I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 25 May 2021

10.00am

Local Board Office
7-13 Pilkington Road
Panmure

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Maria Meredith

 

Deputy Chairperson

Chris Makoare

 

Members

Don Allan

 

 

Debbie Burrows

 

 

Nerissa Henry

 

 

Peter McGlashan

 

 

Tony Woodcock

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Tracey Freeman

Democracy Advisor

 

20 May 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 537 862

Email: Tracey.Freeman@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Tāmaki Model Aero Club - Bruce Maroc                                                            5

8.2     Oliver Christeller                                                                                                  6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Governing Body Member's Update                                                                              9

12        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                  11

13        Board Member's Reports                                                                                            17

14        24 Upper Municipal Place, Onehunga disposal recommendation                         19

15        Approval for a new private road name at 56 Symonds Street, Onehunga            25

16        Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Three and Multi-Board Round Two 2020/2021, grant allocations                                                                                       31

17        Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2020/2021                          251

18        Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rates for 2021/2022 271

19        Economic Development Action Plan: Draft for feedback                                     281

20        Auckland Unlimited Quarter Two Performance Report for the Quarter Ending 31 December 2020                                                                                                           285

21        Urgent decision - Local board representation on the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project                                                          303

22        Local board feedback on the Unit Titles (Strengthening Body Corporate Governance and Other Matters) Amendment Bill                                                  313

23        Local board feedback on the Transport and Infrastructure Committee inquiry into Congestion Pricing in Auckland                                                                              317

24        Local board feedback on the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment proposed changes to support effective management of freedom camping in New Zealand                                                                                                                        321

25        Local Board Views on Plan Change 60 - Open Space (2020) and Other Rezoning Matters                                                                                                                        327

26        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      335

27        Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops                                  339

28        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 27 April 2021, the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 4 May 2021 and the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 11 May 2021 as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Tāmaki Model Aero Club - Bruce Maroc

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Providing Bruce Maroc of Tāmaki Model Aero Club the opportunity to present to the board on the activities being run by the club, and the current challenges the club is faced with.   

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       As per standing orders the Chairperson has approved the deputation request from Bruce Maroc.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      thank Bruce Maroc for his attendance.

Attachments

a          Tāmaki Model Aero Club.............................................................................. 347

 

 

8.2       Oliver Christeller

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Providing Oliver Christeller the opportunity to present a new recreational activity to the board called disc golf that Oliver would like to launch in the local board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       As per standing orders the Chairperson has approved the deputation request from Oliver Christeller.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      thank Oliver Christeller for his attendance.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

Governing Body Member's Update

File No.: CP2021/06526

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on local activities that the Governing Body representative is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To provide the Governing Body Member an opportunity to update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Governing Body Member’s update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2021/06527

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the Chairperson is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing the Chairperson with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Chairperson’s report for May 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair M Meredith Monthly Report May 2021

13

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

Board Member's Reports

File No.: CP2021/06528

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the local board members are involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the board members report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

24 Upper Municipal Place, Onehunga disposal recommendation

File No.: CP2021/00813

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report seeks endorsement from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board for 24 Upper Municipal Place, Onehunga to be recommended to council’s Finance and Performance Committee for disposal.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       24 Upper Municipal Place, Onehunga is a 263m2 commercial building no longer required by council for water infrastructure purposes. The current lease holder and owner of the adjoining properties is seeking to acquire the property as part of its development of the former Onehunga Working Men’s Club site.

3.       As the property is within the Transform Onehunga boundaries, sales proceeds will be allocated to the Eke Panuku Transform/Unlock budget and contribute towards projects with public good outcomes for Transform Onehunga.

4.       Consultation with council and its CCOs (Council Controlled Organisations), iwi authorities and the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has now taken place. Feedback received has been supportive of the proposed disposal of 24 Upper Municipal Place.

5.       A resolution approving the disposal of 24 Upper Municipal Place is required from the Finance and Performance Committee before the proposed divestment can be progressed.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      endorse the disposal of 24 Upper Municipal Place, Onehunga.

b)      note that sales proceeds will be allocated to the Eke Panuku Transform/Unlock budget and contribute towards projects with public good outcomes for Transform Onehunga.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Transform Onehunga will catalyse and reinvigorate wider private development potential in Onehunga through proposed mixed-use developments on specific council landholdings within the Transform Onehunga boundary. The development strategy for Transform Onehunga includes using council landholdings, partnership opportunities and a demand-led market to spur development in the Onehunga Town Centre.

7.       In accordance with its statement of intent, Eke Panuku is required to undertake an ongoing review of council’s property assets. This includes identifying properties from within council’s portfolio that are no longer required for public work purposes and may be suitable for sale and development. Following a purchaser enquiry from the adjoining landowner, 24 Upper Municipal Place was identified as potentially no longer required for a public work.

8.       For all properties that are potentially no longer being required for public work purposes, Eke Panuku engages with council departments and its CCOs through an expression of interest process to establish whether the property must be retained for a strategic purpose or is required for a future funded public work.  Once a property has been internally cleared of any public work requirements, Eke Panuku then consults with local boards, mana whenua and ward councillors. 

9.       The Finance and Performance Committee makes the final decision to approve a property for disposal.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Property information

10.     24 Upper Municipal Place is a 263m2 commercial building. The original property was acquired by the former Borough of Onehunga in 1947 for the purposes of a well.

11.     At the establishment of Auckland Council in 2010, the parcel containing the well, known as 26 Upper Municipal Place was transferred to Watercare Services Limited. 24 Upper Municipal Place continued to be held by Auckland Council for the purposes of water supply infrastructure purposes and was not considered within the scope of Transform Onehunga when it was approved in 2017.

12.     Following Watercare’s disposal of 26 Upper Municipal Place, council has subsequently confirmed 24 Upper Municipal Place is no longer required for a public work.

13.     The Auckland Unitary Plan zoning is Business Town Centre. The entirety of the property has a council rating valuation of $500,000. 24 Upper Municipal Place is subject to offer back obligations to the former owners in accordance with s40 of the Public Works Act 1981.

14.     The proposed disposal of this property is not deemed to be significant under Auckland Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Development opportunity

15.     The existing lease holder and owner of adjacent properties is seeking to acquire 24 Upper Municipal Place to enable it to be included as part of its development of the adjacent former Onehunga Working Men’s Club site.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     The proposed sale of this property and its inclusion as part of the proposed development of the adjoining property is likely to lead to land use changes. It is acknowledged that any form of construction and development can increase carbon emissions. The adjoining landowner may seek to reduce emissions associated with its planned redevelopment through development standards similar to Eke Panuku’s Homestar 6 policy.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     Eke Panuku consulted all relevant council departments and CCOs on the proposed disposal. No substantive feedback was received in response.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     Eke Panuku provided the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board with information memorandums regarding 24 Upper Municipal Place and attended a local board workshop in February 2021.

19.     In response to queries raised both at the workshop and in subsequent correspondence, Eke Panuku staff provided advice to the local board confirming that as 24 Upper Municipal Place is located within the Transform Onehunga boundary, sales proceeds from this property will be allocated to the Eke Panuku Transform/Unlock budget. Advice also confirmed that this property was held for a council service use until 2020 and accordingly was not previously considered for potential disposal or included in the scope of Transform Onehunga.

20.     This report provides the local board with an opportunity to formalise its views regarding this property.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     19 mana whenua iwi authorities were contacted for site-specific feedback on the proposed sale of part of 24 Upper Municipal Place. This engagement sought to understand if there were any issues of cultural significance with the proposed disposal.  Information regarding the size and configuration of the property, and the proposed development of the adjoining property was provided as part of the engagement undertaken.

22.     Eke Panuku received a notification of interest from Te Runanga o Ngāti Whātua. Eke Panuku has acknowledged the notification and confirmed its interests have been noted on the property file. Eke Panuku further discussed with Te Runanga o Ngāti Whātua on how council can recognise the significance, including recording information council’s Geospatial layers. No further confirmation has been received. Eke Panuku will further discuss the issues raised with Te Runanga o Ngāti Whātua before the property is presented for disposal. In the event the property is approved for sale, all iwi entities will be alerted of the decision and council’s intention to sell to the current leaseholder and adjacent landowner.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     As the subject property is within the Transform Onehunga boundaries, the sales proceeds will contribute towards projects with public good outcomes for Transform Onehunga if it is approved for disposal.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     No risks associated with the recommendation contained in this report have been identified.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Following receipt of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s resolution, 24 Upper Municipal Place will be presented to the Finance and Performance Committee with a recommendation to divest.

26.     The current lease holder and owner of adjacent properties is seeking to purchase the property should it be approved for sale. The terms and conditions of any disposal would be approved under appropriate financial delegation.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Images of 24 Upper Municipal Place, Onehunga

23

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Anthony Lewis - Senior Advisor, Portfolio Review, Panuku Development Auckland

Authorisers

Letitia Edwards - Head of Strategic Asset Optimisation (Acting)

Richard Taylor – Priority Location Director, Panuku Development Auckland

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

Approval for a new private road name at 56 Symonds Street, Onehunga

File No.: CP2021/04782

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board to name a new private road, being a commonly owned access lot (COAL), created by way of a subdivision development at 56 Symonds Street, Onehunga.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval.

3.       Developer and Applicant Fifth Ocean Central Limited has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the Local Board.

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana Whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines.

5.       The proposed names for the new private road at 56 Symonds Street are:

·    Aumoana Lane (Applicant Preferred)

·    Tahuaroa Lane (Alternative 1)

·    Hūhunu Lane (Alternative 2)

·    Matahī Lane (Alternative 3)

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      approves the name Aumoana Lane (applicant’s preferred name) for the new private road created by way of subdivision at 56 Symonds Street, Onehunga, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60347820 and SUB60347821).

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent reference BUN60347820 (subdivision reference number SUB60347821) was issued in June 2020 for the construction of 21 new residential freehold units and one commonly owned access lot (COAL).

7.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachment A.

8.       In accordance with the Standards, any road including private ways, COALs, and right of ways, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

9.       Therefore, in this development, the new COAL requires a road name because it serves more than five lots. This can be seen in Attachment A, where the COAL that requires a name is highlighted in yellow.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval

11.     The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Maori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

12.     Theme: The Applicant would like to subtly reflect their development company’s name, Fifth Ocean Central Ltd, in the road naming, and so they have proposed names with an oceanic theme as detailed in the table below:

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by the Applicant)

Aumonana Lane

(Applicant preferred)

Te Reo Māori word meaning (noun): open sea and oceanic

Tahuaroa Lane

(Alternative 1)

Te Reo Māori word meaning (location): ocean – a name for the ocean

Hūhunu Lane

(Alternative 2)

Te Reo Māori word meaning (noun): double canoe, ocean-going canoe

Matahī Lane

(Alternative 3)

Te Reo Māori word meaning (verb): to raise eyebrows – a sign of agreement or astonishment

 

13.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the Council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.

14.     Although the names are a themed reference to the development company name, they do not directly include the actual company name and thus are acceptable. It is therefore for the Local Board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

15.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

16.     Road Type: ‘Lane’ is an acceptable road type for the new private road, suiting the form and layout of the COAL.

17.     Consultation: mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of Council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

22.     On 24th March mana whenua were contacted by the Applicant, as set out in the Guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with an interest in the general area were contacted:

·    Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki (Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Tribal Trust)

·    Ngāti Maru (Ngāti Maru Rūnanga Trust)

·    Ngāti Pāoa (Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust)

·    Ngāti Pāoa (Ngāti Paoa Trust Board)

·    Ngāti Tamaoho (Ngāti Tamaoho Trust)

·    Ngāti Tamaterā (Ngāti Tamaterā Settlement Trust

·    Ngāti Te Ata (Te Ara Rangatu o Te Iwi o Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua)

·    Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara (Ngā Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara Development Trust)

·    Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei (Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Trust)

·    Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua (Makaurau Marae Māori Trust)

·    Te Ākitai Waiohua (Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority)

·    Te Kawerau ā Maki (Te Kawerau Iwi Settlement Trust)

·    Te Patukirikiri (Te Patukirikiri Incorporated)

·    Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua (Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua)

·    Waikato – Tainui (Te Whakakitenga o Waikato Incorporated)

23.     A response from Kowhai Olsen of Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua has been received, advising no objection to the names proposed.

24.     By the close of the consultation period, no further responses, comments, or feedback were received. Dependent on the scale of the development and its level of significance, not all road naming applications receive comments from mana whenua.

25.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua and only Te Reo Māori names are proposed.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the Council.

27.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     There are no significant risks to Council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site & Location Plan

29

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Andrea Muhme - Planner

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Three and Multi-Board Round Two 2020/2021, grant allocations

File No.: CP2021/06204

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Three (Attachment B) and Multi-Board Round Two 2020/2021(Attachment C).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.   This report presents applications received for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Three (Attachment B) and Multi-Board Round Two 2020/2021(Attachment C).

2.   The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board adopted the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Community Grants Programme 2020/2021 on 28 April 2020 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

3.   The local board has set a total community grants budget of $120,000 for the 2020/2021 financial year. An additional fund of $2,550 (MT/2021/48) was allocated to the community grants budget. A total of $70,814.79 was allocated in the previous grant rounds. This leaves a total of $51,735.21 to be allocated to one local grants and one multiboard round.

4.   Twenty-nine applications were received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Three 2020/2021, requesting a total of $182,975.44 and sixteen multiboard applications were also received requesting a total of $66,499.52.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Three 2020/2021, listed in Table One below:

Table One: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Three 2020/2021

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2111-307

Pukepuke 'o Tonga Limited

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of delivering free ten week "Ako faiva" workshops specifically the cost of the tutor, marketing, catering, rehearsal tupenu, and administration including certificates, catering, and t-shirts for the final showcase.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2111-333

Dolphin Theatre Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the royalty fees, advertising, electricity, promotional photography and printing costs for the theatre production "A Christmas Carol".

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2111-342

Action Education Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the facilitator fees, travel, administration, equipment, and resources to deliver 20 spoken word poetry workshops at schools in the Māungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2111-301

Glen Innes Chinese Groups Incorporated

Community

Towards venue hire, purchase of a projector, and memory sticks, purchase and delivery charges for costumes from China, bus hire, stationery, and administration costs for the Dragon boat event, Mid-Autumn festival, Christmas event, and Chinese Lunar New Year celebration.

$9,243.00

Eligible

LG2111-302

Panmure Business Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the purchase and installation of decorative lighting on two trees around the local board area.

$3,110.00

Eligible

LG2111-303

Onehunga Chinese Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of venue hire (Pearce Street Hall), outdoor activities (bus hire cost), website design and maintenance, volunteer expense, telecommunication (phone vouchers), accountant fees and the Mid-Autumn Festival and Chinese New Year celebration costs.

$9,910.00

Eligible

LG2111-304

Onehunga District Council of Social Services Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of delivering six "Building Capacity and Capability" professional development workshops for the social services and community wellbeing organisations in Maungakiekie, including the costs of advertising, catering, room hire (Onehunga Community House), and presenters costs including hours and travel.

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG2111-306

Big Buddy Mentoring Trust

Community

Towards the purchase of a laptop, wireless keyboard, and mouse, docking station. a monitor and a carry bag for the “Central Auckland Mentoring Manager”.

$3,891.55

Eligible

LG2111-311

Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

Community

Towards the overall costs to deliver a health and well-being programme to St Joseph's Catholic School Onehunga including the costs of educational resources, insurance and teachers' salaries.

$4,455.96

Eligible

LG2111-313

Ellerslie Toy Library Incorporated

Community

Towards purchasing new science, technology. engineering and mathematics toys for the toy library and a flagpole sign.

$1,156.40

Eligible

LG2111-315

CCS Disability Action Auckland Incorporated

Community

Towards the plumbing cost to install cold water for an outdoor bench unit and taps to the Bubble House at the “DigIt!” community garden facility in Royal Oak.

$1,400.00

Eligible

LG2111-317

The Tongan Health Society Incorporated

Community

Towards the delivery of the “Pacific Elderly Day Programme”, including costs for speakers and instructors’ fee, transportation (pick up and drop off), consumables, resources for activities, advertising, and catering costs.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2111-318

Mount Wellington Playcentre

Community

Towards the purchase of a new printer and play resources for the playcentre, including a water wall, messy play wall, large wooden scales and a pulley system.

$1,963.93

Eligible

LG2111-324

Graeme Dingle Foundation Auckland

Community

Towards the programme coordinators’ wages for the delivery of "Project K" for the students from Tamaki College.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2111-325

Everybody Eats Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the purchase of kitchen equipment including a soup mixer, vacuum pack machine, pasta and noodle maker, and stand mixer for the restaurant operating at 306 Onehunga Mall.

$7,467.55

Eligible

LG2111-326

Halaevalu Tuipulotu-Halanukonunuka

Community

Towards resources to run free mathematics classes every Saturday in low decile areas within the local board for year one to 13 students, including whiteboards, stationary books, pencils, ink, a ream of paper, book bags, whiteboard markers, mathematics charts, and dusters.

$1,000.00

Eligible

LG2111-332

Pro-Pare Athlete Management Trust

Community

Towards the cost of running a programme for at-risk Pacifica and Maori youth aged between 14 to 19 at the Talavou Hub specifically the cost of petrol and catering.

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG2111-334

The Friends Of Onehunga Community House Incorporated

Community

Towards the purchase and installation of a hot water system for the kitchen at the Friends of Onehunga Community House.

$4,410.00

Eligible

LG2111-336

Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust

Community

Towards the purchase and installation of a new fencing and shade sail at the Onehunga Clinic and playgroup.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2111-337

Road Safety Education Limited

Community

Towards the venue hire, catering and facilitators' costs to deliver the “Road Safety” programme for the students from the Tamaki College.

$2,500.00

Eligible

LG2111-338

Belong Aotearoa - ARMS

Community

Towards wages for the "Safari Playgroup Assistant", English language tutors’ fee, volunteer travel reimbursement, and transport costs including the cost of the driver and mileage.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2111-339

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the costs of training, management, and supervision of the volunteer counsellors and telecommunications from 1 June 2021 to 31 March 2022.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2111-346

Dance Therapy NZ

Community

Towards the venue hire, programme facilitation, marketing, equipment and materials, coordination, supervision, client support and liaison costs for the "Arts 4 Us", "Stars" and "Dance 4 Us" programme.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2111-348

YMCA North Incorporated

Community

Towards the "Raise Up" Maungakiekie-Tāmaki programme and event costs between June to September 2021 including meeting, uniform, facilitators, training, marketing, materials, transport, mileage, gifts, and prizes and the purchase of sports equipment to deliver a free multi-sport drop-in programme at the YMCA Lagoon Stadium.

$9,452.70

Eligible

LG2111-345

Environmental Education for Resource Sustainability Trust

Environment

Towards plants, recycling bins and operational costs for the Environmental Education for Resource Sustainability Trust.

$5,246.25

Eligible

LG2111-347

The Auckland King Tides Initiative

under the umbrella of the Institute of Professional Engineers New Zealand

Environment

Towards the costs of tidal wave signage, installation of tidal gauges, co-design and delivery of community workshops with the Royal Oak Intermediate between July and December 2021

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2111-329

Auckland Basketball Services Limited

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of basketballs, affiliation fees, and venue hire from 1 June 2021 to 31 March 2022.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2111-331

The Auckland Table Tennis Association Incorporated.

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of eight table tennis tables, wages for the Project Manager Development Coach and the Development Coach for the 'Tables in Communities” project.

$9,768.10

Eligible

LG2111-343

Glenbrae School

Sport and recreation

Towards the costs to construct a bike track, and a bike shed.

$10,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$182,975.44

 

 

 

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Multiboard Round Two 2020/2021, listed in Table Two below:

 

 

 

 

 

Table Two: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Multiboard Round Two 2020/2021

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2021-209

New Zealand Dance Advancement Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the artistic costs and fees for the development of “2021 Tāmaki Tour” and associated workshops.

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-258

The Operating Theatre Trust - Tim Bray Theatre Company

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire, lighting, and free show tickets for children from low decile schools in the local board area to attend the theatre production "The Twits' by Roald Dahl".

$7,264.52

Eligible

MB2021-262

The Kids for Kids Charitable Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the venue hire and production cost to host the National Young Leaders Day event in May 2021.

$1,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-206

Shakthi Seniors Charitable Trust Incorporated

Community

Towards transport, venue, administration, facilitators, volunteers, and catering at the Anchorage Park School Community Hall from 1 July 2021 to 30 June 2022.

$3,200.00

Eligible

MB2021-221

Habitat for Humanity Northern Region Limited

Community

Towards heating items, volunteer costs, and transport for whanau winter warming packs from 1 June 2021 to 30 September 2021

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-225

Pet Refuge New Zealand Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the pet refuge shelter landscaping and tree planting costs.

$4,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-229

The StarJam Charitable Trust

Community

Towards tutor fees, coordinator salary and levies, venue hire, equipment, resources, and training.

$4,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-243

Anxiety New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards the salary of the helpline manager, programme coordinator, a registered psychologist and community educator, and two intern psychologists to deliver a series of community workshops from July 2021 to May 2022.

$4,500.00

Eligible

MB2021-246

Age Concern Auckland Incorporated

Community

Towards salary costs, office overheads, room and equipment hire, meeting, catering, and volunteer expenses.

$3,500.00

Eligible

MB2021-253

KidsCan Charitable Trust

Community

Towards programme items including food, raincoats, shoes and socks for children attending KidsCan low decile partner schools within the Auckland region.

$8,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-260

PHAB Association (Auckland) Incorporated

Community

Towards operational costs, including youth worker wages, activity costs, administration and coordination fees from July 2021 to June 2022.

$1,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-267

OUTLine New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards a portion of general operating expenses including telephone and internet costs, printing, insurance, clinical supervision wages, training fees and volunteer costs.

$1,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-269

Whau ACE Adult and Community Education Incorporated

Community

Towards the purchase of five laptops and salary costs for employment facilitators between July 2021 and March 2022.

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-214

Auckland Softball Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards operating expenses of the Auckland Softball Association.

$6,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-251

Touch New Zealand Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of running the "Community Connect" programme, specifically the cost of venue hire and equipment.

$9,259.00

Eligible

MB2021-256

Waiata Epsom Tennis Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the replacement cost of the stadium lights.

$6,950.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$68,673.52

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       Auckland Council’s Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·     local board priorities

·     lower priorities for funding

·     exclusions

·     grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·     any additional accountability requirements.

 

9.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board adopted the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Community Grants Programme 2020/2021 on 28 April 2020 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

10.     The community grants programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The aim of the local board grants programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include:

·        local food production and food waste reduction

·        decreasing use of single-occupancy transport options

·        home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation

·        local tree planting and streamside revegetation

·        education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

15.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

17.     Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they can increase their chances of success in the future.

18.     A summary of each application received through Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Three 2020/2021 and multi-board applications is provided in Attachment B and Attachment C.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grants processes.

20.     Eleven applicants applying to Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Three and nine applicants applying to the multiboard round two 2020/2021 indicate projects that target Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

22.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $120,000 for the 2020/2021 financial year. An additional fund of $2,550(Resolution number MT/2021/48) was allocated to the community grants budget. A total of $70,814.79 was allocated in the previous grant rounds. This leaves a total of $51,735.21 to be allocated to one local grants and one multiboard round.

23.     Twenty-nine applications were received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Three 2020/2021, requesting a total of $182,975.44 and sixteen multiboard applications were also received requesting a total of $66,499.52.

24.     Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Following the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board allocating funding for round three of the local grants and round two of multiboard grants, grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Grants Programme 2020/2021

41

b

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Three 2020/2021 - grant applications

45

c

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Multiboard Round Two 2020/2021 - grant applications

179

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moumita Dutta - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

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25 May 2021

 

 

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25 May 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2020/2021

File No.: CP2021/06539

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2020/2021 allocations.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board provides strategic partnerships grants to support local community groups and organisations to build capacity and capability, upskill staff and volunteers and become more sustainable to deliver on initiatives which align to the local board’s priorities and outcomes.

3.       The 2020/2021 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships work programme line 818 has a total budget of $250,000.

4.       After the distribution of $100,000 supporting the implementation of the Strategic Partnerships programme, the residual amount available for allocation is $150,000.

5.       The grant round opened on 1 April 2021 and closed on 16 April 2021.

6.       Four applications were received and assessed by a panel of staff for alignment to the criteria outlined in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2020/2021 framework (Attachment A).

7.       The applications were presented to the local board at a workshop on 18 May 2021 to discuss their alignment with the local board’s priorities and outcomes for the grant round.

8.       Four applications, totalling $139,320, are identified as having high alignment with the criteria and are recommended for funding.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      approve the following applications for strategic partnerships grants:

Application ID

Applicant

Proposal

Recommended funding

MTSG2020-101

Flipping East

Contribution to a Strategic Lead role and improved professional standards of operation.

$40,000

MTSG2021-102

Rākau Tautoko

Contribution for 1 mentor and 1 leader and programme costs for 4 terms of the school year.

$19,320

 

MTSG2020-103

Te Taura Taiohi

Contribution for 2 part-time Administrator roles, support for the steering group and a communication platform.

$30,000

 

MTSG2020-104

Mad Ave Community Trust

Contribution to an Operational Resource role and improved professional standards of operation.

$40,000

 

Total

 

      $129,320

Horopaki

Context

9.       The purpose of the strategic partnerships grant is to support local community organisations to deliver against the following outcomes identified in the Local Board Plan 2020:

·    Our diverse communities are active, involved and engaged

·    Te ao Māori is thriving and visible

·    Our social and physical infrastructure is future-proofed

·    Our transport choices are accessible, sustainable and safe

·    Our built, natural and cultural taonga / treasures are protected and celebrated

·    Our people and businesses prosper economically and socially

10.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships work programme line 818 has a total budget of $250,000. The budget funds the services of a Partnerships Broker, building capacity and capability for identified organisations, delivering funding workshops and drop-in sessions held across the local board area and the development of a collaborative funding pilot, with the balance distributed through non-contestable grants.

11.     After the distribution of $100,000 supporting the implementation of the Strategic Partnerships programme the remaining amount available for allocation to the non-contestable grant round in 2020/2021 is $150,000.

12.     The non-contestable grant round opened for applications on 1 April 2021 and closed on 16 April 2021. Targeted community organisations were invited to submit an expression of interest application.

13.     The Partnerships Broker and staff met with each of the four local community groups and organisations that had registered their interest to participate in the assessment process to discuss their proposal and support them as it was developed for submission. 

14.     Four applications were received (Attachment B) and following round table meetings with all the applicants, the applications were assessed by a panel of staff for alignment to the criteria outlined in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2020/2021 framework.

15.     Four applications were presented to the local board at a workshop on 18 May 2021 to discuss their alignment with the local board’s priorities and outcomes for the grant round.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     Local community groups and organisations were able to apply for $20,000 per year, up to a total of $40,000 for multi-year funding for up to two years. This included contributions to wages and salaries, ongoing operational costs and access to organisational capacity and capability building support throughout implementation.

17.     The four applications received are requesting a total of $139,320 and have been assessed as having high alignment to the local board’s priorities and outcomes criteria.

18.     Staff recommend allocating a total of $129,320 to the following applicants, as outlined in table 1:

 

 

 

 

 

Table 1: Applications recommended for funding

Application ID

Applicant name

Proposal

Requested funding

Recommended funding

Staff analysis

MTSG2020-101

Flipping East

Contribution to a Strategic Lead role and improved professional standards of operation.

$40,000

$40,000

 

A previous applicant from the 2019/2020 grant round this proposal is highly aligned with the purpose of the fund to strengthen and support the organisation to reach the goal of being a rangatahi resource to deliver the mission as youth leaders of innovative youth practice in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

If the grant is approved, the applicant has agreed to work with staff to build the applicant's capabilities.

MTSG2020-102

Rākau Tautoko

Contribution for 1 mentor and 1 leader and programme costs for 4 terms of the school year.

$19,320

$19,320

 

This proposal ensures continuation of the Phenomenal Young Women programme based at Taha Awa Riverside Community Centre. Implementation support provided would include a tailored funding strategy to strengthen their position to attract other funders.

If the grant is approved, the applicant has agreed to work with staff to build the applicant's capabilities.

MTSG2020-103

Te Taura Taiohi

Contribution for 2 part-time Administrator roles, support for the steering group and a communication platform.

$40,000

$30,000 

 

Reason for part-funding: A previous recipient of support from the 2018/2019 work programme this proposal for Phase 3 is a continuation of creating sustainability and a core team to drive the mahi, grow the network, and develop a communication platform. The bulk of the work will be done in Year 1 and therefore it is recommended that the funding for Year 2 is reduced proportionally.

If the grant is approved, the applicant has agreed to work with staff to build the applicant's capabilities.

MTSG2020-104

Mad Ave Community Trust

Contribution to an Operational Resource role and improved professional standards of operation.

$40,000

$40,000 

 

A previous applicant from the 2019/2020 grant round this proposal is highly aligned with the purpose of the fund to strengthen and support the organisation to focus on securing diverse funding in the short, medium, and long term and build capacity to grow their reach in the education and training sectors by accessing accreditation for MOE and other government contracts.

If the grant is approved, the applicant has agreed to work with staff to build the applicant's capabilities.

Total

$139,320

$129,320

 

 

19.     Funding these entities will enable the local board to:

·        strengthen its strategic partnerships with more local community groups and organisations

·        invest in capacity and capability building so that the entities are better able to deliver their services effectively, demonstrate impact, become more sustainable and strengthen their funding position to attract diverse funding opportunities

·        improve people’s connectedness and wellbeing so that they are engaged in the community and have access to a wide range of support through the Covid-19 recovery period

·        strengthen support to the voluntary and community sector

·        enable social innovation and enterprise

·        work in a holistic and integrated way.

20.     As part of the implementation support provided staff work with the recipients to utilise ‘The Community Impact Toolkit’. This is a five-step process from planning for change through to reporting. This will form part of the funding agreement to ensure good practice measures and evaluation processes are in place and to enable full accountability and report back to the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The four applications determined to highly align with the criteria and recommended for funding have developed and utilise and deliver online content. This will have a positive impact on climate change due to the reduced need for people to travel to reach these services.

22.     The four applications determined to highly align with the criteria and recommended for funding are helping to develop community resilience and adaptation including in the areas of natural environment, economy, food and Te Puāwaitanga ō te Tātai. This will broadly contribute toward community readiness for changes in the future such as those caused by climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     During work programme development and implementation staff collaborate with the Community and Social Innovation Youth Empowerment, Community Action for Youth Alcohol and Drugs and Community Places teams to ensure a coordinated approach, best utilisation of the budgets available and a shared commitment to the outcomes and success of the programme.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     The local board is responsible for the allocation of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2020/2021.

25.     The aim of the strategic partnerships grant is to support local community groups and organisations to build capacity and capability, upskill staff and volunteers so that the entity becomes more sustainable, is able to leverage the investment and attract diverse funding opportunities to achieve outcomes identified in the Local Board Plan 2020.

26.     Four applications were presented to the local board at a workshop on 18 May 2021 to discuss their alignment with the local board’s priorities for the grants.

27.     The four applications determined to highly align with the criteria provide a geographical balance of delivery across the local board area. Online delivery methods may have a positive impact on reach and participation rates for local board residents and target populations.

28.     Feedback received from the local board has informed the applications recommended for funding.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     Māori make up 13 percent of the local board population, which is higher than the Auckland average by two per cent.

30.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2020/2021 aims to respond to council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to local community groups and organisations who deliver positive outcomes for Māori.

31.     All four of the applications recommended for funding have identified outcomes for Māori, as shown in Table 2.

Table 2: Māori outcomes

Applicant name

Māori outcomes delivered

Flipping East

Taking a neighbourhood scale approach in a locality such as Tāmaki requires Flipping East to continue to strengthen engagement with a range of Mana Whenua and Urban Māori roopu in the area through a variety of ways including:

·    valuing, validating, and protecting local knowledge of Māori origins of rōhe, mountains, rivers, history in Tāmaki

·    creating meaningful ways for local Māori to have input into decision making and employed in the operations of the organisation

·    normalising te reo and tikanga into our organisational practice.

Rākau Tautoko

The young women in the Phenomenal Young Women programme are all Māori, Pasifika, shy, humble and struggle to have a voice.

Statistically, young, Māori and Pasifika females are more affected by abuse, violence, and neglect.

The programme works hard to empower young women to learn about their own self-worth and support they can lean on.

 

Te Taura Taiohi

Team mahi is underpinned by values of aroha, manākitanga, rangatiratanga, kotahitanga, whanaungatanga and kaitiakitanga.

Understanding of the importance of the Treaty of Waitangi for inclusivity, connectedness and decision making gives a voice to Rangatahi Māori.

 

Mad Ave Community Trust

Embeds tikanga and Mātauranga Māori (Maori knowledge) as a tool for wellness and transformation. Takes a system focus through a Tikanga Maori world view practice and ethos.

The majority of people they work alongside are Māori and Pasifika but this is not exclusive to these cultures. Over the course of a year through the programmes/ projects they work directly with approximately 600-800 people. An example of mahi in the Environment Sector includes the Omaru Restoration Activities: A project that engages Glen Innes community environmental awareness through education in Glen Innes schools, Matariki riparian planting and environmental trade pathways.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2020/2021 work programme line 818 has a total budget of $250,000.

33.     The amount available for allocation to the strategic partnerships grant round is $150,000.00

34.     Staff recommend allocating $129,230 across four applications for the grant round.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2020/2021. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.     Staff will notify all successful applicants of the outcome and create funding agreements.

37.     Staff will provide the local board with quarterly progress reports on the funded local community groups and organisations and the grant recipients will be invited to present their mahi at a local board community forum or local board workshop annually during the term of the agreement.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grants 2020 framework

259

b

Summary of applications 2020/2021

261

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Carole Blacklock - Specialist Advisor

Authorisers

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Libraries & Information

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rates for 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/05322

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for the Business Improvement District (BID) programmes for the 2021/2022 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are rohe within Tāmaki Makaurau, where local business and property owners have agreed to work together to improve their business environment, encourage resilience and attract new businesses and customers.

3.       Auckland Council supports business associations operating BID programmes, including Glen Innes, Onehunga and Panmure business associations, by collecting a targeted rate from commercial properties within a defined geographic area. The funds from the targeted rate are then provided by way of a BID grant to the relevant business association.

4.       Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body.

5.       Each business association operating a BID programme sets the BID grant amount at its Annual General Meeting (AGM) when members vote to approve an operational budget for the following financial year. This budget funds the implementation of a business plan that delivers programmes based on each association’s BID strategic priorities.

6.       Glen Innes Business Association members approved a BID grant sum of $166,000 for 2021/2022. This figure is unchanged from the current financial year.

7.       Onehunga Business Association members approved the sum of $410,000. This figure is unchanged from the current financial year.

8.       Panmure Business Association members approved $443,896. This figure is unchanged from the current financial year.

9.       The business associations operating BID programmes are incorporated societies that are independent of the council. However, to sustain public trust and confidence in the council, there needs to be a balance between the independence of the business association and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

10.     For the council to be confident that the funds provided to the BID-operating business associations are being used appropriately, the council requires the BIDs to comply with the Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi), known as the BID Policy. 

11.     The council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy and this report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds.

12.     Staff are satisfied the Glen Innes, Onehunga and Panmure business associations sufficiently complies with the BID Policy.

13.     Staff propose the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board receives this report and recommends to the Governing Body the striking (setting) of the BID targeted rate sought by Glen Innes, Onehunga and Panmure business associations as part of the council’s Annual Budget 2021/2022 decision-making.

14.     After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly BID grant payments, effective from 1 July 2021. This enables Glen Innes, Onehunga and Panmure business associations to implement programmes that contribute to Outcome 6: Our people and businesses prosper economically and socially, thereby supporting the aspirations of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020.

15.     Maungakiekie-Tāmaki’s BID programmes, managed by the BID-operating business associations, will continue to play an important role in supporting their members facing two global challenges. A BID programme can support local businesses to mitigate some of the flow-on effects from the COVID 19 lockdowns through business resilience and recovery initiatives. A BID programme can also facilitate opportunities that address the climate change emergency, with a focus on sustainability.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      recommends to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for inclusion in the Annual Budget 2021/2022 for the following Business Improvement District (BID) programmes:

i.        $166,000 for Glen Innes Business Association

ii.       $410,000 for Onehunga Business Association

iii.      $443,896 for Panmure Business Association

 

Horopaki

Context

BID programmes promote economic well-being and collaboration with the council

16.     Tāmaki Makaurau is projected to include approximately 660,000 (SOURCE: Auckland Council Growth Model 2021-2051 (“i11v6”) more people in the next 30 years. This level of population growth presents challenges and opportunities for Auckland town centres and commercial precincts.

17.     Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are rohe within Auckland where local business and property owners have agreed to work together, with support from the council, to improve their business environment, promote innovation and attract new businesses and customers.

18.     BID programmes provide the opportunity for the council group to partner with business associations to seize on the opportunities from Auckland’s growth. 

19.     BID programmes encourage collaboration to achieve greater local outcomes. They provide a mechanism to enable local boards to engage with the business sector in local town centres and business areas in a co-ordinated way.

BID programmes provide essential support in building business resilience and aiding economic recovery

20.     The economy continues to be impacted by the flow-on effects from the COVID-19 pandemic and related lockdowns, affecting both retail-based town centres and industrial precincts.

21.     BID-operating business associations provide the local business leadership required to help their members to mitigate some of the economic effects of the pandemic through business resilience and recovery initiatives.

BID programmes are funded by a targeted rate on business ratepayers within a set area

22.     BID programmes are funded by a targeted rate applied to all commercially rated properties within a designated area around a town centre or commercial precinct.

23.     Auckland Council supports business associations operating BID programmes by collecting the targeted rates and providing these funds, in their entirety, by way of a BID grant to the relevant business association.

24.     This revenue is paid to the business association every quarter to provide a regular and sustainable income stream to implement an agreed work programme.

The BID Policy is the mechanism to ensure accountability for BID targeted rates

25.     Auckland Council’s Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) (Kupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) ensures accountability for BID targeted rate funding and encourages good governance and programme management.

26.     The policy outlines the principles behind the council’s BID programme; creates the process for establishing, expanding, amalgamating and disestablishing BID programmes; determines rating mechanisms; prescribes operating standards and guidelines; and sets accountability requirements.

 

Diagram A: From calculation to approval, how the BID targeted rate is set.

The business association sets the BID grant amount to deliver its work programme

27.       BID-operating business associations are provided with a rate modelling spreadsheet to help with their budget decision-making. The spreadsheet models any proposed changes to their current BID grant amount and, most importantly, how that influences the BID targeted rate for everyone who will pay it. When considering a change to the BID grant amount, the association’s board must take into account what the local business and property owners can afford.

28.     Each BID-operating business association prepares an annual business plan for the following financial year that will deliver programmes based on their strategic priorities and financial parameters.

29.     The cost of implementing that business plan is set out in an annual budget that the association’s board (governing committee) agrees will be recommended for approval by the business association membership.

30.     The AGM provides the forum where members vote to approve the operational budget and, in doing so, set the requisite BID grant amount for the following financial year.

Local boards are responsible for recommending the targeted rate if a BID complies with the BID Policy

31.     Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body. The local board should recommend the setting of the targeted rate if it is satisfied that the BID is substantially complying with the BID Policy.

32.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board approved a similar recommendation for the BID programme last year (resolution number MT/2020/54), as did 17 other local boards that have BID programmes operating in their rohe.

The Governing Body sets the targeted rate when it approves the Annual Budget

33.     The recommendation in this report is put into effect with the Governing Body’s approval of the Annual Budget 2021/2022 and its striking (setting) of the targeted rates.

34.     In accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, the Governing Body is authorised to make the final decisions on what BID programme targeted rates, if any, to set in any particular year or property (in terms of the amount and the geographic area to be rated).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

35.     BID programmes are operated by independent business associations, and their programmes and services are provided according to their members’ stated priorities. In recognition of their independent status, the BID Policy does not prescribe standards for programme effectiveness. That is a matter for business association members to determine. Staff, therefore, cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

Glen Innes, Onehunga and Panmure business associations complies with the BID Policy

36.     Staff are satisfied that Glen Innes, Onehunga and Panmure business associations have sufficiently met the requirements of the BID Policy.

37.     Staff require BID-operating business associations to provide to the council the following documents, and stay in touch with their local board at least once a year:

·   Current strategic plan – evidence of achievable medium- to long-term opportunities.

·   Audited accounts – assurance that the BID-operating business association is managing its members’ BID targeted rate funds responsibly.

·   Annual report on the year just completed – evidence that programmes are addressing priority issues that benefit BID targeted ratepayers.

·   Business plan for the coming year – detailed one-year programme, based on the strategic plan, to be resourced and achieved.

·   Indicative budget for the following year – Auckland Council’s Annual Budget requires targeted rates to be identified a year in advance to inform the Annual Budget process which sets all rates.

·   Board Charter – establishes guidelines for effective board governance and positive relationships between the association and its members.

·   Annual Accountability Agreement – certification that these requirements have been met.

·   Programme Agreement – a good faith agreement between each BID-operating business association and the council that sets basic parameters of the council-business association relationship.

·   AGM minutes – the provisional minutes of each business association’s 2020 AGM meetings which contain the resolution, voted on by members, confirming the BID grant amount for the 2021/2022 financial year.

 

38.     In addition, BID-operating business associations are required to inform the council staff of progress with other compliance requirements, including:

·   Incorporated Society registration – a current registration of the business association along with all required documents up to date.

·   Resolving problems or issues, if any – problems or issues that have an impact on the governance or operation of the BID programme.

 

39.     The BID Policy sets an annual compliance deadline of 10 March for the information to be forwarded to the council, as summarised in the table below.

 

Table 1: Business association’s compliance with the BID Policy as of 10 March 2021

Requirement

Financial Year 2019/2020

 

Strategic Plan

2018 - 2023

2020 - 2023

2016-2023

Audited financials

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual Report

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Business Plan

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Indicative budget

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Board Charter

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual Accountability Agreement

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual meeting w/ local board

 

8 December 2020

 

8 December 2020

 

9 March 2021

Programme Agreement

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Greenvalid to 2023

valid to 2023

valid to 2023

Incorporated society registration

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

2020 AGM minutes (provisional)

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Resolving problems or issues

Nothing to record

Nothing to record

Nothing to record

 

40.     As Glen Innes, Onehunga and Panmure business associations have sufficiently complied with the BID Policy, staff advise the local board to recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rate.

 

Glen Innes, Onehunga and Panmure business associations retain the same BID grant amount for 2021/2022.

41.     As shown in Table 2 below:

·    Glen Innes’ BID target rate for 2021/2022 - $166,000 - is unchanged from the current financial year.

·    Onehunga’s BID target rate for 2021/2022 - $410,000 - is unchanged from the current financial year.

·    Panmure’s BID target rate for 2021/2022 - $$443,896 – is unchanged from the current financial year.

 Table 2: BID targeted rates comparison: 2021/2022 c.f. 2020/2021

 

 

   BID

 

2021/2022

 

2020/2021

 

Increase / %

 

 

 

 

 

 

$166,000

 

 

 

$166,000

 

 

Nil

LAST INCREASED: 2012

 

$410,000

 

$410,000

 

Nil

LAST INCREASED: 2020

 

 

 

$443,896

 

$443,896

 

Nil

LAST INCREASED: 2018

 

42.     Of Tāmaki Makaurau’s 50 BID-operating business associations, 21 increased their targeted rates for 2021/2022 with the percentage increase ranging from between 1.7% to 10%. One reduced its income after a one-off increase (2020/2021) to fund America’s Cup- related activities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

43.     Through targeted rate-funded advocacy and activities, BID-operating business associations, promote and often facilitate environmental sustainability programmes.

44.     From running carbon-reducing ‘shop local’ campaigns to promoting online channels and championing waste reduction and recovery programmes, there are many examples of BID programmes leading the local business sector’s response to the climate change emergency.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

45.     Advocacy is a key service provided by business associations and those with BID programme-funded personnel are at an advantage. BID-operating business associations ensure the views and ambitions of their members are provided to elected representatives and council teams, including CCOs, on those policies, plans, programmes and projects that impact them.

46.     The BID-operating business associations work with Auckland Unlimited (AU) on economic development initiatives, events and sustainability programmes.

47.     The BID-operating business associations also work constructively with both Panuku and Auckland Transport on often controversial proposals and projects.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

48.     The local board’s views are most frequently expressed by its appointed representative on the board of each BID-operating business association. This liaison board member (or alternates) can attend BID board meetings to ensure there is a direct link between the council and the operation of the BID programme.

Visions, plans aligned

49.     The BID-operating business associations and local board share an interest in the local rohe and are ambitious for its future and its people. They also share goals that include economic prosperity, community identity, placemaking and pride.

50.     Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board BID programmes tangibly support the vision and aspirations of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020, best expressed in Outcome 6: Our people and businesses prosper economically and socially.

Local rohe, local benefit, local funding

51.     Recommending that the Governing Body sets the targeted rates for Glen Innes, Onehunga and Panmure business associations means that the BID programme will continue to be funded from targeted rates on commercial properties within their respective current rohe. They will provide services in accordance with their members’ priorities as stated in their strategic plan.

52.     Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is among several local boards which provides additional funding to local business associations, however accountability for any grants is set by funding agreements between the local board and each business association. Those contractual obligations are separate from the requirements of the BID Policy and are not covered in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

53.     Māori make up more than 14% of the population living in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area, compared to 11.5% of Auckland (SOURCE: 2018 CENSUS)Individual business associations may, through operating their BID programme, identify opportunities for niche support or development of any Māori business sector in their rohe.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

54.     There are no financial implications for the local board. Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from commercial ratepayers in their district and used by the business association for improvements within that rohe. The council’s financial role is to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the association every quarter.

55.     The targeted rate is payable by the owners of the commercial properties within the geographic area of the individual BID programmes.  In practice, this cost is often passed on to the business owners who occupy these properties.  This cost may be harder to meet at a time when businesses continue to be financially impacted by the flow-on effects of the COVID-19 lockdown restrictions. 

56.     The council last year extended its Rates Remission and Postponement Policy to commercial property owners as part of the Annual Budget 2020/2021 to help mitigate the impact of the targeted rate on those who are struggling financially. This policy will continue for the 2021/2022 financial year.

57.     If the Governing Body agrees with the BID targeted rates proposed by the local boards, the cost of grants will be met from the existing operational budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

58.     There are no direct financial risks to the local board or the council that could result from this recommendation to endorse the BID targeted rates for these business associations.

59.     To sustain public trust and confidence in the council, there needs to be a balance between the independence of the BID-operating business associations and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

60.     The rules and obligations of the BID Policy are intended to help minimise the potential for business associations to misuse BID targeted rate funds by requiring each BID to plan for their intended use, report on its activities to its members and to have its accounts audited.

61.     The council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy and this report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds.

62.     Economic disruption created by the flow-on effects of COVID-19 lockdowns will continue to be felt, in Auckland’s town centres and business precincts. The BID programme is an internationally proven approach to engage and empower local businesses.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

63.     If the local board supports this report, it will recommend to the Governing Body that the BID targeted rates be set as part of the Annual Budget 2021/2022.

64.     After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly BID grant payments, effective from 1 July 2021, to the Glen Innes, Onehunga and Panmure Business Associations. This enables each BID to implement programmes that improve their local business environment and support businesses as they recover from the flow-on effects from the COVID 19 lockdowns and help address the climate change emergency through sustainability initiatives.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gill Plume - BID Senior Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

Economic Development Action Plan: Draft for feedback

File No.: CP2021/06426

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on the draft Economic Development Action Plan: Council’s role in Auckland’s recovery 2021-2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The council organisation and council-controlled organisations have worked collaboratively to develop the draft Economic Development Action Plan. This plan defines and agrees, for the next three years, the council family’s economic objectives and priorities and determines a coordinated course of action. The plan is limited to actions that are within the remit of council and council-controlled organisation (CCO) activities.

3.       The draft plan aligns with the 10-year budget and will inform the work programmes of relevant council family departments. The work is supported by the chief executives of council and all substantive council-controlled organisations.

4.       The draft plan outlines detailed actions within six areas of focus (‘workstreams’) as outlined in Attachment A. It reflects the guiding principles of transitioning towards a regenerative and low carbon economy, supporting economic opportunities for Māori, and responding to our communities of greatest need.

5.       There will be targeted engagement on the draft plan, including with iwi, advisory panel members and business groups. Feedback will be sought until 14 June 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      provide feedback by 14 June 2021 for consideration in the final draft Economic Development Action Plan: Council’s role in Auckland’s recovery 2021-2024.

Horopaki

Context

6.       In August 2020, the CCO Review Panel delivered its report alongside 64 recommendations which were endorsed in full by the Governing Body. The review stated that council and all substantive council-controlled organisations (CCOs) should together define the economic outcomes for Auckland and agree on how to achieve and measure them. The review also acknowledged the need for better coordination and definition of responsibilities for local economic development within the council family. The Economic Development Action Plan forms part of council’s response to that review.

7.       The plan is not a long-term strategy and does not replace the Economic Development Strategy 2012. The priorities and focus over the next three years, however, consider direction from council’s existing strategies i.e., the Auckland Plan 2050, Economic Development Strategy 2012, Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan and Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau: Council’s Māori Outcomes Framework.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       Comprehensive background work to support the development of the action plan has been completed by the Chief Economist Unit (CEU), the Auckland Plan Strategy and Research Department (APSR) and Auckland Unlimited. This includes a report from the CEU providing a profile of Auckland’s economy over the last 10 years, the impact of Covid-19 on the Auckland economy, and the main roadblocks to recovery. The same report also identified areas where the council group can have a material impact on economic development. Key areas are:

·   assets

·   procurement

·   land use and zoning

·   regulatory processes

·   travel network

·   town centres

·   pricing

·   skills and investment attraction

·   tourism attraction

·   social support services

·   coordination of responses through partnerships.

9.       There has also been an extensive review of plans and strategies across the council and CCOs to identify common economic development themes. These were: innovation and technology, Māori economy, regenerative, resilient, low carbon economy, workforce transition, competitive high-value sectors, local economic development, infrastructure, and culture and creativity.

10.     This background work formed the basis for six workstreams:

·   Destination Tāmaki Makaurau: attracting people and investment

·   Local Tāmaki Makaurau: enabling thriving local economies

·   Skilled Tāmaki Makaurau: supporting quality jobs and skill development

·   Future Tāmaki Makaurau: preparing businesses for the future

·   Enabled Tāmaki Makaurau: infrastructure enabling economic development

·   Enabled Tāmaki Makaurau: regulations that enable economic development.

11.     Each workstream has both council and CCO staff representation. These workstreams have developed a set of actions with responsibilities and timeframes as detailed in this draft plan. A monitoring framework will be developed to ensure roles, responsibilities and accountabilities of council and each CCO are clearly defined as they relate to the actions in the draft plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan has provided direction to the development of the draft plan, aspiring to a more resilient economy that is regenerative, inclusive, local and enables Aucklanders to thrive.

13.     The draft action plan has embedded the guiding principle of ‘transitioning to a regenerative and low carbon economy’ into each of its six workstreams. The development of actions is underpinned by kaitiakitanga and considers how resources used give back to nature and increase value through reuse and renewal. Where applicable, actions broadly encourage a decrease in greenhouse gas emissions, low carbon products and services, climate innovation, and less dependency on natural resources.

14.     The actions presented in this draft action plan will go through a further climate impact assessment using tools developed by the Chief Sustainability Office. The results of this assessment will be incorporated into the final plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The draft plan responds to the CCO review recommendation for council and all CCOs to together define the economic outcomes for Auckland and agree on how to achieve and measure them. The actions in the draft plan will be shared and accountabilities of council and each CCO well defined. Some CCOs will have a more active role than others.

16.     The scope and development of the Economic Development Action Plan has been agreed to through the council and CCO Chief Executives’ group. This group is updated with progress on the plan as appropriate. The project team includes a representative and contribution from each CCO.

17.     The scope of the plan is limited to actions that are within the remit of council and CCO activities. A review and discussion document of the council group’s levers that materially contribute to economic development formed the basis for this draft plan (refer to Attachment B).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     Each workstream of the plan will have a local impact, acknowledging the interdependency of local economies and the regional economy. The draft plan includes the focus area ‘Local Tāmaki Makaurau: enabling thriving local economies’ and has been informed by the recent local board plans’ local economic priorities.

19.     The Local Tāmaki Makaurau workstream seeks to clarify what the Auckland Council group will do to support the local economies of Auckland. This includes setting out the roles that each part of the group plays in delivering actions, while also setting the foundations to help the group identify the economic places (sub-regional and local) of Auckland and deliver outcomes at the local level.

20.     A memo was distributed on 17 February 2021 to inform local board members of the development of council’s Economic Development Action Plan 2021-24 and to outline the process for local board feedback to the plan. At the request of the local board chairpersons, the draft plan will be provided at all local board business meetings in May 2021 with written feedback by formal resolution provided to the project leads by 14 June 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau has provided direction to the development of the draft plan, in particular, the Kia ora te Umanga mahi objective of supporting economic opportunities for Māori businesses and iwi organisations. The draft plan has also considered direction from the Auckland Plan 2050, the Kaitiaki Forum’s strategic plan and the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s Issues of Significance (2017) as they relate to Māori economic development.

22.     The draft action plan has embedded the guiding principle of ‘supporting economic opportunities for Māori’ into each of its six workstreams. The development of actions will consider partnership opportunities with mana whenua and mataawaka, a focus on equity and addressing systemic barriers, and identifying new economic opportunities for Māori.

23.     The project team have communicated with iwi from the commencement of the project to determine and initiate the preferred process of engagement for each iwi. This draft plan will be sent to all iwi for input and feedback through to 14 June 2021.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The scope of the Economic Development Action Plan states that actions will be funded within the existing 10-year Budget 2021-2031 and therefore, no additional funding is required. The draft plan identifies some actions that rely on external funding sources and partnerships.

25.     At the advice of the finance division, budget alignment is demonstrated in the draft plan at both the group of activity and CCO / council directorate level.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     The draft plan outlines actions that require a commitment from the responsible directorate to include in their work programmes and within their existing budgets. The monitoring framework will include regular progress reporting to ensure effective implementation of the action plan.

27.     This action plan is an internal document, outlining work to be done within the remit of council and its CCOs. The content of the plan builds on earlier consultation undertaken in the development of key strategies that have provided direction. Input and feedback for this action plan has therefore been targeted to key groups.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     The draft plan will be distributed to the key groups that have been engaged from the commencement of the project. Feedback will be considered until 14 June 2021.

29.     The final Economic Development Action Plan: Council’s role in Auckland’s recovery 2021-2024 and its monitoring framework will be presented to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events committee on 8 July 2021 for adoption.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janelle Breckell - Principal Strategic Advisor

James Robinson – Head of Strategy and Planning, Auckland Unlimited

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Jacques Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

Auckland Unlimited Quarter Two Performance Report for the Quarter Ending 31 December 2020

File No.: CP2021/06571

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on the performance of Auckland Unlimited for the quarter ending 31 December 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board with relevant information on the various activities that have been carried out in the Auckland region. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Unlimited quarterly performance report for the quarter ending 31 December 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Unlimited Quarter Two Performance Report for Quarter ending 31 December 2020

287

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jan Brown – Manager, Local Board Engagement, Auckland Unlimited

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

Urgent decision - Local board representation on the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project

File No.: CP2021/06397

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board of an urgent decision made under delegation by the Chair and Deputy Chair on 13 May 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Boards 3 December 2020 business meeting, the local board considered the urgent decision-making process and passed resolution MT/2019/75:

a)   adopt the urgent decision-making process for matters that require a decision where it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirement of a quorum;

b)   delegate authority to the chair and deputy chair, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board;

c)   agree that the relationship manager, chair and deputy chair (or any person/s acting in these roles) will authorise the urgent decision-making process by signing off the authorisation memo;

d)   note that all urgent decisions will be reported to the next ordinary meeting of the local board. CARRIED

3.       The Chair of the Establishment Unit Board (EUB) has been appointed and Council has been advised that he needs to convene an inaugural meeting of the EUB as soon as possible. The work of the EUB will be moving at pace and therefore Council needs to respond with an expedited process.

4.       A representative of Auckland Council’s local boards needs to be selected to sit on the EUB. There is no joint forum between local boards so the Chairs’ Forum will be used to select a representative.

5.       As the Chairs’ Forum does not have a formal mandate to select representatives, there is a procedural requirement to seek mandate from each of the 21 local boards to make this selection.

6.       Therefore, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is being asked to endorse the use of the Chairs’ Forum as the selection panel.

7.       An urgent decision was required as the selection of the local board representative will be made at the Chairs’ Forum on 17 May 2021 and the next business meeting is on 25 May 2021.

8.       A copy of the urgent decision and the local board’s feedback is Attachment A of this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the urgent decision made on 13 May 2021, to endorse the use of the Chairs’ Forum as the selection panel to appoint the local board representative to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project (Attachment A).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent decision - Local board representation on the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project

305

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mal Ahmu - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

Local board feedback on the Unit Titles (Strengthening Body Corporate Governance and Other Matters) Amendment Bill

File No.: CP2021/06467

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on its formal feedback, developed through delegation by the Chair and Deputy Chair on the Unit Titles (Strengthening Body Corporate Governance and Other Matters) Amendment Bill.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s 28 April 2020 business meeting it delegated authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair to approve and submit the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, parliament, select committees and other councils (resolution: MT/2020/32).

3.       The local board’s feedback has been approved by the Chair and Deputy Chair for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on the Unit Titles (Strengthening Body Corporate Governance and Other Matters) Amendment Bill.

4.       A copy of the local board’s feedback is Attachment A of this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the local board’s feedback on the Unit Titles (Strengthening Body Corporate Governance and Other Matters) Amendment Bill.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Feedback on the Unit Titles (Strengthening Body Corporate Governance and Other Matters) Amendment Bill

315

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Simone Tongatule - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

Local board feedback on the Transport and Infrastructure Committee inquiry into Congestion Pricing in Auckland

File No.: CP2021/06468

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board of its formal feedback, developed through delegation by the Chair and Deputy Chair on the Transport and Infrastructure Committee inquiry into Congestion Pricing in Auckland.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s 28 April 2020 business meeting it delegated authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair to approve and submit the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, parliament, select committees and other councils (resolution: MT/2020/32).

3.       The local board’s feedback has been approved by the Chair and Deputy Chair for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission to the Transport and Infrastructure Committee.

4.       A copy of the local board’s feedback is Attachment A of this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the local board’s feedback on the Transport and Infrastructure Committee inquiry into Congestion Pricing in Auckland.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Feedback on the Transport and Infrastructure Committee inquiry into Congestion Pricing in Auckland

319

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Simone Tongatule - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

Local board feedback on the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment proposed changes to support effective management of freedom camping in New Zealand

File No.: CP2021/06469

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board of its formal feedback, developed through delegation by the Chair and Deputy Chair on the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment proposed changes to support effective management of freedom camping in New Zealand.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s 28 April 2020 business meeting it delegated authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair to approve and submit the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, parliament, select committees and other councils (resolution: MT/2020/32).

3.       The local board’s feedback has been approved by the Chair and Deputy Chair for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission to the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment.

4.       A copy of the local board’s feedback is Attachment A of this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the local board’s feedback on the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment proposed changes to support effective management of freedom camping in New Zealand.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment proposed changes to support effective management of freedom camping in New Zealand

323

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Simone Tongatule - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

Local Board Views on Plan Change 60 - Open Space (2020) and Other Rezoning Matters

File No.: CP2021/06560

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To invite the local board to provide its views on the council initiated Plan Change 60 – Open Space (2020) and Other Rezoning Matters (PC60).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Decision-makers on a plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan must consider local boards’ views on the plan change, if the relevant local boards choose to provide their views.

3.       Each local board has a responsibility to communicate the interests and preferences of people in its area on Auckland Council policy documents, including plan changes. A local board can present local views and preferences when that view is expressed by the whole local board.[1]

4.       On 28 January 2021, Auckland Council notified Plan Change 60. Submissions closed on 1 March 2021. The plan change includes 105 sites (in some cases, a site comprises more than one lot) and aims to rezone land to:

(a)  recognise land recently vested or acquired as open space

(b)  correct zoning errors or anomalies (including rezoning land to better reflect its use)

(c)  facilitate Panuku Development Auckland’s (Panuku) land rationalisation and disposal process or

(d)  facilitate Kāinga Ora’s and Auckland Council redevelopment of certain neighbourhoods.

5.       One hundred and six submissions have been received on the proposed plan change. The vast majority of these oppose Panuku’s rezoning and land disposal. In summary there are 15 submissions in support of the plan change, four in support but seeking amendments, 85 in opposition and two out of scope.

6.       No iwi authority has made a submission in support or opposition to Plan Change 60.

7.       This report is the mechanism for the local board to resolve and provide its views on Plan Change 60 should it wish to do so. Staff do not recommend what view the local board should convey.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      provide local board views on Plan Change 60 - Open Space (2020) and Other Rezoning Matters.

b)      appoint a local board member to speak to the local board views at a hearing on Plan Change 60.

c)      delegate authority to the chairperson of the Ōrākei Local Board to make a replacement appointment in the event the local board member appointed in resolution b) is unable to attend the plan change hearing.

Horopaki

Context

8.       Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of Auckland Council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards provide their views on the content of these documents. Decision-makers must consider local boards’ views when deciding the content of these policy documents.[2]

9.       If the local board chooses to provide its views, the planner includes those views in the hearing report. Local board views are included in the analysis of the plan change, along with submissions.

10.     If appointed by resolution, local board members may present the local board’s views at the hearing to commissioners, who decide on the plan change.

11.     This report provides an overview of the proposed plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP), and a summary of submissions’ key themes.

12.     The report does not recommend what the local board should convey, should the local board decide to convey its views on plan change 60. The planner must include any local board views in the evaluation of the plan change. The planner cannot advise the local board as to what its views should be, and then evaluate those views.

13.     The key theme from submissions is opposition to the proposed rezonings relating to Kāinga Ora/Auckland Council redevelopment and Panuku’s land rationalisation and disposal. Attachment A identifies the land parcels that are the subject of submissions.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Plan Change 60 affects land across the Auckland region.

15.     The purpose of the proposed plan change is to rezone land to either:

(a)  recognise land recently vested or acquired as open space

(b)  correct zoning errors or anomalies (including rezoning land to better reflect its use)

(c)  facilitate Panuku’s land rationalisation and disposal process or

(d)  facilitate Kāinga Ora’s and Auckland Council redevelopment of certain neighbourhoods.

16.     The Section 32 Report and details of the plan change are available from the council’s website at Plan Change 60. The council’s planner, and other experts, will evaluate and report on:

·   section 32 Report that accompanies the plan change

·   submissions and

·   the views and preferences of the local board, if the local board passes a resolution.

17.     Submissions were made by 106 people/organisations as outlined below.

Submissions

Number of submissions

In support

15

In support but requesting change(s)

4

In opposition

85

Out of scope

2

Total

106

 

 

18.     Key submission themes are listed below.

Oppose the rezoning of:

·   142 Triangle Road, Massey (Maps 4 & 37)

·   1-5 Lippiatt Road, Ōtāhuhu (Map 73)

·   23 Waipuna Road, Mount Wellington (Map 75)

·   12R Rockfield Road, Ellerslie (Map 76)

·   11R Birmingham Road, Ōtara (Map 77)

·   2R Keeney Court, Papakura (Map 78)

·   Walkway adjacent to 45 Brandon Road, Glen Eden (Map 79)

·   45 Georgina Street, Freemans Bay (Map 81)

·   36 Cooper Street, Grey Lynn (Map 82)

·   13 Davern Lane, New Lynn (Map 85)

·   67 East Street, Pukekohe (Map 86)

·   Princes Street West, Pukekohe (Map 87)

·   R105 Stott Avenue, Birkenhead (Map 93)

·   26 Princes Ōtāhuhu (Map 96).

Support the rezoning but request an alternative zone:

·   2157 East Coast Road, Stillwater (Map 71).

Both support for and opposition to the rezoning:

·   50 Mayflower Close, Māngere East (Map 100)

·   62 Mayflower Close, Māngere East (Map 105).

Support for rezoning or further information required:

·   1337 Whangaparaoa Road, Army Bay (Map 104).

19.     The key reasons for submission opposing the plan change include:

·   opposed to the rezoning of pocket parks – they are needed to support intensification and for social and environmental benefits

·   loss of valuable reserve land

·   few parks in the area

·   significant negative effect on enjoyment of our neighbourhood/ adverse effects on property and locality

·   park has significant cultural heritage associations and natural value

·   contradicts Auckland Unitary Plan heritage policies

·   inadequate public notification

·   green areas needed in more intensive housing areas

·   contrary to climate change/greenhouse effects – green spaces are needed for low carbon Auckland Council

·   inconsistent with Auckland Unitary Plan objectives and policies

·   park has trees which will be lost with rezoning and development

·   site is an overland flow path and flood plain

·   property values will be adversely affected

·   loss of walkway and critical linkage

·   sale of spaces is desperate revenue gathering/selling due to Covid is short-sighted

·   subsequent building will severely impact on sunlight and amenities of adjoining sites

·   contrary to Auckland Council’s declaration of a climate emergency, open space network plans, National Policy Statement – Urban Development – well functioning environments, open space provision policy, Auckland Plan 2050, the Urban Ngahere Strategy

·   site is a Significant Ecological Area and part of a wildlife corridor and refuge

·   inconsistent with Local Boards goal of increasing tree canopy.

20.     Information on individual submissions, and the summary of all decisions requested by submitters, is available from council’s website: Plan Change 60

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     Several submissions raised specific climate concerns. These relate to the loss of locally accessible open space and the associated vegetation, particularly mature trees.

22.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·   to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and 

·   to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

23.     The local board could consider if Plan Change 60:

·   will reduce, increase or have no effect on Auckland’s overall greenhouse gas emissions (e.g. does it encourage car dependency, enhance connections to public transit, walking and cycling or support quality compact urban form)

·   prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change. That is, does the proposed plan change elevate or alleviate climate risks (e.g. flooding, coastal and storm inundation, urban heat effect, stress on infrastructure).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     Panuku is a council-controlled organisation that resulted from the merging of Auckland Council Property Limited and Waterfront Auckland. One of the roles of Panuku is the release of land or properties that can be better utilised by others.

25.     In conjunction with Auckland Council’s Stakeholder and Land Advisory team, Panuku have identified 26 council-owned parcels of land which are either surplus to requirements or they are part of a Panuku regeneration project (i.e. a series of projects and initiatives, designed to kickstart the transformation process and bring about changes that will help centres prosper in the future). Those parcels considered to be surplus to requirements have been cleared for sale by Auckland Council.

26.     Auckland Council’s decision to dispose of or sell the land parcels is separate from the zoning of the land. Zoning is a method used to implement the Auckland Unitary Plan’s objectives and policies and to achieve the purpose of the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA). The merit of any rezoning of land (from open space to residential or business) therefore must be assessed against the purpose of the RMA and the relevant Auckland Unitary Plan objectives and policies. Other relevant considerations which will be considered in the section 42A hearing report include the Auckland Plan 2050, Auckland’s Climate Plan and the Urban Ngahere Strategy and open space network plans.

27.     Auckland Transport made a submission in relation to the rezoning of 1337 Whangaparaoa Road, Army Bay. The key matter raised is the traffic effects of rezoning the Whangaparaoa Golf course from Residential – Single House to Open Space – Sport and Active Recreation zone.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     The plan change affects sites throughout the Auckland region and feedback is therefore sought from all local boards.

29.     Factors the local board may wish to consider in formulating its view:

·   interests and preferences of people in local board area

·   well-being of communities within the local board area

·   local board documents, such as the local board plan and local board agreement

·   responsibilities and operation of the local board.

30.     A memo was sent to all local boards on 27 October 2020 outlining the proposed changes, the rational for them and the likely plan change timeframes.

31.     This report is the mechanism for obtaining formal local board views. The decision-maker will consider local board views, if provided, when deciding on the plan change.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     If the local board chooses to provide its views on Plan Change 60 it may also comment on matters that may be of interest or importance to Māori generally. In the 2018 census, approximately 11.5 per cent (or 181,194) of the Auckland region’s population identified as Māori.

33.     Plans and Places consulted with all iwi authorities when it prepared Plan Change 60. On 27 October 2020, a memorandum outlining the draft proposed plan change was sent to all Auckland’s 19 mana whenua entities and the Tupuna Maunga Authority as required under the RMA.

34.     Comments were received from:

·   Ngāti Manuhiri – asking for an extension of time to 11 December 2020 to enable a discussion with their governance arm

·   Waikato Tainui – they will support mana whenua to take the lead role on such plan changes

·   Tupuna Maunga Authority – their interest is those sites that are within Height Sensitive Areas or regionally Significant Volcanic Viewshafts.

35.     No iwi authorities made a formal submission.

36.     The hearing report will include analysis of Part 2 of the RMA which requires that all persons exercising RMA functions shall take into account the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi/Te Tiriti o Waitangi.[3] The plan change does not trigger an issue of significance as identified in the Schedule of Issues of Significance and Māori Plan 2017.[4]

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.     Panuku’s land rezoning and rationalisation (26 land parcels) is part of the Auckland Council’s financial recovery.

38.     The draft Long-term Plan 2021-2031 proposes the selling of surplus properties and reinvesting the proceeds into critical infrastructure for the city. Over the next three years, Auckland Council is seeking to increase these sales to return $70 million a year to invest in Auckland.

39.     The 26 land parcels that are part of this plan change form part of the $70 million return sought.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     There is a risk that the local board will be unable to provide its views and preferences on the plan change if it doesn’t pass a resolution. This report provides:

·   the mechanism for the local board to express its views and preferences if it so wishes

·   the opportunity for a local board member to speak at a hearing.

41.     If the local board chooses not to pass a resolution at this business meeting, these opportunities are forgone.

42.     The power to provide local board views regarding the content of a plan change cannot be delegated to individual local board member(s).[5] This report enables the whole local board to decide whether to provide its views and, if so, to determine what matters those views should include.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.     The planner will include, and report on, any resolution(s) of the local boards in the Section 42A hearing report. The local board member appointed to speak to the local board’s views will be informed of the hearing date and invited to the hearing for that purpose.

44.     The planner will advise the local boards of the decision on the plan change request by memorandum.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

The land parcels in PC60 that are the subject of submissions

333

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tony Reidy - Team Leader Planning

Authorisers

Eryn Shields - Team Leader  Regional, North West and Islands

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2021/06529

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the board with the governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is required and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar is updated every month. Each update is reported to business meetings. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the attached Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar May 2021

337

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops

File No.: CP2021/06530

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a summary of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board workshops for 27 April, 4, 11 and 18 May 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local board workshops are held to give board members an opportunity to receive information and updates or provide direction and have discussion on issues and projects relevant to the local board area. No binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the local board record of workshops held on 27 April, 4, 11 and 18 May 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board Record of Workshops May 2021

341

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Tāmaki Model Aero Club                               Page 347


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

25 May 2021

 

 











[1] Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, section 15(2)(c)

[2] Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, ss15-16.

 

[3] Resource Management Act 1991, section 8.

[4] Schedule of Issues of Significance and Māori Plan 2017, Independent Māori Statutory Board

[5] Local Government Act 2002, Schedule 7, clause 36D.