I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee will be held on:

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 13 May 2021

10.00am

Reception Lounge
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Kōmiti Whakarite Pārae, Mahi Toi, Hapori, Kaupapa

Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

MEMBERSHIP

Chairperson

Cr Alf Filipaina

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

 

Members

Cr Josephine Bartley

IMSB Member Tony Kake

 

Deputy Mayor Cr Bill Cashmore

Cr Tracy Mulholland

 

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Cr Pippa Coom

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Angela Dalton

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Chris Darby

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

Cr John Watson

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

Cr Paul Young

 

Cr Shane Henderson

 

 

Cr Richard Hills

 

 

IMSB Member Mr Terrence Hohneck

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

Maea Petherick

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

10 May 2021

Contact Telephone: (09) 890 8136

Email: maea.petherick@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


 

Terms of Reference

 

Responsibilities

 

This committee deals with the development and monitoring of strategy, policy and action plans associated with community, social and cultural activities. The committee will establish an annual work programme outlining key focus areas in line with its key responsibilities, which include:

 

·         The Southern Initiative and The Western Initiative

·         sports and recreation, including parks and reserves

·         community facilities and community services

·         acquisition of property relating to the committee’s responsibilities and in accordance with the LTP

·         grants for regional events, arts and cultural and heritage organisations, indoor sports and leisure and for the regional community development programme

·         economic development

·         arts and culture

·         community safety

·         community engagement

·         community development

·         homelessness

·         working with the six demographic advisory panels to give visibility to the issues important to their communities and help effect change

·         working with the Auckland Domain Committee to give visibility to the issues important to the Domain and to help effect change.

 

Powers

 

(i)         All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities, including:

(a)        approval of a submission to an external body

(b)        establishment of working parties or steering groups.

(ii)        The committee has the powers to perform the responsibilities of another committee, where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee.

(iii)       If a policy or project relates primarily to the responsibilities of the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee, but aspects require additional decisions by the Planning Committee and/or the Environment and Climate Change Committee, then the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee has the powers to make associated decisions on behalf of those other committee(s). For the avoidance of doubt, this means that matters do not need to be taken to more than one of these committees for decisions.

(iv)       The committee does not have:

(a)        the power to establish subcommittees

(b)        powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2).

 

 

 


 

 

Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·           Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·           Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·           Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·           In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·           The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·           However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·           All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·           Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·           Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·           All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·           Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·           Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·           Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

13 May 2021

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          7  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    7

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          7

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                8

8          Demographic Advisory Panel work programme                                                        9

9          Outcomes of Regional Arts and Culture grants 2019/2020 - presentations         63

10        2021 Review of the Strategy to Minimise Alcohol Harm                                         65

11        Proposed land exchange Taniwha Reserve and Maybury Reserve, Glen Innes. 137

12        Draft Economic Development Action Plan                                                             147

13        Reserve revocation recommendation for 29-31 St Johns Road, Meadowbank 187

14        Reserve Revocation Proposal - 39R Pohutukawa Road and 17W Hawke Crescent, Beachlands                                                                                                                 193

15        Papakura Senior Citizens Hall - Transfer of assets to Auckland Council           219

16        Summary of Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee Information - updates, memos and briefings - 13 May 2021                                                                        227

17        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 11 March 2021, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public input had been received.

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 


 

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

13 May 2021

 

Demographic Advisory Panel work programme

File No.: CP2021/00138

 

  

 

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on the demographic advisory panels and to gain endorsement for their strategic work programmes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides a general update on the demographic advisory panels since their inaugural meeting in August 2020.

3.       The panels have received an overview of the council’s key strategic framework, policies and operational plans. This provided context for the development of their strategic work programmes which will be presented by the co-chairs for approval by the committee.

4.       Panels have identified priority areas which are summarised below and will be covered in more detail during their presentations. A detailed work programme has been provided by the Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel and the Seniors Advisory Panel in appendices B and C.

 

Advisory Panel

Summary of priorities

Disability

·    Advise the council on helping to change the public awareness of the strengths and rights of disabled people, and to celebrate disability in its diversity. 

·    Provide input on council initiatives and advocacy to increase disabled people’s access to affordable accessible housing.

·    Help the council group to identify priorities for more accessible end to end transport solutions.

·    Understand and advise on the council’s strategies for recruiting, retaining and mentoring disabled people. 

·    Support the council to understand and remove barriers to the participation of disabled people in governance. Advocate for council-appointed entities to include appointees with lived experience of disability. 

Ethnic

·    Belonging and participation- advocacy for anti-racism, and create safe opportunities for people to meet, connect, participate in and enjoy community and civic life

·    Opportunity and prosperity – attract and retain skills, talent and investment and supporting recovery from Covid-19

·    Transport and access – increase genuine choices for a healthy, vibrant and equitable Auckland

·    Affordable housing

 

 

Pacific

·    Economic development - to help advance economic development and participation of Pacific communities through a curation of related Council efforts to identify barriers and unlock ways forward.

·    Engagement and civic participation - to improve engagement and civic participation of Pacific communities in the council’s policy and decision-making, service design and delivery.

·    Recovery, resilience, climate change and sustainability - to help strengthen the council’s post Covid-19 recovery efforts in relation to Pacific communities; and to enhance an inclusive and targeted approach with council’s initiatives on climate change, policies and strategies for environmental sustainability.

Rainbow

·    Working with council policy makers and councillors to ensure Rainbow communities are always central when implementing solutions and supports.

·    Ensuring council services and interactions with our communities are safe and public-facing staff are appropriately trained and aware of the diverse needs of Rainbow people.

·    Building on the success of Pride events by improving advocacy and community development for Takataapui and Pasifika rainbow communities.

Seniors

·    Participation and inclusiveness

·    Accessibility

·    Transport

·    Valuing and including seniors

·    Housing

·    Heritage

Youth

·    Youth Mental Health

·    Youth Employability

·    Cost of Living (Youth Homelessness)

·    Climate Justice

5.       An overview of areas of common interest has been provided in appendix D – this includes the panels involvement in regional plans, strategies and policies such as the Long-term Plan as well as detail about their participation in cross panel working groups.

6.       This report also outlines the results of co-chair elections and some changes in membership that have happened as a result of member resignations.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      approve the demographic advisory panels’ strategic work programmes

b)      note the update to the terms of reference with respect to the election of co-chairs and the outcome of those elections

c)      note the changes to panel membership as a result of member resignations.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The demographic advisory panels held their inaugural meeting on 31 August 2020 via zoom which gave them an opportunity to virtually meet the councillors and staff who work with the panels and provided them with an overview of the council and their roles as panel members.

8.       In accordance with the terms of reference, the panels have developed a work programme and set a strategic agenda for the remainder of the term. These agendas were expected to focus on regional policies, plans and strategies such as the Auckland Plan and the Long-term Plan as well as operational and organisational strategies relevant to diverse communities.

9.       To support the development of their strategic work programmes, panel meetings have included time for panels to build an understanding of the council’s key strategic framework, policies and operational plans that the panels will have an ongoing role with such as I am Auckland, Age Friendly Auckland, the Disability Operational Action Plan and Ara Moana Pasifika Strategy.

10.     In addition, there have been a number of cross panel activities which have given one or two members from each panel a deeper focus on key topics of interest:

·        Mayoral forum with the co-chairs

·        Co-chairs forum – one with an introduction to the Long-term Plan and the second as an opportunity to meet members of the Executive Leadership Team and Governing Body members to provide initial thoughts on community priorities

·        Climate Change working group

·        Elections working group

·        Thriving Communities working group

·        All panels meeting on the Regional Land Transport Plan

11.     Panel work programmes are being presented to the PACE committee for approval.

Elections

12.     The Mayor recommended interim co-chairs at the start of the term to provide some diversity of thought and some previous experience of working with the council to provide support and guidance to new panel members.

13.     A change was made to the panels’ terms of reference to enable them to confirm these appointments or elect new co-chairs after members had got to know each other. Elections have taken place during the first few months of 2021.

14.     The updated terms of reference is attached at Appendix A.

Changes in panel membership

15.     Two panel members have resigned as a result of new employment opportunities outside Auckland. The replacement for the Youth Advisory Panel was appointed from the reserve list while the Rainbow Communities Advisory Panel replacement was appointed by the mayor in consultation with the Chief Liaison Councillor and the panel liaison councillor, in line with the terms of reference.  

16.     An additional panel member has recently resigned due to personal reasons. At this stage, it is uncertain whether or not they will be replaced.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Strategic work programmes

17.     Panels have identified key priorities for their panels which are summarised in the following table:

Advisory Panel

Priority areas

Disability

Context

The Disability Advisory Panel will inspire and support Auckland Council to value and utilise the expertise and leadership of disabled people. The council can value disability diversity by:

·    Embedding disability impact thinking and universal design as the norm across people and places, access, climate action, the council workforce, governance and digital inclusion. 

·    Ensuring that recovery from the impacts of COVID includes doing things differently in ways that empower disabled people in Tāmaki Makaurau.

Actions

1.   Advise the council on helping to change the public awareness of the strengths and rights of disabled people, and to celebrate disability in its diversity. 

2.   Provide input on council initiatives and advocacy to increase disabled people’s access to affordable accessible housing.

3.   Help the council group to identify priorities for more accessible end to end transport solutions.

4.   Understand and advise on the council’s strategies for recruiting, retaining and mentoring disabled people. 

5.   Support the council to understand and remove barriers to the participation of disabled people in governance. Advocate for council-appointed entities to include appointees with lived experience of disability. 

6.   Through the panel’s activity, demonstrate the strengths disabled people bring to creating a Tāmaki Makaurau that works for everyone.

Ethnic

Support the economic and social development of diverse communities in Auckland, grounding in honouring the treaty and environmental sustainability

Priorities:

·    Belonging and participation- advocacy for anti-racism, and create safe opportunities for people to meet, connect, participate in and enjoy community and civic life

·    Opportunity and prosperity – attract and retain skills, talent and investment and supporting recovery from COVID-19

·    Transport and access – increase genuine choices for a healthy, vibrant and equitable Auckland

·    Affordable housing

Pacific

·    Economic development - to help advance economic development and participation of Pacific communities through a curation of related Council efforts to identify barriers and unlock ways forward.

·    Engagement and civic participation - to improve engagement and civic participation of Pacific communities in the council’s policy and decision-making, service design and delivery.

·    Recovery, resilience, climate change and sustainability - to help strengthen the council’s post Covid-19 recovery efforts in relation to Pacific communities; and to enhance an inclusive and targeted approach with council’s initiatives on climate change, policies and strategies for environmental sustainability.

Rainbow

·    Working with council policy makers and councillors to ensure Rainbow communities are always central when implementing solutions and supports.

·    Ensuring council services and interactions with our communities are safe and public-facing staff are appropriately trained and aware of the diverse needs of Rainbow people.

·    Building on the success of Pride events by improving advocacy and community development for Takataapui and Pasifika rainbow communities.

Seniors

Objective: To act as kaitiaki to support, oversee and guide completion and delivery of the Age-friendly Auckland Plan, and ensure the impacts of Covid-19 on seniors are taken into account.

 

Priorities:

·    Participation and inclusiveness

·    Accessibility

·    Transport

·    Valuing and including seniors

·    Housing

·    Heritage

With an overarching focus on the impacts of Covid-19 and climate change on seniors.

Youth

·    Youth Mental Health

·    Youth Employability

·    Cost of Living (Youth Homelessness)

·    Climate Justice

18.     Panels will provide presentations to outline their priorities in more detail. Some panels have developed a more detailed strategic work programme which are included in appendices B-C.

19.     In addition, an overarching view of key programmes of work that are relevant to all panels is included as attachment D.


 

Election of co-chairs

20.     Elections have taken place during February to April. The following people have been elected as co-chairs for the remainder of the term:

·        Disability Advisory Panel: Martine Abel Williamson and Jason Boberg

·        Ethnic Peoples Advisory Panel: Kathy Yan and Mohamud Mohamed

·        Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel: Hainoame Fulivai and Manu Sione

·        Rainbow Communities Advisory Panel: Aych McArdle and John Kingi

·        Seniors Advisory Panel: Gayle Marshall and Jay Reid

·        Youth Advisory Panel: Chris Balzat and Murali Magesan

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The Climate Change Working Group has been an important way to provide diverse community advice to guide the implementation of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

22.     The Climate Change Working Group meets quarterly and comprises one to two representatives from each demographic advisory panel.

23.     The objectives of this Group are to:

·        provide advice as appropriate on key issues, barriers and opportunities arising through implementation of the plan.

·        provide an opportunity for diverse communities and staff to discuss issues, share information and identify opportunities to build capability in relation to climate change.

·        recognise local knowledge and expertise, provide guidance and advice on region-wide communication and engagement in relation to climate change.

·        facilitate engagement with individual networks, communities and portfolios and advocate when appropriate to support delivery of outcomes of the plan.

24.     Many of the panels have included climate change as an important consideration in their work programmes as well as having an ongoing commitment to the working group.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     The panels have been able to engage with several of the CCOs so far:

·        Auckland Transport has held introductory meetings with the Disability and Seniors Advisory Panels and engaged with the panels through an integrated panel meeting on the Regional Land Transport Plan.

·        Auckland Unlimited has presented to the Ethnic Peoples and Pacific Peoples Advisory Panels on the economic impact of COVID on Auckland’s diverse communities.

·        Auckland Unlimited has also connected with the Disability, Seniors and Youth Advisory Panels to provide them with an overview of regional facilities and programmes of work that are of relevance to diverse communities.

26.     Further engagement is expected in response to the strategic priorities identified by the panels.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     While the panels have been set up to advise on regional strategies, plans and policies, local board members have been invited to attend open meetings.

28.     It is likely that there will be some ongoing engagement with local boards, particularly in community-based open meetings and community forums.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     Each panel, except the Ethnic Peoples Advisory Panel, has at least one member with lived experience in Te Ao Māori and knowledge of the contemporary issues facing Māori communities who helped shape the development of the work programmes.

30.     Advisory panels’ work programmes are aligned with the Auckland Plan that focuses on enabling Māori aspirations through recognition of Te Tiriti O Waitangi.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     During the 2020-2021 financial year, the advisory panels budget was reduced to achieve savings as part of the Emergency Budget and as a result of resourcing constraints. This has meant that panels have generally met every other month instead of monthly.

32.     For the 2021-2022 financial year, subject to the current Long-term Plan process and an increase in staff resourcing, the meeting frequency will increase to every six weeks. The increase in cost will be met from within existing budget.

33.     This report has been reviewed and approved by the Commercial Finance Manager.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     While the work plans have been developed with the understanding that the panels are meeting less frequently than in previous terms, there is still a risk that the panels will not be able to manage their expected workload and deliver on their identified priority areas.

35.     Regular engagement with the co-chairs through agenda setting meetings and co-chair forums will help to monitor the effectiveness and satisfaction of the panels.

36.     Additional budget will be sought where required to ensure that panels are able to contribute to key regional plans, policies and programmes of work.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     The work programmes are living documents which will be updated at each meeting to reflect progress. The panels will review their work programme by the end of 2021 to consider any changes in priority or focus for the remainder of their term.

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Demographic Advisory Panels Terms of Reference

17

b

Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel workplan

33

c

Seniors Advisory Panel workplan

51

d

Forward work programme - all panels

59

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Carol Hayward - Principal Advisor Panels

Authorisers

Kenneth Aiolupotea - General Manager Democracy and Engagement

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

13 May 2021

 

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13 May 2021

 

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13 May 2021

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

13 May 2021

 

Outcomes of Regional Arts and Culture grants 2019/2020 - presentations

File No.: CP2021/05021

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Provide the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee an overview on outcomes of funding received through the Regional Arts and Culture grants programme round two 2019/2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Powerpoint presentations will be provided by:

·    Action Education – WORD the Front Line.

·    Show Me Shorts Film Festival.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      receive the presentations from Action Education – WORD the Front Line and Show Me Shorts Film Festival and thank Julia Rahui, Youthline and Mark Prebble, Show Me Shorts Film Festival for their attendance.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Catherine George, Regional Funding Advisor

Authoriser

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

13 May 2021

 

2021 Review of the Strategy to Minimise Alcohol Harm

File No.: CP2021/01286

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to improve the Auckland council whānau approach to minimising alcohol related harm in Auckland communities.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland communities continue to experience alcohol related harm, with significant disproportionate impacts for some groups. Alcohol related harm is a complex problem and requires a multi-sectoral response.

3.       In 2016, Auckland Council refreshed its Auckland Council whānau Internal Strategy to Minimise Alcohol Harm: the strategy.

4.       The strategy is part of a wider framework determining the scope of council’s regulatory and non-regulatory action to minimise alcohol harm and lift community wellbeing.

5.       Staff completed a review to determine if the strategy and its approach is still relevant, effective, practical, and consistent with best practice.

6.       To complete the review staff undertook desktop research and engagement with council whānau staff members and external alcohol harm sector organisations and groups.

7.       The strategy benefits and re-enforces council whānau actions by:

·    providing direction and structure for action

·    fostering accountability

·    developing partnerships; and

·    establishing a joint work programme.

8.       The review identified five key issues with the strategy and its implementation including:

·    the purpose / intent is not clear

·    it is not well aligned to Auckland Plan, including Māori outcomes and best practice

·    the scope for effective action is constrained by legislation and resource

·    the co-ordination of actions is challenging in new context

·    linking strategy action to indicators of success and outcomes is difficult.

9.       These five opportunities for change suggest the following improvements:

·    refresh the strategy approach as a statement of commitment

·    revise framework to align with the Auckland Plan and Māori wellbeing domains

·    develop a co-ordination plan of actions

·    embed a revised approach to implementation

·    develop a monitoring and evaluation framework.

10.     If approved, staff will implement the improvements for consideration by the PACE Committee at its November 2021 meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      agree to implement changes and improvements to the Auckland council whānau approach to minimise alcohol related harm in Auckland communities, including a:

i)        refresh to the current Auckland Council Whānau Internal Strategy to Minimise Alcohol Harm as a statement of commitment to minimise alcohol related harm

ii)       revised framework for better strategic alignment with the Auckland Plan and Māori wellbeing domains

iii)      three-year co-ordination plan of contributor actions

iv)      revised implementation approach to flex within a changing context

v)      monitoring and evaluation framework.

Horopaki

Context

The strategy guides council’s work in relation to alcohol

11.     Auckland Council adopted an alcohol strategy in 2012 (RDO/2012/119). After review in 2016, it approved a refreshed version: Auckland Council Whānau Internal Strategy to Minimise Alcohol-related Harm.

Figure 1: Strategic framework

12.     The strategy sets out the following problem:

Auckland communities continue to be concerned by alcohol related harm and the significant social and economic cost it incursThe multifaceted nature of alcohol related harm requires a collaborative and intersectoral approach to alcohol harm minimisation. 

13.     The strategy guides council’s work in relation to alcohol with a vision statement, four outcomes, five workstreams, 94 activities and 24 council whānau contributors. (refer Figure 1).

14.     The strategy also aims to increase collaboration across council whānau and with external partners through a networking group.

The strategy requires six-monthly monitoring and a three-yearly review

15.     The strategy’s monitoring and review requirements include six-monthly monitoring reports on activities and actions of the work program and a three-yearly evaluation to examine its relevance, practical use, and effectiveness.

16.     The last monitoring update in September 2020 identified:

·    strong progress on completing work program actions (refer Figure 2)

·    a core of staff utilising the network group for collaboration

·    ideas for updating and improving the strategy.

Figure 2: Progress status on work program actions

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

This review used updated data, research, and stakeholder views to evaluate the strategy

17.     To complete the review staff undertook desktop research and engaged with network members, strategy contributors and external alcohol harm sector organisations and groups. Key findings from this review are outlined below (refer Attachment A:  Findings report).

18.     Context analysis identifies the current and future problem as:

Tāmaki Makaurau communities continue to experience alcohol related harm with significant and persisting inequities for groups. Legislative constraints and COVID-19 impact limit council’s scope for action.

Alcohol continues to cause disproportionate harm for groups in Tāmaki Makaurau

19.     Alcohol continues to cause harm in Tāmaki Makaurau and in greater proportions for young, Māori and Pacific peoples.

20.     Risks of harm are compounding for groups after COVID-19 disruption to services and increased levels of economic stress and uncertainty.

Legislation and resources limit council’s role in alcohol harm minimisation

21.     The strategy is part of a wider framework determining the scope of council’s regulatory and non-regulatory action to minimise alcohol harm and lift community wellbeing.

22.     The council’s ability to impact established and worsening issues around alcohol harm are limited. COVID-19 impacts, and recovery affect council’s operating context.

Engagement with the strategy benefits and re-enforces council whānau actions

23.     Those within council whānau who engaged with the strategy, have identified that we must re-enforce each other’s actions to achieve impact.

…It is great for information sharing, encouragement, and collaboration.  Although some opportunities for partnership fell through this year our work has benefited from other department’s community networks. Council whānau staff member

…Ultimately only all of us joined up together is what is going to really achieve change.  Council whānau staff member
 

 

 

 

 


24.     Contributors identified key benefits of the current strategic approach. Essential features of a collective impact model enable these benefits:

Key benefits

Features of collective impact

·   Provided direction and structure

× Common agenda

·   Established ongoing work-program

× Co-ordinated actions

·   Key connections across council whānau

× Backbone support

·   Learning through information sharing

× Continuous communication 

·   Developed synergies and partnerships

× Mutually re-enforcing activities

·   Fostered accountability

× Regular reporting

Strategy intent not clear, outcomes not aligned, challenges to co-ordinate actions

25.     Staff and external organisations expressed a need for commitment to a strategic approach to alcohol harm minimisation and highlighted key issues (refer Figure 3) with elements of the strategy.

…We can’t just commit to safety and harm reduction in the good times, when funding is easy, resources abundant.  Next year will be hard, but we have to stay committed and find efficiencies and innovation – this group will become even more important as an enabler. Council whānau staff member…bringing all parts of council together and providing an overview I think those are really good points, it needs strong leadership on these issues and co-ordination across council. Sector partner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Opportunity to improve our collective impact on alcohol harm minimisation within scope

26.     Key staff, external partner input and desktop analysis established opportunities to address the identified issues. Staff considered potential improvements under the scope of council statutory mandate, reputational integrity, strategic alignment, feasibility and effectiveness.

27.     Staff recommend five improvements to strengthen collective impact of council whānau activities on alcohol harm (see Figure 4 below): The benefits of these improvement align to addressing the identified issues.

 

… [council] needs to do what they are mandated to do and continue to push for it and having an approach to it. Sector partner …this is not just Auckland council’s problem to fix. It’s everyone’s and council is one of the key players in the region.  Sector partner                                            28.     Implementing the five recommended improvements will strengthen our collective impact, better fulfil our role and more effectively contribute to a cross-sectoral response to alcohol minimisation.

 

 

 

29.     An overview or worked example of how the five suggested improvements could be implemented within a revised strategy approach is provided in Figure 5.

Figure 5: Overview of suggested improvements

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

30.     The decision of this report does not directly impact climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     Key contributor engagement and external partner input informed the development of a refreshed strategy approach.

32.     Key contributors across council whānau have highlighted the benefits of greater connectedness and collaboration through a joined-up approach, as well as the challenges of resourcing, changes, competing priorities and uncertainty.

33.     The suggested approach aligns with Kia manawaroa tātou – council’s operational strategy 2022[1] for the COVID-19 recovery context. The approach aims to support council whānau staff in their work to minimise alcohol related harm during challenging times.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     Experiences of alcohol related harm differ in Auckland areas. At the time of writing five local boards have alcohol harm minimisation actions for their communities in their annual plans. Local board areas affected by greater rates of deprivation, high Māori and Pasifika population have greater concern about alcohol related harm.[2]

35.     Due to the narrow and internal nature of the review and approach local board engagement was out of scope. A revised approach seeks to broaden network members and involve local board services.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     Staff received input from, Māori public health providers and advocates. Their views are considered in the findings report and improvement analysis.

37.     The impacts of alcohol harm for Māori are severe and recognised as a significant issue under te Tiriti o Waitangi claim Wai 2624[3]. A te ao Māori research lens identified protective factors for Māori wellbeing rooted in cultural identity.[4]  

38.     The revised approach seeks to achieve better Māori outcomes support by integrating Māori wellbeing domains into an improved framework[5].

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

39.     There are no financial implications of the decision sought in this report as staff time to implement the decision is within the relevant department budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     The table below summarises key risks and mitigations.

If…

Then…

Mitigation

External stakeholders and public perceive engagement as insufficient or misunderstand the scope of the council role

There may be criticism of council’s commitment to working with communities to reduce alcohol related harm 

Be clear about the internal nature of the approach and scope of the council mandate, funding and of this review.

Highlight targeted engagement with sector partner agencies and advocacy organisations during the review.

There is no nominated and visible leadership

Staff may not prioritise participation, collaboration, reporting or have a full view of high-level strategic alignment.

Develop strategy implementation structures and mechanisms including engagement of the appropriate level of internal support to enable visible leadership of action. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     If approved, staff will draft a revised approach to the Auckland Council Whānau Internal Strategy to Minimise Alcohol Harm. This will be based on the five identified improvements within a ‘Statement of Commitment’ and include:

·    guiding principles

·    revised framework

·    co-ordination plan

·    monitoring and evaluation framework

·    approach to implementation

·    sector engagement

 

42.     Staff will report back to the committee for a decision on the revised strategy in November 2021. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Findings Report

73

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dorothee Guthrie - Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki – General Manager - Community & Social Policy

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

13 May 2021

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

13 May 2021

 

Proposed land exchange Taniwha Reserve and Maybury Reserve, Glen Innes.

File No.: CP2021/03901

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to publicly notify a proposed land exchange of part of Taniwha Reserve, Glen Innes, with private land.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Community views are sought to inform decision-making about a proposed land exchange of 2,779m² of land at Taniwha Reserve (in part) with 10,472m² of the Tāmaki Regeneration Company’s land, in accordance with section 15 of the Reserves Act 1977.

3.       Staff recommend public notification of a proposed land exchange between Auckland Council and Tāmaki Regeneration Company.

4.       The land exchange would result in increased road frontage for both Maybury Reserve and Taniwha Reserve. It would improve their visibility from adjoining roads and allow increased passive surveillance. The exchange would improve the configuration of the open space network in Glen Innes, an outcome of the Open Space Network Plan for Part of Panmure, Glen Innes and Saint Johns 2019-2034.

5.       The proposed exchange has been assessed against council open space policies and is deemed to be a high priority.

6.       The proposed land exchange could benefit the community by:

·     increasing amenity values and open space (net gain of 7,693m2 open space)

·     providing more multifunctional and useable recreational space 

·     improving sightlines and pedestrian access into and through the open spaces.

7.       There is a low risk of challenge to decision-making for the land exchange in accordance with section 15(2) of the Reserves Act 1977. This is mitigated by ensuring appropriate public and mana whenua consultation.

8.       If the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee approves public notification of the proposed land exchange, this process will commence in late May 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      approve notification under section 15(2) of the Reserves Act 1977 of a proposed exchange of 2,779m² of reserve land at 193-195 Taniwha Street, Glen Innes (part Lot 142 DP 42356) for 10,472m² of Tamaki Regeneration Company’s land located:

Adjacent to Maybury Reserve West

i)          12A, 12B, 12C,12D,12E, 14A, 14B, 14C, 14D, 14E Maybury Street (1,286m²) (Lot 4 DP 184600)

ii)         2/12 Maybury Street (617m²) (Lot 3 DP 184600)

iii)        part of 1/12 Maybury Street (118.8m²) (Lot 2 DP 184600)

iv)        part of 8 Maybury Street (110.7m²) (Part of Lot 1 DP 184600)

v)         part of 4 Maybury Street (70.1m²) (Part of Lot 7 DP 187240)

Adjacent to Maybury Reserve North

vi)        200A, 202 Taniwha Street (1,072m²) (Lot 165 DP 43833)

vii)       192, 192A, 198A Taniwha Street (2,008m²) (Lot 166 DP 43833)

viii)      184,184A, 184B,190A Taniwha Street (2,008m²) (Lot 167 DP 43833)

ix)        180-182A Taniwha Street (1216m²) (Lot 168 DP 43833)

Adjacent to Taniwha Reserve East

x)         45 Epping Street (751m²) (Lot 128 DP 39662)

xi)        47 Epping Street (771m²) (Lot 129 DP 39662)

xii)       49 Epping Street (774m²) (Lot 130 DP 39662)

xiii)      179A Taniwha Street (329m²) (Part of Lot 1 DP 188991)

xiv)     179B Taniwha Street (26.7m²) (Part of Lot 1 DP 188991)

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Tāmaki Regeneration Company is undertaking a major redevelopment in Glen Innes.   

10.     This development presents opportunities for Auckland Council to improve access to, and the functionality of, Maybury Reserve and Taniwha Reserve.

11.     Maybury Reserve and Taniwha Reserve are recreation reserves owned by Auckland Council and subject to the Reserves Act 1977. Figure 1 shows the location and layout of these two reserves. 

Figure 1: Maybury Reserve and Taniwha Reserve

 

Tāmaki Regeneration Company has proposed a land exchange

12.     To facilitate the implementation of their housing re-development, the Tāmaki Regeneration Company requests to exchange part of Taniwha Reserve (2,779m²) for 10,472m² of Tāmaki Regeneration Company land to be vested as recreation reserve.

13.     This proposed land exchange would improve the configuration of Maybury and Taniwha reserves. The improved configuration would help to improve crime prevention by increasing road frontage and visibility into the parks from the surrounding roads.

14.     The proposed land exchange would enable future development of a shared pathway connecting Maybury and Taniwha reserves to the Glen Innes town centre. It would also enable the development of a destination playground at Maybury Reserve and the extension of Ruapotaka Marae onto Maybury Reserve West. These actions are listed in the Open Space Network Plan for Part of Panmure, Glen Innes and Saint Johns 2019-2034. Funding for those developments is not included as part of the land exchange.

15.     Figures 2 and 3 show the proposed Tāmaki Regeneration Company land (outlined in red) to be vested to Auckland Council. The Auckland Council reserve land to be vested to Tāmaki Regeneration Company is outlined in blue.

 

Figure 2: Proposed land exchange areas

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 3 Proposed land parcels to be exchanged

Land to be exchanged to Auckland Council as local purpose reserve (recreation) (OUTLINED IN RED)

Shown

Legal Name

Area (Total = 10,472m²)

Current owner

Site A

Lot 4 DP 184600

Lot 3 DP 184600

Part of Lot 2 DP 184600

Part of Lot 1 DP 184600

Part of Lot 7 DP 187240

2,202.6m²

Tāmaki Regeneration Company

Site B

Lot 165 DP 43833

Lot 166 DP 43833

Lot 167 DP 43833

Lot 168 DP 43833

6,306m²

Tāmaki Regeneration Company

Site C

Lot 128 DP 39662

Lot 129 DP 39662

Lot 130 DP 39662

Part of Lot 1 DP 188991

Part of Lot 1 DP 188991

1,972m²

Tāmaki Regeneration Company

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Land to be exchanged to Tāmaki Regeneration Company (OUTLINED IN BLUE)

Shown

Legal Name

Area (Total = 2,779m²)

Current owner

Site D

 

Part of Lot 142 DP 42356

2,779m²

Auckland Council

 

The land exchange process is set out in the Reserves Act 1977

16.     Section 15 of the Reserves Act prescribes the process for a land exchange between reserves and other land. The process has four key steps:

·      the administering body (in this case Auckland Council) publicly notifies its intention to undertake the land exchange and calls for objections in writing, allowing a period of at least one month for objections to be received

·      after a period of at least one month following public notification the administering body considers all objections to the proposed land exchange

·      the administering body passes a resolution supporting the land exchange if it considers it appropriate to do so after considering the objections received

·      a copy of the resolution supporting the land exchange is forwarded to the Minister of Conservation, or their delegate, along with the objections for authorisation.

17.     Relevant mana whenua must also be consulted.

There is shared decision-making allocation for open space acquisition

18.     The decision-making allocations for the acquisition of land for parks and open space are set out in Volume Two of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

19.     The Governing Body is responsible for:

·      the number and general location of all new parks and the prioritisation of major upgrades to existing parks (including sports fields within parks).

·      acquisition and divestment of all park land, including land exchanges.

20.     Local boards are responsible for the specific location of new local parks (including the prioritisation for acquisition) within budget parameters agreed with the Governing Body.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The proposed land exchange is deemed to be a high priority when assessed against council policy

21.     Land exchanges are formally assessed against the Parks and Open Space Acquisition Policy (2013) and the Open Space Provision Policy (2016). They are prioritised according to the highest rating achieved.

22.     The proposed land exchange at Maybury and Taniwha reserves is deemed high priority due to its potential benefits.

23.     Table 1 below summarises the assessment of the proposed land exchange.

            Table 1: Initial assessment of the proposed land exchange against acquisition criteria

1.  

1.         

1.         

Acquisition criteria

Comment

Overall rating

Meeting community needs, now and in the future

·        Increases accessibility and capacity of existing reserves that serve an area of high population growth and redevelopment.

The land exchange is a high priority

 

Connecting parks and open spaces

·        High priority as the land exchange would enable the planned development of a pedestrian path providing a link between Taniwha Reserve, Maybury Reserve and Glenn Innes town centre.

Protecting and restoring Auckland’s unique features and meanings

·        High priority as the land exchange would enable the revegetation of Ōmaru Creek with riparian planting to improve ecological function and resilience against flood events.

Improving the parks and open spaces we already have

·        High priority as the proposed land exchange would improve the accessibility and functionality of existing open space.

·        The proposed land exchange would improve crime prevention through environmental design for both reserves by improving entrance visibility, increasing road frontage, and opening up views to the surrounding area.

·        The land exchange would enable a proposed playground to be built. The development of a destination youth playground on the land to be acquired from the Tāmaki Regeneration Company adjacent to Maybury Reserve has been prioritised as part of the Open Space Network Plan for Part of Panmure, Glen Innes and Saint Johns 2019-2034.

 

Staff recommend support for public notification of the land exchange

24.     Staff recommend that the local board support public notification of the proposed land exchange.

·      The proposed exchange has been assessed against council open space policies and is deemed to be a high priority.

·      If approved, the proposed land exchange would improve access to, and the functionality of, Maybury Reserve and Taniwha Reserve. The reserves would better meet the needs of existing and future residents.

25.     The land exchange would result in an approximate loss of 2,779m² of council land. However, Auckland Council would receive 10,472m² of land at no capital cost. The net gain for Auckland Council is 7,693m² of open space.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     Parks and open spaces can serve as ecological corridors. They can promote and protect native plants and animals, enhance biodiversity and increase resilience to environmental change. Vegetation captures carbon from the air, helping slow the accumulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

27.     Vegetated areas, including grass, help reduce maximum temperature ranges in urbanised areas. Parks and open spaces can also help reduce flood risk during rainstorms by buffering peak flows and reducing the volume and velocity of stormwater runoff.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     There would be a minor impact on operational activities to manage the additional 7,693m² of open space. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     The proposed land exchange aligns with the following objectives on the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020:

Outcome three: Our physical and social infrastructure is future-proofed

·        The Tāmaki Regeneration Company is delivering a major social, economic and physical transformation of Glen Innes.

·        The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will work closely with the Tāmaki Regeneration Company to upgrade Glen Innes town centre, enhancing local parks and reserves and upgrading key infrastructure.

·        The local board is committed to creating an appealing and attractive open space network by carrying out the Open Space Network Plan for Part of Panmure, Glen Innes and Saint Johns 2019-2034 as funding allows. This includes developing a destination youth playground in Maybury Reserve.

Outcome five: Our built, natural and cultural taonga / treasures are protected and celebrated

·        The local board will partner with the community and mana whenua to restore Ōmaru Creek

·        The proposed land exchange will contribute to the future health of Maybury Reserve and Taniwha Reserve. The Open Space Network Plan for Part of Panmure, Glen Innes and Saint Johns 2019-2034 identifies future riparian planting to be undertaken at these reserves to improve the health of Ōmaru Creek.

30.     The Open Space Network Plan for Part of Panmure, Glen Innes and Saint Johns 2019-2034 identifies the proposed land exchange as a high priority. This includes improving open space configuration, connectivity and ecological restoration at both Taniwha Reserve and Maybury Reserve West.

31.     Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board, at its meeting of 28 March 2021, supported public notification of the proposed land exchange [MT/2021/18 refers].

32.     Decision-making for the development of local parks is allocated to local boards.

 

 

 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     The provision of quality parks and open spaces has broad benefits for Māori, including:

·        help facilitate Māori participation in outdoor recreational activity

·        help make Auckland a green, resilient, and healthy environment consistent with the Māori worldview of the natural world and their role as kaitiaki of the natural environment.

34.     The proposed land exchange does not contain any known sites or places of significance to mana whenua.

35.     Subject to the proposed land exchange being approved for public notification, consultation with mana whenua will be undertaken as part of the statutory land exchange process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     There are no financial implications of public notification of a proposed land exchange. The costs of public and mana whenua engagement on the land exchange will be met within current budget.

37.     There will be additional maintenance costs associated with the increased open space area. The Long-term Plan 2018-2028 provides for maintenance, including for land acquired at no capital cost.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     There is a low risk of challenge to council decision-making for the proposed land exchange in accordance with section 15 of the Reserves Act 1977. The risk is mitigated by ensuring appropriate public and mana whenua consultation.

39.     The Tāmaki Regeneration Company will manage any risks associated with their redevelopment projects in Glen Innes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     The process for land exchanges under the Reserves Act 1977 is as follows:

41.     If the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee approves public notification of the proposed land exchange, the next step, the public notification stage, will commence in late May 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Holly Meese - Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Carole Canler - Senior Policy Manager

Kataraina Maki – General Manager - Community & Social Policy

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

13 May 2021

 

Draft Economic Development Action Plan

File No.: CP2021/03608

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the draft Economic Development Action Plan: council’s role in Auckland’s recovery 2021-24, and to seek feedback on the draft Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The council organisation and council-controlled organisations have worked collaboratively to develop the draft Economic Development Action Plan as outlined and discussed at the PACE committee workshop on 24 March 2021. This plan defines and agrees, for the next three years, the council family’s economic objectives and priorities and determines a coordinated course of action. The plan is limited to actions that are within the remit of council and CCO activities.

3.       The draft plan aligns with the 10-year budget and will inform the work programmes of relevant council family departments. The work is supported by the chief executives of council and all substantive council-controlled organisations.

4.       The draft plan outlines detailed actions within six areas of focus (‘workstreams’) as outlined in Attachment A. It reflects the guiding principles of transitioning towards a regenerative and low carbon economy, supporting economic opportunities for Māori, and responding to our communities of greatest need.

5.       Feedback on the draft Plan is sought from Committee. Committee members can also provide feedback directly to staff until 14 June 2021.

6.       There will be targeted engagement on the draft plan, including with iwi, local boards, advisory panel members and business groups. Feedback will be sought until 14 June 2021. This feedback will be incorporated in the final Plan as appropriate.

7.       The final Economic Development Action Plan: Council’s role in Auckland’s recovery 2021-24 and its monitoring framework will be presented to the PACE committee on 8 July 2021 for adoption.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      receive the draft Economic Development Action Plan: Council’s role in Auckland’s recovery 2021-24.

b)      provide feedback by 14 June 2021 for consideration in the final Plan.

Horopaki

Context

8.       In August 2020, the CCO review panel delivered its report alongside 64 recommendations, which were endorsed in full by the Governing Body. The review stated that council and all substantive council-controlled organisations (CCOs) should together define the economic outcomes for Auckland and agree on how to achieve and measure them. The review also acknowledged the need for better coordination and definition of responsibilities for local economic development within the council family. The Economic Development Action Plan forms part of council’s response to that review.

9.       The plan is not a long-term strategy and does not replace the Economic Development Strategy 2012. The priorities and focus over the next three years, however, consider direction from our existing strategies i.e., the Auckland Plan 2050, Economic Development Strategy 2012, Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan and Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau: Council’s Māori Outcomes Framework.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     Comprehensive background work to support the development of the action plan has been completed by the Chief Economist Unit (CEU), the Auckland Plan Strategy & Research Department (APSR) and Auckland Unlimited. This includes a report from the CEU providing a profile of Auckland’s economy over the last 10 years, the impact of Covid-19 on the Auckland economy, and the main roadblocks to recovery. The same report also identified areas where the council group can have a material impact on economic development. Key areas are:

·         Assets

·         Procurement

·         Land use and zoning

·         Regulatory processes

·         Travel network

·         Town centres

·         Pricing

·         Skills and investment attraction

·         Tourism attraction

·         Social support services

·         Coordination of responses through partnerships

11.     There has also been an extensive review of plans and strategies across the council and CCOs to identify common economic development themes. These were: innovation and technology, Māori economy, regenerative, resilient, low carbon economy, workforce transition, competitive high-value sectors, local economic development, infrastructure, and culture and creativity.

12.     This background work formed the basis for six workstreams:

·         Destination Tāmaki Makaurau: attracting people and investment

·         Local Tāmaki Makaurau: enabling thriving local economies

·         Skilled Tāmaki Makaurau: supporting quality jobs and skill development

·         Future Tāmaki Makaurau: preparing businesses for the future

·         Enabled Tāmaki Makaurau: infrastructure enabling economic development

·         Enabled Tāmaki Makaurau: regulations that enable economic development.

13.     Each workstream has both council and CCO staff representation. These workstreams have developed a set of actions which set out responsibilities for delivering the action, timeframes for delivery, and the funding source.

14.     Many of the actions represent work underway and some suggest an improvement to our existing work programmes. Other actions, particularly in the infrastructure and regulatory workstreams, are more complex and will take longer than this three year action plan to implement. In these instances, the action plan indicates what can be done in the first three years to make progress towards a longer term objective.


 

15.     A monitoring framework is being developed as the actions are finalised to ensure roles, responsibilities and reporting accountabilities of council directorates and each CCO are clearly defined. An indication of the measurement approach is included in this draft plan and feedback is sought on this approach.

16.     The guiding principles have been considered in the development of the draft actions. The final actions will go through further analysis to consider how they reflect these principles. This analysis will be presented in the final plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan has provided direction to the development of the draft plan, aspiring to a more resilient economy that is regenerative, inclusive, local and enables Aucklanders to thrive.

18.     The draft action plan has embedded the guiding principle of ‘transitioning to a regenerative and low carbon economy’ into each of its six workstreams. The development of actions are underpinned by kaitiakitanga and considers how resources used give back to nature and increase value through reuse and renewal. Where applicable, actions broadly encourage a decrease in greenhouse gas emissions, low carbon products and services, climate innovation, and less dependency on natural resources.

19.     The actions presented in this draft action plan will go through a further climate impact assessment using tools developed by the Chief Sustainability Office. The results of this assessment will be incorporated into the final plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The draft plan responds to the CCO review recommendation for council and all CCOs to together define the economic outcomes for Auckland and agree on how to achieve and measure them. The actions in the draft plan will be shared and accountabilities of council and each CCO well defined. Some CCOs will have a more active role than others.

21.     The scope and development of the Economic Development Action Plan has been agreed to through the council and CCO Chief Executives’ group. This group is updated with progress on the plan as appropriate. The project team includes a representative and contribution from each CCO. 

22.     The scope of the plan is limited to actions that are within the remit of council and CCO activities. A review and discussion document of the council groups levers that materially contribute to economic development formed the basis for this draft plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     Each workstream of the plan will have a local impact, acknowledging the interdependency of local economies and the regional economy. The draft plan includes the focus area ‘Local Tāmaki Makaurau: enabling thriving local economies’ and has been informed by the recent local board plans’ local economic priorities.

24.     The Local Tāmaki Makaurau workstream seeks to clarify what the Auckland Council Group will do to support the local economies of Auckland. This includes setting out the roles that each part of the group play in delivering actions, while also setting the foundations to help the group identify the economic places (sub-regional and local) of Auckland and deliver outcomes at the local level.


 

 

25.     A memo was distributed on February 17 to inform local board members of the development of council’s Economic Development Action Plan 2021-24 and to outline the process for local board feedback to the plan. At the request of the Local Board Chairs, the draft plan will be provided at all local board business meetings in May with written feedback by formal resolution provided to the project leads by 14 June 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau has provided direction to the development of the draft plan, in particularly, the Kia ora te Umanga mahi objective of supporting economic opportunities for Māori businesses and iwi organisations. The draft plan has also considered direction from the Auckland Plan 2050, the Kaitiaki Forum’s strategic plan and IMSB’s Issues of Significance (2017) as they relate to Māori economic development.

27.     The draft action plan has embedded the guiding principle of ‘supporting economic opportunities for Māori’ into each of its six workstreams. The actions will be assessed on how they consider partnership opportunities with mana whenua and mataawaka, focus on equity and addressing systemic barriers, and identify new economic opportunities for Māori.

28.     The project team have communicated with iwi from the commencement of the project to determine and initiate the preferred process of engagement for each iwi. This draft plan will be sent to all iwi for input and feedback through to 14 June 2021.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     The scope of the Economic Development Action Plan states that actions will be funded within the existing 10-year budget 2021-31 and therefore no additional funding is required. The draft plan identifies some actions that rely on external funding sources and partnerships.

30.     At the advice of the finance division, budget alignment is demonstrated in the draft plan at both the group of activity and CCO / Council directorate level.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     The draft plan outlines actions that require a commitment from the responsible CCO / council directorate to include in their work programmes and within their existing budgets. The monitoring framework will include regular progress reporting to ensure effective implementation of the action plan.

32.     This action plan is an internal document, outlining work to be done within the remit of Council and its CCOs. The content of the plan builds on earlier consultation undertaken in the development of key strategies. Input and feedback for this action plan has therefore been targeted to key groups.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     The draft plan will be distributed to the key groups that have been engaged from the commencement of the project. Feedback will be considered until 14 June 2021.

34.     The final Economic Development Action Plan: Council’s role in Auckland’s recovery 2021-24 and its monitoring framework will be presented to the PACE committee on 8 July 2021 for adoption.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Economic Development Action Plan

153

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janelle Breckell - Principal Strategic Advisor

James Robinson, Head of Strategy and Planning, Auckland Unlimited

Authorisers

Jacques Victor – General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

13 May 2021

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

13 May 2021

 

Reserve revocation recommendation for 29-31 St Johns Road, Meadowbank

File No.: CP2021/04857

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek approval to revoke the reserve status of the council owned property at 29-31 St John Road, Meadowbank to enable the redevelopment of the existing Meadowbank Community Centre into a mixed-use building. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ōrākei Local Board approved the redevelopment of the Meadowbank Community Centre located at 29-31 St Johns Road by way of Service Property Optimisation at its 19 July 2018 business meeting (resolution number OR/2018/145).

3.       This project involves the development of a mixed-use building which incorporates the redeveloped Meadowbank Community Centre on the ground floor. The completed ground floor building and part of the land will be retained in council ownership, while a residual portion of the land and the airspace development rights will transfer to the selected development partner.

4.       29-31 St Johns Road is an unclassified Local Purpose (Community Centre) Reserve. The reserve status of this property needs to be revoked in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 to enable the development of a fit-for-purpose mixed-use facility that incorporates the Meadowbank Community Centre.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      approve the revocation of the unclassified Local Purpose (Community Centre) Reserve at 29-31 St Johns Road, Meadowbank under section 24(1)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977;

b)      note that the revocation of the reserve status of 29-31 St Johns Road, Meadowbank is being recommended to enable the Ōrākei Local Board to redevelop the Meadowbank Community Centre utilising the Service Property Optimisation policy;

c)      note the redeveloped Meadowbank Community Centre will be held for a community centre purpose under the Public Works Act 1981.

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Meadowbank Community Centre is located at 29-31 St Johns Road, Meadowbank as shown in Attachment A.

6.       On 19 July 2018, the Ōrākei Local Board approved the redevelopment of the Meadowbank Community Centre using Service Property Optimisation as a development funding tool (resolution number OR/2018/145). 

7.       The project involves the development of a mixed-use building with the sale of part of the land and airspace development rights to fund the redevelopment of the Meadowbank Community Centre, which will occupy the ground floor of the building and part of the land.

8.       The current record of title does not record that the land is held under the Reserves Act 1977. However, as part of the due diligence undertaken for this project, it was identified in council records that following the acquisition of the land, the council had intended to classify the land as a Local Purpose (Community Centre) Reserve. The classification process was never completed. Therefore, the unclassified Local Purpose (Community Centre) Reserve status needs to be revoked to enable the redevelopment project to progress.

9.       The ground floor of the building and part of the land will be retained in council ownership for the purpose of a Community Centre. The residual land and airspace development will transfer to the selected development partner. The land area that will be retained in council ownership will comprise approximately 1,051m² and the residual land will comprise approximately 609m², subject to a final survey once the new community centre is built.

10.     The ability to redevelop the Meadowbank Community Centre and sell the airspace to fund the redevelopment by way of Service Property Optimisation cannot proceed without the unclassified reserve status of 29-31 St Johns Road, Meadowbank being revoked. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The Ōrākei Local Board approved the redevelopment of the Meadowbank Community Centre, including the satisfactory conclusion of any required statutory processes, at its 19 July 2018 business meeting. 

12.     The unclassified reserve status of 29-31 St Johns Road, Meadowbank restricts the implementation of the Ōrākei Local Board’s decision to redevelop the Meadowbank Community Centre into a mixed-use building by way of service property optimisation. 

13.     In accordance with existing delegations, the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee has the authority to authorise the commencement of the reserve revocation process in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 prior to the planned disposal of the airspace.  Final approval to revoke the reserve status is required by the Minister of Conservation under section s24(1)(b) of the Reserve Act 1977. 

14.     The redeveloped Meadowbank Community Centre will be retained in council ownership under the Public Works Act 1981. Section 52 of the Public Works Act 1981 provides the mechanism to set apart the community centre from the airspace development. A new record of title will be issued under s47 of the Public Works Act 1981 noting the community centre will be held for a public work. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.     We consider the impact of emissions from the redevelopment of the Meadowbank Community Centre into a mixed-use building to potentially increase.  This is due to emissions associated with the demolition of the existing building at 29-31 St Johns Road, Meadowbank and the construction of a new mixed-use facility.

16.     Panuku will seek to ensure emissions associated with the demolition are reduced as much as possible by ensuring the party selected to undertake the demolition include appropriate methods for treating the resulting waste.  Panuku will also seek to ensure that the developer reduce emissions for the redevelopment of the Meadowbank Community Centre by including development standards as part of any future development agreement. It is Panuku policy that all residential developments are constructed to a minimum of Homestar 6.

17.     Key impacts on 29-31 St Johns Road, Meadowbank from climate change are likely to be higher temperatures and changing rainfall patterns. The property is located on the top of a ridge and is not within a flood plain or near the coast.  Therefore, there are not likely to be significant flooding concerns in the future from either rainfall or rising sea levels.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     Service Property Optimisation is a tri-partite concept that involves the relevant local board, the relevant council department and Panuku. Staff from Panuku and council’s Service and Asset Planning team have worked with the Ōrākei Local Board to consider a number of options to progress the redevelopment of the Meadowbank Community Centre.  The service requirements of the redeveloped Meadowbank Community Centre are based on the service requirements identified in the Community Needs Assessment and are supported by the council’s Service and Asset Planning team, council’s Community Facilities team and the Ōrākei Local Board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The redevelopment of the Meadowbank Community Centre is a priority for the Ōrākei Local Board. 

20.     The 2014 Ōrākei Local Board Plan advocated for the upgrade of the Meadowbank Community Centre and the 2017 and 2020 Ōrākei Local Board Plan specifically noted the redevelopment of the Meadowbank Community Centre. 

21.     The Ōrākei Local Board approved the redevelopment of the Meadowbank Community Centre by way of Service Property Optimisation at its 19 July 2018 business meeting (resolution number OR/2018/145).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     Mana whenua have been advised of the optimisation concept and a framework for engagement has been agreed through the Panuku Mana Whenua Governance Forum.

23.     Through the open market tender process, this project has provided a commercial opportunity for an iwi group to be part of the development partner consortium, with the intention to be a long term investor in the build to rent residential development of the airspace above the new Meadowbank Community Centre.

24.     Site specific Mana Whenua engagement is required to be undertaken regarding the proposed reserve revocation of 29-31 St Johns Road, Meadowbank.  This will be undertaken subject to approval being received from this Committee to commence the reserve revocation process. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     The Service Property Optimisation concept seeks to alter the balance of incentives to those local boards and communities prepared to deal constructively with underperforming service-assets by providing the opportunity to receive direct local benefits and tap into efficiencies. 

26.     The concept offers an alternative funding source to deliver fit-for-purpose community facilities and improved community outcomes on a cost-neutral basis by using proceeds from the sale or redevelopment of assets, land or both to reinvest in approved local projects. Reinvestment seeks to advance planned LTP projects and current business strategies and plans. An optimisation opportunity is driven by market demand and must be commercially viable to proceed.

27.     The redevelopment of the Meadowbank Community Centre project cannot proceed without the unclassified reserve status of 29-31 St Johns Road, Meadowbank being revoked. The redevelopment and sale of the airspace will contribute to the capital cost to complete the integration of the fit-for purpose community centre in the mixed-use building.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     Approval is required from the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to revoke the reserve status of 28-31 St Johns Road, Meadowbank to enable implementation of the Ōrākei Local Board’s decision to enable the property to be developed into a mixed-use building.

29.     There is a risk that the Minister of Conservation may not approve the proposed reserve revocation.  In such a circumstance the status quo would remain, and we would be unable to implement the decision of the Ōrākei Local Board to redevelop the Meadowbank Community Centre. 

30.     The redeveloped, fit-for-purpose Meadowbank Community Centre will be held for the purpose of community centre under the Public Works Act 1981.  The purpose of holding the land for a community centre will be registered on the record of title.  

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Subject to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee resolving the revocation of the unclassified reserve, Panuku will commence the reserve revocation process on behalf of Auckland Council. 

32.     Once the roof form, services and any structural support elements of the redeveloped Meadowbank Community Centre are in place, a survey will be undertaken to set apart the ground floor improvements and part of the land under the provisions of s52 Public Works Act 1981. 

33.     New records of titles will be issued for the community facility and build to rent apartments within the airspace. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site photo of 29-31 St Johns Road, Meadowbank

191

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Perwez Abdullah - Portfolio Specialist

Authorisers

Letitia Edwards - Head of Strategic Asset Optimisation (Acting)

Marian Webb – General Manager Assets and Delivery

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

13 May 2021

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

13 May 2021

 

Reserve Revocation Proposal - 39R Pohutukawa Road and 17W Hawke Crescent, Beachlands

File No.: CP2021/04959

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To report on the results of the notification of the proposals to revoke the reserve status under s.24 Reserves Act 1977 of two properties approved for disposal, and to seek approval to submit a request to the Minister of Conservation to uplift the reserve status on each property.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       39R Pohutukawa Road and 17W Hawke Crescent, Beachlands are council owned reserves, each measuring approximately 1,333 m². They were approved for disposal by the Franklin Local Board as part of an optimisation project by way of direct service reinvestment on 26 March 2019 (FR/2019/38), subject to the satisfactory conclusion of any required statutory processes.

3.       Panuku Development Auckland has undertaken iwi and public notification under s.24 Reserves Act 1977 on the two properties. Seven submissions (six objections) were received for 39R Pohutukawa Road. Two submissions (no objections) were received for 17W Hawke Crescent.

4.       Some objectors mentioned a cave located under 39R Pohutukawa Road as a basis for objection, and others requested that the council protect the reserve by leaving it vacant or making it into a community garden. Two were concerned about the impact on their properties’ value and three about their rates bill.

5.       Panuku Development Auckland now seeks a formal resolution from the PACE Committee to approve the recommendation to request to the Minister of Conservation that the reserve status over each of the two properties be uplifted. 

6.       Property descriptions, details of the notification process and the submissions are set out in Attachments A to D.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      agree to submit a request to the Minister of Conversation to uplift the reserve status of the following properties:

i)        39R Pohutukawa Road, Beachlands comprised of an estate in fee simple of 1333 m² being Lot 89 DP 19657 contained in certificate of title NA5C/156, and

ii)       17W Hawke Crescent, Beachlands comprised of an estate in fee simple of 1558 m² being Lot 11 DP 19523 contained in certificate of title NA5C/152.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       39R Pohutukawa Road, Beachlands is a vacant section of approximately 1,333 m² that was created on subdivision in 1925 to provide pedestrian access to the foreshore.  The site was vested in the Crown as a plantation reserve.  In 1965 the property was vested in the former Manukau City Council for the purpose of plantation reserve, subject to the Reserves and Domains Act 1953.

8.       17W Hawke Crescent, Beachlands is a vacant section of approximately 1,518 m² that was created on subdivision in 1925 to provide pedestrian access to the foreshore.  The site was vested in the Crown as a plantation reserve.  In 1965 the property was vested in the former Manukau City Council for the purpose of plantation reserve, subject to the Reserves and Domains Act 1953.

9.       The Franklin Local Board approved both properties for disposal on 26 March 2019 by way of service property optimisation, subject to the satisfactory conclusion of any required statutory processes (FR/2019/37).

10.     The principal statutory requirement for these properties is to undergo a reserve revocation process under s.24 Reserves Act 1977.

11.     Property descriptions and the details of public and iwi notification processes, together with the outcomes for each of these properties are set out in Attachments A to E of this report.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Iwi were notified on 20 July 2020, and a public notice was placed in the Eastern Courier on 30 September 2020, and again on 4 November 2020. The notice was also placed on the council’s website and letters were sent to adjoining owners. The notification period ran until 30 November 2020.

13.     We received seven submissions from members of the public regarding 39R Pohutukawa Road. Six of the submitters stated their objection to the proposal to revoke the reserve status of the property and requested that the council consider potential uses of the reserve for the local community.  One submitter is interested in purchasing the property should it progress to a sale on the open market. The submissions received for 39R Pohutukawa Road are set out in Attachment D.

14.     Four of the objections mentioned a cave in the cliff running under the reserve, making it unsuitable and unsafe for development. We visited and inspected the cliff below the reserve. There is a cave, but it runs under the adjoining property, which has been developed (see Attachment A).

15.     Two objectors were concerned that the loss of the reserve would have an adverse effect on the value of their properties. Three expressed the hope that they would receive a reduction in their rates bill if the reserve status was uplifted.

16.     We received two submissions from members of the public regarding 17W Hawke Crescent. Both submitters are adjoining owners and are interested in purchasing the property should it progress to a sale on the open market. The submissions received for 17W Hawke Crescent are set out in Attachment E.

17.     Panuku recommends that the PACE Committee request the Minister of Conservation to uplift the reserve status of the two properties on the basis that they are not required for reserve purposes. The revocation of reserve status is required if the optimisation process is to continue.


 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The proposal to use these sites for residential housing is a land use change. We recognise that any form of construction and development can increase emissions. Emissions associated with any potential redevelopment can be reduced through development standards agreed through a future development agreement, application of Panuku’s Homestar 6 policy and requirements to reduce carbon emissions in commercial developments.

19.     These sites are both coastal properties and it is recognised that coastal properties may be impacted in the future by rising sea levels.  However, we consider there is less of a risk to these properties because they are on a cliff and significantly above the high-water mark.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     Council’s Community Investment team (the former Parks and Recreation Policy team) assessed the subject sites against council’s open space provision policies and has determined they are not required for open space purposes. The Community Investment team supports the proposed reserve revocation and divestment of these sites.

21.     Relevant council departments and CCOs have been consulted about the proposed disposal of the sites. No substantive feedback was received in response.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     The Franklin Local Board endorsed the potential reserve revocation and sale of 39R Pohutukawa Road, Beachlands at its 26 March 2019 business meeting.

23.     The Franklin Local Board endorsed the potential reserve revocation and sale of 17W Hawke Crescent, Beachlands at its 26 March 2019 business meeting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     Panuku notified all the relevant Mana Whenua iwi authorities of the proposal to revoke the reserve status of the properties and a summary of the responses to this engagement are contained in Attachments A to C of this report.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     If the reserve status is lifted from the two properties, a plan change will be necessary to change their open space zoning to an appropriate residential zoning in order to allow the highest and best value of the land to be realised.

26.     The proceeds from the sale will be reinvested locally into eligible community projects at a neutral cost and with no cost to the ratepayer.  Optimisation by way of direct reinvestment will enable the Franklin Local Board to use the proceeds from the disposal of the sites to reinvest into an eligible local project of its choosing.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     If the reserve status of the properties is not revoked, it will not be possible to progress their disposal. The properties would remain in council ownership and would incur ongoing maintenance and management costs and as open space.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     If the committee resolves to recommend proceeding with the application to revoke the reserve status of the properties, council officers will forward the resolution to the Department of Conservation together with the objections received. 

29.     If the Minster approves the request, a notice will be published in the New Zealand Gazette authorising the revocation, and this will be submitted to Land Information New Zealand for issue of titles.

30.     Panuku will seek to change the zoning from open space to the most appropriate zoning on the advice of the Unitary Plan team and complete the disposal process for the properties.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Property details 39R Pohutukawa Road

197

b

Property details 17W Hawke Crescent

205

c

Correspondence with Iwi

209

d

Objections received for 39R Pohutukawa Road

211

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Moira Faumui - Portfolio Research Analyst

Carl May - Portfolio Specialist

Authorisers

Letitia Edwards - Head of Strategic Asset Optimisation (Acting)

Marian Webb – General Manager Assets and Delivery

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

13 May 2021

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

13 May 2021

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

13 May 2021

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

13 May 2021

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

13 May 2021

 

Papakura Senior Citizens Hall - Transfer of assets to Auckland Council

File No.: CP2021/05020

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To decline the transfer of Papakura Senior Citizens Hall to Auckland Council.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Papakura Senior Citizens Club (the club) own the Senior Citizens Hall (the hall) and land at 8 East Street, Papakura.  The club wound up in December 2020 and under the rules in their Deed of Incorporation the club will transfer their assets to Auckland Council. There is also a caveat on the title in favour of Auckland Council.

3.       Auckland Council is not obliged to accept the transfer of assets.  If the transfer of assets is accepted, they will be held in trust subject to s140 and s141 of the Local Government Act 2002.  This restricts the use (to benefit older people in Papakura and surrounding areas) and any future disposal (proceeds to be used to benefit older people in Papakura and surrounding areas).

4.       Auckland Council has significant financial constraints as outlined in the draft Recovery Budget 2021-2031.  It states that our current community asset base is financially, socially and culturally unsustainable.

5.       Options have been considered relating to the transfer of assets to Auckland Council. To meet the intent of the club’s Deed of Incorporation, all options should benefit older people in Papakura and surrounding areas:

Option 1: Accept transfer of assets and manage hall for benefit of older people

Option 2: Accept transfer, sell assets and use/distribute funding for benefit of older people

Option 3: Decline transfer of assets

Managed by council or third party/lease but must specifically benefit older people so utilisation may be limited

Proceeds of sale could be used on a council project e.g. Haumaru Housing or a specific grants round could be held for organisations that work with older people

The club have indicated they would sell the hall and distribute the proceeds of sale to charitable groups to benefit older people in Papakura

 

6.       The recommended option is option 3, decline the transfer of assets as:

·    there is no need for additional hall/venue for hire space in Papakura.  There are other council owned facilities with capacity for more bookings and activities

·    the hall is in poor condition

·    there is no funding for renewals and ongoing operating expenses.  The estimated cost to bring the hall up to standard is $400,000.  Estimated operating expenditure of $33,000 per annum would be required for maintenance, cleaning and utilities.  Additional operating expenditure could be required to manage the hall to ensure it specifically benefits older people.  Reprioritisation of existing projects and renewals would be required to fund the investment required for the assets.


 

7.       The club would like a decision on the transfer of assets as soon as possible.  The Papakura Local Board considered the options at their business meeting on 28 April 2021 and resolved to recommend to Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee (PACE) to decline the transfer of assets and lift the caveat on the title.

8.       The main risk of the recommended option is the perception of a missed opportunity for the council to benefit older people in Papakura.  This can be mitigated by the club distributing the proceeds of sale to charitable groups who will benefit older people in Papakura.

9.       The next step is to inform Papakura Senior Citizens Club of the council’s decision.  Should PACE decide to support accepting the transfer of assets, a report to Finance and Performance Committee will be required to approve the acquisition and allocate funding.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      decline the transfer of Papakura Senior Citizens Hall to Auckland Council, noting that

i)        there is no identified need for additional hall/venue for hire space as there is capacity for more bookings and activities in other council owned facilities in Papakura

ii)       the hall is in poor condition with weathertightness, internal guttering and fire safety system issues

iii)      there are significant financial constraints outlined in the draft Recovery Budget 2021-2031 with no funding available to bring the hall up to standard or for ongoing renewals and operating costs

iv)      Papakura Local Board supports Papakura Senior Citizens Club distributing the proceeds of sale to charitable groups to benefit older people in Papakura and surrounding areas

b)      approve the withdrawal of Caveat 073463.1 subject to Auckland Council staff confirming there are no ongoing requirements arising from the Deed and Bond.

Horopaki

Context

Papakura Senior Citizens Club requires a decision on the transfer of their assets

10.     Papakura Senior Citizens Club (the club) owns the Senior Citizens Hall (the hall) and land at 8 East Street, Papakura.  The club has offered entertainment, socialising and activities for older people from the hall since they acquired it in 1968.  The building was known as the Manchester Unity Hall prior to the club’s acquisition.

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11.     Papakura Local Board and predecessors have supported the club with rates relief on the property since 1968.  

12.     In 1973, the club updated the rules in their Deed of Incorporation regarding winding up their operations: 

In the event of the winding up of the Club the assets of the Club after payment of all just debts and expenses shall be paid and transferred to the Papakura Borough Council or such other Local Body as shall at the time of dissolution be exercising jurisdiction over the area now know [sic] as Papakura Borough on trust to be used for the benefit of elderly residents of Papakura and neighbouring districts. 

13.     The rules mean that assets would be held in trust by the council specifically to benefit older people in Papakura and surrounding areas.  

14.     In 1974, a caveat referring to a Deed and Bond was registered on the title in favour of Papakura Borough Council forbidding the registration of any Memorandum of Transfer or other instrument until the caveat is withdrawn.  This means the club cannot sell the hall unless Auckland Council agrees to lift the caveat on the title. Staff are investigating the Deed and Bond reference to compliance with parking requirements. 

15.     The club wound up in December 2020 and require a decision on the transfer of assets to Auckland Council or the lifting of the caveat on the title to allow them to sell the hall to others. 

Auckland Council is not obliged to accept the transfer of assets

16.     The council does not have a legal obligation to accept the transfer of assets.

17.     If the council accepts the transfer of assets, s140 and s141 of the Local Government Act 2002 include provisions that restrict the use and disposal of property vested in trust.  For the Papakura Senior Citizens Hall, this means: 

·    the hall must be used for the benefit of older people in Papakura and neighbouring districts

·    additional or different uses of the hall would require permission from the relevant Minister in writing.  The process would include a letter to the Minister setting out the context and the rationale for the change of use, ideally indicating support from the club.  There is no guarantee of timeframes or outcome

·    the hall can be sold and proceeds of sale used for the benefit of older people in Papakura and neighbouring districts.  The club would need to be given a reasonable opportunity to comment on the intended sale.     

Auckland Council has significant financial constraints as outlined in the Recovery Budget 2021-2031

18.     The Recovery Budget 2021-2031 outlines that our current community asset base is financially, socially and culturally unsustainable and proposes a move away from a focus on assets to alternative ways of delivering services through partnerships, digital channels and multi-use facilities.  Over the first three years of the Recovery Budget is it proposed to focus on existing assets rather than acquiring or building new assets.

The decision maker is the Governing Body

19.     As the hall is not currently owned by the council, accepting the transfer of assets is an unbudgeted acquisition.  Acquisitions are a Governing Body decision. The decision-making process is:

·    Papakura Local Board provide their feedback and recommendation

·    Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee (PACE) consider whether the service is required in terms of strategy and policy decision making that relates to social, community and cultural activities.  If PACE resolve to decline the transfer of assets, no further decisions are sought

·    If PACE supports the transfer of assets, Finance and Performance Committee must resolve whether to approve the acquisition and allocate funding for ongoing operating, maintenance and renewals of the hall.   

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

All options should benefit older people in Papakura 

20.     Three high level options have been considered for the transfer of Papakura Senior Citizens Hall.  To meet the intent of the club’s Deed of Incorporation, all options should benefit older people in Papakura and surrounding areas either through the provision of hall services or projects/services provided by others.  Table 1 outlines the options and factors for consideration.

Table 1: Options for the transfer of Papakura Senior Citizens Hall

Factor

Option 1: Accept transfer of assets and manage hall for benefit of older people

Option 2: Accept transfer, sell assets and use/distribute funding for benefit of older people

Option 3: Decline transfer of assets

Further information

Managed by council or third party/lease but must specifically benefit older people

Proceeds of sale could be used on a council project e.g. Haumaru Housing or a specific grants round could be held for organisations that work with older people

The club have indicated they would sell the hall and distribute the proceeds of sale to charitable groups to benefit older people in Papakura

Cost

Estimated OPEX cost of $33,000 per annum for hall maintenance, cleaning and utilities

CAPEX – $400,000 required to bring hall up to standard; ongoing renewals also required

Additional staff resource may be required

Staff time/ project management

Potential consequential OPEX and renewals if proceeds of sale are used on a council building project

Current CV is $820,000

Minimal cost to council

Likely to be some staff time and legal fees to lift the caveat on the title

Service limitations/ opportunities

Additional meeting/activity space for older people but no evidence of need; other nearby bookable spaces available with capacity

Potentially require dedicated staff resource to ensure benefits older people

S140 and s141 Local Government Act restrict use and disposal of property held in trust – Senior Citizens Club would need to be consulted on sale

Potential for service/OPEX projects or roles to be funded

Potential to increase services to older people in Papakura without resources required from council

Risks

Condition continues to deteriorate as no budget available for renewals and depreciation

Insufficient demand for hall space from older people to justify dedicated building, resulting in low utilisation

No suitable projects or services identified that benefit older people specifically

No internal capacity to manage specific grants round

Perception of opportunity missed by council

 

21.     Option 1, accepting the transfer of assets is the mostly costly option for the council, followed by option 2, accepting the transfer of assets and selling the hall.  Both options will require significant staff resource and reprioritisation of current work programme priorities to progress. 

22.     The club has prepared a list of charitable organisations to distribute proceeds of sale to if the council declines the transfer of assets, as per option 3.  These organisations are well placed to benefit older people in Papakura and surrounding areas.

Recommendation to decline the transfer of assets

23.     We recommend option 3 to decline the transfer of assets for the reasons outlined below.

There is no identified need for additional hall/venue for hire space in Papakura 

24.     There are three council owned venue for hire facilities within one kilometre of the hall – Papakura Old Central School, Massey Park Grandstand Function Room and Elizabeth Campbell Hall.  There is also a meeting room at the Sir Edmund Hillary Library (available during opening hours) which is less than 300 metres from the hall. 

25.     All facilities have capacity for more bookings; several rooms have no bookings for entire days.

26.     The cost of hiring council venues has been raised as a barrier for use.  If the transfer of assets was accepted, we would recommend that the hall is brought in line with the hire costs of other council facilities.

27.     Given there is capacity available in other facilities in Papakura and these facilities are available for general use including older people, we do not consider there is a need for the Papakura Senior Citizens Hall.

The hall is in poor condition     

28.     An asset condition assessment has been completed by Community Facilities.  The hall is in poor condition with particular concern about weathertightness (windows), water ponding in internal guttering and an inadequate fire safety system.  Due to the age and condition of the hall, it will require ongoing funding to ensure it is safe to use.

There is no funding for renewals and ongoing operating expenses  

29.     The estimated cost to bring the hall up to standard is $400,000.  Ongoing renewals would also need to be funded.

30.     Operating expenditure of approximately $33,000 per annum (based on similar facilities) would be required for maintenance, cleaning and utilities.

31.     Depending on the way the hall is operated (e.g. council run or third party/lease), additional operating expenditure could be required to fund the management of the hall, to ensure the hall is used for the benefit of older people and to support activities and programmes specific to older people.

32.     There is no funding available to bring the hall up to standard, fund operating costs or ongoing renewals and maintenance.  We would need to reprioritise existing projects and renewals to accept the transfer of assets. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

33.     Declining the transfer of assets does not have a climate impact. Accepting the transfer of assets would mean the council is responsible for the climate impacts of the existing building.  There is limited opportunity to increase the sustainability of the building without significant investment.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

34.     Connected Communities and Community Facilities have been involved in the preparation of this advice and support the recommendations.  The impact on their areas varies with the options.  The greatest impact on staff and resources would be option 1, the transfer of assets is accepted.  Connected Communities would be responsible for managing the use of the hall or a specific grants process if the hall is sold by the council.  Community Facilities would be responsible for renewing and maintaining the hall. 

35.     Panuku Development Auckland have confirmed their willingness to explore Haumaru Housing projects in Papakura or surrounding areas that could be suitable for use of the proceeds of sale if option 2 is progressed.  

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     Papakura Senior Citizens Club wound up in December 2020.  They would like a decision on the transfer of assets as soon as possible.  There are concerns about the security of the hall while it is not being actively managed and they cannot afford to continue paying for cleaning and utilities. 

37.     It is understood that the two groups who were using the hall have been given notice to vacate by the club.

38.     Papakura Local Board considered the options at their business meeting on 28 April 2021.  They resolved to recommend to PACE to decline the transfer of assets and lift the caveat on the title.  They noted that:

·    the Papakura Senior Citizens Club is no longer in existence

·    the Deed of Incorporation requires the council to hold the hall in trust to benefit older people in Papakura and this creates limitations on the uses of the hall

·    there is no identified need for additional hall/venue for hire space

·    the hall is in poor condition

·    the council has significant financial constraints with no funding available to bring the hall up to standard or for ongoing renewals and operating costs

·    there is support for the Club to distribute the proceeds of sale to charitable groups to benefit older people in Papakura and surrounding areas.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     There is no particular impact on Māori of declining the transfer of assets.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

40.     There are minimal financial implications of the recommended option 3.  There will be some legal costs to lift the caveat on the title to allow the club to sell the hall and this will be funded from existing budgets. 

41.     The financial implications of option 1, accepting the transfer of assets are $400,000 CAPEX in financial year 2022 (FY22), approximately $33,000 OPEX per annum from FY22 and ongoing renewals funding.  There is also likely to be a requirement for additional staff resource to manage the hall or fund a third party to manage the hall. 

42.     There is no funding available and projects and renewals would need to be stopped/ reprioritised to create capacity.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

43.     The main risk of the recommended option 3 is the perception that the council has missed an opportunity to benefit older people in Papakura and surrounding areas.  However, the club has suggested a number of charitable organisations who could receive the proceeds of sale and benefit older people through their services.

44.     The risks associated with options 1 and 2 are listed in Table 1 in paragraph 20.  The main risks to the council of accepting the assets are financial and/or resource related.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

45.     Staff will inform the Papakura Senior Citizens Club of the PACE decision.

46.     Should PACE support the transfer of assets, a report to Finance and Performance Committee will be required to approve the acquisition and allocate funding for ongoing operating, maintenance and renewals of the hall.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Nicola Terry - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Service Strategy and Integration

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

13 May 2021

 

Summary of Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee Information - updates, memos and briefings - 13 May 2021

File No.: CP2021/03267

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A.

2.       To provide a public record of memos, workshops or briefing papers that have been distributed for the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee’s (PACE) information since 11 March 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This is regular information-only report which aims to provide public visibility of information circulated to committee members via memo or other means, where no decisions are required.

4.       The following papers/memos were circulated to members:

Date

Subject

06/04/2021

Central Library Closure

12/04/2021

Central Library Closure - UPDATE

20/04/2021

Central Library Closure - UPDATE

05/05/2021

Snapshot Homelessness Statistics March 2021

05/05/2021

Regional Arts and Culture Outcomes

 

5.       The following workshops/briefings have taken place:

Date

Workshop/briefing

24/03/2021

Economic Development Action Plan

27/04/2021

Independent report re: Aktive Auckland - CONFIDENTIAL

 

6.       These documents can be found on the Auckland Council website, at the following link: http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

·   at the top of the left page, select meeting “Park, Arts, Community and Events Committee” from the drop-down tab and click ‘view’;

·   under ‘attachments’, select either the HTML or PDF version of the document entitled ‘extra attachments’.

7.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary. Committee members should direct any questions to the authors.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      receive the summary of the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee report – 13 May 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee Forward Work Programme

229

b

WORKSHOP: Economic Development Action Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

MEMO: Central City Library Closure (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

MEMO: Central Library Closure - UPDATE (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

MEMO: Central Library Closure UPDATE (Under Separate Cover)

 

f

EMAIL: Snapshot Homelessness Statistics March 2021 (Under Separate Cover)

 

g

MEMO: Regional Arts and Culture Grants Programme 2019/2020 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maea Petherick - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

13 May 2021

 

 

Kōmiti Whakarite Parae, Mahi Toi, Hapori, Kaupapa / Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee
Forward Work Programme 2021

This committee deals with the development and monitoring of strategic policies and action plans associated with regional parks, libraries, arts, communities and events.

The full terms of reference can be found here: Auckland Council Governing Body Terms of Reference

This committee meets bi-monthly commencing in March 2021

 

Area of work and Lead Department

Reason for work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Expected timeframes

Highlight the month(s) this is expected to come to committee in 2021

 

no meeting

Mar

No meeting

May

No meeting

Jul

No meeting

Sept

No meeting

Nov

No meeting

2022

 

The Demographic Advisory Panels

 

Democracy and Engagement

The six demographic panels will engage and report to the committee on a regular basis. The Panels play a key role in influencing council policies, plans and initiatives

Decision:       Endorsement of panel strategic work programmes. Expecting this to be split across two meetings. Co-chairs to present where possible

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Sport and Recreation Facilities Operational Grant

Allocate $1,023,000 per annum (allowed for in the LTP) following community Access Scheme being repurposed to a contestable grant

Decision: funding allocation approval for 2021/2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community Access Scheme

 

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Review of the Community Access Scheme.

The review will also seek evidence to determine whether the current funding agreements are being used in the most strategic and effective way to address the greatest access needs in the system.

Reports:

·    Community Access Scheme Review - extension to current funding agreements

·      Community Access Scheme Review

Decision: to approve the extension of the current Community Access Scheme funding agreements for one year, from 1 July to 30 June 2021, while a review of the scheme continues.

 

Progress

to approve the extension of the current Community Access Scheme funding agreements for one year.

20 August 2020 link to decision

Approve repurposing the existing Community Access Scheme to a contestable operational grant

10 December 2020 link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan

 

Parks, Sports and Recreation

 

 

Status report on implementation plan

Update: implementation and progress update, joint report with the Parks and Open Spaces Strategic Action Plan update

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sport and Rec Strategic Partnership Grant to Aktive Auck Sports Recreation

 

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Approval of $552,000 strategic partnership grant to Aktive Auckland & Sport to deliver on agreed priority initiatives.

Update: will be provided to the committee via memo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aktive and the Auckland Regional Sports Trusts

 

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Approval of $552,000 strategic partnership grant to Aktive Auckland & Sport to deliver on agreed priority initiatives.

Decision: allocation of strategic partnership grant funding

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Sport and Recreation grants programme

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Review of previous grants allocation and recommendation for next round

 

Decision: funding allocation approval for 2021/2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Sport & Recreation Facility Investment Fund

 

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Purpose of the fund is the allocate $120 million over ten years to support the development of regional and sub-regional sport and recreation facilities across Auckland.

Decision: funding allocation approval for 2021/2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Golf Investment Plan

 

Community and Social Policy

Council’s strategic approach to outcomes, priorities and investment in golf.

Decision: approval to consult publicly on a draft investment pland

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Options to expand revenue streams for sport facilities investment

 

Community and Social Policy

 

Provide strategic direction to expand revenue streams to fund future sports facilities investment in the draft Sports Facilities Investment Plan

Decision or Update Direction to expand revenue streams to fund future sports facilities investment in the draft Sports Facilities Investment Plan  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Active Recreation Investment and Visitor Experience

 

Community and Social Policy

 

Councils strategic approach to outcome, priorities and investment for active walking, cycling, waterways and visitor experience on open space, parks, and regional parks

Decision: on scope and phasing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Takaro – Investing in play discussion document

 

 

Community and Social Policy

Development of a play investment plan

Decision: consider and approve for public release

timing to be confirmed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Parks Management Plan Review

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships

Reserve Act Classification update for Regional Parks

 

Decision:  Reserves Act classifications

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Parks Management Plan Review

Service Strategy and Integration

Statutory review of the omnibus regional parks’ management plan

Reports:

·      Regional Parks Management Plan - approval to notify intent to prepare new plan

Decision: consider and approve scope, phasing and engagement approach

Progress to date:

public notification of discussion paper for consultation.

20 August 2020 link to decision

Memo – Regional Parks Management Plan – 16 September 2020

15 October 2020 link to memo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Auckland Paths

Parks, Sports and Recreataion

Report on implementation plan

Inform: note progress (workshop or memo)

Timing to be confirmed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Governance of Colin Dale Park

 

Community and Social Policy

To decide on the governance arrangements for Colin Dale Park. The loical board has asked that the committee consider regional governance for the park.

Decision: Agree whether or not Colin Dale Park should be regionally governed.

 

ü

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One Local Initiatives (OLIs)

One Local Initiatives

 

Community and Social Policy, as well as Community Facilities

Status update on non-transport “One Local Initiatives”. 

Inform:update on progress and implementation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Economic Development

The Southern Initiative (TSI)

 

Chief Planning Office

 

Provide an update on both the The Southern Initiative and The Western Initiative approach, priorities and achievements.

Inform: Strategic direction regarding both the Southern Initiative and the Western Initiative approach to social and community innovation in South Auckland and West Auckland.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Social, Community, Cultural Services and Infrastructure

Marae Programme

 

Māori Outcomes

Council partners with marae in a number of ways.  A large part of the marae programme across council is in two parts - the Marae Infrastructure Programme, which seeks to deliver safe, healthy and warm marae, and the Cultural Initiatives Fund, which is a contestable grant open to marae and papakāinga.  The interim guidelines for both programmes have been adopted by PACE.  Both are due for review.  .

Reports:

·    Marae Infrastructure Programme- Funding Allocation Guideline

·    Cultural Initiative Fund

·    Te Atatū Marae – land tenure

 

Decision:        adopt revised/updated guidelines for Marae Infrastructure Programme and Cultural Initiatives Fund

 

Progress to date:

Marae Infrastructure Programme – Interim Funding Guideline.

13 February 2020 link to decision

To revise out of date resolutions in relation to the development of a marae on Te Atatū Peninsula

15 October 2020 – link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cultural Initiatives Fund

 

Māori Outcomes

The Cultural Initiatives Fund is open annually for applications for marae and papapkainga housing.  This report will provide an overview of the process, applications and recommend decisions on grants for committee endorsement

Reports:

 

·    Cultural Initiative Fund

 

Decision:        confirm the grants to be made to marae and papakāinga housing from the CIF contestable grant round for 2021/22

Committee for their consideration by mid-2020.

Progress to date:

June deferred to August

Cultural Initiatives Fund grants for marae pakāinga/Māori housing 2020/2021

20 August 2020 - link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Māori Outcomes Framework

Nga Matarae

Development of the Māori Outcomes Framework to guide Council’s evolved approach to achieving outcomes for Māori

Decision: July report on the final measures for ‘Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau – a Māori performance measurement framework

November – quarter 1 report on measures

 

Progress to date:

Māori outcomes framework - Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau 

20 August 2020 - link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community Facilities Network Plan and Action Plan

Service Strategy and Integration

Update on progress of delivery.

 

Priority actions will be reflected in 2019/2020 work programmes and draft 2020/2021 work programmes subject to available resources

Consider: Annual update on progress of the Community Facilities Network Plan Delivery.

Progress to date:

To report progress on implementation of the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan (2019)

15 October 2020 link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Facility Partnerships Policy Implementation

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

 

Update and approval of facility partnership opportunities progressed through the application of the Facility Partnerships Policy

Consider:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Citizens Advice Bureaux Services

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

(Arts, Community & Events)

Review of the Citizens Advice Bureaux Services

Staff to negotiate new funding and strategic relationship agreements with Auckland Citizens Advice Bureaux Services (ACABx) for the 2019-2021 period. This will also include working with ACABx to develop a regional network service provision framework to be completed by 30 September 2020.

 

Reports:

·      Formation of a political advisory group for the Citizens Advice Bureaux Service Framework

 

Decision:on review

 

Progress to date:

formation Citizens Advice Bureaux Service Framework Political advisory group 

13 February 2020 - link to decision

update about the development of the Citizens Advice Bureaux (CAB) regional service provision framework and present the CAB insights report.

15 October 2020 - link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Graffiti Prevention Action Plan

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

(Arts Community & Events)

A regional, integrated approach to preventing graffiti vandalism was confirmed through the 2012 Auckland Graffiti Vandalism Prevention Plan.

This approach has been reviewed and updated in 2019, in the context of a refreshed approach to prevention and enforcement and an acknowledgment of the significant success of the rapid removal methodology.

Decision: on the strategic direction

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Homelessness

 

Arts, Community & Events & Community & Social Policy

 

Implementing position and role on homelessness

Reports:

·    Implementing a cross-sectoral approach to homelessness

 

Decision:on council commitment and implementation action

 

Progress to date:

June 2020 – deferred to August

endorsement of the Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa (Auckland’s regional cross-sectoral homelessness plan) Strategic Framework. 

20 August 2020 - link to decision

Memo – Update on COVID19 and post-COVID19 support for people who are homeless

20 August 2020 – link to memo

Memo – A Night Shelter in Auckland – 22 Sept 2020

15 October 2020 –  – link to memo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Safe Communities

 

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

(Arts Community & Events) 

In February 2019 the Community Development and Safety Committee endorsed the draft application (COM/2019/2), and Auckland became and accredited Safe Community in May 2019. This is now in operation through the Safety Collective Tamaki Makaurau I Auckland of which Auckland Council is a member.

Decision: On strategic direction. The committee will be asked to consider and endorse the work of the Safety Collective since Safe Communities Accreditation was achieved in mid-2019.

Consider: Committee-police regular engagement via this committee.

Progress to date:

20 August 2020 – deferred to October 2020

Memo – the Safety Collective – 14 August 2020

20 August 2020 link to memo

15 October 2020 - Public Input

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Event Fund Grants Allocation

 

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

(Arts, Community & Events)

Regional Events grants

2019/20 Round 2 - 2020/21 Round 1

Two rounds per year

The two annual funding rounds held in recent years have been combined into one round for the 2020/2021 year

 

Reports:

·    Regional Event Fund Grants Allocation 2019/2020 - Round Two, Strategic Priorities

·      Regional Event Fund Grants Allocation 2020/2021

Decision: Funding allocations for the regional event fund 2019/2020 round two and 2020/2021 round one for approval.

Progress to date:

grant allocations for 2019/2020 Regional Event Fund round two.https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2020/02/PAC_20200213_MIN_9595_WEB.htm

13 February 2020  link to decision

Report requested for June 2020 – deferred to August

grant allocations for the 2020/2021 Regional Event Grant Programme. 

20 August 2020  link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Arts & Culture Grants

 

 

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships (Arts, Community & Events)

Regional Arts & Culture grants

2019/20 Round 2

2020/21 Round 1

Two round per year

Reports:

·    Regional Arts and Culture grant allocation: Round two 2019/2020

·      Regional Arts and Culture grant allocation 2020/2021

Decision: Funding allocations for the regional arts and culture fund 2019/2020 round two and 2020/2021 round one for approval.

Progress to date:

Workshop to review grant priorities scheduled for May 2020.

June 2020 – deferred to August

2019/2020 Regional Arts and Culture grants programme.

20 August 2020  link to decision

2020/2021 Regional Arts and Culture grants programme

10 December 2020  link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Community Development Grants

 

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

(Arts, Community & Events)

Regional Community Development grants

2019/2020 – one round per year

Reports:

·    Regional Community Development grants 2019/2020

·    ACE regional contestable grants priorities FY 20/21

·    Regional Community Development grants 2020/2021

 

Decision: Funding allocations for the regional community development fund 2019/2020 for approval.

Progress to date:

allocations for the Regional Community Development grants 2019/2020.

13 February 2020 link to decision

Report requested for June 2020 - deferred

Regional Arts and Culture, Events, and Community Development grants programmes FY2020/2021 – 2021/2022.

20 August 2020 link to decision

approve the allocations for the Regional Community Development grants 2020/2021.

10 December 2020  - link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arts & Culture Work Programme FY22

 

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

To present the Arts & Culture work programme for approval for FY22.

This will include public art outside the city centre.

Note:public art within the city centre will be considered by the Planning Committee.

Decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Events Work Programme FY22

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

To present the regional events work programme for FY22

July 2021

Regional Events Work Programme FY22

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Implementation of improvements resulting from the review of the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012

 

Community & Social Policy

The committee resolved that staff report back on the implementation of approved improvementsresulting from the  review of the Community Occupancy Guideline 2012.

Decision: current state review and agree next steps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Intercultural Cities Network

 

Community & Social Policy

Consideration of a proposal to join the Intercultural Cities Network to support implementation and monitoring of progress on ‘Inclusive Auckland’ actions.

Decision: Consider and decide whether Auckland should be a member of the network

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Investing in Aucklanders (Age Friendly City)

 

Community & Social Policy

Identify issues and opportunities for an inclusive friendly city

The pilots will be designed and implemented over the next 18 months. Regular progress updates will be provided to this Committee.

Direction: on the approach to a friendly, inclusive, diverse city.

 

A draft Auckland Age-friendly Action Plan will be presented to PACE for approved consultation in early 2021. A final Action Plan is expected to come to PACE for endorsement in late 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHO Age Friendly City

 

Community & Social Policy

To develop an Age-friendly plan for Auckland and join the WHO Age-Friendly Cities and Communities Network

Decision: on the Age-friendly plan to join the WHO Age-Friendly Cities and Communities Network

Memo – Update on the Age-friendly Auckland Project, Tāmaki tuawhi kaumatua - 22 September 2020

15 October 2020 - link to memo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thriving Communities Plan Refresh

 

Community & Social Policy

To implement the improvements identified in the 2018 Thriving Communities Status report including a refresh of the Thriving Communities Plan

Direction approve draft plan for public consultation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am Auckland Implementation and Evaluation Plan monitoring

 

Community & Social Policy

Annual implementation and evaluation report

Direction: approve three year status review

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grant Policy Monitoring

 

Community & Social Policy

Audit of the application of the Grants Policy

Decision:  on audit results

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Toi Whitiki / Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan Strategy?

 

Community and Social Policy

Review of progress made on Toi Whitiki strategy. What has been achieved, what isworking well and what needs to change to improve investment and outcomes.

Decision: approve current state review and agree next steps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mt Albert Pool Indicative Business Case

 

Community and Social Policy

Indicitive Business Case approved for preparation.

Decision: approve preferred option

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol Strategy three yearly review

 

Community and Social Policy

Three year review is due

Decision: approve refreshed alcohol strategy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Smokefree Update Report

 

Community and Social Policy

Smokefree report back is due

Decision: approve priorities for 2021/2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Public Art Policy

 

Community and Social Policy

Review of the Public Arts Policy: what’s working what’s not.

Decisions relating to major public arts

Staff will report back to the committee on implementation progress within 18 months.

Decision:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Investigation in North-west Community Provision

 

Community and Social Policy

Investigation to identify andy current gaps in services or facilities or in the future

Reports:

Indicative Business Case: Aquatic Provision in Northwest Auckland

Decision: on investigation findings

Progress to date:

Business case for a destination aquatic facility with leisure components

10 December link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Libraries and Information Services

Community Facilities Network Plan Sub Action: Central library strategic review

 

Libraries and Information and Community Social Policy

A strategic review of the Central Library has been commissioned to understand how the current building can meet future need and demand for services, assess the Central Library’s current and potential future role in the region, and guide decision making about future investment and development opportunities

Reports:

·      Investigtion of the central library

Decision: consider the strategic review and decide on the direction of the plan, as well as receive the strategic review

Progress to date:

seek approval to develop a indicative business case for the central library / Tāmaki Pātaka Kōreo

10 December 2020 – link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fines and Charges

Libraries and Information

 

Case developed for removing overdue fines from Auckland Libraries

Decision: to move case forward for consideration

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Libraries

 

Libraries and Information

Work around the integration with customer services

 

Decision: on matters relating to regional aspects of the proposed integration (local boards will decide on local outcomes)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Investment and 10-Year Budget work programme

Community Facilities Network Plan priorities for Long-term Plan consideration

Service Strategy and Integration

 

Indicative business cases for CFNP priority actions to consider as part of the 2021-2031 Auckland Council Long-term Plan

Decision: on indicative business cases relating to CFNP priorities.

LTP – have a separate process

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strategic acquisition issues and opportunities

Community and Social Policy

Understanding current acquisition issues and options.

Inform:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Growth programme

 

Community and Social Policy

Update on proposed growth funding allocation for 2021-2022

Decision: on growth funding allocation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OTHER

Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women.

In early 2019, council affirmed its commitment to advancing the goals of the Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW).

Inform:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Food Policy Alliance

 

 

Community and Social Policy

To consider food policy alliance

Decision: on food policy alliance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community Engagement

Democracy Services & Communication and Engagement

Community engagement, advance participatory democracy

Inform: progress and issues associated with enhancing community engagement and participation (workshop):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Lead Department

Area of work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Decision

Regional Sport and Recreation grants programme 2018/2020

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Review of previous grants allocation and recommendation for next round

Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme 2020/2021

·      opens for applications on 24 January 2020 closes on 6 March 2020

·      allocating $508,00 from July 2020, in accordance with the Community Grants Policy 2014.

allocating $508,000 from July 2020, in accordance with the Community Grants Policy 2014.

Decision: on sport and recreation grants programme objectives and approach

 

 

allocation of funding 2020/2021.

approve funding budget of $508,000.

20 August 2020 link to decision

 

Youth Centres Review

 

Community & Social Policy

Review councils assistance to youth centres

Reports:

Youth Centre Investigation

Decision on review findings

 

council’s support to youth centres and non-council youth services 

11 June 2020 - link to decison

 

 

 

 

 



[1] See Attachment A (Findings report: Appendix two)

[2] Five local boards with alcohol harm minimisation priorities: Mangere-Otahuhu, Manurewa, Maungakiekie, Puketapapa, Waiheke as of January 2021.

[3] Under Waitangi Tribunal claim Wai 2624 claimant David Rātu says that the Crown breached the Treaty by failing to implement recommendations from the Law Commission in 2010. The claim was combined with Wai 2575 under which the Tribunal is investigating claims of disparate Māori health outcomes.

[4] Health Promotion Agency (2018); https://www.hpa.org.nz/sites/default/files/Māori_attitudes_and_behaviours_towards_alcohol_September_2018.pdf

[5] See Figure 4 and Attachment A.