I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 18 May 2021

5.00pm

The Gallery

Level 1, Manukau Civic Building
31-33 Manukau Station Road
Manukau

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Apulu Reece Autagavaia

 

Deputy Chairperson

Dawn Trenberth

 

Members

Dr Ashraf Choudhary, QSO, JP

 

 

Dr Ofa Dewes

 

 

Lotu Fuli

 

 

Swanie Nelson

 

 

Ross Robertson, QSO, JP

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Carol McGarry

Democracy Advisor

 

10 May 2021

 

Contact Telephone: +64 27 591 5024

Email: carol.mcgarry@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Whānau Community Centre                                                          5

8.2     Deputation - Holy Cross Tongan Catholic Community request for a Community Garden in Papatoetoe                                                                     6

8.3     Deputation - Len Brown Skatepark, Otara                                                        6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Governing Body Member Update                                                                                9

12        Board Members' Report                                                                                              11

13        Chairperson's Announcements                                                                                 13

14        New community lease to Multicultural, Christian, Education and Sporting Trust at Sandbrook Reserve, 47REveritt Road, Ōtara                                                           15

15        Grant of a new community lease for Room 9 at 46 Fair Mall, Otara                      27

16        Revitalising Town Centres Programme 2020/2021                                                  35

17        Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board and Multiboard Grant Round Two 2020/2021, grant allocations                                                                                                                    43

18        Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rates 2021/2022         61

19        Local Board Views on Plan Change 60 - Open Space (2020) and Other Rezoning Matters                                                                                                                          71

20        Economic Development Action Plan: Draft for feedback                                       79

21        Central government submission - congestion pricing                                         139

22        Addition to the 2019-2022 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Meeting Schedule   187

23        Local board resolution responses and information report                                  189

24        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      209

25        Record of Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Notes                                 215

26        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 4 May 2021, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Whānau Community Centre

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

Nik Naidu, Rachael Mario and Raji Singh from the Whānau Community Centre will be in attendance to present to the board about their projects and advocacy work for their communities.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      thank Nik Naidu, Rachael Mario and Raji Singh from the Whānau Community Centre for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Holy Cross Tongan Catholic Community request for a Community Garden in Papatoetoe

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

Amelia Latu - Mentor, Holy Cross Tongan Catholic Community and Elizabeth Keresoma - Talanoa Ako provider will be in attendance to introduce their group and request land that can be used for a Community garden in Papatoetoe.

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      thank Amelia Latu and Elizabeth Keresoma from the Holy Cross Tongan Catholic Community for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

8.3       Deputation - Len Brown Skatepark, Otara

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

Aaron Martin – President of the East Skate Club Incorporated will be in attendance to present to the board on the Len Brown Skatepark in Otara.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      thank Aaron Martin from the East Skate Club Incorporated for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

Governing Body Member Update

 

File No.: CP2021/03132

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board on regional matters.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal reports from the Manukau Ward Councillors.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

 

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

Board Members' Report

 

File No.: CP2021/03134

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Providing board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board;

a)      receive the board members’ written and oral reports.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

 

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

Chairperson's Announcements

 

File No.: CP2021/03136

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

This item gives the chairperson an opportunity to update the board on any announcements.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive the chairperson’s verbal update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

 

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

New community lease to Multicultural, Christian, Education and Sporting Trust at Sandbrook Reserve, 47REveritt Road, Ōtara

File No.: CP2021/04920

 

  

 

Te take te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek a new community ground lease for Multicultural,Christian,Education and Sporting Trust at Sandbrook Reserve, 47R Everitt Road, Ōtara.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Community leases are one of the ways in which council provides support to local community organisations, assisting them to sustain the activities and experiences they provide in alignment with recognised local priorities.

3.       Multicultural,Christian,Education and Sporting Trust entered into a lease with the former Manukau City Council in October 2010. The lease expired in September 2020.  The Trust owns the buildings on Sandbrook Reserve and has applied for a new ground-lease for the property.

4.       Staff are satisfied the Trust meets the standards specified and recommend the lease be granted in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      grant, under section 61 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977, a new community ground-lease to Multicultural,Christian,Education and Sporting Trust for the land at 47R Everitt Road, Ōtara (marked in red and hatched on the map Attachment B) and described as Allotment 518 and Allotment 560 Parish of Manurewa, subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)          term – ten (10) years commencing 1 October 2020 with a single 10-year right-of-renewal, and final expiry of 30 September 2040

ii)         rent – one dollar ($1.00) plus GST per annum, if requested

iii)        rent review date – on renewal

iv)        permitted use - for the purpose of an early childhood education centre and ancillary use

v)         the community outcomes plan (Attachment C), to be included in the lease agreement as Schedule 3

vi)        all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.


 

 

Horopaki

Context

The land and building

5.       The land at Sandbrook Reserve is on land described as Allotment 518 and Allotment 560 Parish of Manurewa.  Allotment 518 is held by the Department of Conservation under the Reserves Act 1977 as a local purpose (community buildings) reserve and vested in the Auckland Council, in trust.  Allotment 560 is held by Auckland Council, in trust, as a classified local purpose (community buildings) reserve.  As the land is classified as local purpose reserve, iwi consultation and public notification of the proposed lease is not required.

 

Multicultural,Christian,Education and Sporting Trust (trading as Ōtara Community Pre-School)

The tenant

6.       Multicultural,Christian,Education and Sporting Trust registered under the Charitable Trusts Act 1957 in February 2010.  The aims of the Trust are to offer high quality multicultural education and care to the children of the community through learning stories and proper programme planning as in Te Whariki (Early Childhood Education).

7.       The centre trades under the name Ōtara Community Pre-School and has operated out of the site at Sandbrook Reserve for many years.  It was originally established in the mid-1990s as a Samoan language nest for children 0 to five years.  Over the years the centre has become multicultural with a diverse ethnic background of children attending between 7.00 am and 3.30 pm – Monday to Friday.

8.       In November 2017 a new building was completed on the site, with the two buildings joined by a covered pergola.  Currently, most of the activities of the centre take place in the new building.

9.       The early childhood education (ECE) provider is licensed by the Ministry of Education for 100 children.  They currently have 30 children attending the centre, aged between 0 and six years old.  There are six full-time and one part-time paid staff and two full-time volunteers at the centre. Ninety percent of the children identify as Pacific Island, five percent Māori and the remaining five percent as other.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 sets out the criteria for applicants, guides local board decision-making and outlines the standard terms and conditions of community leases.

11.     Under the guidelines, groups that own their own buildings have an automatic right to reapply for a new lease at the end of the occupancy term.  This is the right that the Trust is exercising.  It is recommended that a new lease be granted to the Multicultural Christian Education and Sporting Trust for the standard term of 10 years plus one 10-year right of renewal in line with the guidelines.

12.     Local boards have discretion to vary the term of the lease if it wished.  The guidelines suggest that where a term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms in the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

13.     After assessing the lease application and meeting with the tenant, staff have determined that the group qualifies for a new community lease because the:

i)          activity of the preschool supports the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2020 outcome: parks and facilities that meet our people’s needs

ii)         Multicultural,Christian,Education and Sporting Trust is not in breach of the current occupancy agreement

iii)         the group’s financial accounts have sufficient reserves to cover its operating costs with no declared conditional liabilities

iv)        Multicultural,Christian,Education and Sporting Trust funds its activities mostly by way of grants from the Ministry of Social Development and some fees

iv)        the premises meet the needs of the local community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     The expected impact of the recommendation on greenhouse gas emissions is “no impact” as the proposal continues existing activities and does not introduce any new sources of emissions.

15.     Climate change has minimal potential to impact the ECE lease as the building is not within a flood plain zone.  The building is not near the coast.

 

47R Everitt Road, Otara

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     Ōtara-Papatoetoe’s Facilities Manager accompanied the lease specialist on the site visit to the ECE on 14 April 2021.

17.     The building is tenant-owned, and the proposed lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group.  The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the advice in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     The recommendations in this report are within local boards’ allocated authority relating to the local recreation, sports and community facilities.

19.     This lease was approved as part of the 2020-2023 community lease work programme that was adopted by the local board on 18 August 2020 (item ID 395); and workshopped with the local board on 1 September 2020 and the community facilities monthly update of 23 March 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     Information on the lease application was reported at the South-Central Mana Whenua Forum hui of 31 March 2021. No objections were received from forum members.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     All costs involved in the preparation of the lease agreement are borne by Auckland Council.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

22.     The granting of a new community lease to the Trust allows them to continue to provide services to the local, and wider communities.

23.     If a new community lease is not granted, the Trust would have no security of tenure over the building, which would inhibit their ability to apply for funding and grants, develop programmes, maintain their building and deliver services.

24.     It would also mean that the asset would be transferred to council and ongoing maintenance and renewal work would then be funded from the local board budget.

25.     There are no known risks associated with the granting of this new community lease.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Subject to approval by the local board the lease agreement will be prepared for approval and signing by the tenant.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Map - 47R Everitt Road, Ōtara

21

b

Community Outcomes Plan - Multicultural,Christian,Education and Sporting Trust

23

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jenny Young - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Stakeholder and Land Advisory

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

Grant of a new community lease for Room 9 at 46 Fair Mall, Otara

File No.: CP2021/05555

 

  

 

Te take te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the preferred occupant for a community lease of Room 9 at 46 Fair Mall, Ōtara and to grant a new community lease for the office.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Room 9 at Fair Mall is a small (9.2m2) office within the council’s Fair Mall area of Ōtara Town Centre and is now available for a new tenant.

3.       The vacancy was advertised in March/April 2021 with five applications received and assessed against the criteria in the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.  The applications were workshopped with the local board on 4 May 2021.

4.       Staff have assessed all applications and concluded that Te Puke o Tara Incorporated scored the highest for grant of the lease, albeit by a small margin. Based on this staff recommend the lease be granted to Te Puke Otara Incorporated, subject to the public notification and iwi engagement process being successfully completed.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the public notification and iwi consultation of Auckland Council’s intention to grant new community leases for the available rooms within 46 Fair Mall, Ōtara.

b)      delegate to the Ōtara -Papatoetoe Local Board Chairperson, following public notification, the authority to appoint a hearings panel to consider objections, and to decide.

c)      grant under section 138 of the Local Government Act 2002, subject to any objections being resolved, a new community lease to Te Puke o Tara Incorporated, for Room 9 within 46 Fair Mall, Ōtara (as marked on Attachment A) on land described as Lot 40 Deposited Plan 55184 contained in Record of Title NA89C/14; on the following terms and conditions:

i)      term - five (5) years commencing 1 July 2021 with a single five-(5) year right of renewal, final expiry 30 June 2026.

ii)       rent - $1.00 per annum (plus GST), if requested.

iii)      an annual operational charge of $25.00 (plus GST) per square meter of space occupied exclusively ($230 + GST)

iv)      the approved community outcomes plan (Attachment B), to be included in the lease agreement as Schedule 3.

d)      note all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, the Local Government Act 2002.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       This report considers the leasing of Room 9 at 46 Fair Mall, Ōtara.

6.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is the delegated authority for local recreation, sport, and community facilities, including community leasing, licensing, and landowner matters.

Land and buildings

7.       The land at 46 Fair Mall, Ōtara is described as Lot 40 Deposited Plan 55184 contained in Record of Title NA89C/14 is held in fee simple by Auckland Council under the Local Government Act 2002.  As such, all tenancies of more than six-months must be publicly advertised and local iwi consulted.

8.       The property known as 46 Fair Mall, Ōtara (circa 1970) is made up of a series of single office spaces; together with the Tui Rom (venue for hire space), Ōtara Library, Ōtara Music Arts Centre (OMAC), Fresh Gallery and a small café next to the gallery.  One office is available as a community tenancy.

9.       The one remaining untenanted community office is located next to OMAC on the eastern side of Fair Mall.

Lease term and costs

10.     This report recommends that the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board grant a new lease for Room 9 at Fair Mall for an initial term of five-years with a single five-year right of renewal, as outlined in the Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012 for a council-owned building.

11.     A community outcomes plans will be developed for the tenant, to be approved by the local board chairperson, in consultation with local board members, and included as a schedule within the lease agreement.

12.     In line with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 the recommended annual rent is $1.00 plus GST, if requested.  The tenant will be charged an annual operational fee of $25 per square meter (plus GST) of the exclusive space occupied.  This charge is based on the recovery of the direct costs to council of providing the premises and covers building insurance, a share of the overheads (electricity and water) and maintenance provided by council as set out in the standard lease agreement.  For Room 9 the annual operational fee is $230 plus GST.

13.     The local board has discretion to vary the term of the lease if it wishes.  However, the guidelines suggest that where the term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms within the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

Expression of Interest

14.     The request for expressions of interest was advertised in the Manukau Courier, the council website, social media platforms, and through staff networks in March/April 2021.  The office was open for viewing by interested applicants by appointment.  Only one group asked to view the office, which was not suitable for their needs.

15.     Five community groups applied.  The groups are:

i)     Ōtara Business Association Incorporated (on behalf of Walter Mulitalo, JP)

ii)     Ōtara Business Association Incorporated

iii)    Te Puke o Tara Incorporated

iv)   The Community Builders Trust NZ (for Ōtara Bike Burb)

v)    Turehou Māori Wardens Charitable Trust.

16.     The five applications were assessed against the following criteria:

·           eligibility, open membership/users

·           financial stability, accounts, funding, and sustainability

·           best fit with the office configuration and size; extent and type of community use, collaborative initiatives

·           need for the services provided in the area, services of complementary nature to those already in place

·           ability of the group to manage the rooms as a community space able to be used by a wider range of people

·           a preference for an Ōtara-based group, serving the Ōtara community

·           alignment of programmes and services with the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2020 and the Auckland Plan.

Applicant groups

Ōtara Business Association Incorporated on behalf of Walter Mulitalo, JP

17.     The association registered with the New Zealand Companies Office under the Incorporated Societies Act 1908 in August 1994 and are a partner, with Auckland Council, as a local economic development initiative business improvement district (BID).  This is a specified commercial area (town centre, industrial area, or a combination of both) designated for a targeted rate, with boundaries agreed by the local board and business association.  The BID leads business to business events and networking, business attraction programmes, marketing and promotion, strategic planning, stakeholder and partnership development, advocacy, safety initiatives, and governance on behalf of the local businesses.

18.     The society has offered to be the umbrella tenant for Walter Mulitalo, a Justice of the Peace who has been providing his services to the Ōtara and wider community for many years.  Justices of the Peace do not charge for their services and Walter will be assisted by the business association, which is funded by a targeted rate and local board funding.

19.     Walter works mainly in the mornings and has agreed to share the office with the business association in the afternoons when he is not using it.

Ōtara Business Association Incorporated

20.     The association registered with the New Zealand Companies Office under the Incorporated Societies Act 1908 in August 1994 and are a partner, with Auckland Council, as a local economic development initiative business improvement district (BID).  This is a specified commercial area (town centre, industrial area, or a combination of both) designated for a targeted rate, with boundaries agreed by the local board and business association.  The BID leads business to business events and networking; business attraction programmes; marketing and promotion, strategic planning; stakeholder and partnership development, advocacy; safety initiatives; and governance on behalf of the local businesses.

21.     The association has three full-time paid employees, as well as 11 part-time and one full-time volunteers.  There are 65 members of the business association.  The group is funded by a targeted rate levy on businesses and local board funding.

22.     The association is a current tenant of Fair Mall, with two rooms used as an office and a monitoring office for the town centre’s CCTV network.  It was granted a new lease for the offices in October 2020, at which time the manager had advised the board of a need for additional office space to fully meet their needs as the support service provided to local retailers and businesses.

The Community Builders NZ Trust (for Ōtara Bike Burb)

23.     The trust registered with the New Zealand Companies Office under the Charitable Trusts Act 1957 in January 2019.  The aims of the trust are to strengthen and develop the capacity and capability of local residents from the most disadvantaged communities to become local change-makers, with a particular focus on areas like south Auckland, Far North and Waikato regions.

24.     The trust has applied for the room to be used by their Ōtara Bike Burb group.  Otara Bike Burb is an eco-sustainable space located in the Otara Town Centre that is dedicated to socialising and encouraging bike riding in many different ways.  Before officially launching in November 2020, Otara Bike Burb organised Ōtara’s very first “Wheelie Stunts” competition.  After a year the group were able to secure a 40ft container and were able to create an official base where all the hands-on work would happen. On a day-to-day basis the group gives the community the opportunity to bring in their bikes for repairs; and also rescues old and used bikes from the public, repair them and redistribute them into the community.

25.     The trust has six part-time staff, providing 240 hours work each week along with 25 part-time and 12 full-time volunteers, providing 85 hours service each week.  The group is funded by grants, fundraising and the sale of community t-shirts.

Te Puke o Tara Incorporated

26.     The society registered under the Incorporated Societies Act 1908 in 1975.  The group aims to support Ōtara youth, provide facilities for Ōtara people for the pursuit of cultural, spiritual, social, recreational and other community activities.  Te Puke o Tara is a 50% partner in the Ōtara Market returning at least 30% of the distributions back to the Ōtara community.  The kaupapa of the group is "making Ōtara a better place to live".

27.     The group has no paid staff and operates with six part-time and one full time volunteer, providing 30 hours of services each week.  The group is funded from the 50% ownership of the Ōtara Market, grants and fundraising.

Turehou Māori Wardens Charitable Trust

28.     The trust registered under the Charitable Trusts Act 1957 in June 2004.  Turehou Māori Wardens was first established in 1997 before becoming a trust in 2004.  The trust aims to provide social and economic advancement of the community, assistance and support for tangata whenua in Ōtara, Papatoetoe, East Tamaki, Pakuranga and Howick.  The wardens provide Justice of the Peace services, community patrols, crisis call out support, cultural support, advocacy, monitoring of off licence premises, patrolling liquor ban areas, collaboration with liquor license staff and objections to non-compliant premises.

29.     The trust has 38 members: with 20 part-time and eight full-time volunteers providing 800 hours per week of service.  The group is funded by grants and donations.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Assessment of applications

30.     All the applications received were assessed against the criteria contained in the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012; with the local board requesting one additional criterion - that they wished to lease the spaces within the building to Otara-based groups.

31.     The applications were assessed on a 100-point scale and the following scores were concluded:

Group  

Score (out of 100)

Ōtara Business Association Incorporated
(on behalf of Walter
Mulitalo, JP)

60

Ōtara Business Association Incorporated

82

The Community Builders Trust NZ

83

Te Puke o Tara Incorporated

84

Turehou Māori Wardens Charitable Trust

57

Public notification

32.     Under the Local Government Act 2002, leases of more than six-months must be publicly notified and the relevant local iwi consulted.

33.     Public notification will be by way of an advertisement in the Manukau Courier, on the council website and via other social media outlets.  Submitters will have one month to make a submission or objection.  If any objections are received with a request to be heard, the local board will convene a hearings panel to consider and decide on the proposed lease.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

34.     The proposed new lease falls into the “potential increase” category.

35.     Climate change is expected to have the potential to impact this site, as parts of the building complex sits within flood plain zones (as shown below):

 

46 Fair Mall, Ōtara

36.     The flood map shows the extent of flooding expected around the Auckland region during severe rainfall events.  However, areas that are not highlighted may also experience flooding in some circumstances.  Flood plains (shaded light blue) show areas predicted to be covered by flood water as a result of a 1-in-100-year rainstorm event by river or surface flooding.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.     The proposed new lease has no identified impacts on the council group.  The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the advice in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.     The recommendation within this report falls within the local board’s allocated authority relating to local recreation, sports, and community facilities.

39.     The assessed applications were discussed with the local board at its local board workshop of 4 May 2021.

40.     The applications received support the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes of revitalising town centres and empowered, inclusive and prosperous communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

41.     Formal consultation with iwi will take place alongside the public notification of the intended lease once the preferred candidate is known.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     All costs relating to the advertising of the intention to lease and preparation of the lease agreement will be borne by council.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

43.     If a lease is not granted for the currently empty office, it will be unavailable to support groups working in the Ōtara area.

44.     As there is no significant departure from the approved land use or change in the anticipated activities there are no identified risks in granting the lease.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

45.     Subject to the local board granting the lease, public advertising and formal iwi engagement of the board’s intention will take place.  Once this process is successfully completed a lease agreement will be sent to the group for signing.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan - Room 9, 46 Fair Mall Otara

33

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jenny Young - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - Financial Planning Manager - Council Parent

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

Revitalising Town Centres Programme 2020/2021

File No.: CP2021/05971

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the allocation of funding for business associations, community organisations and social enterprise groups for the Ōtara- Papatoetoe Local Board: Revitalising town centres Programme Expressions of Interest 2020/2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2020/2021 Revitalising town centres programme has a budget of $200,000, which for the first time is being allocated through a contestable expression of interest process. 

3.       The grant is open to community groups, business associations and social enterprises.

4.       The grant round opened for applications on 17 March 2021 and closed on 14 April 2021.

5.       Thirteen applications were received totalling $695,522.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      approve the following grant allocations from: Placemaking: Town centres project line # 858 from the 2020/2021 work programme:

Application number

Applicant Names

Purpose of funding

Amount

OPBID2021-02

 

The Community Builders NZ Trust - The Ōtara Kai Village

Events

$30,000

OPBID2021-13

 

Ōtara Health Charitable Trust

Ōtara town centre clean-up partnering with the Manukau Beautification Trust, community, volunteers, and schools.

Rejuvenate current features and create new ones.

Activations and events within the town centre.

$58,000

OPBID2021-14

 

Hunters Corner Town Centre Society Incorporated

Crime prevention officer initiative

$57,000

OPBID2021-05

 

The Papatoetoe Food Hub Collective

Events.

Purchase container kitchen.

 

$35,000

OPBID2021-04

 

Manukau Business Association

Funding requested to support the second stage of a CCTV project, including camera installation.

$20,000

 

Total

$200,000

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocated $240,000 in its 2019/2020 work programme to support the following three local business associations through a non-contestable process, to contribute to clean, safe and attractive town centres:

·    Ōtara Business Association

·    Hunters Corner Town Centre Society Incorporated

·    Papatoetoe Central Mainstreet Society Incorporated.

7.       This was a legacy practice that had continued over several years after council amalgamation.

8.       In 2020/2021, the local board re-allocated $200,000 of its LDI budget to the Revitalising Town centres programme and advised staff to make it an open contestable expression of interest (EOI) process to enable sharing of responsibility and provide opportunity to other local groups interested in activating local town centres.

9.       Staff developed and finalised a set of criteria in discussion with the local board early in 2021.

10.     The expression of interest process was opened, based on the agreed criteria, on 17 March 2021 and closed on 14 April 2021.

11.     A total of thirteen applications were received, requesting $695,522.

12.     The applications were presented to the local board at a workshop on 4 May 2021.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     Staff have assessed the applications received, based on the following criteria approved by the local board for the objectives of the projects/initiatives:

·        Neighbourhood or community events or activations in the town centre

·        Beautification of town centres

·        Business development workshops that benefit local business owners

·        Mentoring on strategic thinking and planning for the business associations

·        One off funding for security resourcing

·        Building kai resilience and support for our communities.

14.     Five applications are identified as having high alignment to the assessment criteria. Table 1 summarises the applications and amounts recommended.

Table 1: EOI Applications received and funding recommendation

Applicant name

Project Proposed

Amount requested

Amount recommended

The Community Builders NZ Trust Otara Kai Village–

The Ōtara Kai Village

Funding requested for the following projects:

·    Social media strategy resources

·    Improving beautification using rubbish bins

·    Events

$86,000

$30,000

Ōtara Health Charitable Trust

Funding requested for the following projects:

·    Ōtara town centre clean-up partnering with the Manukau Beautification Trust, community, volunteers, and schools

·    Rejuvenate current features within the town centre and create new ones

·     Activations and events within the town centre.

$60,000

$58,000

Hunters Corner Town Centre Society Incorporated

Funding requested to resource the following initiatives that support the safety and wellbeing of the town centre businesses, customers, and community:

·    Crime prevention officer

·    Delivery of the Winter Festival

·    Roller door project

·    Website.

$120,000

$57,000

The Papatoetoe Food Hub Collective

Funding requested to support this social enterprise that provides a café, catering services and community gardens, to deliver the following initiatives:

·    Create colourful murals

·    Events

·    Purchase container kitchen

·    New activation space.

$40,000

$35,000

Manukau Business Association

Funding requested to support the second stage of a CCTV project. The grant will be utilised for streaming footage to the NZ Police and Auckland Transport.

$96,672

$20,000

Total

$402,672

$200,000

15.     Funding these activities will support the community to deliver the following Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives:

·    Empowered, inclusive and prosperous communities

·    Celebrating the heritage and cultural diversity of our communities

·    Promoting economic well-being in the community and local employment

·    Building capacity and empowerment in the community.

The Community Builders NZ Trust Otara Kai Village

16.     The applicant, a grassroots community group, has a strong track record of successful delivery of events in the area. They have shown leadership within the local area to support community and activate the town centre through the Kai Village initiative. Staff recommend supporting the event activations.

17.     The project fund requests also included social media strategy resources, painting the rubbish bins and a historical exhibit initiative.

18.     Further work and detail was needed to explain the social media strategy resources, painting the rubbish bins and the historical exhibit project application. Staff will work with the group to strengthen their future application for these projects/initiatives.

Ōtara Health Charitable Trust

19.     The applicant is a trusted provider of community and health services in the area and is well established in the community with strong relationships locally with various partners.

20.     The Trust’s application focused on three projects - town-centre clean-up; rejuvenate some physical features; activate and initiate events in the town centre including Matariki and language weeks. The applicant provided a robust application with a strong focus on collaboration and partnership with others in the town centre.

Hunters Corner Town Centre Society Incorporated

21.   The top priority for the Society is the Crime Prevention Officer (CPO) initiative which provides placemaking and safety support to the town centre. Due to a higher demand for funding through this grants round, funding is recommended only for the CPO initiative. The projects not included in this round of grants are - Winter Food Festival, planter boxes for safety and the roller door project.

The Papatoetoe Food Hub Collective

22.   The Collective are a well-established enterprise group in the town centre that run various kai-based projects and training. The funding request is for a container kitchen, events and new activation space initiatives. These initiatives are well aligned with the criteria set out and can help in achieving local board plan outcomes.

23.   A series of events are planned in partnership with local community organisations and businesses to celebrate neighbourhoods, cultural diversity with art, food and physical activity.

24.   The project aims to commission local artists to create colourful murals on the containers and walls. The project will also deliver events for the community and acquire a container kitchen to expand the groups capacity to support the Healthy School Lunches Programme in Papatoetoe. The project will utilise the Hub to host and support community led events and workshops and activate the town centre.

Manukau Business Association

25.     The business association are requesting funding for CCTV camera installation with an aim to reduce crime and antisocial behaviour.

26.     Staff recommend part funding this application as a one off as this is a partnership building opportunity with NZ Police, Auckland Transport, Panuku, Manukau Business Association and Auckland Council. The grant will be utilised for streaming footage to the NZ Police and Auckland Transport, which they can access regularly for pursuits and evidential purposes. 

Applications not recommended for funding

27.     Eight applications are identified as having low alignment to the assessment criteria and are not recommended for funding. These applications are shown in table 2.

Table 2: Applications not recommended for funding

Applicant name

Purpose of funding

Amount requested

Rationale to decline

Muskaan Care Trust

·    Healthy food and healthy living

·    Disease prevention

·    Budgeting.

$21,000

The outcomes do not align to any of the assessment criteria.

Ned Pitone So’e

Clean up and repainting Otara town centre.

$100,000

The applicant is from a private business.

Ōtara Business Association

Digital Workshops.

 

$15,300

Digital workshops are offered for free for business owners to access online through MBIE.

Ōtara Business Association

Add lighting and vibration sensors to the “Fish canopy”.

$40,000

Needed quotes and breakdown of costs and clearer understanding of what the lights would look like and the operations and maintenance of the lights. Could be considered for the next round of funding

Papatoetoe Business Association

Digital Workshops.

 

$16,550

Digital workshops are offered for free for business owners to access online through MBIE.

Papatoetoe Business Association

Santa Parade.

$35,000

The event does not have long term impact for the town centre. The BID has the oppurtunity to apply for the event funding through the Local Board discretionary contestable grant pool as it as done in the past.

The Turehou Māori Wardens ki Otara Charitable Trust

The Turehou Maori Wardens – Operations

$25,000

This is a project that can be partly funded through the safety initiatives and the Maori Responsiveness fund

The Otara Kai Village

Historical Exhibit

$40,000

The project application required more work and could be funded from the next funding round.

Total

$292,850

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

28.     The local board work programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing information and advice to individuals and groups with projects that support community events to ensure climate change imperatives are considered in their delivery.

29.     The grants enable projects that encourage the community to shop locally and improve connection with their town centres which can contribute towards reducing their carbon footprint.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

30.     The 2020/2021 Revitalising town centres programme, including the relationships with business improvement districts and business associations, is managed by council’s Connected Communities department with advice from the teams in Council Controlled Organisations and External Partnerships.

31.     The Council Controlled Organisations and External Partnerships team have shared their views and supported the process.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     The outcomes through this programme will benefit the local town centres.

33.     The local board discussed the applications at a workshop on 4 May 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     The local board work programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori.

35.     Several of the applicants represent grass roots Māori initiatives that are contributing to building the capacity to deliver on Māori aspirations.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     The 2020/2021 local board work programme line 858: Placemaking: Town centres project has an allocated budget of $200,000 for organisations to contribute to the revitalisation of town centres and develop innovative approaches to resolving local issues.  

37.     Staff recommend allocating the total budget of $200,000 in contestable grant funding to the five applicants detailed above.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     The assessment process has identified a low risk with the associated applications based on previous delivery and accountabilities.

39.     Recommendations for EOI allocations are based on assessment criteria as outlined in the analysis. Reductions or variations in recommended funding allocations may compromise the groups ability to deliver.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     Staff will administer funding agreements for the successful applicants.

41.     Funding recipients will be invited to present to the local board on the application of their funding at a workshop in early 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tiaria Fletcher – Specialist Advisor, Connected Communities

Authorisers

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Libraries & Information

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board and Multiboard Grant Round Two 2020/2021, grant allocations

File No.: CP2021/05035

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local and Multiboard Grant Round Two 2020/2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local and Multiboard Grants Round Two 2020/2021 as provided in Attachment B.

3.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board adopted the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Grants Programme 2020/2021 on 19 May 2020 (OP/2020/55) as provided in Attachment A. The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

4.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $373,057 for the 2020/2021 financial year.

5.       Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grant and Multi-Board Grant Round One 2020/2021 was completed and a total of $130,767 was allocated.

6.       One excellence award was also approved and an amount of $2,000 was allocated. Quick Response Grant Round One 2020/2021 was completed and $14,666.92 was allocated.

7.       A Southern Initiative (TSI) fund of $51,500 was added to the grants budget and at the October meeting (OP/2020/164) and $10,000 from the grants budget was allocated towards costs for a Te reo translation of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2020.

8.       A total of $13,366 was allocated in Quick Response Round Two 2020/2021. A further $19,500 was reallocated from Te Kete Rukuruku, to the grants budget line (OP/2021/47).

9.       This leaves a total of $273,257 for the remaining one local and one quick response grant round.

10.     Forty-nine applications were received for consideration by the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board for the Local and Mulitboard Grant Round Two 2020/2021, requesting a total of $486,874.03.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)           agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Local and Multiboard Grant Round Two 2020/2021, outlined in Table One:

Table One: Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local and Multiboard Grant Round Two 2020/2021 applications:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

 

LG2113-201

Auckland Wheelbreakers Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire at the Parafed Auckland gym from 1 June 2021 to 31 March 2022.

$4,830.00

Eligible

LG2113-202

Papatoetoe Sports Awards Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards junior and senior awards for sporting excellence at Kolmar Sports Centre from 29 October 2021 to 6 November 2021.

$20,000.00

Eligible

LG2113-203

Auckland Kindergarten Association

Community

Towards the extension of the community garden and fale at Mayfield Kindergarten from 15 June 2021 to 30 July 2021.

$15,245.09

Eligible

LG2113-207

Auckland Seniors Support and Caring Group

Community

Towards funding community activities at Te Puke ō Tara Community Centre and festival celebrations from 5 June 2021 to 18 December 2021

$4,000.00

Eligible

LG2113-211

Tangaroa College Board of Trustees

Sport and recreation

Towards sports competition transport costs from 2 June 2021 to 11 September 2021.

$3,500.00

Eligible

LG2113-212

Dawson-School Board of Trustees

Environment

Towards the purchase and installation of a solar power system at Dawson Primary School from 5 July 2021 to 14 December 2021

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2113-214

Graeme Dingle Foundation Auckland

Community

Towards the continued provision of Kiwi Can at Papatoetoe West School from 3 June 2021 to 9 July 2021

$4,000.00

Eligible

LG2113-216

South East Auckland Senior Citizens Association Incorporated

Community

Towards Diwali celebrations in Otara and Manurewa on 16 October 2021

$11,350.00

Eligible

LG2113-217

All Heart NZ Charitable Trust

Environment

Towards truck hire, labour, refurbishing and wages at the All Heart Store from 1 June 2021 to 31 December 2021

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2113-218

World Council of Sikh Affairs Incorporated

Community

Towards rent, stationary, catering and a trip for the New Zealand Punjabi Academy from 10 June 2021 to 13 August 2021

$7,000.00

Eligible

LG2113-219

Otara Business Association Incorporated

Events

Towards koha, performers and catering for a Māori New Year celebration at the Otara Town Centre on 3 July 2021

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2113-220

Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

Community

Towards Life, Education, Health and Wellbeing lessons in Ōtara-Papatoetoe schools from 9 August 2021 to 3 September 2021

 $7,918.22

Eligible

LG2113-221

The Rising Foundation

Community

Towards programme coordinator operating costs at Sir Edmund Hillary Collegiate from 8 June 2021 to 20 July 2021

$4,615.00

Eligible

LG2113-222

Manukau Beijing Opera Society Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire of Papatoetoe Townhall from 4 June 2021 to 24 June 2021

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2113-225

Auckland Basketball Services Limited

Sport and recreation

Towards venue and equipment at Allan Brewster Stadium from 1 June 2021 to 15 February 2022

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2113-228

Pacific Fusion Fashion Show Limited

Arts and culture

Towards marketing for the Pacific Fusion Fashion Show from 1 October 2021 to 31 October 2021

$23,575.00

Eligible

LG2113-231

Sound of Praise International Ministry

Community

Towards catering, speakers, advertising and the venue for a youth leadership event on 28 May 2021

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG2113-232

The Community Builders NZ Trust

Community

Towards gear, travel costs and membership for 10 young BMX riders at Colin Dale Park from 5 July 2021 to 21 December 2021

$12,040.00

Eligible

LG2113-233

Tennis Auckland Region Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the renovation of the court at Manukau Tennis Sports and Community Centre from 1 June 2021 to 30 June 2021

$22,198.00

Eligible

LG2113-234

Papatoetoe Central Main Street Society Incorporated

Events

Towards the “Food and Culture Festival” in Papatoetoe on 7 August 2021

$15,000.00

Eligible

LG2113-235

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards operational costs at Youthline from 1 June 2021 to 31 March 2022

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2113-236

Maunga Tonu Charitable Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire, guest speakers and catering at Sir Edmund Hillary Collegiate from 25 May 2021 to 8 December 2021

$18,500.00

Eligible

LG2113-237

Auckland Regional Migrant Services Charitable Trust

Community

Towards wages, venue and transport for the “Safari South Multicultural Playgroup” from 1 June 2021 to 31 May 2022

$7,000.00

Eligible

LG2113-241

The Community Builders NZ Trust

Community

Towards entertainment, advertising and catering at the Ōtara Kai Village from 6 June 2021 to 1 December 2021

$60,000.00

Eligible

LG2113-242

Raukatauri Music Therapy Trust

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire at Otara Music and Arts Centre from 1 May 2021 to 31 May 2022

$2,206.96

Eligible

LG2113-243

Cook Islands Tag Football  Association

Sport and recreation

Towards equipment for Pacific Cup Touch from 20 November 2021 to 20 March 2021

$4,129.80

Eligible

LG2113-244

Action Education Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards spoken word workshops in schools from 1 June 2021 to 30 June 2022

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2113-245

Diabetes New Zealand

Events

Towards the Diabetes and Whānau Fun Day at Ōtara Town Centre on 6 November 2021

$7,940.49

Eligible

LG2113-247

Papatoetoe High School Board of Trustees

Sport and recreation

Towards the establishment of a gym at Papatoetoe High School from 1 June 2021 to 31 December 2021

$45,000.00

Eligible

LG2113-248

Carers New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards magazine development, printing and shipping for “Supporting carers” during COVID-19 from 6 July 2021 to 31 May 2022

$18,000.00

Eligible

LG2113-249

Muskaan Care Trust

Arts and culture

Towards venue, promotion and facilitation of Indian dance classes at Papatoetoe Town Centre from 1 July to 30 June 2022

$14,558.00

Eligible

LG2113-250

Aroya Mantra

Arts and culture

Towards an Indian Cultural Day at Ōtara Town Centre on 15 August 2021

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2113-251

XLR8 Sports Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards fees and storage for Touch Rugby at the East Tamaki Reserve from 1 July 2021 to 27 February 2022

$5,715.00

Eligible

LG2113-252

Environmental Education for Resource Sustainability Trust

Environment

Towards operational costs as well as purchase and delivery of native plants and recycling bins to local schools from 1 June 2021 to 31 October 2021

$6,056.25

Eligible

LG2113-253

Counties Manukau Touch Association Inc

Sport and recreation

Towards storage fees for Counties Manukau Touch Association from 1 July 2021 to 30 June 2022

$4,680.00

Eligible

LG2113-254

New Zealand Council Of Victim Support Groups Incorporated

Community

Towards recruiting, training, reimbursement and supervision for Victim Support’s volunteers in Counties Manukau Central from 1 July 2021 to 30 June 2022

$7,500.00

Eligible

LG2113-255

East Tamaki Rugby Football Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards physiotherapy services for four senior teams with East Tamaki Rugby Football Club from 1 June 2021 to 30 September 2021

$16,500.00

Eligible

MB2021-206

Shakthi Seniors Charitable Trust Incorporated

Community

Towards transport, venue, admin, facilitators, volunteers and catering at Anchorage Park School Community Hall from 1 July 2021 to 30 June 2022

$2,400.00

Eligible

MB2021-210

YMCA North Incorporated

Community

Towards the delivery cost of three week long sports camps for South Auckland intermediate schools

$10,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-214

Auckland Softball Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards operating expenses of the Auckland Softball Association

$6,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-216

Fix Up, Look Sharp

Community

Towards leasing costs for Fix Up, Look Sharp at 50 Lovegrove Crescent, Ōtara from 2 July 2021 to 4 July 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-220

Shivarchan Senior Citizens Association

Community

Towards venue hire at the Shiva Hall from 1 June 2021 to 31 December 2021

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-221

Habitat for Humanity Northern Region Limited

Community

Towards heating items, volunteer costs and transport for whanau winter warming packs from 1 June 2021 to 30 September 2021

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-236

Children's Autism Foundation

Community

Towards overall costs to deliver community workshops and outreach visits between October 2021 to May 2022.

$1,566.22

Eligible

MB2021-245

The Operating Theatre Trust

Arts and culture

Towards free theatre tickets for low decile school and early childhood centre children from 25 September 2021 to 31 November 2021

$10,850.00

Eligible

MB2021-252

David Riley

Arts and culture

Towards the creation and publication of books and audiobooks based on two Cook Island legends.

$2,000.00

 

MB2021-253

KidsCan Charitable Trust

Community

Towards programme items food, raincoats, shoes and socks for children attending KidsCan low decile partner schools within the Auckland region

$10,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-264

The Kids for Kids Charitable Trust

Events

Towards the National Young Leaders Day (NYLD) production expenses

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-269

Whau ACE Adult & Community Education Incorporated

Community

Towards the purchase of five laptops and salary costs for employment facilitators between July 2021 and March 2022

$3,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$486,874.03

 

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

12.     The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

13.     The local board grants programme sets out:

·       local board priorities

·       lower priorities for funding

·       exclusions

·       grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·       any additional accountability requirements.

14.     The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board adopted its grants programme for 2020/2021 on the 19th of May 2020 (OP/2020/55) and will operate three quick response and two local grant rounds for this financial year.  This includes the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Excellence Awards, which are open all year round (OP/2020/55).

15.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, and community networks and workshops.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way.

18.     Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction, decreasing use of single-occupancy transport options, home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation, local tree planting and streamside revegetation, and education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

20.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

22.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applications about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

23.     A summary of each application received through the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response Grant Round One 2020/2021 is provided in Attachment B.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Maori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Maori. Auckland Council’s Maori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grants processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $373,057 for the 2020/2021 financial year.

26.     Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grant and Multi-Board Grant Round One 2020/2021 was completed and a total of $130,767 was allocated.

27.     One excellence award was also approved and an amount of $2,000 was allocated. Quick Response Grant Round One 2020/2021 was completed and $14,666.92 was allocated.

28.      A Southern Initiative (TSI) fund of $51,500 was added to the grants budget and at the October meeting (OP/2020/164) and $10,000 from the grants budget was allocated towards costs for a Te reo translation of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2020.

29.     A total of $13,366 was allocated in Quick Response Round Two 2020/2021. A further $19,500 was reallocated from Te Kete Rukuruku, to the grants budget line (OP/2021/47). This leaves a total of $273,257 for the remaining one local and one quick response grant round.

30.     Forty-nine applications were received for consideration by the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board for the Local and Mulitboard Grant Round Two 2020/2021, requesting a total of $486,874.03.

31.      Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes including information in this report and have not identified any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local boards programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Following the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board allocation of funding for Local and Multiboard Grants Round Two, staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision and facilitate payment of the grant.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Otara-Papatoetoe Grant Programme 2020/2021

55

b

Otara-Papatoetoe Local Grants Round Two and Multiboard Grants 2020/2021 grant applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

James Boyd - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rates 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/05097

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for the Greater East Tāmaki, Hunters Corner, Manukau, Ōtara and Papatoetoe Central Business Improvement District (BID) programmes for the 2021/2022 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are rohe within Tāmaki Makaurau, where local business and property owners have agreed to work together to improve their business environment, encourage resilience and attract new businesses and customers.

3.       Auckland Council supports business associations operating BID programmes, including Greater East Tāmaki Business Association, Hunters Corner Town Centre Society (Hunters Corner), Manukau Business Association (trading as Business Manukau), Ōtara Business Association and Papatoetoe Central Mainstreet Society, by collecting a targeted rate from commercial properties within a defined geographic area. The funds from the targeted rate are then provided by way of a BID grant to the relevant business association.

4.       Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities relating to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body.

5.       Each business association operating a BID programme sets the BID grant amount at its Annual General Meeting (AGM) when members vote to approve an operational budget for the following financial year. This budget funds the implementation of a business plan that delivers programmes based on each association’s BID strategic priorities.

6.       GETBA members approved a BID grant sum of $545,000 for 2021/2022. This figure is unchanged from the current financial year.

7.       Hunters Corner Town Centre Society members approved a BID grant sum of $126,590 for 2021/2022. This figure is unchanged from the current financial year.

8.       Manukau Business Association members approved a BID grant sum of $510,000 for 2021/2022. This figure is unchanged from the current financial year.

9.       Ōtara Business Association members approved a BID grant sum of $94,730 for 2021/2022. This figure is unchanged from the current financial year.

10.     Papatoetoe Central Mainstreet Society members approved a BID grant sum of $100,692 for 2021/2022. This figure is unchanged from the current financial year.

11.     The business associations operating BID programmes are incorporated societies that are independent of the council. However, to sustain public trust and confidence in the council, there needs to be a balance between the independence of the business associations and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

12.     For the council to be confident that the funds provided to the BID-operating business associations are being used appropriately, the council requires the BIDs to comply with the Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi).  

13.     Council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy and this report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds.

14.     Staff are satisfied Greater East Tāmaki, Hunters Corner, Manukau, Ōtara and Papatoetoe Central business associations sufficiently comply with the BID Policy.

15.     Staff propose the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board receives this report and recommends to the Governing Body the striking (setting) of the BID targeted rate sought by Greater East Tāmaki, Hunters Corner, Manukau, Ōtara and Papatoetoe Central business associations as part of the council’s Annual Budget 2021/2022 decision-making.

16.     After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly BID grant payments, effective from 1 July 2021. This enables Greater East Tāmaki, Hunters Corner, Manukau, Ōtara and Papatoetoe Central business associations to implement programmes that contribute to Outcome 2: Prosperous local economy, thereby supporting the aspirations of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2020.

17.     Ōtara-Papatoetoe’s BID programmes, managed by the BID-operating business associations, will continue to play an important role in supporting their members facing two global challenges. A BID programme can support local businesses to mitigate some of the economic flow-on effects from the COVID 19 lockdowns through business resilience and recovery initiatives. A BID programme can also facilitate opportunities that address the climate change emergency, with a focus on sustainability.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for inclusion in the Annual Budget 2021/2022 for the following Business Improvement District (BID) programmes:

i)        $545,000 for Greater East Tāmaki Business Association

ii)       $126,590 for Hunters Corner Town Centre Society

iii)      $510,000 for Manukau Business Association

iv)      $94,730 for Ōtara Business Association

v)      $100,692 for Papatoetoe Central Mainstreet Society.

 

Horopaki

Context

BID programmes promote economic well-being and collaboration with the council

18.     Tāmaki Makaurau is projected to include approximately 660,000 (SOURCE: Auckland Council Growth Model 2021-2051 (“i11v6”) more people in the next 30 years. This level of population growth presents challenges and opportunities for Auckland town centres and commercial precincts.

19.     Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are rohe within Auckland where local business and property owners have agreed to work together, with support from the council, to improve their business environment, promote innovation and attract new businesses and customers.

20.     BID programmes provide the opportunity for the council group to partner with business associations to seize on the opportunities from Auckland’s growth. 

21.     BID programmes encourage collaboration to achieve greater local outcomes. They provide a mechanism to enable local boards to engage with the business sector in local town centres and business areas in a co-ordinated way.

BID programmes provide essential support in building business resilience and aiding economic recovery

22.     The economy continues to be impacted by the flow-on effects from the COVID-19 pandemic and related lockdowns, affecting both retail-based town centres and industrial precincts.

23.     BID-operating business associations provide the local business leadership required to help their members to mitigate some of the economic effects of the pandemic through business resilience and recovery initiatives.

BID programmes are funded by a targeted rate on business ratepayers within a set area

24.     BID programmes are funded by a targeted rate applied to all commercially rated properties within a designated area around a town centre or commercial precinct.

25.     Auckland Council supports business associations operating BID programmes by collecting the targeted rates and providing these funds, in their entirety, by way of a BID grant to the relevant business association.

26.     This revenue is paid to the business association every quarter to provide a regular and sustainable income stream to implement an agreed work programme.

The BID Policy is the mechanism to ensure accountability for BID targeted rates

27.     Auckland Council’s Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) ensures accountability for BID targeted rate funding and encourages good governance and programme management.

28.     The policy outlines the principles behind the council’s BID programme; creates the process for establishing, expanding, amalgamating and disestablishing BID programmes; determines rating mechanisms; prescribes operating standards and guidelines; and sets accountability requirements.

 

Diagram A: From calculation to approval, how the BID targeted rate is set.

The business association sets the BID grant amount to deliver its work programme

29.      BID-operating business associations are provided with a rate modelling spreadsheet to help with their budget decision-making. The spreadsheet models any proposed changes to their current BID grant amount and, most importantly, how that influences the BID targeted rate for everyone who will pay it. When considering a change to the BID grant amount, the association’s board must take into account what the local business and property owners can afford.

30.     Each BID-operating business association prepares an annual business plan for the following financial year that will deliver programmes based on their strategic priorities and financial parameters.

31.     The cost of implementing that business plan is set out in an annual budget that the association’s board (governing committee) agrees will be recommended for approval by the business association membership.

32.     The AGM provides the forum where members vote to approve the operational budget and, in doing so, set the requisite BID grant amount for the following financial year.

Local boards are responsible for recommending the targeted rate if a BID complies with the BID Policy

33.     Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities relating to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body. The local board should recommend the setting of the targeted rate if it is satisfied that the BID is sufficiently complying with the BID Policy.

34.     The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board approved a similar recommendation for the BID programmes last year (resolution number OP/2020/50), as did 17 other local boards that have BID programmes operating in their rohe.

The Governing Body sets the targeted rate when it approves the Annual Budget

35.     The recommendation in this report is put into effect with the Governing Body’s approval of the Annual Budget 2021/2022 and its striking (setting) of the targeted rates.

36.     In accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, the Governing Body is authorised to make the final decisions on what BID programme targeted rates, if any, to set in any particular year or property (in terms of the amount and the geographic area to be rated).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

37.     BID programmes are operated by independent business associations, and their programmes and services are provided according to their members’ stated priorities. In recognition of their independent status, the BID Policy does not prescribe standards for programme effectiveness. That is a matter for business association members to determine. Staff, therefore, cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

All five business associations comply with the BID Policy

38.     Staff are satisfied that the Greater East Tāmaki, Hunters Corner, Manukau, Ōtara and Papatoetoe Central business associations have sufficiently met the requirements of the BID Policy.

39.     Staff require BID-operating business associations to provide to the council the following documents, and stay in touch with their local board(s) at least once a year:

·   Current strategic plan – evidence of achievable medium- to long-term opportunities.

·   Audited accounts – assurance that the BID-operating business association is managing its members’ BID targeted rate funds responsibly.

·   Annual report on the year just completed – evidence that programmes are addressing priority issues that benefit BID targeted ratepayers.

·   Business plan for the coming year – detailed one-year programme, based on the strategic plan, to be resourced and achieved.

·   Indicative budget for the following year – Auckland Council’s Annual Budget requires targeted rates to be identified a year in advance to inform the Annual Budget process which sets all rates.

·   Board Charter – establishes guidelines for effective board governance and positive relationships between the association and its members.

·   Annual Accountability Agreement – certification that these requirements have been met.

·   Programme Agreement – a good faith agreement between each BID-operating business association and the council that sets basic parameters of the council-business association relationship.

·   AGM minutes – the provisional minutes of each business association’s 2020 AGM meetings which contain the resolution, voted on by members, confirming the BID grant amount for the 2021/2022 financial year.

 

40.     In addition, BID-operating business associations are required to inform the council staff of progress with other compliance requirements, including:

·   Incorporated Society registration – a current registration of the business association along with all required documents up to date.

·   Resolving problems or issues, if any – problems or issues that have an impact on the governance or operation of the BID programme.

 

41.     The BID Policy sets an annual compliance deadline of 10 March for the information to be forwarded to the council, as summarised in the table below.

 

Table 1: Business associations’ compliance with the BID Policy as of 10 March 2021

 

Requirement

Financial Year 2019/2020

May be an image of text that says 'getba Greater East Tamaki Business Association Inc.'

 

 

 

Strategic Plan*

 

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green 2017-2022

 

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green2019-2023

 

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green2019-2023

 

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green2014-2024

 

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green2015-2021

Audited financials

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual Report

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Business Plan

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Indicative budget

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Board Charter

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual Accountability Agreement

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual meeting w/ local board

20 August 2020

4 May 2021

10 November 2020

4 May 2021

4 May 2021

Programme Agreement

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Greenvalid to Oct 2022

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Greenvalid to Sept 2022

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Greenvalid to Oct 2022

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Greensigned 2016 no expiry date

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Greenvalid to Dec 2025

Incorporated society registration

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

2020 AGM minutes (provisional)

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Resolving problems or issues

Nothing to record

Nothing to record

Nothing to record

Nothing to record

Nothing to record

 

42.     As the Greater East Tāmaki, Hunters Corner, Manukau, Ōtara and Papatoetoe Central business associations have sufficiently complied with the BID Policy, staff advise the local board to recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates.

 

All five business associations retain the same BID grant amounts for 2021/2022

43.     As shown in Table 2 below shows:

·    Greater East Tāmaki Business Association’s proposed BID targeted rate for 2021/2022 - $545,000 – is unchanged from the current financial year.

·    Hunters Corner Town Centre Society’s proposed BID targeted rate for 2021/2022 - $126,590 – is unchanged from the current financial year.

·    Manukau Business Association’s proposed BID targeted rate for 2021/2022 - $510,000 – is unchanged from the current financial year.

·    Ōtara Business Association’s proposed BID targeted rate for 2021/2022 - $94,730 – is unchanged from the current financial year.

·    Papatoetoe Central Mainstreet Society’s proposed BID targeted rate for 2021/2022 - $100,692 – is unchanged from the current financial year.

 

Table 2: BID targeted rates comparison: 2021/2022 c.f. 2020/2021

 

 

   BID

 

2021/2022

 

2020/2021

 

Increase / %

 

 

May be an image of text that says 'getba Greater East Tamaki Business Association Inc.'

 

 

$545,000

 

 

 

$545,000

 

 

Nil

LAST INCREASED: 2020/2021

 

 

 

 

$126,590

 

 

 

$126,590

 

 

Nil

LAST INCREASED: 2016/2017

 

 

 

 

$510,000

 

 

 

$510,000

 

 

Nil

LAST INCREASED: 2019/2020 due to BID expansion

 

 

$94,730

 

 

 

$94,730

 

 

Nil

LAST INCREASED: 2017/2018

 

 

$100,692

 

 

 

$100,692

 

 

Nil

LAST INCREASED: 2015/2016

 

44.     Of Tāmaki Makaurau’s 50 BID-operating business associations, 21 increased their targeted rates for 2021/2022 with the percentage increase ranging between 1.7% to 10%. One BID reduced its income after a one-off increase in 2020/2021 to fund America’s Cup-related activities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

45.     Through targeted rate-funded advocacy and activities, BID-operating business associations promote and often facilitate environmental sustainability programmes.

46.     From running carbon-reducing ‘shop local’ campaigns to promoting online channels and championing waste reduction and recovery programmes, there are many examples of BID programmes leading the local business sector’s response to the climate change emergency.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

47.     Advocacy is a key service provided by business associations and those with BID programme-funded personnel are at an advantage. BID-operating business associations ensure the views and ambitions of their members are provided to elected representatives and council teams, including CCOs, on those policies, plans, programmes and projects that impact them.

48.     The BID-operating business associations work with Auckland Unlimited (AU) on economic development initiatives, events and sustainability programmes.

49.     The BID-operating business associations also work constructively with both Panuku and Auckland Transport on often controversial proposals and projects.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

50.     The local board’s views are most frequently expressed by its appointed representative on the board of each BID-operating business association. This liaison board member (or alternates) can attend BID board meetings to ensure there is a direct link between the council and the operation of the BID programme.

Visions, plans aligned

51.     The BID-operating business associations and local board share an interest in the local rohe and are ambitious for its future and its people. They also share goals that include economic prosperity, community identity, placemaking and pride.

52.     Ōtara-Papatoetoe BID programmes tangibly support the vision and aspirations of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2020, best expressed in Outcome 2: Prosperous local economy.

Local rohe, local benefit, local funding

53.     Recommending that the Governing Body sets the targeted rates for the five business associations means that the BID programmes will continue to be funded from targeted rates on commercial properties in their respective rohe. They will provide services in accordance with their members’ priorities as stated in their strategic plans.

54.     Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is among several local boards which provides additional funding to local business associations, however accountability for any grants is set by funding agreements between the local board and each business association. Those contractual obligations are separate from the requirements of the BID Policy and are not covered in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

55.     Māori make up more than 15.7% of the population living in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area, compared to 11.5% of Auckland (SOURCE: 2018 CENSUS)Individual business associations may, through operating their BID programme, identify opportunities for niche support or development of any Māori business sector in their rohe.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

56.     There are no financial implications for the local board. Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from commercial ratepayers in the district and used by the business association for improvements within that rohe. The council’s financial role is to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the associations every quarter.

57.     The targeted rate is payable by the owners of the commercial properties within the geographic area of the individual BID programmes.  In practice, this cost is often passed on to the business owners who occupy these properties.  This cost may be harder to meet at a time when businesses continue to be financially impacted by the flow-on effects of the COVID-19 lockdown restrictions. 

58.     The council last year extended its Rates Remission and Postponement Policy to commercial property owners as part of the Annual Budget 2020/2021 to help mitigate the impact of the targeted rate on those who are struggling financially. This policy will continue for the 2021/2022 financial year.

59.     If the Governing Body agrees with the BID targeted rates proposed by the business associations, the cost of grants will be met from the existing operational budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

60.     There are no direct financial risks to the local board or the council that could result from this recommendation to endorse the BID targeted rates for these business associations.

61.     To sustain public trust and confidence in the council, there needs to be a balance between the independence of the BID-operating business associations and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

62.     The rules and obligations of the BID Policy are intended to help minimise the potential for business associations to misuse BID targeted rate funds by requiring each BID to plan for their intended use, report on its activities to its members and to have its accounts audited.

63.     The council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy and this report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds.

64.     Economic disruption created by the flow-on effects of COVID-19 lockdowns will continue to be felt in Auckland’s town centres and business precincts. The BID programme is an internationally proven approach to engage and empower local businesses.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

65.     If the local board supports this report, it will recommend to the Governing Body that the BID targeted rates be set as part of the Annual Budget 2021/2022.

66.     After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly BID grant payments, effective from 1 July 2021, to the Greater East Tāmaki, Hunters Corner, Manukau, Ōtara and Papatoetoe Central business associations.This enables the BIDs to implement programmes that improve the local business environment and support businesses as they recover from the economic flow-on effects from the COVID 19 lockdowns and help address the climate change emergency through sustainability initiatives.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Siddens - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

Local Board Views on Plan Change 60 - Open Space (2020) and Other Rezoning Matters

File No.: CP2021/05610

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To invite the local board to provide its views on the council initiated Plan Change 60 – Open Space (2020) and Other Rezoning Matters (PC60).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Decision-makers on a plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan must consider local boards’ views on the plan change, if the relevant local boards choose to provide their views.

3.       Each local board has a responsibility to communicate the interests and preferences of people in its area on Auckland Council policy documents, including plan changes. A local board can present local views and preferences when that view is expressed by the whole local board.[1]

4.       On 28 January 2021, Auckland Council notified Plan Change 60. Submissions closed on 1 March 2021. The plan change includes 105 sites (in some cases, a site comprises more than one lot) and aims to rezone land to:

(a)  recognise land recently vested or acquired as open space

(b)  correct zoning errors or anomalies (including rezoning land to better reflect its use)

(c)  facilitate Panuku Development Auckland’s (Panuku) land rationalisation and disposal process or

(d)  facilitate Kainga Ora’s and Auckland Council redevelopment of certain neighbourhoods.

5.       One hundred and six submissions have been received on the proposed plan change. The vast majority of these oppose Panuku’s rezoning and land disposal. In summary there are 15 submissions in support of the plan change, four in support but seeking amendments, 85 in opposition and two out of scope.

6.       No iwi authority has made a submission in support or opposition to Plan Change 60.

7.       This report is the mechanism for the local board to resolve and provide its views on Plan Change 60 should it wish to do so. Staff do not recommend what view the local board should convey.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      provide local board views on Plan Change 60 - Open Space (2020) and Other Rezoning Matters

b)      appoint a local board member to speak to the local board views at a hearing on Plan Change 60

c)      delegate authority to the chairperson of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board to make a replacement appointment in the event the local board member appointed in resolution b) is unable to attend the plan change hearing.

Horopaki

Context

8.       Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of Auckland Council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards provide their views on the content of these documents. Decision-makers must consider local boards’ views when deciding the content of these policy documents.[2]

9.       If the local board chooses to provide its views, the planner includes those views in the hearing report. Local board views are included in the analysis of the plan change, along with submissions.

10.     If appointed by resolution, local board members may present the local board’s views at the hearing to commissioners, who decide on the plan change.

11.     This report provides an overview of the proposed plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP), and a summary of submissions’ key themes.

12.     The report does not recommend what the local board should convey, should the local board decide to convey its views on plan change 60. The planner must include any local board views in the evaluation of the plan change. The planner cannot advise the local board as to what its views should be, and then evaluate those views.

13.     The key theme from submissions is opposition to the proposed rezonings relating to Kainga Ora/Auckland Council redevelopment and Panuku’s land rationalisation and disposal. Attachment A identifies the land parcels that are the subject of submissions.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Plan Change 60 affects land across the Auckland region.

15.     The purpose of the proposed plan change is to rezone land to either:

(a)  recognise land recently vested or acquired as open space

(b)  correct zoning errors or anomalies (including rezoning land to better reflect its use)

(c)  facilitate Panuku’s land rationalisation and disposal process or

(d)  facilitate Kainga Ora’s and Auckland Council redevelopment of certain neighbourhoods.

16.     The Section 32 Report and details of the plan change are available from the council’s website at Plan Change 60. The council’s planner, and other experts, will evaluate and report on:

·   section 32 Report that accompanies the plan change

·   submissions and

·   the views and preferences of the local board, if the local board passes a resolution.

17.     Submissions were made by 106 people/organisations as outlined below.

Submissions

Number of submissions

In support

15

In support but requesting change(s)

4

In opposition

85

Out of scope

2

Total

106

 

18.     Key submission themes are listed below.

Oppose the rezoning of:

·   142 Triangle Road, Massey (Maps 4 & 37)

·   1-5 Lippiatt Road, Otahuhu (Map 73)

·   23 Waipuna Road, Mount Wellington (Map 75)

·   12R Rockfield Road, Ellerslie (Map 76)

·   11R Birmingham Road, Otara (Map 77)

·   2R Keeney Court, Papakura (Map 78)

·   Walkway adjacent to 45 Brandon Road, Glen Eden (Map 79)

·   45 Georgina Street, Freemans Bay (Map 81)

·   36 Cooper Street, Grey Lynn (Map 82)

·   13 Davern Lane, New Lynn (Map 85)

·   67 East Street, Pukekohe (Map 86)

·   Princes Street West, Pukekohe (Map 87)

·   R105 Stott Avenue, Birkenhead (Map 93)

·   26 Princes Otahuhu (Map 96).

Support the rezoning but request an alternative zone:

·   2157 East Coast Road, Stillwater (Map 71).

Both support for and opposition to the rezoning:

·   50 Mayflower Close, Mangere East (Map 100)

·   62 Mayflower Close, Mangere East (Map 105).

Support for rezoning or further information required:

·   1337 Whangaparaoa Road, Army Bay (Map 104).

19.     The key reasons for submission opposing the plan change include:

·   opposed to the rezoning of pocket parks – they are needed to support intensification and for social and environmental benefits

·   loss of valuable reserve land

·   few parks in the area

·   significant negative effect on enjoyment of our neighbourhood/ adverse effects on property and locality

·   park has significant cultural heritage associations and natural value

·   contradicts Auckland Unitary Plan heritage policies

·   inadequate public notification

·   green areas needed in more intensive housing areas

·   contrary to climate change/greenhouse effects – green spaces are needed for low carbon Auckland Council

·   inconsistent with Auckland Unitary Plan objectives and policies

·   park has trees which will be lost with rezoning and development

·   site is an overland flow path and flood plain

·   property values will be adversely affected

·   loss of walkway and critical linkage

·   sale of spaces is desperate revenue gathering/selling due to Covid is short-sighted

·   subsequent building will severely impact on sunlight and amenities of adjoining sites

·   contrary to Auckland Council’s declaration of a climate emergency, open space network plans, National Policy Statement – Urban Development – well functioning environments, open space provision policy, Auckland Plan 2050, the Urban Ngahere Strategy

·   site is a Significant Ecological Area and part of a wildlife corridor and refuge

·   inconsistent with Local Boards’ goal of increasing tree canopy.

20.     Information on individual submissions, and the summary of all decisions requested by submitters, is available from council’s website: Plan Change 60

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     Several submissions raised specific climate concerns. These relate to the loss of locally accessible open space and the associated vegetation, particularly mature trees.

22.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·   to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and 

·   to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

23.     The local board could consider if Plan Change 60:

·   will reduce, increase or have no effect on Auckland’s overall greenhouse gas emissions (e.g. does it encourage car dependency, enhance connections to public transit, walking and cycling or support quality compact urban form)

·   prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change. That is, does the proposed plan change elevate or alleviate climate risks (e.g. flooding, coastal and storm inundation, urban heat effect, stress on infrastructure).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     Panuku is a council-controlled organisation that resulted from the merging of Auckland Council Property Limited and Waterfront Auckland. One of the roles of Panuku is the release of land or properties that can be better utilised by others.

25.     In conjunction with Auckland Council’s Stakeholder and Land Advisory team, Panuku have identified 26 council-owned parcels of land which are either surplus to requirements or they are part of a Panuku regeneration project (i.e. a series of projects and initiatives, designed to kickstart the transformation process and bring about changes that will help centres prosper in the future). Those parcels considered to be surplus to requirements have been cleared for sale by Auckland Council.

26.     Auckland Council’s decision to dispose of or sell the land parcels is separate from the zoning of the land. Zoning is a method used to implement the Auckland Unitary Plan’s objectives and policies and to achieve the purpose of the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA). The merit of any rezoning of land (from open space to residential or business) therefore must be assessed against the purpose of the RMA and the relevant Auckland Unitary Plan objectives and policies. Other relevant considerations which will be considered in the section 42A hearing report include the Auckland Plan 2050, Auckland’s Climate Plan and the Urban Ngahere Strategy and open space network plans.

27.     Auckland Transport made a submission in relation to the rezoning of 1337 Whangaparaoa Road, Army Bay. The key matter raised is the traffic effects of rezoning the Whangaparaoa Golf course from Residential – Single House to Open Space – Sport and Active Recreation zone.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     The plan change affects sites throughout the Auckland region and feedback is therefore sought from all local boards.

29.     Factors the local board may wish to consider in formulating its view:

·   interests and preferences of people in local board area

·   well-being of communities within the local board area

·   local board documents, such as the local board plan and local board agreement

·   responsibilities and operation of the local board.

30.     A memo was sent to all local boards on 27 October 2020 outlining the proposed changes, the rationale for them and the likely plan change timeframes.

31.     This report is the mechanism for obtaining formal local board views. The decision-maker will consider local board views, if provided, when deciding on the plan change.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     If the local board chooses to provide its views on Plan Change 60 it may also comment on matters that may be of interest or importance to Māori generally. In the 2018 census, approximately 11.5 per cent (or 181,194) of the Auckland region’s population identified as Māori.

33.     Plans and Places consulted with all iwi authorities when it prepared Plan Change 60. On 27 October 2020, a memorandum outlining the draft proposed plan change was sent to all Auckland’s 19 mana whenua entities and the Tupuna Maunga Authority as required under the RMA.

34.     Comments were received from:

·   Ngāti Manuhiri – asking for an extension of time to 11 December 2020 to enable a discussion with their governance arm

·   Waikato Tainui – they will support manawhenua to take the lead role on such plan changes

·   Tupuna Maunga Authority – their interest is those sites that are within Height Sensitive Areas or regionally Significant Volcanic Viewshafts.

35.     No iwi authorities made a formal submission.

36.     The hearing report will include analysis of Part 2 of the RMA which requires that all persons exercising RMA functions shall take into account the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi/Te Tiriti o Waitangi.[3] The plan change does not trigger an issue of significance as identified in the Schedule of Issues of Significance and Māori Plan 2017.[4]

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.     Panuku’s land rezoning and rationalisation (26 land parcels) is part of the Auckland Council’s financial recovery.

38.     The draft Long-term Plan 2021-2031 proposes the selling of surplus properties and reinvesting the proceeds into critical infrastructure for the city. Over the next three years, Auckland Council is seeking to increase these sales to return $70 million a year to invest in Auckland.

39.     The 26 land parcels that are part of this plan change form part of the $70 million return sought.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     There is a risk that the local board will be unable to provide its views and preferences on the plan change if it doesn’t pass a resolution. This report provides:

·   the mechanism for the local board to express its views and preferences if it so wishes

·   the opportunity for a local board member to speak at a hearing.

41.     If the local board chooses not to pass a resolution at this business meeting, these opportunities are forgone.

42.     The power to provide local board views regarding the content of a plan change cannot be delegated to individual local board member(s).[5] This report enables the whole local board to decide whether to provide its views and, if so, to determine what matters those views should include.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.     The planner will include, and report on, any resolution(s) of the local boards in the Section 42A hearing report. The local board member appointed to speak to the local board’s views will be informed of the hearing date and invited to the hearing for that purpose.

44.     The planner will advise the local boards of the decision on the plan change request by memorandum.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

The land parcels in PC60 that are the subject of submissions

77

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tony Reidy - Team Leader Planning

Authorisers

Eryn Shields - Team Leader  Regional, North West and Islands

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

Economic Development Action Plan: Draft for feedback

File No.: CP2021/05642

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on the draft Economic Development Action Plan: Council’s role in Auckland’s recovery 2021-24.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The council organisation and council-controlled organisations have worked collaboratively to develop the draft Economic Development Action Plan. This plan defines and agrees, for the next three years, the council family’s economic objectives and priorities and determines a coordinated course of action. The plan is limited to actions that are within the remit of council and council-controlled organisation (CCO) activities.

3.       The draft plan aligns with the 10-year budget and will inform the work programmes of relevant council family departments. The work is supported by the chief executives of council and all substantive council-controlled organisations.

4.       The draft plan outlines detailed actions within six areas of focus (‘workstreams’) as outlined in Attachment A. It reflects the guiding principles of transitioning towards a regenerative and low carbon economy, supporting economic opportunities for Māori, and responding to our communities of greatest need.

5.       There will be targeted engagement on the draft plan, including with iwi, advisory panel members and business groups. Feedback will be sought until 14 June 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive the draft Economic Development Action Plan: Council’s role in Auckland’s recovery 2021-24

b)      provide feedback by 14 June 2021 for consideration in the final draft Economic Development Action Plan: Council’s role in Auckland’s recovery 2021-24.

Horopaki

Context

6.       In August 2020, the CCO Review Panel delivered its report alongside 64 recommendations which were endorsed in full by the Governing Body. The review stated that council and all substantive council-controlled organisations (CCOs) should together define the economic outcomes for Auckland and agree on how to achieve and measure them. The review also acknowledged the need for better coordination and definition of responsibilities for local economic development within the council family. The Economic Development Action Plan forms part of council’s response to that review.

7.       The plan is not a long-term strategy and does not replace the Economic Development Strategy 2012. The priorities and focus over the next three years, however, consider direction from council’s existing strategies i.e., the Auckland Plan 2050, Economic Development Strategy 2012, Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan and Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau: Council’s Māori Outcomes Framework.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       Comprehensive background work to support the development of the action plan has been completed by the Chief Economist Unit (CEU), the Auckland Plan Strategy and Research Department (APSR) and Auckland Unlimited. This includes a report from the CEU providing a profile of Auckland’s economy over the last 10 years, the impact of Covid-19 on the Auckland economy, and the main roadblocks to recovery. The same report also identified areas where the council group can have a material impact on economic development. Key areas are:

·        assets

·        procurement

·        land use and zoning

·        regulatory processes

·        travel network

·        town centres

·        pricing

·        skills and investment attraction

·        tourism attraction

·        social support services

·        coordination of responses through partnerships.

9.       There has also been an extensive review of plans and strategies across the council and CCOs to identify common economic development themes. These were: innovation and technology, Māori economy, regenerative, resilient, low carbon economy, workforce transition, competitive high-value sectors, local economic development, infrastructure, and culture and creativity.

10.     This background work formed the basis for six workstreams:

·        Destination Tāmaki Makaurau: attracting people and investment

·        Local Tāmaki Makaurau: enabling thriving local economies

·        Skilled Tāmaki Makaurau: supporting quality jobs and skill development

·        Future Tāmaki Makaurau: preparing businesses for the future

·        Enabled Tāmaki Makaurau: infrastructure enabling economic development

·        Enabled Tāmaki Makaurau: regulations that enable economic development.

11.     Each workstream has both council and CCO staff representation. These workstreams have developed a set of actions with responsibilities and timeframes as detailed in this draft plan. A monitoring framework will be developed to ensure roles, responsibilities and accountabilities of council and each CCO are clearly defined as they relate to the actions in the draft plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan has provided direction to the development of the draft plan, aspiring to a more resilient economy that is regenerative, inclusive, local and enables Aucklanders to thrive.

13.     The draft action plan has embedded the guiding principle of ‘transitioning to a regenerative and low carbon economy’ into each of its six workstreams. The development of actions is underpinned by kaitiakitanga and considers how resources used give back to nature and increase value through reuse and renewal. Where applicable, actions broadly encourage a decrease in greenhouse gas emissions, low carbon products and services, climate innovation, and less dependency on natural resources.

14.     The actions presented in this draft action plan will go through a further climate impact assessment using tools developed by the Chief Sustainability Office. The results of this assessment will be incorporated into the final plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The draft plan responds to the CCO review recommendation for council and all CCOs to together define the economic outcomes for Auckland and agree on how to achieve and measure them. The actions in the draft plan will be shared and accountabilities of council and each CCO well defined. Some CCOs will have a more active role than others.

16.     The scope and development of the Economic Development Action Plan has been agreed to through the council and CCO Chief Executives’ group. This group is updated with progress on the plan as appropriate. The project team includes a representative and contribution from each CCO. 

17.     The scope of the plan is limited to actions that are within the remit of council and CCO activities. A review and discussion document of the council group’s levers that materially contribute to economic development formed the basis for this draft plan (refer to Attachment B).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     Each workstream of the plan will have a local impact, acknowledging the interdependency of local economies and the regional economy. The draft plan includes the focus area ‘Local Tāmaki Makaurau: enabling thriving local economies’ and has been informed by the recent local board plans’ local economic priorities.

19.     The Local Tāmaki Makaurau workstream seeks to clarify what the Auckland Council group will do to support the local economies of Auckland. This includes setting out the roles that each part of the group plays in delivering actions, while also setting the foundations to help the group identify the economic places (sub-regional and local) of Auckland and deliver outcomes at the local level.

20.     A memo was distributed on 17 February 2021 to inform local board members of the development of council’s Economic Development Action Plan 2021-24 and to outline the process for local board feedback to the plan. At the request of the local board chairpersons, the draft plan will be provided at all local board business meetings in May 2021 with written feedback by formal resolution provided to the project leads by 14 June 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau has provided direction to the development of the draft plan, in particular, the Kia ora te Umanga mahi objective of supporting economic opportunities for Māori businesses and iwi organisations. The draft plan has also considered direction from the Auckland Plan 2050, the Kaitiaki Forum’s strategic plan and the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s Issues of Significance (2017) as they relate to Māori economic development.

22.     The draft action plan has embedded the guiding principle of ‘supporting economic opportunities for Māori’ into each of its six workstreams. The development of actions will consider partnership opportunities with mana whenua and mataawaka, a focus on equity and addressing systemic barriers, and identifying new economic opportunities for Māori.

23.     The project team have communicated with iwi from the commencement of the project to determine and initiate the preferred process of engagement for each iwi. This draft plan will be sent to all iwi for input and feedback through to 14 June 2021.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The scope of the Economic Development Action Plan states that actions will be funded within the existing 10-year Budget 2021-2031 and therefore, no additional funding is required. The draft plan identifies some actions that rely on external funding sources and partnerships.

25.     At the advice of the finance division, budget alignment is demonstrated in the draft plan at both the group of activity and CCO / council directorate level.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     The draft plan outlines actions that require a commitment from the responsible directorate to include in their work programmes and within their existing budgets. The monitoring framework will include regular progress reporting to ensure effective implementation of the action plan.

27.     This action plan is an internal document, outlining work to be done within the remit of council and its CCOs. The content of the plan builds on earlier consultation undertaken in the development of key strategies that have provided direction. Input and feedback for this action plan has therefore been targeted to key groups.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     The draft plan will be distributed to the key groups that have been engaged from the commencement of the project. Feedback will be considered until 14 June 2021.

29.     The final Economic Development Action Plan: Council’s role in Auckland’s recovery 2021-24 and its monitoring framework will be presented to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events committee on 8 July 2021 for adoption.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Economic Development Action Plan

85

b

Auckland's economic recovery and council's role

119

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janelle Breckell - Principal Strategic Advisor

James Robinson, Head of Strategy and Planning, Auckland Unlimited

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Jacques Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

Central government submission - congestion pricing

File No.: CP2021/05704

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the local board with an opportunity to provide input into Auckland Council’s submission to Parliament’s Transport and Infrastructure Committee inquiry into congestion pricing in Auckland.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Minister of Transport has asked Parliament’s Transport and Infrastructure Committee to undertake an inquiry into congestion pricing in Auckland.

3.       The select committee has invited public submissions, which close on 20 May 2021.

4.       Based on previous decisions on this matter, staff are recommending that the Planning Committee support in principle the implementation of congestion pricing in Auckland, conditional upon particular issues being addressed.

5.       The local board now has the opportunity to consider the matters raised by ‘The Congestion Question’ (TCQ) project and formulate its views for inclusion as part of Auckland Council’s submission to the select committee.

6.       Feedback received from local boards by 10 May will be considered for incorporation into the council’s submission.  Feedback received from local boards by 17 May will be appended to the council’s submission.

7.       Due to the timing of the submission deadline in relation to the Auckland Council Planning Committee schedule, council staff will be asking for a delegated sign off at the 6 May Planning Committee meeting.

8.       Staff anticipate that the council will continue to be involved in this work as a full decision-making partner and will thus be able to resolve its final position on matters set out in the submission in due course and with the benefit of some insight into public sentiment through the select committee process.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive the report and its attachments as follows:

i)        Attachment A - memo provided to Auckland Council Planning Committee and local board members dated 1 April 2021

ii)       Attachment B - findings report produced by ‘The Congestion Question’ project (TCQ) dated July 2020

iii)      Attachment C – report to Planning Committee dated 6 May 2021

b)      note the boards feedback to be considered for incorporation into Auckland Council’s submission to the Transport and Infrastructure Committee inquiry into congestion pricing in Auckland, to be tabled at the meeting.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Parliament’s Transport and Infrastructure Committee is calling for public submissions on its inquiry into congestion pricing in Auckland.

10.     Submissions close on Thursday 20 May.  Due to the timing of the submission deadline in relation to the Auckland Council Planning Committee schedule, council staff will be asking for a delegated sign off at the 6 May Planning Committee meeting.

11.     Feedback received from local boards by 10 May will be considered for incorporation into the main submission. Feedback received from local boards by 17 May will be appended to the council submission.

12.     The local board now has the opportunity to consider the matters raised by the TCQ project and formulate its views for inclusion as part of Auckland Council’s submission to the select committee.

13.     Congestion pricing involves implementing a charge (or charges) to manage demand on the road network.  This can encourage users to change their travel behaviour, such as the time, route, or mode by which they travel. 

14.     A copy of a memo provided to the Planning Committee and local board members (dated 1 April) on this subject is presented as Attachment A to this report. A copy of a report outlining the main findings from phase two of the TCQ project is presented as Attachment B to this report.

15.     Auckland Council and Auckland Transport will make a combined submission to the inquiry. The Transport and Infrastructure Committee is interested in hearing people’s thoughts on the idea of introducing congestion pricing in Auckland, and will be guided in its inquiry by the below terms of reference:

·    Using ‘The Congestion Question’ (TCQ) reports as a base, developing a thorough understanding of how a congestion regime could be implemented, including the use of technology, which routes would be included, and how charging could be structured and facilitated.

·    Through the submissions process, lead a constructive public dialogue to ensure all affected groups and individuals have an opportunity to have their say.

·    Ensuring that equity and mitigation issues are identified and how any scheme could be structured to ensure that any one group, particularly those on lower incomes, are not unreasonably impacted.

·    Focusing on how any revenue raised would be used and would integrate with other revenue streams derived from fuel taxes, road user charges, and other fiscal factors.

·    Identifying and evaluating comparative congestion charging models internationally and identifying best practice.

·    Confirming the likely behavioural change and benefits from a congestion charge in Auckland, including evaluating the impact of behavioural change on existing alternative transport modes, especially public transport.

·    Provide the opportunity for those outside Auckland to engage with the issue through the submissions process.

·    Understanding the impact of a congestion charge on emissions and air quality.

·    Understanding the options for legislative change to enable congestion pricing.

16.     Council staff have presented to the Planning Committee on the TCQ project previously, most recently on 3 December 2020 where a project update and the findings from phase two were presented. The Planning Committee passed the following resolutions at that meeting (resolution number PLA/2020/116):

·    note that phase two of the TCQ project is complete

·    receive the findings from phase two of the TCQ project

·    approve officers scoping the next phase of the project alongside officers from participating agencies, including Auckland Transport

·    note that officers will seek the Planning Committee’s approval of the scope before proceeding with the third phase of the TCQ project

·    require that the scope provides a timeline and process for comprehensive public engagement, including targeted engagement with Maori, due to the critical importance of hearing from Aucklanders about the implications and options of congestion pricing before any decisions are finalised

·    require that the potential social inequity impacts and the mitigation of any such impacts be fundamental to further considerations and the scope of the next phase of work

·    requests quarterly progress reporting on the next phase of congestion pricing in Auckland

·    urge central government to fully commit its agencies to progress the next phase of congestion pricing in Auckland, including provisional scheme design, for a final decision by quarter three in 2021.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

17.     Due to the announcement of the select committee inquiry, phase three of TCQ has been put on hold until the government clarifies the next steps. The submission timeframes do not allow the necessary work to be undertaken to determine the details of scheme design and implementation that will be required to support final decisions on congestion pricing. Further work will therefore be required either under the auspices of the select committee or TCQ (or something akin to it).

18.     Based on previous decisions on this matter, staff are recommending that the Planning Committee:

·    support in principle implementation of congestion pricing in Auckland, conditional upon the following issues being addressed:

i)    mitigation of equity impacts

ii)   having public transport services and projects in place to allow road users to switch to alternative modes where appropriate

iii)   that revenue collected, in addition to that needed to operate the scheme and to address subclauses a) i) and a) ii) above, be used to offset and, as revenue and costs allow, replace the Regional Fuel Tax.

19.     Staff propose that the submission be framed around several key issues of concern for Auckland Council as identified through the resolutions of and discussions at the Planning Committee’s December 2020 meeting, TCQ phase two reports and the select committee inquiry’s terms of reference. These issues include:

·    the case for congestion pricing in Auckland

·    the mitigations required to ensure more equitable outcomes for vulnerable communities

·    the role of congestion pricing in helping reduce Auckland’s transport emissions

·    the need to ensure appropriate public and active transport alternatives are in place in affected corridors prior to the introduction of congestion pricing

·    the need to understand and address potential revenue implications for Auckland Council.

20.     Staff anticipate that Auckland Council will continue to be involved in this work as a full decision-making partner and will thus be able to resolve its final position on matters set out in the submission in due course and with the benefit of some insight into public sentiment through the select committee process.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     Local boards’ input to the Auckland Council submission to the select committee does not in itself raise direct climate impacts.

22.     The introduction of congestion pricing in Auckland will likely have positive climate impacts.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Auckland Transport is working closely with Auckland Council staff to develop the submission.

24.     The Auckland Transport Board has previously indicated its in principle support for the introduction of congestion pricing.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     The impacts of congestion pricing will vary between local board areas depending on the specific corridors selected for inclusion within the scheme and the travel patterns of local people.

26.     The social evaluation analysis undertaken in support of TCQ phase two modelled the potential variance in household impact of a particular congestion pricing scheme between local board areas and further differentiated by household income levels. In terms of the differentiation of financial impact the least affected local board area is Orakei (average additional household costs of 0.23 per cent of average household income) while the most affected was Otara-Papatoetoe (0.65 per cent).

27.     The key point here is not the precise modelled numbers (which will change as input assumptions to the model are updated) but rather the differentiation between high- and low-income areas. This further reinforces the need for mitigation measures to offset the potentially inequitable impact of congestion pricing on low-income households.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     Local boards’ input to the Auckland Council submission to the select committee does not in itself have a direct impact on Māori.

29.     Impacts on Māori have been canvassed as part of the TCQ project, and further information can be found in Attachment B.

30.     Staff have invited mana whenua input into Auckland Council’s submission and have provided an update for the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum to consider at its May 2021 forum meeting.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     Local boards’ input to the Auckland Council submission to the select committee does not in itself have a direct financial impact.

32.     The establishment of a congestion pricing scheme will require significant investment in infrastructure (e.g., number plate recognition technology) and ongoing operating costs. Given that no decisions on congestion pricing have been made, no funding has been allocated to its implementation in either Auckland Transport Alignment Project (ATAP) 2021-31 or the draft Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) 2021-31. It is likely both documents will be updated prior to any implementation of congestion pricing in Auckland so there will be an opportunity to revisit funding allocations in the future

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     Due to the timing of business meetings, local boards may need to resolve their feedback prior to the Planning Committee resolving its views on the matter. This risk can be mitigated by reviewing the attached report to planning committee (Attachment C) and - for those who resolve their feedback after 6 May – we recommend that the Planning Committee resolutions are considered.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Submissions to the Transport and Infrastructure Committee’s inquiry into congestion pricing in Auckland close on 20 May 2021.

35.     The Transport Strategy Team will lead the development of the Auckland Council group’s submission to the select committee.

36.     Feedback received from local boards by 10 May will be considered for incorporation into the main submission. 

37.     Feedback received from local boards by 17 May will be appended to the council submission.

38.     The deadline for the select committee to report its findings and any recommendations to the Minister of Transport is not yet known. As indicated throughout this report, further work will be required either during or after the select committee process to determine key matters ahead of final decisions on whether to implement congestion pricing in Auckland.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo to Planning Committee and local board members dated 1 April.

145

b

The Congestion Question main findings document.

149

c

Transport and Infrastructure Committee inquiry into congestion pricing in Auckland report to Planning Committee 6 May 2021

175

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kat Ashmead, Senior Policy Advisor, Local Board Services

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

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18 May 2021

 

 

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18 May 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

Addition to the 2019-2022 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Meeting Schedule

File No.: CP2021/03749

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for a meeting date to be added to the 2019-2022 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board meeting schedule to accommodate providing feedback in July 2021.

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board adopted the 2016-2019 meeting schedule on 3 December 2019.

3.       There was no provision for a meeting in July 2021 due to the board having a 2-week recess.

4.       The local board is being asked to approve an extraordinary meeting date on 27 July 2021 to adopt the board’s feedback to the Auckland Transport Signage Bylaw 2015 and the Auckland Transport Election Signs Bylaw 2013 as this feedback cannot be delegated.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      approve the addition of an extraordinary meeting date to the 2019-2022 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board meeting schedule to provide the board’s feedback to the Auckland Transport Signage Bylaw 2015 and the Auckland Transport Election Signs Bylaw 2013 as follows:

i)        Tuesday 27 July 2021 at 12.30pm

b)      agree to hold the extraordinary meeting in the Woodside Room, Level 1, Manukau Civic Building, 31-33 Manukau Station Road, Manukau.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

Local board resolution responses and information report

 

File No.: CP2021/04738

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       This report provides a summary of resolution responses and information reports for circulation to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board.

Information reports for the local board:

2.      Auckland Unlimited Quarter two performance report for the period ending 31 December 2020 is attached to this report as Attachment A.         

3.      April/May Auckland Unlimited Newsletter for Ōtara-Papatoetoe as Attachment B.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the Auckland Unlimited Quarter two report included as Attachment A

b)      note the April/May Auckland Unlimited Newsletter for Ōtara-Papatoetoe, Attachment B.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Unlimited - Quarter two report

191

b

April/May Auckland Unlimited Newsletter for Ōtara-Papatoetoe

207

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2021/03138

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Work Calendar

211

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

Record of Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2021/03140

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board record for the workshops held on 6 April, 13 April and 27 April 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 12.1.4, the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its local board workshops held over the past month.

3.       Resolutions or decisions are not made at workshops as they are solely for the provision of information and discussion. This report attaches the workshop record for the period stated below.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board workshop records for: 6 April, 13 April and 27 April 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Record, 6 April 2021

217

b

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Record, 13 April 2021

219

c

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Record, 27 April 2021

221

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

18 May 2021

 

 

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[1] Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, section 15(2)(c)

[2] Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, ss15-16.

 

[3] Resource Management Act 1991, section 8.

[4] Schedule of Issues of Significance and Māori Plan 2017, Independent Māori Statutory Board

[5] Local Government Act 2002, Schedule 7, clause 36D.