the original Māori name for the maunga, which has been quarried; the remnants of which lie adjacent to the site and are identified as a Mana Whenua site of significance.

The maunga is also known as Wiri Mountain, one of two volcanic cones making up Ngā Matuku-rua.  

Rocksolid Way 

(Alternative 2)

Following the theme of ‘Basalt Rock’, which derived from Late Latin basaltes, a misspelling of Latin basanites (‘very hard stone’).

The meaning of ‘rocksolid’ refers to something completely or perfectly solid (as because of great strength) supported by a rock-solid foundation.

Rock Way

(Alternative 2)

A rock is any naturally occurring solid mass or aggregate of minerals or mineraloid matter. Basalt is a type of rock.

 

13.    Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

14.    Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

15.    Road Type: ‘Way’ and ‘Road’ are acceptable road types for the new public road, suiting the form and layout of the road.

16.    Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.    The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.    The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.    The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.    To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

21.    On 9 March 2021 mana whenua were contacted by the Applicant, as set out in the Guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with an interest in the general area were contacted:

·    Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki (Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Tribal Trust)

·    Ngāti Maru (Ngāti Maru Rūnanga Trust)

·    Ngāti Tamaoho (Ngāti Tamaoho Trust)

·    Ngāti Tamaterā (Ngāti Tamaterā Settlement Trust

·    Ngāti Te Ata (Te Ara Rangatu o Te Iwi o Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua)

·    Ngāti Whanaunga (Ngāti Whanaunga Incorporated)

·    Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua (Makaurau Marae Māori Trust)

·    Te Ākitai Waiohua (Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority)

·    Te Kawerau ā Maki (Te Kawerau Iwi Settlement Trust)

·    Waikato – Tainui (Te Whakakitenga o Waikato Incorporated)

22.    By the close of the consultation period, Ngāti Te Ata provided comments. They do not support the names proposed by the Applicant, and suggested ‘Matukutūruru Road’ which has been adopted by the Applicant as first alternative.

23.    A Cultural Value Assessment has been undertaken by Te Ākitai Waiohua during the resource consent process and no commentary to the naming of the road was included. Ngāti Te Ata required a Cultural Value Assessment to be undertaken during the resource consent process, however did not provide one. Feedback was also received from Waikato-Tainui advising that they do not have a specific interest in this site.

24.    No further no responses, comments, or feedback have been received.

25.    This site is listed as a site of significance to mana whenua and one Te Reo Māori name is proposed.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.    The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

27.    The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.    There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.    Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site and Location Plans

95

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Andrea Muhme - Planner

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

06 May 2021

 

 

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PDF Creator


Manurewa Local Board

06 May 2021

 

 

Manurewa Local Board Grants Programme 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/04197

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To adopt the Manurewa Grants Programme 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

3.      The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt their own local grants programme for the next financial year.

4.      This report presents the Manurewa Grants Programme 2021/2022 for adoption (as provided in Attachment A to this report).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      adopt the Manurewa Grants Programme 2021/2022 in Attachment A.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.      The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

6.      The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt its own local grants programme for the next financial year. The local board grants programme guides community groups and individuals when making applications to the local board.

7.      The local board community grants programme includes:

· outcomes as identified in the local board plan

· specific local board grant priorities

· which grant types will operate, the number of grant rounds and opening and closing   dates

· any additional criteria or exclusions that will apply

· other factors the local board consider to be significant to their decision-making.

8.      Once the local board grants programme 2021/2022 has been adopted, the types of grants, grant rounds, criteria and eligibility with be advertised through an integrated communication and marketing approach which includes utilising the local board channels.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.      The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. The new Manurewa Grants Programme has been workshopped with the local board and feedback incorporated into the grants programme for 2021/2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

10.    The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Local board grants can contribute to climate action through the support of projects that address food production and food waste; alternative transport methods; community energy efficiency education and behaviour change; build community resilience and support tree planting.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

11.    The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

12.    Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant council unit will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.    The grants programme has been developed by the local board to set the direction of its grants programme. This programme is reviewed on an annual basis.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

14.    All grant programmes respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to organisations delivering positive outcomes for Māori. Applicants are asked how their project aims to increase Māori outcomes in the application process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

15.    The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-Term Plan 2018 -2028 and local board agreements.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

16.    The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy. Therefore, there is minimal risk associated with the adoption of the grants programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

17.    An implementation plan is underway and the local board grants programme will be locally advertised through the local board and council channels, including the council website, local board Facebook page and communication with past recipients of grants.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manurewa Grant Programme 2021/2022

101

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Authorisers

Rhonwen Heath - Head of Rates Valuations & Data Mgmt

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

06 May 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Manurewa Local Board

06 May 2021

 

 

Decision-making responsibilities policy

File No.: CP2021/04924

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To endorse the draft decision-making responsibilities policy for inclusion in the long-term plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Governing Body is required by legislation to allocate decision-making responsibility for the non-regulatory activities of Auckland Council to either itself or local boards. This allocation is outlined in the Decision-Making Responsibilities of Auckland Council’s Governing Body and Local Boards policy that is published in each long-term plan and annual plan.

3.      The policy also records delegations given to date by the Governing Body to local boards and provides a list of statutory responsibilities that are conferred on both governance arms.

4.      An internal review of the policy was undertaken in early 2021 and considered by the Joint Governance Working Party at its meeting on 22 March 2021. The review outlined some proposed changes to the policy as well as some recommendations on how to take forward other issues that do not yet lend themselves to a policy amendment. The recommendations adopted by the Joint Governance Working Party have informed the proposed changes in the draft policy. (Attachment A).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      endorse the draft Decision-making Responsibilities of Auckland Council’s Governing Body and local boards policy.

Horopaki

Context

5.      The Governing Body and local boards obtain their decision-making responsibilities from three sources:

·   statutory responsibilities - functions and powers directly conferred by the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 (LGACA) 2009

·   non-regulatory activities that are allocated to local boards and the Governing Body in accordance with a set of principles (section 17(2) LGACA)

·   delegations – these can be regulatory or non-regulatory responsibilities; the Governing Body has delegated some of its responsibilities to local boards.

Allocation of non-regulatory responsibilities

6.      The primary purpose for the policy is to set out the allocation of non-regulatory decision-making responsibilities. However, it incorporates other sources of decision-making authority for completeness and context, including a register of key delegations which have been given by the Governing Body to local boards.

Joint Governance Working Party (JGWP)

7.      To facilitate a review by the JGWP, staff provided an analysis of issues raised, mainly by local boards, and proposed recommendations in relation to those issues. The report containing this advice can be found in the record of the Joint Governance Working Party Meeting, 23 March 2021.

8.      The JGWP carefully considered the issues that were in scope for the review as well as the staff advice and raised some questions and issues that staff are exploring further. These are discussed in the advice below.

9.      This report only covers the discussions relating to the recommended changes to the policy. A memo will be provided to each local board providing a summary of the issues considered in the review and outlining a staff response to specific issues, if any, that individual local boards raised in their feedback.

10.    Following their review, the JGWP agreed as follows:

That the Joint Governance Working Party:

(a)        note the feedback from local boards on the decision-making responsibilities policy

(b)        request the following amendments to the decision-making responsibilities policy:

(i)         request that staff report with urgency that local boards can be delegated approval for developing and approving area plans, provided the governing body can make its views known on such plans

(ii)        that the local boards can take responsibilities for decision making over drainage reserves provided such decisions are constrained to those that will not negatively affect the drainage functions and stormwater network operations.

(iii)       provide for local boards to tailor locally delivered projects within regional environmental programmes, subject to advice from staff on the types of projects that can be tailored

(iv)       provide explicit reference to Health and Safety obligations and requirements that local boards and Governing Body must consider in their decisions

(v)        local boards can object to a special liquor licence and this be enabled by an appropriate administrative process.

(c)   note the recommendations that the next phase of the Waiheke pilot should consider some of the issues that have been raised including:

(i)         trialing delegations from Auckland Transport on decision-making relating to street trading for roads and beaches, placemaking and urban design decisions

(ii)        Identifying opportunities and non-regulatory decision-making elements in relation to town centres that the Governing Body can consider when making allocation

(d)   recommend that Auckland Transport consider if there are types of community activities that can take place on road reserves without impacting the roading network.

(e)   Request staff scope out a review of the role of the governing body in regional governance within the shared governance model of Auckland Council, taking into considerations the recommendation of the CCO Review.

The following members requested that their dissenting votes be recorded as follows:

Cr A Filipaina against e)

Member R Northey against e)

The following members requested that their abstention be recorded as follows

Cr S Henderson against (b)(i)

Cr R Hills against (b)(iii)

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Request for further advice or implementation support

Area plans

11.    Local boards requested that the responsibility for adoption of area plans, which is currently allocated to the Governing Body, be assigned to them. This can be done through allocating the responsibility to local boards or through the Governing Body delegating this allocated responsibility to local boards to exercise on their behalf.

12.    Staff have considered this request and advised the JGWP as follows.

·   Area plans are an important tool in council’s spatial planning framework. It is used to strategically plan an area usually for the purpose of seeking and/or supporting changes to the Unitary Plan. The responsibility for the Unitary Plan rests with the Governing Body.

·   Area plans, as a stand-alone non-regulatory tool and decision, appear ‘local’ in nature given their focus on local planning which is a responsibility allocated to local boards.

·   However, area plans also meet the exceptions in section 17(2) of the LGACA: specifically that for these decisions to be effective, they require alignment or integration with other decision-making responsibilities that sit with the Governing Body. These include plan changes and amendments to the Unitary Plan, infrastructure prioritisation and regional investment.

·   During the Waiheke pilot, the Waiheke Local Board sought a delegation to sign off the Waiheke Local Area Plan. This delegation was granted with conditions that included a requirement to ensure the involvement of a member of the Independent Maori Statutory Board. This suggests delegations on a case-by-case basis can be possible and provides an alternative route if a standing delegation is not given to local boards.

13.    The JGWP carefully considered the advice of staff but were not all in agreement with it. Members had strong views about the need to empower local boards in their local planning role and have requested staff to reconsider their advice and to explore the risks and possible risk mitigation of enabling local boards to adopt the plans through a delegation from the Governing Body.

14.    Whilst the practice already ensures high involvement of local boards in the development of these plans, it was the view of the JGWP members that delegating the adoption decision with relevant parameters is more empowering for local boards. JGWP members felt that this would enable local boards to make local planning decisions that are aligned with their local board plan aspirations and other community priorities without requiring further approval from the Governing Body, whose members may not be as familiar with these local priorities.

15.    JGWP members agreed that area plans, while local, often require funding and alignment to other plans that are developed by the Governing Body. Keeping the responsibility and accountability allocated to the Governing Body ensures the decision continues to sit at the right level but that this does not necessarily need to be exercised by the Governing Body on all occasions.

16.    The JGWP have requested advice from staff on how to pursue a Governing Body delegation. Staff will seek to provide further advice to the JGWP. If the JGWP considers recommending a delegation from the Governing Body on this issue, staff will present the request to the Governing Body for consideration. A delegation can be given at any time and it will have immediate effect.

Special liquor licence administration process for notifying local boards

17.    One of the issues raised in the local board feedback is special liquor license applications. On this matter, the request was for clarification that local boards can object, as per the delegation from Governing Body granting the ability to make objections under the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012. Elected members perceived this is not being enabled as notifications on these licences are not proactively shared with them in the same way that information about other applications (on, off and club licences) are.

18.    The JGWP has recommended that this be clarified in the policy and request that staff enable notifications to be sent to local board where public consultation is required for special licence applications.

Proposed changes to the Allocated decision-making responsibilities (part c)

Local purpose (drainage) reserves

19.    During discussions with local boards on the scope of the review, many local boards raised concerns about the interpretation of the policy.

20.    An example raised by Upper Harbour Local Board demonstrated the need for clarity, especially in areas where decision-making authority allocated to both governance arms overlap. During the development of the board’s local park management plans, staff had advised that those reserves that are primarily dedicated to stormwater drainage should be treated as part of the stormwater network. This advice appeared to suggest that local boards do not hold any decision-making over a subset of local parks since it is the Governing Body that is responsible for management of the stormwater network.

21.    Through discussions with staff as part of this review, the advice has been revised. Staff accept this is an example of where there is clear overlap in activities and decision-making responsibilities. Staff will need to work closely with local boards to develop protocols that enable decision-making by the Governing Body on stormwater issues to be exercised efficiently and effectively.

22.    The JGWP were supportive of the staff recommendation to clarify that the exercise of decision-making in relation to stormwater network and how it functions must be properly enabled on local parks. This is done by acknowledging that these considerations and decisions about the stormwater network constrains local board decision-making over local parks (or parts of local parks) that have a stormwater drainage function. This clarity will also help staff to understand that the local board continues to retain the decision-making responsibility over all other activities of local parks.

Role of local boards in environmental programmes and grants

23.    Some local boards feel the current policy wording and ways of working does not provide a meaningful role for local boards on regional environmental issues, specifically regional environmental programmes. These local boards have also requested that local boards be enabled to monitor the progress of any locally-delivered projects (funded by regional environmental programmes) through the established work programme reporting mechanism.

24.    Local board input into regional environmental programmes is at the policy and/or programme approval stage. The approved programme direction provides sufficient guidance to staff, acting under delegation from the Governing Body, when developing an implementation plan and prioritising projects for delivery.

25.    At the operational level, where identified priorities and project ideas are to be delivered in local parks or other key locations within the local board area, local board input is sought by staff at workshops. This is to ensure locally delivered projects are tailored to local circumstances. While it is possible to capture this current practice in the policy, this needs to be done in a way that continues to enable relevant local boards to add value to projects without too many administrative requirements. A member of the JGWP also expressed concern about signalling all projects can be tailored to local circumstances as this is not the case.

Other changes

Health and Safety – parameters for decision-making

26.    Council decisions need to take account of Health and Safety considerations, as well as reflecting a shared approach to risk.

27.    Staff advise that Health and Safety considerations should be explicit in the policy to protect the council from liability. The JGWP supports this recommendation and a reference to complying with health and safety legislation and plans has been inserted in the policy.

Issues relating to delegations

28.    The review considered requests for new delegations or additional support to implement delegations given to local boards. Some of these were requests for delegation from Auckland Transport.

29.    The review considered that before recommending or agreeing any new delegation, the delegator, whether it be Governing Body or Auckland Transport, must first weigh the benefits of reflecting local circumstances and preferences (through a delegation) against the importance and benefits of using a single approach in the district (through itself retaining the responsibility, duty, or power concerned).

30.    Staff advised the JGWP to recommend that the Waiheke pilot (part of the Governance Framework Review) which is about to enter another phase, expands to include a trial of delegated decision-making on key issues raised in this review. They include several issues that relate to Auckland Transport, namely street trading and town centre/urban design. Piloting these delegations can help Auckland Transport to identify any practical issues that need to be considered before a formal delegation to all local boards can be given on any of the issues identified.

Other issues

JGWP resolution on role of governing body

31.    Some members of the JGWP expressed concerns about what they perceived to be a heavy focus on local board responsibilities.

32.    Both sets of governors were invited to identify issues to be examined in the review. The Governing Body, in workshop discussions, did not identify any major issues that it wanted to review but was open to including any issues raised by local boards. As a result, almost all of the issues raised were suggested by local boards and the majority of them relate to their areas of decision-making responsibility. This may have given the impression of a bias towards examining the role of local boards.

33.    To address this concern, the JGWP requested that staff scope a review of the role of the governing body. Staff will provide advice to the JGWP in response to this request at an upcoming meeting.

Escalation process for any disputes relating to the Allocation of decision-making responsibilities for non-regulatory activities

34.    The process for resolving disputes relating to allocation of non-regulatory responsibilities (including disputes over interpretation of the allocation table) will vary depending on the issue at hand. The chart below outlines the basic escalation process.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

35.    This report relates to a policy and does not have any quantifiable climate impacts.

36.    Decisions that are taken, in execution of this policy, will likely have significant climate impacts. However, those impacts will be assessed on a case-by-case basis and appropriate responses will be identified as required.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.    Council departments support and implement decisions that are authorised by this policy.

38.    Feedback received to date from some departments reinforces the need for guidance notes to aid interpretation of the allocations in the decision-making policy. This work will be done in consultation with departments.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

39.    This report canvasses issues that had been raised by local boards and focuses on those issues that warrant an amendment to the policy.

40.    All other issues raised by local boards in their feedback were canvassed in the staff advice that formed part of the review. This information is available to all local boards.

41.    Staff have also prepared responses to specific issues raised by local boards and have shared this information in a memo.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

42.    There are no decisions being sought in this report that will have a specific impact on Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

43.    There are no financial implications directly arising from the information contained in this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.    The are no identified risks other than timeframes. The Governing Body will be adopting this policy in June as part of the long-term plan. Local board feedback is requested in early May in order to provide time to collate and present this to the Governing Body for consideration.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

45.    Staff will prepare guidance notes to aid the interpretation of the decision-making policy following its adoption.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Decision making responsibilities policy

111

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Shirley Coutts - Principal Advisor - Governance Strategy

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

06 May 2021

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

06 May 2021

 

 

Animal Management Bylaw Statement of Proposal Attachment Update

File No.: CP2021/04735

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To advise the board that an incorrect attachment was provided on the report for the Statement of Proposal to amend the Animal Management Bylaw and controls at the 15 April 2021 business meeting. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The board resolved on the Statement of Proposal to amend the Animal Management Bylaw and controls at its 15 April 2021 business meeting.

3.      Following the business meeting staff advised that an incorrect version of the State of Proposal was attached to the report. In that version the beehive restrictions included on pages 2 and 4 of the Statement of Proposal and page 16 of Appendix B to the Statement of Proposal are incorrect.

4.      The correct draft Statement of proposal is attached to this report as Attachment A.

5.      The incorrect statement of proposal that was provided does not impact the resolution the board made at the 15 April 2021 business meeting. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      note the correct draft Statement of proposal attached to this report as Attachment A.

b)      confirm its feedback as provided at the business meeting on 15 April 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Statement of Proposal

127

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

06 May 2021

 

 

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