I hereby give notice that an extraordinary meeting of the Ōrākei Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 6 May 2021

5.00pm

Ōrākei Local Board Office,
25 St Johns Road, Meadowbank

 

Ōrākei Local Board

 

OPEN ADDENDUM AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Mr Scott Milne, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Troy Elliott

 

Members

Troy Churton

 

 

Colin Davis, JP

 

 

Sarah Powrie

 

 

Margaret Voyce

 

 

David Wong, JP

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Kim Lawgun

Democracy Advisor

 

4 May 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 302 163

Email: kim.lawgun@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

06 May 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

 

10        Local board consultation feedback and input into the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 5

11        Allocation of Operational Budget for Waiatarua Reserve Weed Management    75

 


Ōrākei Local Board

06 May 2021

 

 

Local board consultation feedback and input into the 10-year Budget 2021-2031

File No.: CP2021/05100

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To summarise consultation feedback from the Ōrākei Local Board area on:

·   proposed priorities, activities and advocacy initiatives for the Ōrākei Local Board Agreement 2021/2022. 

·   regional topics for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

2.       To recommend any local matters to the Governing Body, that they will need to consider or make decisions on in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 process.

3.       To seek input on the proposed regional topics in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

4.       Local board agreements set out annual funding priorities, activities, budgets, levels of service, performance measures and advocacy initiatives for each local board area. Local board agreements for 2021/2022 will be included in the Council’s 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

5.       Auckland Council publicly consulted from 22 February to 22 March 2021 to seek community views on the proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031. This included consultation on the Ōrākei Local Board’s proposed priorities for 2021/2022, and advocacy initiatives for 2021-2031 to be included in their local board agreement.

6.       Auckland Council received 19 965 submissions in total across the region and 1216 submissions from the Ōrākei Local Board area.

7.       Submitters from the Ōrākei Local Board area generally supported the regional proposals and strongly supported the local advocacy initiatives, particularly in respect to improving local water quality.

8.       In the 10-year Budget process there are matters where local boards provide recommendations to the Governing Body, for consideration or decision-making. This includes:  

·   any new/amended business improvement district targeted rates

·   any new/amended local targeted rate proposals 

·   proposed locally driven initiative capital projects outside local boards’ decision-making responsibility

·   release of local board specific reserve funds

·   any local board advocacy initiatives.

The Governing Body will consider these items as part of the 10-year Budget decision-making process in May/June 2021.

9.       Local boards have a statutory responsibility to provide input into regional strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. This report provides an opportunity for the local board to provide input on council’s proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive consultation feedback on the proposed Ōrākei Local Board priorities and activities for 2021/2022 and key advocacy initiatives for 2021-2031.

b)      receive consultation feedback on regional topics in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 from people and organisations based in the Ōrākei Local board area.

c)      approve its advocacy initiatives for inclusion (as an appendix) to its 2021/2022 Local Board Agreement.

d)      recommend the release of local board specific reserve funds to the Governing Body.

e)      provide input on regional topics in the proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031 to the Governing Body.

Horopaki

Context

10.     Each financial year Auckland Council must have a local board agreement, agreed between the Governing Body and each local board. The Ōrākei Local Board Agreement reflects priorities in the Ōrākei Local Board Plan 2020 through identified local activities, budgets, levels of service, performance measures and advocacy initiatives.

11.     The local board agreements 2021/2022 will form part of the Auckland Council’s 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

12.     Auckland Council publicly consulted from 22 February to 22 March 2021 and sought community views on the proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031, as well as local board priorities and proposed advocacy initiatives to be included in the local board agreements 2021/2022.

13.     Due to the impacts of the ongoing COVID-19 global pandemic, significant pressure has been placed upon the council’s financial position. This has created significant flow-on effects for the council’s proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031, in particular in the first three years.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     This report includes analysis of consultation feedback, any local matters to be recommended to the Governing Body and seeks input on the regional topics in the proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

Consultation feedback overview 

15.     As part of the public consultation on the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 Auckland Council used a variety of methods and channels to reach and engage with a broad cross section of Aucklanders to gain their feedback and input into regional and local topics.

16.     In total, Auckland Council received feedback from 19,965 people in the consultation period. This feedback was received through:

a)      written feedback – 18,975 hard copy and online forms, emails and letters.

b)      in person – 607 pieces of feedback through 61 Have Your Say events (38 in person and 23 online webinars), three of which were hosted by the Ōrākei local board, and two independently managed phone interviews. Due to the Covid-19 lockdowns 26 events were affected (either cancelled, postponed or moved to an online platform).

c)      social media – 78 pieces of feedback through Auckland Council social media channels.

17.     The Ōrākei Local Board held the following consultation events to explain and receive feedback on 10-Year budget:

·   Three Have Your Say Events: a round-table style event at the Ōrākei Community Centre, a joint Waitematā / Ōrākei Local Board Water Quality Skype meeting and a Chinese community town hall event at the Remuera Library.

·   Three drop-in events at the St Heliers Library, the Eastridge Shopping Centre and the Ellerslie Community Day

·   Five awareness raising presentations at the Eastern Bay Network meeting, Remuera Gardens Retirement Village, Grace Joel Retirement Village, Rawhiti Estate and Bupa Remuera Retirement Village

·   A forum by which Youth of Ōrākei were able to outline their submission.

18.     The Ōrākei Local Board received 1,216 submissions, of which 225 were pro forma submissions and 14 were received from organisations.

19.     Further submissions were provided by Mana Whenua and Mataawaka groups and these are discussed separately below. 

20.     The tables and graphs below indicate the demographic categories people identified with. This information only relates to those submitters who provided demographic information.

Figure 1: Demographic analysis of submissions received from the Ōrākei Local Board area.

21.     The demographic analysis of Ōrākei Local Board submitters shows an increase in the number of submissions received from young people and those identifying as Chinese and Maori compared with previous years’ annual plan and long-term plan statistics.

22.     All feedback will be made available on an Auckland Council webpage called “Feedback submissions for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031” and will be accessible from 3 May 2021 through the following link: akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/submissions-budget-2021-2031.

Feedback received on the Ōrākei Local Board’s priorities for 2021/2022 and key advocacy initiatives

23.     The Ōrākei Local Board consulted on the following priorities for 2021/2022:

·   Implement multiple environmental programmes along the coast, in Pourewa Valley and in our community reserves

·   Advance plans to improve community access to coastal reserves e.g. Hakumau Reserve and The Landing

·   Continue to monitor and implement measures to improve water quality in our waterways and wetlands

·   Work with our community, business and resident associations to undertake placemaking at our local centres of Ellerslie, Remuera and Ōrākei

·   Support local businesses and town centres in their recovery from the economic impacts of COVID-19

·   Improve community safety in the bays through traffic calming, CCTV and CPTED (Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design) implementation

·   Finalise an Ōrākei Arts Plan to guide future enhancement of art, local heritage and culture at our public facilities and places

·   Investigate and plan for continued improvement of our fields at Thomas Bloodworth Park and Shore Road East.

24.     The Ōrākei Local Board also consulted on the following key advocacy initiatives:

·   Build the links to the Glen Innes to Tamaki Drive Shared Path - the north-south links to the Glen Innes to Tamaki Drive Shared Path will improve road safety and reduce congestion by providing off-road access to schools and commuters, and connect multiple communities across the Pourewa Valley

·   Pourewa Valley enhancement – the Board is seeking regional funding from the 10-year budget to help restore and enhance the natural environment of Pourewa Valley as detailed in the Pourewa Valley Integrated Plan

·   Hobson Bay catchment wastewater/stormwater separation – the Board is advocating to the Governing Body to accelerate separation works for the Remuera catchment and for this project to begin following the completion of the Ōrākei/Okahu Bay separation and improve water quality at Hobson Bay.

25.     309 written submissions were received on Ōrākei Local Board’s priorities for 2021/2031 and its key advocacy initiatives. The majority of local respondents support the board’s priorities, particularly the environmental programmes in Pourewa Valley and the water quality improvements. 52 respondents spoke about the importance of water quality improvements, which was the topic to receive the most comments.

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 2: Graph depicting responses from Ōrākei Local Board respondents to the local board priorities

            

26.     All three advocacy initiatives received high levels of support. Respondents strongly supported the Hobson Bay catchment wastewater/stormwater separation proposal, enhancement of Pourewa Valley and the development of the north-south links to the Glen Innes to Tamaki Drive Shared Path.

27.     Of the 18 people who mentioned Hobson Bay in their comments, all were supportive of the initiative. The main reasons for support were the environmental and health concerns of the water quality, and the desire to see the bay used recreationally.

28.     Thirteen people mentioned the Glen Innes to Tamaki Drive Shared Path and most comments were positive. The main reasons for support included improving safety for pedestrians and school children, as well as reducing congestion and promoting alternative modes of transport.

29.     Some responses were not supportive of the initiative, mostly due to scepticism of the path being a viable commuting option, and general discontent towards additional cycleways.

30.     Fourteen people mentioned the Pourewa Valley enhancement initiative, most of which were supportive. The main reasons for supporting enhancement of the Pourewa Valley that respondents support for environmental benefits and recognition of Pourewa Valley as an attractive site for wider Auckland. Two respondents said that the initiative was not an essential investment.

31.     Sixteen per cent of respondents (50 people) indicated that they do not support the Local Board’s priorities. In their comments, 16 people made specific reference to the proposed traffic calming measures, raising concerns about how such measures could exacerbate road congestion.

32.     Eleven people mentioned placemaking in their responses. Of these, nine were against and one person was in support. In the comments, many indicated that they did not know what placemaking is, while others felt that it is wasteful and an unnecessary investment given the post-Covid financial circumstances.

33.     The Ōrākei Arts Plan was mentioned by seven submitters. Of these, five were against and two were in support. Of those who commented, respondents expressed similar sentiments that the Arts Plan seemed wasteful and unnecessary.

34.     Consultation feedback on local board priorities will be considered by the Local Board when approving their local board agreement between the 14-18 June 2021. Local Board key advocacy initiatives will be considered in the current report.

Key themes

35.     Key themes noted across the written and in-person feedback received on the initiatives that Board consulted on include:

·   The need to distinguish between essential and non-essential spend in light of COVID-19, focus on core services and dispose of any ‘nice to haves’

·   Improved water quality of waterways and beaches is regarded as essential

·   Arts and placemaking activity are seen as non-essential.

36.     Other key themes that emerged from the feedback included:

·   The need for infrastructure, parks and facilities in the Local Board area to match the growing population from residential development, intensification and infill housing

·   Concern about increasing levels of crime and anti-social activity.

Requests for local funding

37.     Requests for local funding through the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 consultation included:

·   Ellerslie Residents Association and Ellerslie Business Association advocated for a library / community centre / community mixed use space in Ellerslie Town Centre

·   Ellerslie Business Association and Remuera Business Association requested a greater focus on local board priorities around transport through the Local Board Transport Capital Fund

·   Ellerslie Association Football Club Inc. requested funds to be retained for the relocation of the playground and the carpark at Michaels Avenue Reserve

·   Parnell Cricket Club requested an upgrade of Bloodworth Park, specifically the playing surface to allow for year-round use

·   Remuera Heritage requested support for the restoration of the Remuera Railway Station for community use

·   Remuera Heritage requested the repair of windows in Remuera Library which has a Categories 1 and A status for historic heritage buildings. (This work is due to start).

·   Youth of Ōrākei requested proactive investment in parks, recreational spaces, public transport and to prioritise investment where growth occurs or where there is a significant shortfall in infrastructure

·   Youth of Ōrākei requested investment in improving and maintaining positive ecological conditions of Waiatarua Reserve, Kepa Bush and Pourewa Valley.

Overview of feedback received on regional topics in the 10-year Budget from the Ōrākei Local Board area

38.     The proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031 sets out Auckland Council’s priorities and how to pay for them. Consultation on the proposed 10-year Budget asked submitters to respond to five key questions on:

1.    The proposed investment package

2.    Climate change

3.    Water quality

4.    Community investment

5.    Rating policy.

39.     The submissions received from the Ōrākei Local Board area on these key issues are summarised below, along with an overview of any other areas of feedback on regional proposals with a local impact.

Key issue 1: Proposed investment package

40.     Aucklanders were asked about a proposed $31 billion capital investment programme over the next ten years, allowing the council to deliver key services and renew our aging assets. The proposal includes a one-off 5 per cent average general rates increase for the 2021/2022 financial year, rather than the previously planned 3.5 per cent increase, before returning to 3.5 per cent increases over the remaining years.

41.     The proposal also includes higher borrowings in the short term, a continuation of cost savings and the sale of more surplus property. Without the greater use of rates and debt, around $900 million of investment in Auckland would be delayed from the next three years.

42.     The graphs below give an overview of the 1156 responses from the Ōrākei Local Board area.

Figure 3: Graphs depicting responses to Question 1, including 225 pro forma submissions

  

43.     Submitters from the Ōrākei Local Board area were reasonably split in their level of support for the proposed 10-year investment package. 50 per cent of the total submitters did not support it. However, when the pro forma submissions were set aside this dropped to 39 per cent, with 51 per cent supporting the package.

44.     Common themes emerging from those who supported the package were:

·   Need to invest in the future

·   Will help with impact of COVID-19

·   Need to deal with climate change effects

·   Need better transport/keep Auckland moving.

45.     Those who did not support it, in particular the proposed 5 per cent rates increase, commonly stated the following reasons:

·   Make more savings / focus or core services / do more for less / stop wastage

·   Reduce staff salaries/consultants

·   Rates already unaffordable / people already struggling especially since COVID-19.

Key issue 2: Climate Change

46.     Aucklanders were asked about a proposal to provide additional investment to respond to climate change challenges. This includes enabling a quicker transition from diesel to cleaner electric and hydrogen buses, diverting more waste from landfill and enabling significant planting initiatives. 

47.     The graphs below give an overview of the 926 responses from the Ōrākei Local Board area.

Figure 4: Graph showing support for investment in climate change

 

48.     Of those responding to the proposal to reinvest more in responding to climate change 62 per cent were in support and 27 per cent did not support the proposal. Eleven proforma submissions did not significantly change the level of support.

49.     Themes emerging from those who gave reasons for supporting increased investment were:

·   Urgent, act now, don’t delay

·   A serious problem that needs addressing

·   This is important / proposal makes sense

·   Necessary for the environment / community well-being / future communities.

50.     Of those who were opposed the reasons given were:

·   Unaffordable

·   Improve public transport networks first

·   Not convinced climate change is an issue.

Key issue 3: Water quality

51.     Aucklanders were asked about a proposal to extend and increase the Water Quality Targeted Rate for another three years (from 2028 until 2031) as well as increasing the targeted rate annually in line with proposed average increases in general rates. The Water Quality Targeted Rate funds projects to improve water quality in Auckland’s harbours, beaches and streams.  

52.     The graphs below give an overview of the 923 responses from the Ōrākei Local Board area. Eleven proforma submissions did not significantly change the level of support.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 5: Graph depicting responses to the investment options for improving freshwater and marine water quality

53.     Of those who supported both the extension to and increase in the water quality targeted rate, the most common reasons given were:

·   Clean water is a priority

·   Urgent, don’t delay/defer

·   Vital / water is life / can’t put a price on it

·   Important for harbour, beaches, environment.

54.     Of those supporting the extension only, the following comments were made:

·   Not through rates increases – reprioritise

·   Past neglect/mismanagement

·   Should have been done earlier or that work should be deferred/not undertaken now because people are feeling hardship from the economic effects of COVID-19.

55.     Those submitters opposed to both increasing or extending the targeted rate, gave similar reasons to those supporting the extension only, or felt that despite past or current investment there had been little improvement to date.

56.     Other themes that emerged from submitters’ feedback were:

·   Agreement to support the proposal this time but wanted assurance it wouldn’t be extended indefinitely

·   Concern about urban sprawl and infill, with suggestions from some respondents that developers should pay for the infrastructure upgrade.

57.     Many submitters made reference to Watercare and/or mentioned quality of water supply in their comments, indicating that they hadn’t read or understood the consultation material.

Key issue 4: Community investment

58.     Aucklanders were asked to provide feedback on a proposal that would see the council adopt a new approach for community services to enable them to reduce building and asset maintenance related expenditure. The proposal involves consolidation of community facilities and services, increased leasing or shared facility arrangements, and an increased focus on providing multi-use facilities and online services in the future.

 

 

 

 

 

 

59.     The graphs below give an overview of the 900 responses from the Ōrākei Local Board area on this topic:

Figure 5: Graph showing views on changes to investment in community assets and services

60.     61 per cent of respondents from the Ōrākei Local Board area indicated support for the proposal. The main reasons for support were that multi-use facilities and consolidation is a practical, efficient approach. Comments referred to the efficiency of freeing up capital in under-utilised buildings or assets and the ability to enable optimisation of other assets as well as achieving necessary infrastructure projects.

61.     25 per cent of respondents did not support the proposal. The main reasons for this were that the council should own community assets and that this is the council’s responsibility. Respondents frequently stated opposition to the privatisation of community assets and services, particularly out of concern for the risk to standards of service provision.

62.     While respondents acknowledged that the investment was necessary, they also pointed to other sources of revenue and savings rather than rates increases.

63.     A common theme that emerged from those indicating ‘Do not support’ and ‘Other’, was that community services should follow a user pays model, rather than being funded out of rates.

64.     The importance of preserving libraries was the most consistent message across all response categories, regardless of support of or opposition to the proposal.

65.     Some respondents supported the transition to online services, mentioning lower levels of attendance at libraries and the availability of e-book services online. While many respondents acknowledged this, they also asserted libraries as important physical meeting spaces and the importance of having such spaces after the social isolation brought by the COVID-19 lockdowns.

66.     The feedback also highlighted concerns around digital inequality, and that not everyone would find online services accessible or preferrable.

Key issue 5: Rating policy

67.     Aucklanders were asked for their feedback on a number of proposed rating changes impacting different properties across Auckland differently. Proposed changes also included, for example, the extension of the Natural Environment Targeted Rate until June 2031, along with options to extend the Urban Rating Area.

 

 

 

 

 

68.     The graphs below summarise the feedback from the Ōrākei Local Board submitters on proposed targeted rates or changes to the rating policy. Overall, there was general support for five of the proposals.

69.     The level of response to the four other rating proposals was very low as set out below:

 

Accommodation provider targeted rate                    25 submitters

Electricity network resilience targeted rate              50 submitters

Waitakere rural sewerage targeted rate                  1 submitters

Clevedon water connection targeted rate                no submitters

 

70.     Other themes most commonly mentioned by 69 per cent of submitters who provided further feedback were focused on:

 

 

Recommendations on local matters 

71.     This report allows the local board to recommend local matters to the Governing Body for consideration as part of the 10-year Budget process, in May 2021. This includes:

·   any new/amended business improvement district targeted rates

·   any new/amended local targeted rate proposals 

·   proposed locally driven initiative capital projects outside local boards’ decision-making responsibility

·   release of local board specific reserve funds.

·   approve its advocacy initiatives for inclusion (as an appendix) to its 2021/2022 Local Board Agreement

Local targeted rate and business improvement district (BID) targeted rate proposals

72.     The Auckland Council Business Improvement District (BID) Policy 2016 requires the local board to approve any BID Programme boundary expansion and recommend the setting of the BID targeted rate to the Governing Body.

73.     Local boards are required to endorse any new or amended locally targeted rate proposals or business improvement district (BID) targeted rate proposals in their local board area. Note that these proposals must have been consulted on before they can be implemented.

74.     Local boards then recommend these proposals to the Governing Body for approval of the targeted rate.

Proposed Extension to the Glen Innes Business Improvement District

75.     The Glen Innes Business Association (GIBA) proposed to expand the area to which its BID programme applies across the boundary shared by the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki and Ōrākei Local Boards into the Felton Mathew business area.

76.     The Glen Innes BID programme proposal would have represented both the current and expanded areas, increasing the membership to about 190 business ratepayers and owners, and revenue received from the BID targeted rate will increase from $166,000 to $250,000 as of 1 July 2021.

77.     The GIBA held a postal ballot for the ratepayers who would be added to the BID area and the new businesses in the targeted rate area early this year. However, polling of business ratepayers and owners failed in that it did not reach the threshold of 25 per cent returns from eligible voters. Only 19 per cent of ballots were returned.

78.     The responses to the question in the LTP consultation material resulted in 32 per cent of respondents indicating support for the proposed expansion of the BID, 18 per cent not supporting and 48 per cent saying they didn’t know.

Figure 6: Graph showing responses to the Glen Innes BID expansion proposal

79.     However, due to the low percentage of poll returns, the proposal to expand the Glen Innes BID will not advanced any further.

Funding for Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

80.     Local boards are allocated funding each year for local driven initiatives (LDI). This funding allocation can be spent on local projects or programmes that are important to their communities. Local boards have decision-making over the LDI funds but need approval from the Governing Body where:

·   operational LDI funding is to be converted into capital LDI funding

·   the release of local board specific reserve funds is requested, which are being held by the council for a specific purpose, or

·   a LDI capital project exceeds $1 million.

81.     These considerations do not apply to the Ōrākei Local Board for the 2021/2022 financial year.

Local board advocacy

82.     Local boards are requested to approve any advocacy initiatives for inclusion (as an appendix) to their 2020/2021 Local Board Agreement, taking into account the consultation feedback above. This allows the Finance and Performance Committee to consider these advocacy items when making decisions on the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 in May/June 2021. 

Local board input on regional topics in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031

83.     Local boards have a statutory responsibility for identifying and communicating the interests and preferences of the people in its local board area in relation to Auckland Council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws, and any proposed changes to be made to them. This report provides an opportunity for the local board to provide input on council’s proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

84.     Local board plans reflect community priorities and preferences and are key documents that guide the development of local board agreements (LBAs), local board annual work programmes, and local board input into regional plans such as the 10-year Budget.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

85.     The decisions recommended in this report are part of the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 and local board agreement process to approve funding and expenditure over the next 10 years.

86.     Projects allocated funding through this 10-year Budget process will all have varying levels of potential climate impact associated with them. The climate impacts of the projects that Auckland Council chooses to progress, are all assessed carefully as part of the council’s rigorous reporting requirements.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

87.     The 10-year Budget 2021-2031 is an Auckland Council Group document and will include budgets at a consolidated group level. Consultation items and updates to budgets to reflect decisions and new information may include items from across the group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

88.     The local board’s decisions and feedback are being sought in this report. The local board has a statutory role in providing its feedback on regional plans.

89.     Local boards play an important role in the development of the council’s 10-year Budget. Local board agreements form part of the 10-year Budget. Local board nominees have also attended Finance and Performance Committee workshops on the 10-year Budget

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

90.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the 10-year Budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate the council’s responsiveness to Māori.

91.     Local board plans, developed in 2020 through engagement with the community including Māori, form the basis of local board area priorities. There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and the wider Māori community.

92.     Analysis provided of consultation feedback received on the proposed 10-year Budget includes submissions made by mana whenua and the wider Māori community who have interests in the rohe / local board area.

93.     Copies of the submissions are attached as Attachments A and B.

94.     The Ōrākei Local Board received submissions from five mana whenua entities: Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, Ngāti Tamaterā, Ngāti Whanaunga, Ngāti Whātua, Te Ākitai Waiohua and Waikato.

95.     All submitters articulated an appreciation to the Ōrākei Local Board to provide feedback and a strong desire to work closely with the local board moving forward. Most submitters indicated their degree of support on each of Auckland Council’s six categories indicating support, except for Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei.

96.     Two mataawaka entities, Te Roopu Waiora and Whenua Warrior, made submissions with Te Roopu Waiora advocating for Māori with disabilities and Whenua Warrior advocating for localised food production and supply.

97.     Ongoing conversations between local boards and Māori will assist to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

98.     Some projects approved for funding could have discernible impacts on Māori. The potential impacts on Māori, as part of any project progressed by Auckland Council, will be assessed appropriately and accordingly as part of relevant reporting requirements.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

99.     This report is seeking the local board’s decisions on financial matters in the local board agreement that must then be considered by the Governing Body.

100.   The local board also provides input to regional plans and proposals. There is information in the council’s consultation material for each plan or proposal with the financial implications of each option outlined for consideration.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

101.   The council must adopt its 10-year Budget, which includes local board agreements, by 30 June 2021. The local board is required to make recommendations on these local matters for the 10-year Budget by mid May 2021, to enable and support the Governing Body to make decisions on key items to be included in the 10-year Budget on 25 May 2021.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

102.   The local board will approve its local board agreement and corresponding work programmes in June 2021.

103.   Recommendations and feedback from the local board will be provided to the relevant Governing Body committee for consideration during decision making at the Governing Body meeting.

104.   The final 10-year Budget 2021-2031 (including local board agreements) will be adopted by the Governing Body on 22 June 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Mataawaka submissions

21

b

Mana Whenua submissions

33

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Rachel Cho - Local Board Advisor

Suzanne Weld - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

06 May 2021

 

 

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06 May 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

06 May 2021

 

 

Allocation of Operational Budget for Waiatarua Reserve Weed Management

File No.: CP2021/05104

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the allocation of funds from the Ōrākei Local Board’s Locally Driven Initiatives operational budget to prepare a Weed Management Plan for Waiatarua Reserve.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Waiatarua Reserve is a significant recreational and wetland reserve covering 41 hectares in the southern part of the Ōrākei Local Board area. The management plan for the reserve was updated by way of the Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan and this was adopted in December 2019. 

3.       Actions identified in the Enhancement Plan included assessing and identifying pest plants in the wetland and developing a pest plan control plan to enhance the performance of the wetland.

4.       There are unspent funds with the Board’s Locally Driven Initiatives Operational Expenses budget (LDI OPEX) which could be allocated to developing a plan to assess the wetland and develop a weed management plan to improve the condition of the wetland.

5.       Staff within the Infrastructure and Environment Services department of Auckland Council recommend that $5000 be allocated to advance this work.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      allocate $5000 from its LDI OPEX budget for the preparation of a weed management plan for Waiatarua Reserve.

Horopaki

Context

6.       Waiatarua Reserve is a significant recreational and wetland reserve covering 41 hectares in the southern part of the Ōrākei Local Board area. While the reserve supports an important stormwater management function, it is also one of New Zealand’s largest urban wetlands and has a conservation zoning and Significant Ecological Area status in the Auckland Unitary Plan. as it contains but as well as ecological habitat and systems.

7.       In 2019 the management plan for Waiatarua Reserve was updated and a new plan called the Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan was adopted in December 2019. From that plan a number of actions were outlined, including:

·   View the pest plants in the wetland areas and identify the next priorities for maintenance.

·   Align land-based and water-based pest plant control

·   Develop a pest plan control plan to enhance the performance of the wetland.

8.       For some time, there has been concern within the community that the current maintenance regime is not tailored to supporting the ecological values of the wetland. Staff from Infrastructure and Environmental Services have suggested that weed management plan be developed for the Waiatarua Reserve to identify and better manage the weed species with particular focus on the wetland.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       Staff have advised that the preparation of a weed management plan could be undertaken immediately should Ōrākei Local Board wish to fund it for around $5000 excluding GST.

10.       The weed or pest plant management plan is proposed to include:

·   a species list of all pest plants recorded within the site

·   relative abundance and distribution of pest plants within management units assigned to the site

·   priorities for pest plant control

·   recommended control methods and timing for control

·   current pest plant control contractor activity within the site, and

·   identification of recommended pest plant control that is not currently scheduled by contractors.

11.     The survey area would comprise the main wetland/marsh area in Waiatarua Reserve (approximately 18.2 ha) and the three watercourses leading into it.

12.     The Local Board has recently learnt that the Business Growth Accelerator budget of $5000 is unlikely to be spent before 30 June 2021. Auckland Unlimited which was responsible for this programme was able to undertake the programme using its own funding. Therefore, there is an opportunity for the Board to fund the preparation of the weed management plan from this budget.

13.     It is suggested that Ōrākei Local Board consider allocating $5000 to the preparation of a weed management plan for the wetland area of Waiatarua Reserve.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     There are no known climate impacts as a result of the preparation of this plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan was prepared by staff in Parks, Sports and Recreation and they are therefore aware of the recommendations which have led to the identification of the proposed pest plant management plan.

16.     Depending on the outcome and recommendations of the proposed plan, changes may be required to the current maintenance schedule for the reserve, managed by Community Facilities. The preparation of the plan in itself has no impact on operations at this stage.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Following consultation on a draft plan, Ōrākei Local Board adopted the Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan in December 2019 and now seeks to implement the actions set out in the plan. Effectively managing the wetland is a key focus of the plan and this requires better maintenance of the channels and edges of the wetland.

18.     Comments from members of the public and the Waiatarua Protection Society have highlighted the need for more targeted approach to controlling weeds and other pests in the reserve.  

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     In developing the Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan during 2019 parks planners held a meeting with mana whenua to discuss proposals and receive feedback.

20.     Once the proposed weed management plan has been drafted, staff will ascertain whether further consultation with mana whenua is required.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     There are no financial implications to the Local Board as this is a budget reallocation with the Local Board’s LDI OPEX from the unspent Business Growth Accelerator line item ($5,000) to a new project, Waiatarua Reserve weed management plan, of the same amount.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

22.     There are no apparent risks associated with this proposal.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

23.     Should the Board allocate the funding towards the preparation of the weed management plan, staff will undertake the assessment and report the findings to the Local Board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Suzanne Weld - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager