I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōrākei Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 20 May 2021

3.00pm

St Chads Church and Community Centre
38 St Johns Road
Meadowbank

 

Ōrākei Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Mr Scott Milne, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Troy Elliott

 

Members

Troy Churton

 

 

Colin Davis, JP

 

 

Sarah Powrie

 

 

Margaret Voyce

 

 

David Wong, JP

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Kim Lawgun

Democracy Advisor

 

14 May 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 302 163

Email: kim.lawgun@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     Public Forum - Mark Booth - Eastern Bays Songbird Project                        5

9.2     Public Forum - Terry Moore - Volunteer Day                                                    6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                           7

12        Notice of Motion - Member Troy Churton - Delegated authority for certain notification decisions                                                                                                    9

13        Notice of Motion - Member David Wong - Request for Regular Communication and Transparency on Helicopter Activity over the Ōrākei Local Board area              13

14        Notice of Motion - Member David Wong - Ōrākei Local Board requirement for Event Facilitation Unit to comply with Tamaki Drive Precinct Event Guidelines           17

15        Ōrākei Local Grants and Multiboard Round Two 2020/2021 grant allocations.   21

16        Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rates for 2021/2022 247

17        Adoption of the Ōrākei Urban Ngahere 10 Year Action Plan 2021                      257

18        Local Board Views on Plan Change 60 - Open Space (2020) and Other Rezoning Matters                                                                                                                        299

19        Economic Development Action Plan: Draft for feedback                                     307

20        Updated attachment of the Statement of Proposal to amend the Animal Management Bylaw and controls                                                                            367

21        Ōrākei Local Board feedback on the proposed draft conditions on the Kohimarama Comprehensive Care Retirement Village application                                           459

22        Local Board feedback on the proposals to amend the Freedom Camping Act 2011                                                                                                                                     463

23        Chairman and Board Member May 2021 report                                                     467

24        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      481

25        Ōrākei Local Board Workshop Proceedings                                                          489

26        Resolutions Pending Action report                                                                         497

27        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

28        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               503

C1       The Landing Physical Services Agreement                                                            503


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the minutes of the Ōrākei Local Board meeting, held on Thursday, 15 April 2021 and the minutes of its additional meeting, held on Thursday, 6 May 2021, be confirmed as true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Part 13 of the Board’s Standing Orders provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōrākei Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Mark Booth - Eastern Bays Songbird Project

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the local board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Mark Booth will be in attendance on behalf of the Eastern Bays Songbird Project to provide an update to the Board on the various activities and projects that are happening in the local board area. 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Mark Booth for his attendance.

 

 

9.2       Public Forum - Terry Moore - Volunteer Day

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the local board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Terry Moore will be in attendance to provide the local board with a progress update on the planning of the Volunteers Day. 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Terry Moore for his attendance.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

Under Standing Order 7.1,  Notices of Motion have been received from Member Troy Churton and Member David Wong for consideration under items 12, 13 and 14 respectively.

 


Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

Notice of Motion - Member Troy Churton - Delegated authority for certain notification decisions

File No.: CP2021/05776

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       Member Troy Churton has given notice of a motion that he wishes to propose.

2.       The notice, signed by Member Troy Churton and Chairman Scott Milne as seconder, is appended as Attachment A.

Motion

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      taking consideration to the points raised in the Notice of Motion, agree with the need to delegate some notification decision-making responsibility to local boards.

b)      authorise Member Troy Churton to advocate to the Planning Committee to seek a review and change to delegated decision-making for notification decisions on some residential resource consent applications.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Notice of Motion - Member Troy Churton - Delegated authority for certain notification decisions

11

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

Notice of Motion - Member David Wong - Request for Regular Communication and Transparency on Helicopter Activity over the Ōrākei Local Board area

File No.: CP2021/05997

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       Member David Wong has given notice of a motion that they wish to propose.

2.       The notice, signed by Member David Wong and Member Troy Churton as seconder, is appended as Attachment A.

Motion

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      request the NZ Police to implement a communication and monitoring register to be submitted back to local boards within 24 hours advising the nature, time, and reason for the helicopter flight activity.

b)      request that the Notice of Motion and resolution are forwarded to the Waitematā Local Board for their information; as the impacts of helicopter activity may also be occurring across their area.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Notice of Motion - Member David Wong - Request for Regular Communication and Transparency on Helicopter Activity over the Ōrākei Local Board area

15

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

Notice of Motion - Member David Wong - Ōrākei Local Board requirement for Event Facilitation Unit to comply with Tamaki Drive Precinct Event Guidelines

File No.: CP2021/05999

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       Member David Wong has given notice of a motion that they wish to propose.

2.       The notice, signed by Member David Wong and Member Colin Davis as seconder, is appended as Attachment A.

 

Motion

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      request the Auckland Council Event Facilitation team develop a checklist aligning to the Tamaki Drive Precinct Event Guidelines where key requirements have been completed and signed off.

b)      request this checklist be submitted to the Ōrākei Local Board for confirmation and assurance that key requirements have been met ahead of the local board providing feedback or approval (in line with the Notification to the Ōrākei Local Board).

c)      request that the Auckland Council Event Facilitation team provide a copy of the Notification to Local Stakeholders to the local board – together with the subsequent feedback received from the local stakeholders (which includes residents and business associations).

d)      request Auckland Unlimited and Auckland Transport to ensure their events teams seek feedback from the local board.

e)      request that the Board seeing the final letter of approval which the Events Facilitation teams send to the event organiser. This would be a double check on whether the Board's feedback has been included.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Notice of Motion - Member David Wong - Ōrākei Local Board requirement for Event Facilitation Unit to comply with Tamaki Drive Precinct Event Guidelines

19

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

Ōrākei Local Grants and Multiboard Round Two 2020/2021 grant allocations.

File No.: CP2021/04737

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Ōrākei Local Grants and Multiboard Round Two 2020/2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Ōrākei Local Grants and Multiboard Round Two 2020/2021 (Attachment B).

3.       The Ōrākei Local Board adopted the Ōrākei Local Board Community Grants Programme 2020/2021 on 16 April 2020. The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $279,000 for the 2020/2021 financial year. A total of $125,833 was allocated in the Ōrākei Local Grants Round One and   Quick Response Grants Round One 2020/2021.This leaves a total of $153,167 remaining to be allocated in one quick response and one local grant round.

5.       Twenty-eight applications have been received for Local Grants Round Two and 11 applications were received for Multiboard Round Two 2020/2021 requesting a total of $269,719.95.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received in Ōrākei Local Grants Round Two, listed in Table One

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2112-201

Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards a renovation to the clubrooms, specifically to provide safe internal access to the female and family toilets

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2112-202

St Heliers Village Business Association

Community

Towards the filming and editing

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG2112-205

Remuera Chinese Association Incorporated.

Community

Towards Sommervell Church hall hire for the twice weekly activities on Tuesdays and Thursdays for two hours, from June to December 2021, management administration expenses

$7,242.50

Eligible

LG2112-209

Auckland Paraplegic and Physically Disabled Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of running the 2021 junior and adult events, including the cost of advertising, coaching and the sports development manager's salaries.

$4,562.16

Eligible

LG2112-210

Eastern Bays Toy Library

Community

Towards replacing the current laptop used by the librarian for stock management, and member communication

$1,000.00

Eligible

LG2112-211

College Rifles Rugby Union Football and Sports Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards weekly and quarterly field maintenance

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2112-212

Auckland Water Ski Club

Sport and recreation

Towards painting the Auckland Water Ski Club.

$6,500.00

Eligible

LG2112-213

Auckland Table Tennis Association

Sport and recreation

Towards salaries for development coach and project manager.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2112-215

Auckland Basketball Services Limited

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire at the Barfoot and Thompson stadium to run holiday programmes from June 2021 to March 2022.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2112-216

Remuera Business Association

Events

Towards delivery of the events: market days in spring and autumn, and a magical Christmas event, from October 2021 to May 2022.

$30,000.00

Eligible

LG2112-217

Meadowbank Pony Club

Environment

Towards purchasing the trees and labour to construct protective fences around purchase of trees.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2112-218

Communicare CMA (Ak) Incorporated

Community

Towards the weekly venue hire for the Glendowie Bowling Club and St Marks Parish Hall from 1 June 2021 to 30 May 2022.

$4,158.00

Eligible

LG2112-219

Ellerslie Business Association

Events

Towards costs for the Ellerslie Fairy Festival, Ellerslie Santa Parade and a community event

$20,000.00

Eligible

LG2112-220

Community Wellbeing Network - Ōrākei

Community

Towards venue hire, partition, table and table cloth hire and signage for the “Volunteer Day – Ōrākei” event on 30 October 2021

$9,435.75

Eligible

LG2112-221

St Heliers Business Organisation

Events

Towards delivering the “Christmas Village by the Sea” event from 4 November 2021 to 24 December 2021

$6,000.00

Eligible

LG2112-222

Ōrākei Community Association

Community

Towards promotion and hall and equipment hire for community forums from 1 June 2021 to 24 December 2021

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG2112-223

Dance Therapy NZ

Arts and culture

Towards marketing, facilitation, coordination, supervision, client support and liaison and equipment to run “Arts 4 Us” specialty at Ōrākei Community Centre from 2 August 2021 to 13 December 2021

$6,000.00

Eligible

LG2112-224

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the cost of helpline volunteer counsellor training and management from 1 June 2021 to 31 March 2022.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2112-225

Mission Bay Kohimarama Residents Association

Community

Towards consulting costs to assist with setup of overseeing organisation, venue hire for meetings, postal, print, and social media costs for advertising

$3,700.00

Eligible

LG2112-226

Training Ship Achilles (TS Achilles Unit SCANZ)

Environment

Towards purchase and installation of a 5000 litre water tank and necessary piping, high pressure washer system and a wet dry vacuum, grounded electrical power source.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2112-231

Marist Auckland Water Polo Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards annual pool hire costs for term three at Sacred Heart College Pool Aquatic Centre.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2112-232

IMAGEN8 Limited

Environment

Towards the Ōrākei nature photography  workshops from 1 June 2021 to 28 October 2022

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG2112-233

Mens Shed Auckland East Incorporated

Community

Towards the materials for a security fence and gates for the perimeter of the mens shed buildings in Waiatarua Reserve

$7,985.67

Eligible

LG2112-234

The Auckland King Tides Initiative

under the umbrella of the Institution of Professional Engineers

Environment

Towards Auckland King Tides water level (Tidal) gauge community workshop delivery.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2112-236

Recreation Solutions

Environment

Towards the coordination and delivery of four community volunteer days including communications development and delivery and consultation.

$9,580.00

Eligible

LG2112-238

Environmental Education for Resource Sustainability

Environment

Towards the purchase and delivery of 504 native plants and 78 classroom recycling bins to schools and preschools in Ōrākei.

$6,013.87

Eligible

LG2112-239

Iain Fenwick

Historic Heritage

Towards Alder Tree Pruning

$740.00

Eligible

LG2112-240

Muskaan Care Trust NZ

Community

Towards venue, fees for instructor and project coordinator time, travel expenses, and partial volunteer expenses for activated community members with leadership skills.


$19,918.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$229,835.95

 

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received in Ōrākei Multiboard Grants Round Two, listed in Table Two.

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2021-206

Shakthi Seniors Charitable Trust Incorporated

Community

Towards transport, venue, administration, facilitators, volunteers and catering at Anchorage Park School Community Hall from 1 July 2021 to 30 June 2022

$2,400.00

Eligible

MB2021-209

New Zealand Dance Advancement Trust

Arts and culture

Towards artistic costs and fees for the development of the “2021 Tāmaki Tour” and associated workshops

$3,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-211

Auckland Events Company Limited

Events

Towards the logistic costs to deliver the “Food Truck Series” event at various locations between September 2021 and April 2022

$1,818.00

Eligible

MB2021-218

Leyte-Samar NZ Solidarity Foundation Incorporated

Events

Towards the delivery of 2021 Quincentennial Celebration on 16 October, including event management, performance, choreographer fee, photography, food, decoration, costumes and theatre property.

$2,500.00

Eligible

MB2021-223

Social Nature Movement Limited

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of running the “SUPKids” holiday and after-school programme for children aged five to 18 years specifically the instructors costs.

$10,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-232

Brain Play Limited

Community

Towards operational costs to deliver "Brain Play Science and Technology" classes

$3,150.00

Eligible

MB2021-239

Kingsland Business Society Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of running the free "Date Night" events at the Trinity Kingsland Church including the costs of hall hire, staff (babysitters), catering, printing, and promotion.

$2,520.00

Eligible

MB2021-243

Anxiety New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards the salary of the helpline manager, programme coordinator, a registered psychologist, and community educator, and two intern psychologists to deliver a series of community workshops from July 2021 to May 2022.

$5,625.00

Eligible

MB2021-250

Social Enterprise Auckland

Events

Towards the delivery of the capability building workshops, which includes payments to host for workshop online events, venue, food and gifts for the physical event, logistics, security, contractor costs, and project management fees

$2,871.00

Eligible

MB2021-266

The Reading Revolution

Community

Towards wages for the manager of the shared reading programme at local libraries and retirement villages and community hubs.

$3,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-267

OUTLine New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards a portion of general operating expenses including telephone and internet costs, printing, insurance, clinical supervision wages, training fees and volunteer costs.

$3,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$39,884.00

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·   local board priorities

·   lower priorities for funding

·   exclusions

·   grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·   any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Ōrākei Local Board adopted the Ōrākei Local Board Community Grants Programme 2020/2021 on 16 April 2020. The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

14.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Ōrākei Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

16.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

17.     A summary of each application received through Ōrākei Local Grants and Multiboard Grants Round Two 2020/2021 (Attachment B) is provided.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Maori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Maori. Auckland Council’s Maori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-Term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

20.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $279,000 for the 2020/2021 financial year. A total of $125,833 was allocated in the Ōrākei Local Grants Round One and   Quick Response Grants Round One 2020/2021.This leaves a total of $153,167 remaining to be allocated in one quick response and one local grant round.

21.     Twenty-eight applications have been received for Local Grants Round Two and 11 applications are for Multiboard Round Two 2020/2021 requesting a total of $269,719.95.

22.     Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     Following the Ōrākei Local Board allocation of funding for the quick response grants round one, grants and incentives staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Grants Programme 2020-2021

31

b

Ōrākei Local Grant and Multiboard Round Two 2020/2021 grant applications

35

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ruchita Patel - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

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20 May 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rates for 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/03825

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongoPurpose of the report

1.       To request the local board to recommend that the Governing Body sets the targeted rates for the Ellerslie Village, Remuera and St Heliers Village Business Improvement District (BID) programmes for the 2021/2022 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are areas within Tāmaki Makaurau, including the Ōrākei rohe, where local business and property owners have agreed to work together to improve their business environment, encourage resilience and attract new businesses and customers.

3.       Auckland Council supports business associations operating BID programmes, including Ellerslie Business Association (EBA), Remuera Business Association (RBA) and St Heliers Village Association (SHVA) by collecting a targeted rate from commercial properties within a defined geographic area.  The funds from the targeted rate are then provided by way of a BID grant to the relevant business association.

4.       Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body.

5.       Each business association operating a BID programme sets the BID grant amount at its Annual General Meeting (AGM) when members vote to approve an operational budget for the following financial year. This budget funds the implementation of a business plan that delivers programmes based on each BID’s strategic priorities.

6.       Ōrākei’s three BID-operating business associations – Ellerslie Village ($162,000); Remuera ($242,564); and St Heliers Village ($138,484) – opted to retain their current BID targeted rate amounts for the 2021/2022 financial year. They each resolved to request the Ōrākei Local Board’s endorsement of their BID grant amounts in the council’s Annual Budget 2021/2022 (see Attachment A).

7.       The business associations operating BID programmes are incorporated societies that are independent of the council. However, to sustain public trust and confidence in the council, there needs to be a balance between the BID-operating business associations’ independence and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

8.       For the council to be confident that the targeted rate funds provided to the business associations are being used appropriately, the council requires the BIDs to comply with the Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi).

9.       The council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy and this report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds.

10.     Staff are satisfied the Ellerslie Business Association, Remuera Business Association and St Heliers Village Association sufficiently comply with the BID Policy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rate for the Ellerslie Village Business Improvement District Programme for the 2021/2022 financial year to achieve the amount of $162,000 for Ellerslie Business Association Incorporated and include this amount in the Annual Budget 2021/2022.

 

b)      recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rate for the Remuera Business Improvement District Programme for the 2021/2022 financial year to achieve the amount of $242,564 for The Remuera Business Association Incorporated and include this amount in the Annual Budget 2021/2022.

 

c)      recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rate for the St Heliers Village Business Improvement District Programme for the 2021/2022 financial year to achieve the amount of $138,484 for St Heliers Village Association Incorporated and include this amount in the Annual Budget 2021/2022.

 

Horopaki

Context

BID programmes promote economic well-being and collaboration with the council

 

11.     The Auckland Council Growth Model 2021-2051 reports Tāmaki Makaurau is projected to include approximately 660,000 more people in the next 30 years. This level of population growth presents challenges and opportunities for Auckland town centres and commercial precincts.

 

12.     Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are areas within Auckland where local business and property owners have agreed to work together, with support from the council, to improve their business environment, encourage resilience and attract new businesses and customers.

 

13.     BID programmes provide the opportunity for the council group to partner with business associations, including the EBA, RBA and SHVA, to seize on the opportunities from Auckland’s growth and respond locally to changing economic conditions.

 

14.     BID programmes encourage collaboration to achieve greater local outcomes. They provide a mechanism to enable local boards to engage with the business sector in local town centres and business areas in a co-ordinated way.

BIDs provide essential support in building business resilience and aiding economic recovery

15.     The economy continues to be impacted by the flow-on effects of COVID-19 lockdowns, affecting both retail-based town centres and commercial precincts.

16.     BID-programme operating business associations provide the local business leadership required to help their members to mitigate some of the economic effects of the pandemic through business resilience and recovery initiatives.

BIDs are funded by a targeted rate on business ratepayers within a set area

 

17.     BID programmes are funded by a targeted rate applied to all commercially rated properties within a designated area around a town centre or business precinct.

 

18.     Auckland Council supports business associations operating BID programmes by collecting the targeted rates and providing these funds, in their entirety, by way of a BID grant to the relevant business association.

 

19.     This revenue is paid to the business associations every quarter to provide a regular and sustainable income stream to implement an agreed work programme.

The BID Policy is the mechanism to ensure accountability for BID targeted rates

 

20.     Auckland Council’s Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) ensures accountability for BID targeted rate funding and encourages good governance and programme management.

 

21.     The policy outlines the principles behind the council’s BID programme; creates the process for establishing, expanding, amalgamating and disestablishing BIDs; determines rating mechanisms; prescribes operating standards and guidelines; and sets accountability requirements.

Diagram A: From calculation to approval, how the BID targeted rate is set.

 

The business association sets the BID grant amount to deliver its work programme

 

22.     BID-operating business associations are provided with a rate modelling spreadsheet to help with their budget decision-making. The spreadsheet models any proposed changes to their current BID grant amount and, most importantly, how that influences the BID targeted rate for everyone who will pay it. When considering a change to the BID grant amount, the business association’s board (governing committee) must consider what the local business and property owners can afford.

 

23.     Each business association prepares an annual business plan for the following financial year that will deliver programmes based on their strategic priorities and financial parameters.

 

24.     The cost of implementing that business plan is set out in an annual budget that the BID-operating business association’s board agrees will be recommended for approval by the business association membership.

 

25.     The AGM provides the forum where members vote to approve the operational budget and, in doing so, set the requisite BID grant amount for the following financial year.

 

Local boards are responsible for recommending the targeted rate if a BID complies with the BID Policy

 

26.     Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body. The local board should recommend the setting of the targeted rate if it is satisfied that the BID is sufficiently complying with the BID Policy.

 

 

27.     The Ōrākei Local Board approved similar recommendations for the rohe’s three BID programmes last year (resolution number OR/2020/55), as did 17 other local boards that have BID programmes operating in their rohe. 

The Governing Body sets the targeted rates when it approves the Annual Budget

 

28.     The recommendations in this report are put into effect with the Governing Body’s approval of the Annual Budget 2021/2022 and its striking (setting) of the targeted rates.

 

29.     In accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, the Governing Body is authorised to make the final decisions on what BID programme targeted rates, if any, to set in any particular year or property (in terms of the amount and the geographic area to be rated).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

30.     BID programmes are operated by independent business associations (incorporated societies), and their programmes and services are provided according to their members’ stated priorities. In recognition of their independent status, the BID Policy does not prescribe standards for programme effectiveness. That is a matter for the business association members to determine. Staff, therefore, cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

Ellerslie Village, Remuera and St Heliers Village all comply with the BID Policy

 

31.     Staff are satisfied EBA, RBA and SHVA have sufficiently met the requirements of the BID Policy.

32.     Staff require BID-operating business associations to provide to the council the following documents, and stay in touch with their local board at least once a year:

·   Current strategic plan – evidence of achievable medium- to long-term opportunities.

·   Audited accounts – assurance that the BID-operating business association is managing its members’ BID targeted rate funds responsibly.

·   Annual report on the year just completed – evidence that programmes are addressing priority issues that benefit BID targeted ratepayers. 

·   Business plan for the coming year – one-year programme with key performance indicators, based on the strategic plan, to be resourced and achieved.

·   Indicative budget for the following year – Auckland Council’s Annual Budget requires targeted rates to be identified a year in advance to inform the budgeting process which sets all rates.

·   Board Charter – establishes guidelines for effective board governance and positive relationships between the association and its members.

·   Annual Accountability Agreement – certification that these requirements have been met.

·   Programme Agreement – a good faith agreement between each BID-operating business association and the council that sets basic parameters of the council-business association relationship.

·   AGM minutes - provisional minutes of each business association’s 2020 AGM meetings which contain the resolution, voted on by members, confirming the BID grant amount for the 2021/2022 financial year.

33.     In addition, BID-operating business associations must inform the council of progress with other compliance requirements, including:

·   Incorporated Society registration of the business association and all required documents up to date and filed.

·   Resolving problems or issues, if any, that have an impact on the governance or operation of the BID programme.

 

34.     The BID Policy sets an annual compliance deadline of 10 March for the information to be forwarded to the council. The table below summarises the requirements for the three BIDs within the Ōrākei Local Board area as of 10 March 2021.

 

Table 1: Business associations’ compliance with the BID Policy

 

   

    Requirement

    FY 2019/2020

 

 

Strategic Plan*

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green 2020-2022

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green 2017-2022

 under review

Audited financials

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual Report

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Business Plan

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Indicative budgets

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Board Charter

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual Accountability Agreement

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual meeting w/ local board (special briefing)

2 March 2021

2 March 2021

2 March 2021

Programme Agreement

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Greenvalid to October 2022

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green valid to November 2022

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green valid to June 2023

Incorporated society registration

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

2020 AGM minutes (provisional)

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Resolving problems or issues

Nothing to record

Nothing to record

Nothing to record

 

35.     As the EBA, RBA and SHVA have sufficiently complied with the BID Policy, staff advise the local board to recommend to the Governing Body the striking (setting) of the targeted rates.

 

Business associations opt to retain current BID targeted rates for 2021/2022

 

36.     As shown in Table 2 below, Ōrākei three BID-operating business associations do not propose changes to their BID targeted rates for the 2021/2022 financial year.

 

 

37.     Ellerslie Village voted to keep its 2021/2022 BID targeted rate at $162,000, an amount last increased in 2019/2020.

38.     Remuera has maintained its BID grant at $242,564 for the next financial year. Records show this business association has not increased the sum since 2012.

 

39.     St Heliers Village has also kept its BID grant at the current level, $138,484, for many years.

40.     Across Tāmaki Makaurau’s 50 BID-operating business associations, 21 raised their targeted rates for 2021/2022 with the percentage increase ranging from 1.7% to 10%. One BID reduced its income after a one-off increase in 2020/2021 to fund America’s Cup-related activities.

 

Table 2: BID targeted rates comparison: 2021/2022 c.f. 2020/2021

 

 

   BID

 

2021/2022

 

2020/2021

 

Change

 

 

 

$162,000

 

 

$162,000

 

 

Nil

LAST INCREASED: 2019/2020

 

 

$242,564

 

 

$242,564

 

Nil

LAST INCREASED: 2011/2012

 

 

$138,484

 

 

$138,484

 

Nil

LAST INCREASED: before 2012.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

41.     Through targeted rate-funded advocacy and activities, BID-operating business associations promote and often facilitate environmental sustainability programmes.

42.     From running carbon-reducing ‘shop local’ campaigns to transitioning to energy-efficient lighting and championing waste reduction and recovery programmes, there are many examples of BIDs facilitating local responses to the climate change emergency.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

43.     Advocacy is a key service provided by business associations and those with BID programme-funded personnel are at an advantage. The BIDs ensure the views and ambitions of their members are communicated to elected representatives and staff across the council family, including CCOs, on those plans, policies, projects and programmes which impact them.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

44.     The local board’s views are most frequently expressed by its appointed representative on the board of each BID-operating business association. This liaison board member (or alternate) can attend BID board meetings to ensure there is a direct link between the council and the operation of the BID programme.

 

45.     Ellerslie Village, Remuera and St Heliers Village BIDs value their strong and enduring governance-to-governance relationship with the Ōrākei Local Board. The contributions by the local board’s ‘BID representatives’, past and present, have promoted mutual understanding, collaboration and aligned economic outcomes.

 

Visions, plans aligned

 

 

46.     Ōrākei’s BIDs and local board share an interest in the rohe and are ambitious for its future and its people. They also share goals that include economic prosperity, community identity, placemaking and pride.

 

 

47.     The BID programmes tangibly support the aspirations of the Ōrākei Local Board Plan 2020, best expressed in Outcome 5:  Our town centres and local businesses are increasingly vibrant and prosperous.

Local rohe, local benefit, local funding

 

48.     Recommending that the Governing Body strike the targeted rates for EBA, RBA and SHVA means that these BID programmes will continue to be funded from targeted rates on commercial properties in their rohe. They will provide services in accordance with their members’ priorities as stated in their strategic plans.

 

49.     Several local boards, including Ōrākei, provide additional funding to local business associations, however accountability for any grants is set by funding agreements between the local board and the business association. Those contractual obligations are separate from the requirements of the BID Policy and are not covered in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

50.     At the 2018 Census, Māori represented 5.7 per cent of the population living in the Ōrākei Local Board area, compared to 11.5 per cent of Auckland.  Individual business associations may, through operating their BID programme, identify opportunities for niche support or development of any Māori business sector in their rohe.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

51.     There are no financial implications for the local board. Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from commercial ratepayers in the district and used by the business association for improvements within that rohe. The council’s financial role is to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the associations every quarter.

52.     The targeted rate is payable by the owners of the commercial properties within the geographic area of the individual BID programmes.  In practice, this cost is often passed on to the business owners who occupy these properties.  This cost may be harder to meet at a time when businesses continue to be financially impacted by the effects of the COVID-19 lockdown restrictions. 

53.     The council last year extended its Rates Remission and Postponement Policy to commercial property owners as part of the Annual Budget 2020/2021 to help mitigate the impact of the targeted rate on those who are struggling financially. This policy will continue for the 2021/2022 financial year.

54.     If the Governing Body agrees with the BID targeted rates proposed by the business associations, the cost of grants will be met from the existing operational budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

55.     There are no direct financial risks to the local board or the council that could result from this recommendation to endorse the BID targeted rates for the three business associations.

 

56.     To sustain public trust and confidence in the council, there needs to be a balance between the independence of the BID-operating business associations and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

 

57.     The rules and obligations of the BID Policy are intended to help minimise the potential for business associations to misuse funds by requiring each BID-operating business association to plan for their intended use, report on its activities to its members and to have its accounts audited.

 

58.     The council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy and this report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds.

 

59.     Economic disruption created by the flow-on effects of COVID-19 lockdowns will continue to be felt in Auckland’s town centres and business precincts. The BID programme is an internationally proven approach to engage and empower local businesses.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

60.     If the board supports this report, it will recommend to the Governing Body that the BID targeted rates be set as part of the Annual Budget 2021/2022.

 

61.     After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly BID grant payments, effective from 1 July 2021, to EBA, RBA and SHVA to implement programmes that improve the local business environment, support businesses to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic and help address the climate change emergency through sustainability initiatives.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2020 AGM Provisional Minutes

255

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Paul Thompson - BID Senior Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

Excerpts from business association AGM provisional minutes

 

 

 

 

 

AGM: 13 October 2020

 

 

RESOLUTION:

 

That the Ellerslie Business Association maintains the current targeted rate at $162,000 for the 2021/2022 financial year and ask that the Ōrākei Local Board recommend approval of this targeted rate levy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AGM: 13 October 2020

 

 

RESOLUTION:

 

That the Ōrākei Local Board be requested to resolve to recommend to the Governing Body of the Auckland Council to strike a targeted rate for the St Heliers BID programme for the 2021/2022 financial year to achieve an amount of $138,484.00 for the St Heliers (Village) Association, and to include this amount in the 2021/2022 annual plan/budget.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AGM: 28 October 2020

 

 

RESOLUTION

 

The Remuera Business Association is not proposing to increase the targeted rate, leaving the BID targeted rate grant at $242,564 for 2021/2022 and asks the Ōrākei Local Board to recommend the approval of this amount in the council’s next annual budget.

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

Adoption of the Ōrākei Urban Ngahere 10 Year Action Plan 2021

File No.: CP2021/05744

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the proposed direction for tree planting over the next 10 years and seek the local boards approval of the Ōrākei Urban Ngahere 10-Year Action Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The regional Te Rautaki Ngahere ā-Tāone o Tāmaki Makaurau/ Auckland’s Urban Forest Strategy responds to changes in ngahere canopy cover and potential climate change impacts. The strategy’s target is to increase tree canopy cover across all local board areas in Tāmaki Makaurau to 30 per cent by 2050. 

3.       In 2018/2019, the Ōrākei Local Board funded an implementation plan to understand the current canopy cover and plan for increasing ngahere cover in the local area. The three stages of the implementation plan are ‘knowing’, ‘growing’ and ‘protecting’.

4.       The first part of the ‘knowing’ stage involved analysis of the 2013 Light Detecting and Ranging Technology (LiDAR) data for the Ōrākei Local Board tree canopy cover. A report identifying cover of 20 per cent was adopted by the local board in 2019.

5.       Further work is currently being undertaken to analyse more recent LiDAR data. Initial findings show that net canopy coverage has decreased by 1 per cent between 2013 and 2016-2018 Ōrākei Local Board. 

6.       The final part of the ‘knowing’ stage has been to develop a 10-year action plan that identifies target areas where trees can be planted to help increase canopy cover in the local board area.

7.       This report is seeking adoption of the Ōrākei Urban Ngahere 10-Year Action Plan (Attachment A).

8.       The local board’s adoption of the action plan will set the direction for tree planting over the next 10 years and enable planning and preparation for the ‘growing’ phase to commence in June 2021.

9.       It is recommended that the action plan is reviewed every three years to align with local board plan development.

10.     The triennial review will update the board on planting progress and enable planning to be undertaken to maintain existing as well as highlighting next steps to further increase canopy cover.

11.     Each year an annual planting plan, including site specific analysis, tree selection, soil and environmental condition analysis, will be prepared. The annual planting plan will require local board funding.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      adopt the Ōrākei Urban Ngahere 10 Year Action Plan

b)      request that Parks, Sport and Recreation staff review the Ōrākei Urban Ngahere 10-Year Action Plan every three years and provide a report updating the local board on progress of delivery of the action plan.

c)      request that Parks, Sport and Recreation staff review the Ōrākei Urban Ngahere Action Plan implementation work program annually and provide a report to the local board on the delivery of new tree plantings.

 

Horopaki

Context

12.     In 2016 staff studied the extent of urban forest canopy coverage across Tāmaki Makaurau using information captured from an aerial flight using LiDAR survey technology.

13.     A detailed tree canopy analysis report was developed by staff from the Research Investigation Monitoring Unit (RIMU) and a regional strategy was developed, which the Governing Body approved in October 2018.

14.     The regional strategy’s objective is to increase regional tree canopy cover to 30 per cent, with no local board area having less than 15 per cent canopy cover by 2050.

15.     Local boards’ role in reaching this target is to develop local implementation plans to address the canopy loss in their local board area. The local implementation plan has three stages: ‘knowing’, ‘growing’ and ‘protecting’.

16.     The ‘knowing’ stage of this planning included analysis of the cover that currently exists across the local board area, and a comparison of the net change over a three to five-year period. The percentage canopy cover analysis measures all vegetation on public and private land that is over three metres in height.

17.     The Ōrākei Urban Ngahere (Forest) Analysis Report was approved by the local board on 19th September 2019 (OR/2019/195). It found that the average tree canopy cover across the local board area was 20 per cent based on the findings of the 2013 LiDAR work. 

18.     The findings from the analysis report have been used to help inform development of the Ōrākei Urban Ngahere 10-Year Action Plan, providing guidance on how to redress the canopy loss.

19.     The action plan will provide long-term direction on planting new trees across the local board area with a goal to increase overall tree canopy coverage.

20.     Adoption and implementation of the action plan will lead to:

·   planting of new specimen trees

·   undertaking enrichment planting in local parks

·   working with Auckland Transport to increase tree cover in the road corridor

·   providing guidance and direction for community groups and council departments undertaking or organising community planting events.

21.     Targets and areas to focus planting efforts are outlined in the action plan. Planting trees in these areas will increase canopy cover, establish or enhance ecological corridors for wildlife and provide shade for key areas in parks and reserves.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

22.     The action plan has been informed by findings from the canopy analysis report. Findings in the analysis report were based on a LiDAR survey that was completed in 2013.

23.     A follow-up LiDAR survey was carried out in 2016-2018 and findings suggest a net decrease in canopy cover of 1 per cent in the local board area between 2013 and 2016. This equates to a net decrease in overall tree canopy coverage amounting to approximately 4.67 square hectares less tree canopy cover when compared to 2013. The overall net loss of canopy coverage took place on privately owned land mainly whilst there were some positive increases in tree coverage on publicly owned land.

24.     The comparative findings are negative, revealing a net loss of larger trees and net overall coverage on privately owned land decreasing.  Analysis of the 2018 data is still being finalised and will be reported to the local board in early June 2021.

25.     Site assessments have been carried out to investigate suitable locations for planting new specimen trees based on the information in the analysis report. The primary areas of assessment were parks with playgrounds and local streets that could provide green corridor connections between local parks.

26.     These investigations, along with extensive site visits and subject matter expert input, have helped to inform the proposed locations and set the target for planting that is outlined in the action plan.

27.     The target for the local board is to maintain existing and to increase tree canopy cover in the road corridor and on public reserve land over a 10-year period. This will require the planting of at least one hundred and fifty large growing specimen trees annually. Doing this annually will increase overall tree canopy coverages on publicly managed land by 2030. 

28.     The adoption of the action plan and its implementation will (over a 30-year period), lead to incremental changes that will help work towards achieving above the regional target of 30 per cent canopy cover.

29.     Staff have recommended a realistic target for the local board to work towards in the action plan. It is forecast that with small increases in new planting and decreases in tree removal year on year; the current 19 per cent cover is at least maintained with potentially an incremental increase as the new plantings mature over the next 10 years.

30.     Reporting on implementation of the plan every three years aligns with local board plan development. This will enable the local board to review the target and planting strategy, plan for the next areas of planting and consider the allocation of budgets required.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     Implementation of the strategy and the action plan is an example of an integrated approach to help mitigate emissions, build resilience over the longer term and enable adaptation to the impacts of climate change to meet Auckland Council’s climate goals.

32.     The strategy is identified as a key action in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri - Auckland’s Climate Plan 2020.

33.     Increasing the stock of trees and vegetation in Tāmaki Makaurau will increase carbon sequestration and contribute towards reducing net greenhouse gas emissions.

34.     Increasing trees and vegetation also provides various natural functions that assist with adaptation to the climate change impacts for humans and other species, such as:

·   providing a shading and cooling effect to counter rising temperatures

·   slowing and reducing stormwater runoff to assist in managing increased rainfall events

·   improve air quality by trapping particulates and filtering vehicle pollutants

·   providing additional habitat for indigenous species to occupy, enhancing their resilience to climate change impacts.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

35.     Collaboration across Parks, Sport and Recreation (PSR), Infrastructure and Environmental Services (I&ES) and Community Facilities (CF) departments has been key to the development of the action plan.  

36.     CF staff has helped inform where the current maintenance and renewal programme for trees can be strengthened to improve the overall diversity and increase the extent of the tree canopy cover.

37.     PSR staff will work with CF staff in developing the renewals programme to ensure an ongoing programme of tree renewal occurs to replace poor and ailing stock and to replant where dead, dying or diseased trees are removed. 

38.     Staff will continue to collaborate and develop a tree planting programme and implementation plan for the delivery of new tree plantings in the 2021 planting season and beyond.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

39.     The early draft action plan was workshopped with the local board on 10 September 2020. At the workshop board members were presented the draft plan and were asked to provide feedback.

40.     The feedback received was analysed and incorporated into the updated version of the action plan that was workshopped with the local board on 4 March 2021. Feedback received at the workshop has been incorporated into the final draft of the action plan on attachment A to this report.

41.     As directed by the local board in March, council staff have contacted and met with members of the Eastern Bays Songbird Project to provide detail on the programme and identify areas where cooperation may be possible.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

42.     The strategy was workshopped with mana whenua during its development in three workshops during 2017 and 2018. Feedback and views discussed at the hui helped to shape the final version of the strategy.

43.     The use of native trees for all new tree planting is a strong view of mana whenua, and as such natives are the first choice for planting as outlined in the strategy. Native trees are also identified as the preference for planting in the action plan.

44.     New tree plantings will benefit local Māori and the wider community by providing increased opportunities for access to nature and providing shade in the local park network.

45.     Mana whenua will be updated in the coming months on the local implementation programme and will be engaged to support in providing tree planting advice and to provide a cultural narrative in the choice of species for local areas.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

46.     The adoption of the action plan will conclude the ‘knowing’ stage of the local board’s implementation of the strategy, which is funded by the Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) OPEX budget.

47.     Delivery of the ‘growing’ stage will be funded by CAPEX from various budgets. These include LDI, Asset Based Services (ABS), the Natural Environment Targeted Rate (NETR) and the Mayor’s Million Trees budgets that are allocated by the Governing Body.

48.     In 2021/2022 staff are proposing that the local board allocates $30,000 LDI CAPEX in the annual local board Community Facilities work programme for the delivery of the strategy. The adoption of the action plan will direct priorities for this funding and ensure the right trees are planted in the right place in the 2021/2022 planting season.

49.     To ensure the target outlined in the action plan is met, it is recommended that LDI CAPEX is allocated annually to the local board’s Community Facilities annual work programme to continue planting new trees. The amount of funding required will be quantified annually based on priorities to advance new tree plantings.

50.     LDI OPEX will be sought each year for development of site-specific plans, for board approval to enable delivery of the local board’s annual tree planting programme.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

51.     The trajectory of loss of tree canopy cover across the Ōrākei Local Board area is expected to continue on private land as the area develops. New tree planting on public land is necessary to help offset these changes over the longer term.

52.     Sufficient time is required to plan and prepare for planting. Should the local board not adopt the plan there is a risk that the ‘growing’ stage of the strategy will not be able to start in June 2021.

53.     The 10-year action plan outlines a detailed ‘Planting Opportunities List’ to ensure the right tree is planted in the right place. Should the local board not adopt the action plan there is a risk that trees planted in 2021 will not be appropriate for their location.

54.     There is a risk of poor maintenance of plants once they are in the ground. Adoption of the action plan will help mitigate this risk and enable staff to employ best practice tree planting and ongoing maintenance methods.  

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

55.     Following adoption of the action plan, annual planting plans will be completed that identify areas for planting in 2021, 2022 and 2023. These assessments will advise staff in CF, Auckland Transport and other delivery partners on priorities for the ‘growing’ stage.

56.     Annual updates on the ‘growing’ stage will be reported to the local board. These reports will be provided by departments that are leading the tree planting and collated by Parks Sports and Recreation staff to enable high level reporting on total numbers of new trees planted.

57.     In 2023, staff will review the strategy, report to the board on successes and challenges and recommend direction for planting and funding allocation for the following three years.

58.     Once analysis of the 2018 data is complete the Ōrākei Urban Ngahere (Forest) Analysis Report 2019 will be updated with an addendum. Staff will seek adoption of the addendum by the local board in June 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Urban Ngahere 10 Year Action Plan

263

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Howell Davies - Senior Advisor - Urban Forest

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

Local Board Views on Plan Change 60 - Open Space (2020) and Other Rezoning Matters

File No.: CP2021/05011

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To invite the local board to provide its views on the council initiated Plan Change 60 – Open Space (2020) and Other Rezoning Matters (PC60).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Decision-makers on a plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan must consider local boards’ views on the plan change, if the relevant local boards choose to provide their views.

3.       Each local board has a responsibility to communicate the interests and preferences of people in its area on Auckland Council policy documents, including plan changes. A local board can present local views and preferences when that view is expressed by the whole local board.[1]

4.       On 28 January 2021, Auckland Council notified Plan Change 60. Submissions closed on 1 March 2021. The plan change includes 105 sites (in some cases, a site comprises more than one lot) and aims to rezone land to:

(a)  recognise land recently vested or acquired as open space

(b)  correct zoning errors or anomalies (including rezoning land to better reflect its use)

(c)  facilitate Panuku Development Auckland’s (Panuku) land rationalisation and disposal process or

(d)  facilitate Kāinga Ora’s and Auckland Council redevelopment of certain neighbourhoods.

5.       One hundred and six submissions have been received on the proposed plan change. The vast majority of these oppose Panuku’s rezoning and land disposal. In summary there are 15 submissions in support of the plan change, four in support but seeking amendments, 85 in opposition and two out of scope.

6.       No iwi authority has made a submission in support or opposition to Plan Change 60.

7.       This report is the mechanism for the local board to resolve and provide its views on Plan Change 60 should it wish to do so. Staff do not recommend what view the local board should convey.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      provide local board views on Plan Change 60 - Open Space (2020) and Other Rezoning Matters.

b)      appoint a local board member to speak to the local board views at a hearing on Plan Change 60.

c)      delegate authority to the chairperson of the Ōrākei Local Board to make a replacement appointment in the event the local board member appointed in resolution b) is unable to attend the plan change hearing.

Horopaki

Context

8.       Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of Auckland Council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards provide their views on the content of these documents. Decision-makers must consider local boards’ views when deciding the content of these policy documents.[2]

9.       If the local board chooses to provide its views, the planner includes those views in the hearing report. Local board views are included in the analysis of the plan change, along with submissions.

10.     If appointed by resolution, local board members may present the local board’s views at the hearing to commissioners, who decide on the plan change.

11.     This report provides an overview of the proposed plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP), and a summary of submissions’ key themes.

12.     The report does not recommend what the local board should convey, should the local board decide to convey its views on plan change 60. The planner must include any local board views in the evaluation of the plan change. The planner cannot advise the local board as to what its views should be, and then evaluate those views.

13.     The key theme from submissions is opposition to the proposed rezonings relating to Kāinga Ora/Auckland Council redevelopment and Panuku’s land rationalisation and disposal. Attachment A identifies the land parcels that are the subject of submissions.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Plan Change 60 affects land across the Auckland region.

15.     The purpose of the proposed plan change is to rezone land to either:

(a)  recognise land recently vested or acquired as open space

(b)  correct zoning errors or anomalies (including rezoning land to better reflect its use)

(c)  facilitate Panuku’s land rationalisation and disposal process or

(d)  facilitate Kāinga Ora’s and Auckland Council redevelopment of certain neighbourhoods.

16.     The Section 32 Report and details of the plan change are available from the council’s website at Plan Change 60. The council’s planner, and other experts, will evaluate and report on:

·   section 32 Report that accompanies the plan change

·   submissions and

·   the views and preferences of the local board, if the local board passes a resolution.

17.     Submissions were made by 106 people/organisations as outlined below.

Submissions

Number of submissions

In support

15

In support but requesting change(s)

4

In opposition

85

Out of scope

2

Total

106

 

 

18.     Key submission themes are listed below.

Oppose the rezoning of:

·   142 Triangle Road, Massey (Maps 4 & 37)

·   1-5 Lippiatt Road, Ōtāhuhu (Map 73)

·   23 Waipuna Road, Mount Wellington (Map 75)

·   12R Rockfield Road, Ellerslie (Map 76)

·   11R Birmingham Road, Ōtara (Map 77)

·   2R Keeney Court, Papakura (Map 78)

·   Walkway adjacent to 45 Brandon Road, Glen Eden (Map 79)

·   45 Georgina Street, Freemans Bay (Map 81)

·   36 Cooper Street, Grey Lynn (Map 82)

·   13 Davern Lane, New Lynn (Map 85)

·   67 East Street, Pukekohe (Map 86)

·   Princes Street West, Pukekohe (Map 87)

·   R105 Stott Avenue, Birkenhead (Map 93)

·   26 Princes Ōtāhuhu (Map 96).

Support the rezoning but request an alternative zone:

·   2157 East Coast Road, Stillwater (Map 71).

Both support for and opposition to the rezoning:

·   50 Mayflower Close, Māngere East (Map 100)

·   62 Mayflower Close, Māngere East (Map 105).

Support for rezoning or further information required:

·   1337 Whangaparaoa Road, Army Bay (Map 104).

19.     The key reasons for submission opposing the plan change include:

·   opposed to the rezoning of pocket parks – they are needed to support intensification and for social and environmental benefits

·   loss of valuable reserve land

·   few parks in the area

·   significant negative effect on enjoyment of our neighbourhood/ adverse effects on property and locality

·   park has significant cultural heritage associations and natural value

·   contradicts Auckland Unitary Plan heritage policies

·   inadequate public notification

·   green areas needed in more intensive housing areas

·   contrary to climate change/greenhouse effects – green spaces are needed for low carbon Auckland Council

·   inconsistent with Auckland Unitary Plan objectives and policies

·   park has trees which will be lost with rezoning and development

·   site is an overland flow path and flood plain

·   property values will be adversely affected

·   loss of walkway and critical linkage

·   sale of spaces is desperate revenue gathering/selling due to Covid is short-sighted

·   subsequent building will severely impact on sunlight and amenities of adjoining sites

·   contrary to Auckland Council’s declaration of a climate emergency, open space network plans, National Policy Statement – Urban Development – well functioning environments, open space provision policy, Auckland Plan 2050, the Urban Ngahere Strategy

·   site is a Significant Ecological Area and part of a wildlife corridor and refuge

·   inconsistent with Local Boards goal of increasing tree canopy.

20.     Information on individual submissions, and the summary of all decisions requested by submitters, is available from council’s website: Plan Change 60

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     Several submissions raised specific climate concerns. These relate to the loss of locally accessible open space and the associated vegetation, particularly mature trees.

22.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·   to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and 

·   to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

23.     The local board could consider if Plan Change 60:

·   will reduce, increase or have no effect on Auckland’s overall greenhouse gas emissions (e.g. does it encourage car dependency, enhance connections to public transit, walking and cycling or support quality compact urban form)

·   prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change. That is, does the proposed plan change elevate or alleviate climate risks (e.g. flooding, coastal and storm inundation, urban heat effect, stress on infrastructure).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     Panuku is a council-controlled organisation that resulted from the merging of Auckland Council Property Limited and Waterfront Auckland. One of the roles of Panuku is the release of land or properties that can be better utilised by others.

25.     In conjunction with Auckland Council’s Stakeholder and Land Advisory team, Panuku have identified 26 council-owned parcels of land which are either surplus to requirements or they are part of a Panuku regeneration project (i.e. a series of projects and initiatives, designed to kickstart the transformation process and bring about changes that will help centres prosper in the future). Those parcels considered to be surplus to requirements have been cleared for sale by Auckland Council.

26.     Auckland Council’s decision to dispose of or sell the land parcels is separate from the zoning of the land. Zoning is a method used to implement the Auckland Unitary Plan’s objectives and policies and to achieve the purpose of the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA). The merit of any rezoning of land (from open space to residential or business) therefore must be assessed against the purpose of the RMA and the relevant Auckland Unitary Plan objectives and policies. Other relevant considerations which will be considered in the section 42A hearing report include the Auckland Plan 2050, Auckland’s Climate Plan and the Urban Ngahere Strategy and open space network plans.

27.     Auckland Transport made a submission in relation to the rezoning of 1337 Whangaparaoa Road, Army Bay. The key matter raised is the traffic effects of rezoning the Whangaparaoa Golf course from Residential – Single House to Open Space – Sport and Active Recreation zone.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     The plan change affects sites throughout the Auckland region and feedback is therefore sought from all local boards.

29.     Factors the local board may wish to consider in formulating its view:

·   interests and preferences of people in local board area

·   well-being of communities within the local board area

·   local board documents, such as the local board plan and local board agreement

·   responsibilities and operation of the local board.

30.     A memo was sent to all local boards on 27 October 2020 outlining the proposed changes, the rational for them and the likely plan change timeframes.

31.     This report is the mechanism for obtaining formal local board views. The decision-maker will consider local board views, if provided, when deciding on the plan change.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     If the local board chooses to provide its views on Plan Change 60 it may also comment on matters that may be of interest or importance to Māori generally. In the 2018 census, approximately 11.5 per cent (or 181,194) of the Auckland region’s population identified as Māori.

33.     Plans and Places consulted with all iwi authorities when it prepared Plan Change 60. On 27 October 2020, a memorandum outlining the draft proposed plan change was sent to all Auckland’s 19 mana whenua entities and the Tupuna Maunga Authority as required under the RMA.

34.     Comments were received from:

·   Ngāti Manuhiri – asking for an extension of time to 11 December 2020 to enable a discussion with their governance arm

·   Waikato Tainui – they will support mana whenua to take the lead role on such plan changes

·   Tupuna Maunga Authority – their interest is those sites that are within Height Sensitive Areas or regionally Significant Volcanic Viewshafts.

35.     No iwi authorities made a formal submission.

36.     The hearing report will include analysis of Part 2 of the RMA which requires that all persons exercising RMA functions shall take into account the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi/Te Tiriti o Waitangi.[3] The plan change does not trigger an issue of significance as identified in the Schedule of Issues of Significance and Māori Plan 2017.[4]

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.     Panuku’s land rezoning and rationalisation (26 land parcels) is part of the Auckland Council’s financial recovery.

38.     The draft Long-term Plan 2021-2031 proposes the selling of surplus properties and reinvesting the proceeds into critical infrastructure for the city. Over the next three years, Auckland Council is seeking to increase these sales to return $70 million a year to invest in Auckland.

39.     The 26 land parcels that are part of this plan change form part of the $70 million return sought.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     There is a risk that the local board will be unable to provide its views and preferences on the plan change if it doesn’t pass a resolution. This report provides:

·   the mechanism for the local board to express its views and preferences if it so wishes

·   the opportunity for a local board member to speak at a hearing.

41.     If the local board chooses not to pass a resolution at this business meeting, these opportunities are forgone.

42.     The power to provide local board views regarding the content of a plan change cannot be delegated to individual local board member(s).[5] This report enables the whole local board to decide whether to provide its views and, if so, to determine what matters those views should include.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.     The planner will include, and report on, any resolution(s) of the local boards in the Section 42A hearing report. The local board member appointed to speak to the local board’s views will be informed of the hearing date and invited to the hearing for that purpose.

44.     The planner will advise the local boards of the decision on the plan change request by memorandum.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

The land parcels in PC60 that are the subject of submissions

305

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tony Reidy - Team Leader Planning

Authorisers

Eryn Shields - Team Leader  Regional, North West and Islands

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

Economic Development Action Plan: Draft for feedback

File No.: CP2021/05634

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on the draft Economic Development Action Plan: Council’s role in Auckland’s recovery 2021-2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The council organisation and council-controlled organisations have worked collaboratively to develop the draft Economic Development Action Plan. This plan defines and agrees, for the next three years, the council family’s economic objectives and priorities and determines a coordinated course of action. The plan is limited to actions that are within the remit of council and council-controlled organisation (CCO) activities.

3.       The draft plan aligns with the 10-year budget and will inform the work programmes of relevant council family departments. The work is supported by the chief executives of council and all substantive council-controlled organisations.

4.       The draft plan outlines detailed actions within six areas of focus (‘workstreams’) as outlined in Attachment A. It reflects the guiding principles of transitioning towards a regenerative and low carbon economy, supporting economic opportunities for Māori, and responding to our communities of greatest need.

5.       There will be targeted engagement on the draft plan, including with iwi, advisory panel members and business groups. Feedback will be sought until 14 June 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the draft Economic Development Action Plan: Council’s role in Auckland’s recovery 2021-2024.

b)      provide feedback by 14 June 2021 for consideration in the final draft Economic Development Action Plan: Council’s role in Auckland’s recovery 2021-2024.

Horopaki

Context

6.       In August 2020, the CCO Review Panel delivered its report alongside 64 recommendations which were endorsed in full by the Governing Body. The review stated that council and all substantive council-controlled organisations (CCOs) should together define the economic outcomes for Auckland and agree on how to achieve and measure them. The review also acknowledged the need for better coordination and definition of responsibilities for local economic development within the council family. The Economic Development Action Plan forms part of council’s response to that review.

7.       The plan is not a long-term strategy and does not replace the Economic Development Strategy 2012. The priorities and focus over the next three years, however, consider direction from council’s existing strategies i.e., the Auckland Plan 2050, Economic Development Strategy 2012, Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan and Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau: Council’s Māori Outcomes Framework.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       Comprehensive background work to support the development of the action plan has been completed by the Chief Economist Unit (CEU), the Auckland Plan Strategy and Research Department (APSR) and Auckland Unlimited. This includes a report from the CEU providing a profile of Auckland’s economy over the last 10 years, the impact of Covid-19 on the Auckland economy, and the main roadblocks to recovery. The same report also identified areas where the council group can have a material impact on economic development. Key areas are:

·   assets

·   procurement

·   land use and zoning

·   regulatory processes

·   travel network

·   town centres

·   pricing

·   skills and investment attraction

·   tourism attraction

·   social support services

·   coordination of responses through partnerships.

9.       There has also been an extensive review of plans and strategies across the council and CCOs to identify common economic development themes. These were: innovation and technology, Māori economy, regenerative, resilient, low carbon economy, workforce transition, competitive high-value sectors, local economic development, infrastructure, and culture and creativity.

10.     This background work formed the basis for six workstreams:

·   Destination Tāmaki Makaurau: attracting people and investment

·   Local Tāmaki Makaurau: enabling thriving local economies

·   Skilled Tāmaki Makaurau: supporting quality jobs and skill development

·   Future Tāmaki Makaurau: preparing businesses for the future

·   Enabled Tāmaki Makaurau: infrastructure enabling economic development

·   Enabled Tāmaki Makaurau: regulations that enable economic development.

11.     Each workstream has both council and CCO staff representation. These workstreams have developed a set of actions with responsibilities and timeframes as detailed in this draft plan. A monitoring framework will be developed to ensure roles, responsibilities and accountabilities of council and each CCO are clearly defined as they relate to the actions in the draft plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan has provided direction to the development of the draft plan, aspiring to a more resilient economy that is regenerative, inclusive, local and enables Aucklanders to thrive.

13.     The draft action plan has embedded the guiding principle of ‘transitioning to a regenerative and low carbon economy’ into each of its six workstreams. The development of actions is underpinned by kaitiakitanga and considers how resources used give back to nature and increase value through reuse and renewal. Where applicable, actions broadly encourage a decrease in greenhouse gas emissions, low carbon products and services, climate innovation, and less dependency on natural resources.

14.     The actions presented in this draft action plan will go through a further climate impact assessment using tools developed by the Chief Sustainability Office. The results of this assessment will be incorporated into the final plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The draft plan responds to the CCO review recommendation for council and all CCOs to together define the economic outcomes for Auckland and agree on how to achieve and measure them. The actions in the draft plan will be shared and accountabilities of council and each CCO well defined. Some CCOs will have a more active role than others.

16.     The scope and development of the Economic Development Action Plan has been agreed to through the council and CCO Chief Executives’ group. This group is updated with progress on the plan as appropriate. The project team includes a representative and contribution from each CCO. 

17.     The scope of the plan is limited to actions that are within the remit of council and CCO activities. A review and discussion document of the council group’s levers that materially contribute to economic development formed the basis for this draft plan (refer to Attachment B).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     Each workstream of the plan will have a local impact, acknowledging the interdependency of local economies and the regional economy. The draft plan includes the focus area ‘Local Tāmaki Makaurau: enabling thriving local economies’ and has been informed by the recent local board plans’ local economic priorities.

19.     The Local Tāmaki Makaurau workstream seeks to clarify what the Auckland Council group will do to support the local economies of Auckland. This includes setting out the roles that each part of the group plays in delivering actions, while also setting the foundations to help the group identify the economic places (sub-regional and local) of Auckland and deliver outcomes at the local level.

20.     A memo was distributed on 17 February 2021 to inform local board members of the development of council’s Economic Development Action Plan 2021-2024 and to outline the process for local board feedback to the plan. At the request of the local board chairpersons, the draft plan will be provided at all local board business meetings in May 2021 with written feedback by formal resolution provided to the project leads by 14 June 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau has provided direction to the development of the draft plan, in particular, the Kia ora te Umanga mahi objective of supporting economic opportunities for Māori businesses and iwi organisations. The draft plan has also considered direction from the Auckland Plan 2050, the Kaitiaki Forum’s strategic plan and the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s Issues of Significance (2017) as they relate to Māori economic development.

22.     The draft action plan has embedded the guiding principle of ‘supporting economic opportunities for Māori’ into each of its six workstreams. The development of actions will consider partnership opportunities with mana whenua and mataawaka, a focus on equity and addressing systemic barriers, and identifying new economic opportunities for Māori.

23.     The project team have communicated with iwi from the commencement of the project to determine and initiate the preferred process of engagement for each iwi. This draft plan will be sent to all iwi for input and feedback through to 14 June 2021.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The scope of the Economic Development Action Plan states that actions will be funded within the existing 10-year Budget 2021-2031 and therefore, no additional funding is required. The draft plan identifies some actions that rely on external funding sources and partnerships.

25.     At the advice of the finance division, budget alignment is demonstrated in the draft plan at both the group of activity and CCO / council directorate level.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     The draft plan outlines actions that require a commitment from the responsible directorate to include in their work programmes and within their existing budgets. The monitoring framework will include regular progress reporting to ensure effective implementation of the action plan.

27.     This action plan is an internal document, outlining work to be done within the remit of council and its CCOs. The content of the plan builds on earlier consultation undertaken in the development of key strategies that have provided direction. Input and feedback for this action plan has therefore been targeted to key groups.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     The draft plan will be distributed to the key groups that have been engaged from the commencement of the project. Feedback will be considered until 14 June 2021.

29.     The final Economic Development Action Plan: Council’s role in Auckland’s recovery 2021-24 and its monitoring framework will be presented to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events committee on 8 July 2021 for adoption.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Economic Development Action Plan

313

b

Auckland's economic recovery and council's role

347

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janelle Breckell - Principal Strategic Advisor

James Robinson - Head of Strategy and Planning, Auckland Unlimited

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Jacques Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

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20 May 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

+

Updated attachment of the Statement of Proposal to amend the Animal Management Bylaw and controls

File No.: CP2021/06087

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To report the updated attachment for the draft statement of proposal to amend the Animal Management Bylaw and controls which was considered at the Ōrākei Local Board’s 15 April 2021 business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At its 15 April 2021 business meeting, the Board considered the draft statement of proposal to amend the Animal Management Bylaw and controls report and resolved its feedback and support for public consultation of the draft proposal.

3.       Following the business meeting, reporting staff advised that an older version of the draft statement of proposal was included as Attachment A in error. Notably, the beehive restrictions included on pages 2 and 4 of the older version of the draft statement of proposal were incorrect. The correct proposal was as provided in the agenda report to the Board’s April 2021 meeting, which is to:

·   require an approval to keep more than two standard beehives on urban properties with an area less than 2000 m2 (no approval currently required).

4.       This is the same proposal that was presented to the Board at its workshop on 8 April 2021.

5.       The Board is requested to confirm that there is no change to its feedback, (Attachment B on the agenda report), on the draft statement of proposal to amend the Animal Management Bylaw and controls as resolved at its business meeting on 15 April 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the updated version of draft statement of proposal included with this report as Attachment A.

b)      confirm that there is no change to the Board’s feedback on the draft statement of proposal to amend the Animal Management Bylaw and controls provided at its business meeting on 15 April 2021.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Statement of Proposal

369

b

Ōrākei Local Board resolved feedback on the draft proposal to amend the Animal Managment Bylaw and controls

457

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kim Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

Ōrākei Local Board feedback on the proposed draft conditions on the Kohimarama Comprehensive Care Retirement Village application

File No.: CP2021/05989

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To report the Ōrākei Local Board’s feedback on the proposed draft conditions on the Kohimarama Comprehensive Care Retirement application for formal endorsement.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 15 February 2021, Ryman Healthcare Ltd lodged a resource consent application with the Environment Protection Agency in accordance with the COVID-19 Recovery (Fast-track Consenting) Act 2020 to construct a retirement village in Kohimarama on a currently undeveloped site, accessed from Kohimarama Road and John Rymer Place, Kohimarama.

3.       Under the COVID-19 Recovery (Fast-track Consenting) Act 2020, an Expert Consenting Panel invited comments on its draft conditions from every person or group that commented on the application when invited by the Panel.

4.       The Board’s attached comments (attachment A) on the draft conditions were provided to the Expert Consenting Panel on 5 May 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      endorse its feedback on the proposed draft conditions to the Expert Consenting Panel on the Kohimarama Comprehensive Care Retirement application.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Board’s feedback on the proposed draft conditions on the Kohimarama Comprehensive Care Retirement application

461

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

Local Board feedback on the proposals to amend the Freedom Camping Act 2011

File No.: CP2021/06039

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To report the Ōrākei Local Board’s feedback on the four proposals to amend the Freedom Camping Act 2011.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In recent years the increasing number of freedom campers has raised concern from some communities around freedom campers’ cumulative impact on the environment, and the cost to host them. In particular, this concern has focused on the subset of freedom campers who stay in cars, or vans with sleeping platforms, that are not self-contained.

3.       The Government has identified the opportunity to address some of the issues arising from freedom camping while the borders are closed by introducing a better managed system which delivers a high quality experience for domestic and international visitors, and which ensures the costs of freedom camping are not unfairly placed on the communities which host them.

4.       The discussion document outlines four proposals to improve freedom camping in New Zealand for consideration as follows:

·   Make it mandatory for freedom camping in a vehicle to be done in a certified self-contained vehicle.

·   Make it mandatory for freedom campers to stay in a vehicle that is certified self-contained, unless they are staying at a site with toilet facilities (excluding public conservation lands and regional parks).

·   Improve the regulatory tools for government land managers.

·   Strengthen the requirements for self-contained vehicles.

5.       Attached to this report (attachment A) is Board’s feedback provided to the Governing Body at its meeting on 27 May 2021 for consideration to be included in the Auckland Council submission on the freedom camping proposed amendments to the Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      endorse its feedback on the proposed amendments to the Freedom Camping Act 2011 to be considered by the Governing Body at its 27 May 2021 meeting for inclusion in the Auckland Council submission to the Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Board feedback: Proposed changes to the Freedom Camping Act 2011

465

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

Chairman and Board Member May 2021 report

File No.: CP2021/06073

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board Chairman and Members with the opportunity to provide an update on projects, activities and issues in the local board area.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

a)      That the Ōrākei Local Board Chairman and Board Member May 2021 report be received.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairman and Board Member May 2021 report

469

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2021/06113

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Ōrākei Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Ōrākei Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·   clarifying what advice is required and when

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      note the draft governance forward work calendar as at May 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar - May 2021

483

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kim Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 



Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

Ōrākei Local Board Workshop Proceedings

File No.: CP2021/06003

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the records for the Ōrākei Local Board workshops held following the previous business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local Board workshops are an informal forum held primarily for information or discussion purposes, as the case may be and at which no resolutions or decisions are made.

3.       Attached are copies of the records for the Ōrākei Local Board workshops held on 1, 8 and 22 April 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board records for the workshops held on 1, 8 and 22 April 2021 be noted.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Board workshop record - 1 April 2021

491

b

Ōrākei Local Board workshop record - 8 April 2021

493

c

Ōrākei Local Board workshop record - 22 April 2021

495

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

Resolutions Pending Action report

File No.: CP2021/06114

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board with an opportunity to track reports that have been requested from staff.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board resolutions pending action report be noted.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Board resolutions pending action report - May 2021

499

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 



Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

20 May 2021

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Ōrākei Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       The Landing Physical Services Agreement

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(b)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information.

In particular, the report contains a decision that impact on a third party operator.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 



[1] Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, section 15(2)(c)

[2] Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, ss15-16.

 

[3] Resource Management Act 1991, section 8.

[4] Schedule of Issues of Significance and Māori Plan 2017, Independent Māori Statutory Board

[5] Local Government Act 2002, Schedule 7, clause 36D.