I hereby give notice that an additional meeting of the Papakura Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 5 May 2021

4.30pm

Local Board Chambers
Papakura Service Centre
35 Coles Crescent
Papakura

 

Papakura Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Brent Catchpole

Deputy Chairperson

Jan Robinson, JP

Members

Felicity Auva'a

 

George Hawkins

 

Keven Mealamu

 

Sue Smurthwaite

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Paula Brooke

Democracy Advisor

 

22 April 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 715 279

Email: Paula.Brooke@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Papakura Local Board

05 May 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Local Board views on Plan Changes (Private) 48, 49, 50, 51 and 61 in Drury        7

12        Local board consultation feedback and input into the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 19

13        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

A board member will lead the meeting in prayer.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Papakura Local Board:

confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday 28 April 2021, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Papakura Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Papakura Local Board

05 May 2021

 

 

Local Board views on Plan Changes (Private) 48, 49, 50, 51 and 61 in Drury

File No.: CP2021/02996

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To invite local board views on five private plan changes located within Future Urban zoned land in Drury-Opāheke:

·   Plan Change 48 Drury Central (Kiwi Property Ltd) to rezone 95ha of land east of Drury township to Metropolitan Centre, Mixed Use and Open Space (PC48)

·   Plan Change 49 Drury East (Fulton Hogan Ltd) to rezone 184ha of land east of Drury township to Terrace Housing and Apartment Building, Mixed Housing Urban, Mixed Housing Suburban and Mixed Use (PC49)

·   Plan Change 50 Waihoehoe (Oyster Capital Ltd) to rezone 49ha of land east of Drury township to Terrace Housing and Apartment Building (PC50)

·   Plan Change 51 Drury 2 Precinct (Karaka & Drury Ltd) to rezone 24 ha of land west of Drury township to Town Centre, Terrace Housing and Apartment Building and Mixed Housing Urban (PC51)

·   Plan Change 61 Waipupuke (Lomai Properties Ltd) to rezone 56 ha of land west of Drury township to Neighbourhood Centre, Terrace Housing and Apartment Building and Mixed Housing Urban (PC61)

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Decision-makers on a private plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan must consider local boards’ views on the plan changes, if the relevant local boards choose to provide their views.

3.       Each local board has a responsibility to communicate the interests and preferences of people in its area on Auckland Council policy documents, including private plan changes.  A local board can present local views and preferences when expressed by the whole local board.

4.       Seven private plan changes have been lodged with Auckland Council to urbanise land in Drury-Opāheke earmarked as Future Urban.  This report is seeking local board views in relation to the following five plan changes in Drury-Opāheke:

a.  PC48 Drury Central (Kiwi Property Ltd) to rezone 95ha of land east of Drury township to Metropolitan Centre, Mixed Use and Open Space

b.  PC49 Drury East (Fulton Hogan Ltd) to rezone 184ha of land east of Drury township to Terrace Housing and Apartment Building, Mixed Housing Urban, Mixed Housing Suburban and Mixed Use

c.  PC50 Waihoehoe (Oyster Capital Ltd) to rezone 49ha of land east of Drury township to Terrace Housing and Apartment Building

d.  PC51 Drury 2 Precinct (Karaka & Drury Ltd) to rezone 24 ha of land west of Drury township to Town Centre, Terrace Housing and Apartment Building and Mixed Housing Urban.

e.  PC61 Waipupuke (Lomai Properties Ltd) to rezone 56 ha of land west of Drury township to Neighbourhood Centre, Terrace Housing and Apartment Building and Mixed Housing Urban.

5.       Plan Changes 48, 49 and 50 are referred to as the ‘Drury East plan changes’ in this report.

6.       Plan Changes 51 and 61 are referred to as the ‘Drury West plan changes’ in this report.

7.       The Plan Changes are located on greenfields land zoned Future Urban.  Auckland Council’s Future Urban Land Supply Strategy 2017 (‘FULSS’) sequences the release of greenfield land for urban development. 

8.       The FULSS intends the Drury area west of SH1 and north of SH 22 to be development ready from 2022, and the remainder of the Drury-Opāheke structure plan area (including the Drury East plan change areas) is to be development ready by between 2028 and 2032.

9.       The zonings proposed by the plan changes are broadly consistent with the land uses outlined in the Drury-Opāheke Structure Plan prepared by council in 2019, including the development of two centres located either side of SH1 (Drury Central in PC48 and Drury West in PC51).

10.     The number of submissions and further submissions on the plan changes are summarised in Table 1 below:

Table 1: Number of submissions and further submissions received

 

Plan Change

Submissions

Further submissions

PC48 Drury Central

35

10

PC49 Drury East

49

9

PC50 Waihoehoe

35

10

PC51 Drury 2 Precinct

42

14

PC61 Waipupuke

29

Notified 9 April 2021.
Submissions close 23 April 2021.

 

11.     The key themes raised in the submissions include the funding and timing of infrastructure upgrades required to support urbanisation of these sites, the appropriateness and the location of various zonings and amendments to the precinct plans. The full list of key themes for PCs 48 – 51 and 61 is provided in this report. 

12.     This report is the mechanism for the local board to resolve and provide its views on plan changes 48 – 51 and 61. Staff do not recommend what view the local board should convey.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Local Board:

a)      provide local board views on private plan changes 48 – 51 and 61 relating to Future Urban zoned land in Drury-Opāheke

b)      appoint a local board member to speak to the local board views at hearings on private plan changes 48 – 51 and 61

c)      delegate authority to the chairperson of Papakura Local Board to make a replacement appointment in the event the local board member appointed in resolution b) is unable to attend the private plan change hearing.

 

Horopaki

Context

13.     Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of Auckland Council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards provide their views on the content of these documents.  Decision-makers must consider local boards’ views when deciding the content of these policy documents.

14.     A private plan change request will be included in the Auckland Unitary Plan if it is approved. Local boards must have the opportunity to provide their views on private plan change requests – when an entity other than council proposes a change to the Auckland Unitary Plan. 

15.     If the local board chooses to provide its views, the planner includes those views in the hearing report. Local board views are included in the analysis of the private plan change, along with submissions.

16.     If appointed by resolution, local board members may present the local board’s views at the hearing to commissioners, who decide on the private plan change requests.

17.     This report provides an overview of the private plan changes, and a summary of submissions’ key themes. 

18.     The report does not recommend what the local board should convey, if the local board conveys its views on the plan changes. The planner must include any local board views in the evaluation of the private plan changes. The planner cannot advise the local board as to what its views should be, and then evaluate those views.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Requests

19.     Three private plan change requests to the AUP have been lodged by Kiwi Property No. 2 Ltd. (Kiwi Property), Fulton Hogan Land Development (Fulton Hogan) and Oyster Capital (Oyster) in Drury East that will collectively rezone approximately 330 ha of land in the Drury East area.

20.     Two private plan change requests to the AUP has been lodged in Drury West by Karaka and Drury Ltd (Karaka and Drury) and Lomai Properties Ltd (Lomai Properties) that will collectively rezone approximately 80 ha of land in Drury West area.

21.     The proposed zonings of the five private plan changes are outlined below:

Plan Change 48 Drury Central (Kiwi Property)

·        Approx. 35 ha Metropolitan Centre zone located on the eastern side of the Southern motorway, south of the Drury interchange. A mainstreet is identified, along with a number of future public open spaces.

·        Approx. 51.5 ha Mixed Use area surrounding the Metropolitan Centre that provides for a mix of residential and complementary employment activities.

·        Approx. 8.5 ha Open Space zone adjoining the Hingaia Stream.

Plan Change 49 Drury East (Fulton Hogan)

·        Approx. 22 ha Terrace Housing and Apartment Building (THAB) zoning adjoining Waihoehoe Road closest to the Drury Centre and future public transport.

·        Approx. 65 ha Mixed Housing Urban zoning within the mid-portion of the site.

·        Approx. 95 ha Mixed Housing Suburban zoning at the southern end of the site, to provide a transition to rural activities and to respond to the greater distance from the Drury Centre and future public transport.

·        Approx. 2 ha Business: Mixed Use zoning (to facilitate a local centre). 

Plan Change 50 Waihoehoe (Oyster Capital)

·        Approx. 49 ha THAB zoning, split into two precincts, with an 11ha precinct adjoining Waihoehoe Road closest to the Drury Centre and future public transport and the remaining area subject to amended coverage controls (for stormwater purposes).

Plan Change 51 Drury 2 Precinct (Karaka & Drury Ltd)

·        Approx. 15.5ha Town Centre zoning located north of State Highway 22 and west of Burberry Road.

·        Approx. 14ha THAB zoning adjacent to the proposed Town Centre

·        Approx. 4.5ha Mixed Housing Urban zoning at the northern extent of the site, aligning with the zoning pattern within the Drury 1 Precinct located north of the plan change area.

Plan Change 61 Waipupuke (Lomai Properties Ltd)

·        Approx. 2.02 ha of Business: Neighbourhood Centre zoning

·        Approx. 27.52 ha of Residential: Terraced Housing and Apartment Building zoning

·        Approx. 21.20 ha of Residential: Mixed Housing Urban zoning

·        Open space networks are intended to be developed, with approximately 4.79 ha proposed to be zoned for parks and stormwater reserves.

22.     The location of the plan changes and proposed zoning arrangements are depicted in Figure 1 below.

Figure 1: Drury Plan Changes 48-51 and 61

 

 

Local and regional planning context

23.     The Auckland Plan seeks that most of Auckland's anticipated population and dwelling growth over the next 30 years be within the existing urban area. The remaining development is anticipated to occur in future urban areas and in rural areas. The AUP identifies approximately 15,000 hectares of rural land for future urbanisation with the potential to accommodate approximately 137,000 dwellings and 67,000 jobs.

24.     The Council’s Future Urban Land Supply Strategy 2017 (FULSS) sequences the release of future urban land with the supply of infrastructure over 30 years for the entire Auckland region. The intended staging for growth in Drury-Opāheke set out in the FULSS is:

·    Drury west of SH 1 and north of SH 22 is to be development ready from 2022

·    the remainder of the Drury-Opāheke structure plan area (including all three Drury East private plan change areas) is to be development ready by between 2028 and 2032.

In this context development ready means that urban zoning and bulk infrastructure is provided.

25.     The FULSS timing reflects a range of matters, including assumptions about the likely timing of upgrades of key regional transport networks (State Highway, Mill Road, rail network). The strategy was prepared in 2017 to inform the staging of the release of greenfields land in a manner that enables efficient provision and funding of network infrastructure across the whole Auckland region (which is financed and funded by public agencies).

26.     The three Drury East private plan change requests, if made operative this year, would likely result in development occurring earlier than the 2028 timing set out in the FULSS.

27.     In 2019, the Council adopted the Drury-Opāheke Structure Plan (see Figure 2 below). The structure plan covers a total area of 1,921ha.  Over 30 years the structure plan is estimated to provide room for about 22,000 houses and 12,000 jobs, with a build out population of about 60,000. It also indicates a substantial centre at Drury East, another large centre at Drury West and large areas of housing to the east and west of the motorway.

 Figure 2: Drury-Opāheke Structure Plan

28.     In terms of land use, the 5 private plan change requests are largely aligned with the Drury-Opāheke Structure Plan in making provision for housing and businesses.

29.     Through the Te Tupu Ngātahi / Supporting Growth Alliance (or SGA), Auckland Transport (AT) and Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) have prepared business cases identifying a series of preferred transport network upgrades and interventions to support growth in the south, including Drury East and West. 

30.     In the Drury West area, the following projects have been identified by the SGA to support future growth and are of particular relevance to PC51 and PC61:

·    a new rail station at Drury West with a park and ride facility

·    a connector bus network

·    upgrade of Karaka Road/State Highway 22

·    upgrade of Karaka Road/State Highway 22 / Oira Road intersection

·    upgrade of Karaka Road/State Highway 22 / Jesmond Road intersection

·    upgrade of Jesmond Road and Oira Road to urban arterial and collector road standards respectively.

31.     In the Drury East area, the following projects have been identified by the SGA to support future growth and are of particular relevance to PC48 - 50:

·    a new train station (Drury Central)

·    upgrade of Waihoehoe Road

·    a new road link to the north (Opāheke north-south).

·    Mill Road extension

·    Brookfield Road connected to Quarry Road

·    upgrade of Fitzgerald Road

·    Pitt Road extension to provide additional local connectivity over the motorway corridor

·    Great South Road developed as a Frequent Transit Network route

·    walking and cycling improvements. 

32.     To plan and route protect the preferred transport network, the Drury Arterials Network Notice of Requirement (NoR) has been lodged with Council and assessment is underway. This NoR package involves the following projects:

·     To provide for widening the existing State Highway 22 from State Highway 1 (SH1) to Oira Creek to a four-lane arterial with active transport facilities.

·     Upgrade Jesmond Road and Waihoehoe Road West to a four lane Frequent Transit Network arterial with active transport facilities.

·     Upgrade Waihoehoe Road east of Fitzgerald Road to Drury Hills Road to a two-lane arterial with separated active transport facilities

·     Upgrade Waihoehoe Road east of Fitzgerald Road to Drury Hills Road to a two-lane arterial with separated active transport facilities

·     Widen sections of Ponga Road and Ōpāheke Road to two lane arterials with active transport facilities, and to upgrade the Ōpāheke Road / Settlement Road intersection

33.     KiwiRail in partnership with SGA is continuing with consultations on the proposed locations of the Drury Central and Drury West rail stations. SGA is also continuing to work on confirming the preferred Mill Road corridor alignment.

 

 

Submissions

 

34.     Four of the five plan changes were notified concurrently on 27 August 2020, with an extended submission timeframe of 40 working days, closing on 22 October 2020. Plan Change 61 was notified on 28 January 2021 and submissions closed on 1 March 2021.

35.     The number of submissions and further submissions on the plan changes are summarised in Table 2 below:

Table 2: Number of submissions and further submissions received

Plan Change

Submissions

Further submissions

Support or support w/ amendments

Decline or amend

Neutral/not specified

Withdrawn

Total

PC48 Drury Central

25

8

2

0

35

10

PC49 Drury East

35

12

2

0

49

9

PC50 Waihoehoe

26

8

1

0

35

10

PC51 Drury West

32

8

2

0

42

14

PC61 Waipupuke

11

14

3

1

29

Notified 9 April 2021

36.     The key themes arising from submissions on the Drury East (PC48-50) plan changes are:

For PC48-50

·    8 submissions received in full support of PC48, 11 were received in full support for PC49, 6 were received in full support for PC50

·    Several parties have concerns around the funding and timing of infrastructure upgrades required to support urbanisation of these sites, particularly transport

·    Ensuring servicing of area with utilities, and protection of network utility operator interests

·    Consistency with the National Policy Statement on Urban Development – heights and densities provided for

·    Quality urban design outcomes sought, especially for the metropolitan centre

·    Detailed comments on the transport-related provisions made by AT and NZTA

·    Questions over the workability of provisions linking development trip generation to trigger transport upgrades

·    Location/amount of open space, and width of riparian margins

·    Amendments to precinct plans – particularly the indicative railway station location and the need for ‘Access A’

·    Mitigating flooding within the plan change areas so that it doesn’t increase effects on upstream or downstream sites

·    A few seeking to extend the boundaries of the plan change areas to cover other land

·    Two iwi submissions on each PC seeking consultation, sustainability and cultural type relief

 

PC48 only

 

·     Some seeking lower order centre zone than Metropolitan, or a review of amount of centre zoning to be provided, due to effects on other centres

 

PC49 only

·     Location of Mill Road uncertain – how to integrate this with the plan change

 

·     Several submissions seek to replace business mixed use zone with local/neighbourhood centre zone

 

37.     The key themes arising from submissions on PC51 are:

·    21 submissions received in full support of PC51 for high level general reasons – e.g. promotes sustainable management, achieves purpose of RMA

·    Several parties have concerns around the funding and timing of infrastructure upgrades required to support urbanisation of this site

·    The appropriate zoning and density for the PC area is dependent on the location of the future Drury West rail station, which is not yet confirmed

·    Questions raised over whether the town centre zone is appropriate

·    Amendments to the precinct plan sought – to elements like road layout and typologies, intersections, and parks

·    Detailed comments on the transport provisions made by AT and NZTA

·    Whether the riparian margin standard should be 10m or 20m planting

·    Two iwi submissions seeking consultation, sustainability and cultural type relief

38.     The key themes arising from submissions on PC61 are:

·     1 submission received in full support of PC61 and 10 submissions received in support subject to amendments

·     Several parties have asked Auckland Council to take over the plan change process and include extend the plan change area

·     Concerns have been raised regarding the funding and timing of infrastructure upgrades required to support urbanisation of this site

·     Concerns over the lack of certainty of infrastructure provision and the potential impacts of the proposed infrastructure on other landowners 

·     Questions raised over whether the extent of the neighbourhood centre zone is appropriate

·     Amendments to the precinct and precinct plans sought to address a range of issues including heritage, stormwater, and infrastructure.

·     Amendments sought to objectives, policies, standards and activity rules in the precinct in relation to the underlying Neighbourhood Centre, Terraced Housing and Apartment Building and Open Space zones

·     Detailed comments on the transport provisions made by AT and NZTA

39.     Auckland Council has submitted on all five plan changes, with the key themes in Auckland Council’s submissions being:

·    The plan changes do not provide for the strategic integration of infrastructure (transport, three waters, and community infrastructure), and the planning and funding of such infrastructure, with land use.

·    The plan changes are inconsistent with various planning instruments (such as the AUP Regional Policy Statement and the National Policy Statement on Urban Development) as suitable infrastructure funding and financing solutions have not been found.  

40.     Information on individual submissions, and the summary of all decisions requested by submitters, is available from council’s website.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

41.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·    to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

42.     The local board could consider if the private plan changes:

·    will reduce, increase or have no effect on Auckland’s overall greenhouse gas emissions (e.g. does it encourage car dependency, enhance connections to public transit, walking and cycling or support quality compact urban form)

·    prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change. That is, do the proposed private plan changes elevate or alleviate climate risks (e.g. flooding, coastal and storm inundation, urban heat effect, stress on infrastructure).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

43.     Auckland Transport have canvassed their views through submissions on the five plan changes.  The primary issues raised by Auckland Transport across its five submissions are:

·    Sequencing of growth and alignment with the provision of transport infrastructure and services, including the lack of infrastructure funding to support out of sequence development

·    Cumulative effects of developments enabled by the Drury plan changes as a whole, and the need to address transport network mitigations associated with incremental urbanisation across fragmented land ownership patterns.

·    Development triggers and the provisions of transport upgrades and mitigation

·    Land use integration with public transport networks

·    Location of Drury Centre rail station and associated Park-and-Ride / station plaza

·    Noise mitigation.

44.     Watercare Services Limited has also made submissions on the five plan changes, with some of the main themes being:

·    Ensuring that development within the plan changes does not precede the delivery of bulk infrastructure, particularly the Southern Wastewater Network projects and longer-term upgrades including:

Upsizing the Drury South Pump Station and rising main,

Upsizing the Bremner Road Pump Station;

Further upsizing or replacement of the Hingaia Pump Station and installation of a second new rising main

·    Managing adverse effects of subdivision and development on the operation of infrastructure, including reverse sensitivity effects

·    Ensuring that servicing requirements for the plan change proposals are technically feasible and can be adequately met

·    The funding, delivery and timing of the proposed infrastructure is managed through appropriate precinct provisions

45.     Auckland Transport and Watercare Services Limited will have the opportunity to speak to their views if required at a hearing.

46.     Healthy Waters are part of Council’s internal review team and will assess relevant submissions and provide expert input into the hearing report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

47.     The private plan change requests do not relate to public land for which the local board has decision-making powers.

48.     Factors the local board may wish to consider in formulating its view:

·    interests and preferences of people in local board area

·    well-being of communities within the local board area

·    local board documents, such as local board plan, local board agreement

·    responsibilities and operation of the local board.

49.     This report is the mechanism for obtaining formal local board views. The decision-maker will consider local board views, if provided, when deciding on the private plan change.    

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

50.     The applicants for the Drury East plan changes advised council that they have engaged with mana whenua between 2017 – 2019 prior to lodgement of the plan change.  This has included round table discussions, site visits, cultural values reports, and a trip to identify a pa site.  This consultation has involved the following iwi groups:

Ngāti Te Ata*

Ngāti Tamaoho*

Te Ākitai Waiohua*

Ngaitai ki Tamaki*

Ngaati Whanaunga

Waikato Tainui

*Cultural Values Assessments submitted alongside PC48-50.

51.       Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua and Ngāti Tamaoho submitted on the Drury East plan changes.  The main issues raised were ongoing iwi participation, consultation and engagement in the project, mauri of wai in the area, use of native trees, incorporation of Te Aranga design principles, riparian margin width, stormwater treatment and capture, accounting for natural and cultural landscaping.

52.     The applicant for PC51 Drury 2 Precinct advised council that they have engaged in monthly hui and a site visit with iwi, but have relied on the Cultural Values Assessments prepared in support of the Drury-Ōpāheke Structure Plan rather than seek bespoke assessments for this plan change.  This consultation has involved the following iwi groups:

f.   Ngāti Te Ata

g.  Te Akaitai Waiohua

h.  Ngāti Tamaoho

53.     Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua and Ngāti Tamaoho submitted on PC51 and both oppose the plan change on the basis that there has been no meaningful engagement with Mana Whenua. Aside from consultation, relief is also sought on several sustainability, environmental and cultural matters.

54.     The applicant for PC61 advised council that they have engaged in substantive engagement with iwi prior to lodgement of the plan change and have formed a strong positive relationship. Letters from Ngāti Tamaoho and Ngāti Te Ata have been received by council which confirm their partnership with the applicant and their on-going involvement in the plan change process. No submissions were received from iwi.

55.     Iwi authorities were provided direct notice of the five plan changes upon notification.

56.     The hearing report will include analysis of Part 2 of the Resource Management Act which requires that all persons exercising RMA functions shall take into account the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi/Te Tiriti o Waitangi.[1] 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

57.     There are no financial implications with the local board providing its views.

58.     The local board is not exposed to any financial risk from providing its views.

59.     The cost associated with processing these private plan change requests are recoverable from the applicants. The impacts of development associated with the private plan change requests on infrastructure (and any associated funding/financing issues) is a matter that will be addressed in the hearing reports and at the hearing.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

60.     There is a risk that the local board will be unable to provide its views and preferences on the plan changes, if it doesn’t pass a resolution. This report provides:

·    the mechanism for the Local Board to express its views and preferences

·    the opportunity for a local board member to speak at the hearings.

61.     If the local board chooses not to pass a resolution at this business meeting, these opportunities are foregone.

62.     The power to provide local board views regarding the content of a private plan change cannot be delegated to individual local board member(s).[2]  This report enables the whole local board to decide whether to provide its views and, if so, to determine what matters those views should include.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

63.     The planner will include, and report on, any resolution of the local board in the hearing reports. The local board member appointed to speak to the local board’s views will be informed of the hearing date and invited to the hearing for that purpose. 

64.     The planner will advise the local board of the decision on the private plan change requests by memorandum.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jimmy Zhang - Planner

Authorisers

Warren Maclennan - Manager - Planning, Regional, North, West & Islands

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Papakura Local Board

05 May 2021

 

 

Local board consultation feedback and input into the 10-year Budget 2021-2031

File No.: CP2021/04330

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report                                                                 

1.       To summarise consultation feedback from the Papakura Local Board area on the:

·    proposed priorities, activities and advocacy initiatives for the Papakura local board agreement 2021/2022. 

·    regional topics for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

2.       To recommend any local matters to the Governing Body, that they will need to consider or make decisions on in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 process.

3.       To seek input on the proposed regional topics in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

4.       Local board agreements set out annual funding priorities, activities, budgets, levels of service, performance measures and advocacy initiatives for each local board area. Local board agreements for 2021/2022 will be included in the Council’s 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

5.       Auckland Council publicly consulted from 22 February to 22 March 2021 to seek community views on the proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031. This included consultation on the Papakura Local Board’s proposed priorities for 2021/2022, and advocacy initiatives for 2021-2031 to be included in their local board agreement.

6.       Auckland Council received 19,965 submissions in total across the region and 483 submissions from the Papakura local board area.

7.       61% of local submitters support all or most of the Papakura local board local priorities and advocacy items for 2021/2022. 

8.       Five mana whenua iwi gave feedback on the Papakura local board priorities, all in support.

9.       In the 10-year Budget process there are matters where local boards provide recommendations to the Governing Body, for consideration or decision-making. This includes:  

·    any new/amended business improvement district targeted rates

·    any new/amended local targeted rate proposals 

·    proposed locally driven initiative capital projects outside local boards’ decision-making responsibility

·    release of local board specific reserve funds

·    any local board advocacy initiatives.

The Governing Body will consider these items as part of the 10-year Budget decision-making process in May/June 2021.

10.     Local boards have a statutory responsibility to provide input into regional strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. This report provides an opportunity for the local board to provide input on council’s proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      receive consultation feedback on the proposed Papakura Local Board priorities and activities for 2021/2022 and key advocacy initiatives for 2021-2031.

b)      receive consultation feedback on regional topics in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 from people and organisations based in the Papakura local board area.

c)      recommend any new or amended Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rates to the Governing Body.

d)      recommend any new or amended local targeted rate proposals to the Governing Body.

e)      recommend that the Governing Body approves any proposed locally driven initiative (LDI) capital projects, which are outside local boards’ allocated decision-making responsibility.

f)       approve its advocacy initiatives for inclusion (as an appendix) to its 2021/2022 Local Board Agreement

g)      recommend the release of local board specific reserve funds to the Governing Body.

h)      provide input on regional topics in the proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031 to the Governing Body.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     Each financial year Auckland Council must have a local board agreement (as agreed between the Governing Body and the Papakura Local Board) for each local board area. This local board agreement reflects priorities in the Papakura Local Board Plan 2020 through local activities, budgets, levels of service, performance measures and advocacy initiatives.

12.     The local board agreements 2021/2022 will form part of the Auckland Council’s 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

13.     Auckland Council publicly consulted from 22 February to 22 March 2021 to seek community views on the proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031, as well as local board priorities and proposed advocacy initiatives to be included in the local board agreement 2021/2022.

14.     Due to the impacts of the ongoing COVID-19 global pandemic, significant pressure has been placed upon the council’s financial position. This has created significant flow on effects for the council’s proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031, in particular in the first three years.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     This report includes analysis of consultation feedback, any local matters to be recommended to the Governing Body and seeks input on regional topics in the proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

Consultation feedback overview 

16.     As part of the public consultation Auckland Council used a variety of methods and channels to reach and engage a broad cross section of Aucklanders to gain their feedback and input into regional and local topics.    

17.     In total, Auckland Council received feedback from 19,965 people in the consultation period. This feedback was received through:

·    written feedback – 18,975 hard copy and online forms, emails and letters.

·    in person – 607 pieces of feedback through 61 Have Your Say events (38 in person and 23 online webinars), one of which was held in the Papakura Local Board area, and two independently managed phone interviews.

·    Due to the Covid-19 lockdowns 26 events were affected (either cancelled, postponed or moved to an online platform).

·    social media – 78 pieces of feedback through Auckland Council social media channels.

·    483 submissions were received from people living in the Papakura Local Board area.

18.     All feedback will be made available on the Auckland Council website at akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/hub-page/10-year-budget-2021-2031.

 

19.     The tables below show the source of submissions for the Papakura Local Board area.

·        The majority of submissions were received online and from individuals.

·        Submissions from people in Papakura made up 2.5 percent of total submissions (currently 3.7 percent of Auckland’s total population)

20.     The tables and graphs below indicate the demographic categories people identified with. This information only relates to those submitters who provided demographic information.  Of the 483 submissions received for the Papakura Local Board area:

·    442 provided their ethnicity

·    358 provided their age

 

Feedback received on the Papakura Local Board’s priorities for 2021/2022 and key advocacy initiatives

21.     The Papakura Local Board consulted on the following priorities for 2021/2022:

·    Priority 1: Continue to work with the Papakura Commercial Project Group to plan and support continued development of the town centre and immediate surrounds, to develop Papakura’s future as a vibrant metropolitan centre

·    Priority 2: Invest in community-led arts, event and multi-generational activities, which use and celebrate our parks and open spaces and promote health, movement and discovery for all age groups.  We want to bring people together to meet and have fun at no cost

·    Priority 3: Work in partnership with Māori to develop an annual Waitangi Day event in Papakura, as well as opportunities for Matariki and Māori Language Week Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori celebrations and activities.

22.     The Papakura Local Board also consulted on the following key advocacy initiatives:

·    Initiative 1: Seek Panuku support to progress Papakura as a future vibrant metropolitan centre (as identified in the Auckland Unitary Plan).  This will ensure Papakura develops over time into a larger commercial and retail centre on a key transport hub to support residential growth in surrounding areas

·    Initiative 2: Advocate to Auckland Transport to develop additional park-and-ride capacity, an expanded bus interchange and other actions such as an on-demand bus service, to manage car park demand at the Papakura train station

·    Initiative 3: Advocate to the Governing Body for additional funding, including the reinstatement of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund, to continue the development of the shared walking and cycling pathways from Elliot St to Pescara Point and the Hunua Trail.

23.     363 submissions were received on Local Board’s priorities for 2021/2031 and key advocacy initiatives.

Local board priorities

24.     The majority of local respondents supported either most of the priorities (39 percent) or all of the priorities (22 percent).

25.     The graph below depicts the responses on the local board priorities

26.     Five mana whenua iwi gave feedback on the local priorities.  All were in support of the local priorities.

27.     Mana whenua iwi feedback was as follows:

·    Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust

·    support all priorities

·    Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

·    support all priorities

·    Ngaati Whanaunga

·    support all priorities

·    particular support for community led arts, events and activities

·    suggested to collaborate with other areas on proposed events for Waitangi Day, Matariki and Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori

·    Ngāti Te Whakakitenga o Waikato Incorporated

·    support all priorities

·    Ngāti Tamaoho

·    support all priorities

·    suggestion to co-ordinate with other areas on Waitangi Day, Matariki and Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori eg: Otara

·    would like to know about youth activities and initiatives given the high Māori demographic

·    suggestion for an employment broker to take advantage of proximity to new areas of housing development

·    would like to see more emphasis on employment and growth projects, programmes and initiatives

28.     All mana whenua iwi requested follow up contact to discuss opportunities for working together to achieve mutually beneficial outcomes.

29.     Six mataawaka organisations gave feedback on the local priorities.  Key points from their submissions included:

·    Kootuitui ki Papakura:

·    support all priorities

·    would like to see more no cost events

·    liked the recent art project with photos rangatahi in mainstreet – would like to see more of this type of installation using whanau

·    suggestion for transport to enable access to Bruce Pulman Park

·    suggestion to celebrate all language weeks and events that represent all cultures eg Diwali

·    comments around train station/buses/parking at north end of CBD

·    supportive of walkways linking to Papakura town centre, and to include lighting with paths wide enough for multiple users

·    acknowledge ‘The Corner’, however would like more activities needed for rangatahi eg: free fitness gym, youth centre, run by rangatahi, for rangatahi

·    would like events and facilities for whanau who are not part of churches or Papakura Marae

·    support for local charities working with community, and for council to us and promote the YourPapakura website.

·    Auckland Mataatua Society (Mataatua Marae):

·    supports local priority ‘work in partnership with Māori to develop an annual Waitangi Day event in Papakura, as well as opportunities for Matariki and Māori Language Week Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori celebrations and activities’.

·    Te Kotahi a Tāmaki:

·    supports local priority ‘work in partnership with Māori to develop an annual Waitangi Day event in Papakura, as well as opportunities for Matariki and Māori Language Week Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori celebrations and activities’.

·    Te Roopu Waiora:

·    request to develop a strategy to ensure whanau haua (whanau with disabilities) can access the communications, forums and community services and facilities that the local board is responsible for

·    ensure cultural views and approaches are explored and adopted to ensure diverse communities with disabilities are considered in local board planning

·    encourage improvements to social procurement to encourage improved cultural and disability competence of local businesses, suppliers and government agencies.

·    The Cause Collective:

·    support all local priorities

·    request council owned land is set aside for regenerative urban farming

·    request support for marae led initiatives into the circular economy and technology spaces

·    request social procurement pipelines from neighbourhoods to local industry – connecting local talent to jobs of the future

·    request revitalisation of local green and blue spaces and a regenerative local food system.

·    Whenua Warrior:

·    Supports all priorities

·    Would like more focus on projects that promote food resilience and community level options to increase food sustainability, such as community gardens and food related projects in the town centre and elsewhere.

30.     Consultation feedback on local board priorities will be considered by the local board when approving their local board agreement between the 14-18 June 2021. Local board key advocacy initiatives will be considered in the current report.

Key themes relating to the local board priorities

31.     Key themes of note across the feedback received (through written and in-person channels) included:

·    Support for creating a vibrant town centre / Metropolitan centre

·    A query about the purpose of the Papakura Commercial Projects Group and what it has achieved

·    Support for the Papakura train station park and ride and frustration that it hasn’t eventuated yet

·    Comments about public transport eg: empty buses, reliability of the service, connecting to trains

·    Not a need for a Papakura Waitangi Day event – there are other events people can attend

·    Given the amount of growth – a comment that Papakura is being short-changed on infrastructure

·    Comments about the pandemic and hardship being experienced

·    A desire to see all residents benefit, including those with disabilities and in less affluent areas

·    Commentary around intensification, houses close together and narrow roads

·    Comments about crime and safety

·    Comments questioning building cycleways that won’t be used / others saying there is a need for cycle lanes

·    Support for partnering with Māori / other comments that didn’t agree with singling out Māori

·    Some saw events such as Matariki as nice to haves and rather requested investment in parks and the community

·    Comments about the poor maintenance of road surfaces

Local board Advocacy

32.     Key themes relating to the local board advocacy points were:

Central government

·    Housing

·    Social housing - infrastructure to be in place to support social housing

·    Homelessness

·    Food security

·    Crime and safety / policing

·    Hospital / access to medical services / mental health

Growth and development

·    Roading infrastructure

·    Cycleways

·    Opposing on-road cycleways

·    Did not support cycleways that did not connect

·    Unitary Plan

·    allowing for developments with little or no parking

·    Narrow roads

·    Developments with no on road parking

·    Planning for quality developments – concern that the current intensification and urban design is creating future slums

·    Comments about infrastructure supporting social housing developments

·    Growth - concern over council having to pay for wider infrastructure, eg:  water, stormwater and sewage – developer should pay or central government should help

·    Infrastructure to be in place before development

·    Retaining elite soils for food production rather than allowing urban sprawl.

 

Transport

·    Congestion is seen as a major issue that needs addressing

 

Public transport

·    Fares to be kept at an affordable level – several people commented that the fares are too high already

·    Public Transport needs to be easily accessible and affordable

·    Smaller buses or vans that connect into the rail network rather than the big buses currently used

·    Park and ride – comments that the park and ride is desperately needed at Papakura train station.  Several comments about the provision of free all day car parking near the train station

·    Chose better berm trees that are suited to growing on the berm

Rates

·    Rates increase not supported

·    Council needs to live within its means

·    Incomes have dropped - businesses are struggling and cannot afford a rates increase

Rubbish

·    Requests for rubbish to be part of rates – did not like the user pays ticket approach

·    Illegal dumping

·    Council providing a green waste service

·    Teach zero waste in schools

Governance

·    Ability to create Māori wards not supported

·    Climate change not seen as council core business

Asset sales

·    Support for the partial sale of airport shares

·    The sale of any reserve land was not supported

Council Services

·    Noise control processes inadequate and unresponsive

·    Dog control processes and registrations costly for people already struggling

Requests for local funding

33.     There were no requests for specific local funding. However, the Bruce Pulman Park submission requested additional funding for its operational costs.

 

Overview of feedback received on regional topics in the 10-year Budget from the Papakura Local Board area

34.     The proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031 sets out Auckland Council’s priorities and how to pay for them. Consultation on the proposed 10-year Budget asked submitters to respond to five key questions on:

1.   The proposed investment package

2.   Climate change

3.   Water quality

4.   Community investment

5.   Rating policy.

35.     The submissions received from the Papakura Local Board area on these key issues are summarised below, along with an overview of any other areas of feedback on regional proposals with a local impact.

Key Question 1: Proposed investment package

36.     Aucklanders were asked about a proposed $31 billion capital investment programme over the next ten years, allowing the council to deliver key services and renew our aging assets. The proposal includes a one-off 5 per cent average general rates increase for the 2021/2022 financial year, rather than the previously planned 3.5 per cent increase, before returning to 3.5 per cent increases over the remaining years.

37.     The proposal also includes higher borrowings in the short term, a continuation of cost savings and the sale of more surplus property. Without the greater use of rates and debt, around $900 million of investment in Auckland would be delayed from the next three years.

38.    

The graph below gives an overview of the responses from the Papakura Local Board area.

39.     Key themes included:

In support:

•     We need to recover from the pandemic

•     The impact per rate payer is relatively minor and brief.

•     Will assist with maintaining existing scheduled work and avoiding the postponement of important infrastructure upgrades

•     Auckland is rapidly growing and we need to grow with it

•     A one-off increase makes sense but is a 3.5 percent rates increase thereafter realistic

•     We need to be proactive but remember there are many people on fixed incomes or have been impacted adversely by Covid-19

Not in support:

•     Negative impacts of a rates increase on those on limited incomes

•     Council should be cutting its expenditure

•     People will understand there will be less new facilities post-Covid

•     There are too many staff numbers receiving higher salaries

•     Rates are increasing too fast

 

Key Question 2: Climate Change

40.     Aucklanders were asked about a proposal to provide additional investment to respond to climate change challenges. This includes enabling a quicker transition from diesel to cleaner electric and hydrogen buses, diverting more waste from landfill and enabling significant planting initiatives.  

41.     The graph below gives an overview of the responses from the Papakura Local Board area.

 

42.     Key themes included:

In support

•     This is important for future generations

•     We need to save the environment / planet

•     Climate change is real and we need to act now

•     We need to do more and invest further in this area

Not in support:

•     There are more important projects, ie:  infrastructure, roads, wastewater, transport, homelessness, poverty, health service, police

•     NZ is small and will make no difference on the global stage

•     Pressure the bigger countries that contribute to climate change, eg:  China, India and the USA

•     Concern around the impact on the environment regarding the process for making the electric batteries and what happens to the batteries at end of life

 

Key Question 3: Water quality

43.     Aucklanders were asked about a proposal to extend and increase the Water Quality Targeted Rate for another three years – from 2028 until 2031 – as well as increasing the targeted rate annually in line with proposed average increases in general rates. The Water Quality Targeted Rate funds projects to improve water quality in Auckland’s harbours, beaches and streams.  

44.     The graph below gives an overview of the responses from the Papakura Local Board area.

 

45.     Key themes included:

Support for an extension and the increase:

•     Clean and safe drinking water is crucial

•     NZ’s water cleanliness is very poor – the problem needs to be addressed urgently

•     Improve water quality so everyone can enjoy water activities without having to hesitate

Support for the extension only:

•     Concerns about the impact of extra water rates on households that are struggling

•     Concern that a portion of the rates increase will filter to increasing salaries

•     New housing, new subdivisions and business areas should be paying the extra cost

•     Bring back water tanks in all areas to collect run off from roofs

Not in support:

•     There are more important projects, ie:  infrastructure, roads, wastewater, transport, homelessness, poverty, health service, police

•     NZ is small and will no difference on the global stage

•     Pressure the bigger countries that contribute to climate change, eg:  China India and the USA

•     Concern around the impact on the environment regarding the process making the batteries and what happens to the batteries at end of life.

 

Key Question 4: Community investment

46.     Aucklanders were asked to provide feedback on a proposal that would see council adopt a new approach for community services to enable them to reduce building and asset maintenance related expenditure. The proposal involves consolidation of community facilities and services, increased leasing or shared facility arrangements, and an increased focus on providing multi-use facilities and online services in the future.

47.     The graph below gives an overview of the responses from the Papakura Local Board area.

 

48.     Key themes included:

In support:

•     Any measures that keep community services must be considered

•     The proposed approach will achieve improved efficiency in the provision of community facilities

•     There is a need to do something but utilise and maintain existing buildings

•     There must be community consultation if facilities are to be divested

•     Developers should be required to contribute more for infrastructure

•     Consideration should be given to ensure those who don’t have options to travel further are not negatively impacted, ie:  low income families or elderly.

Not in support:

•     Online services cannot fully replace the value of physical gathering and communication – community facilities anchor a sense of belonging and community

•     It’s council’s responsibility to provide these services

•     Privatisation results in higher consumer costs and poorer service in the long run

•     Saving money should not be the only driver as to why facilities are divested

•     Concern about accessibility if the number of facilities is reduced

 

Key Question 5: Rating policy

49.     Aucklanders were asked for their feedback on a raft of proposed rating changes impacting different properties across Auckland differently. Proposed changes also included, for example, the extension of the Natural Environment Targeted Rate until June 2031, along with options to extend the Urban Rating Area and reinstatement of the Accommodation Provider Targeted Rate.

50.     The graphs below give an overview of the responses from the Papakura Local Board area.

Natural Environment Targeted Rate proposal

 

Proposal to extend the Urban Rating Area

 

Proposal to charge farm and lifestyle properties in the Urban Rating Area residential rates

 

Proposal to extend the City Centre Targeted Rate

 

 

Proposal to introduce the Rodney Drainage Targeted Rate

 

51.     Only three submitters in the Papakura local board gave feedback on the proposal to reinstate the Accommodation Provider Targeted Rate.  Of these, two supported Option 3, while the other submitter made ‘other’ comments.

52.     Of the twelve submitters in the Papakura local board area who gave feedback on the proposal to introduce the Electricity Network Resilience Targeted Rate, five were in support, 5 did not support and 2 made ‘other’ comments.

53.     Only one submitter in the Papakura Local Board area gave feedback on the proposal Clevedon Water Connection Targeted Rate.  This submitter was in support of the proposal.

54.     270 submitters gave feedback on the proposal to introduce the Paremoremo Targeted Rate, with 28 percent overall in support of either option 1 or 2, while 36 percent not supporting either option, and the remaining 36 percent indicating they ‘don’t know’. 

 

Recommendations on local matters 

55.     This report allows the local board to recommend local matters to the Governing Body for consideration as part of the 10-year Budget process, in May 2021. This includes:

·    any new/amended business improvement district targeted rates

·    any new/amended local targeted rate proposals 

·    proposed locally driven initiative capital projects outside local boards’ decision-making responsibility

·    release of local board specific reserve funds.

·    approve its advocacy initiatives for inclusion (as an appendix) to its 2021/2022 Local Board Agreement

Local targeted rate and business improvement district (BID) targeted rate proposals

56.     Local boards are required to endorse any new or amended locally targeted rate proposals or business improvement district (BID) targeted rate proposals in their local board area. Note that these proposals must have been consulted on before they can be implemented.

57.     Local boards then recommend these proposals to the Governing Body for approval of the targeted rate.

58.     There are no proposals for targeted rates in the Papakura Local Board area for the 2021/2022 financial year.

 

Funding for Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

59.     Local boards are allocated funding for local driven initiatives (LDI) annually, to spend on local projects or programmes that are important to their communities. Local boards have decision-making over the LDI funds but need approval from the Governing Body where:

·    operational LDI funding is to be converted into capital LDI funding.

·    the release of local board specific reserve funds is requested, which are being held by the council for a specific purpose.

·    a LDI capital project exceeds $1 million.

60.     These conditions do not apply to the Papakura local board for the 2021/2022 financial year.

Local board advocacy

61.     Local boards are requested to approve any advocacy initiatives for inclusion (as an appendix) to their 2020/2021 Local Board Agreement, taking into account the consultation feedback above. This allows the Finance and Performance Committee to consider these advocacy items when making decisions on the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 in May/June. 

Local board input on regional topics in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031

62.     Local boards have a statutory responsibility for identifying and communicating the interests and preferences of the people in its local board area in relation to Auckland Council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws, and any proposed changes to be made to them. This report provides an opportunity for the local board to provide input on council’s proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

63.     Local board plans reflect community priorities and preferences and are key documents that guide the development of local board agreements (LBAs), local board annual work programmes, and local board input into regional plans such as the 10-year Budget.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

64.     The decisions recommended in this report are part of the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 and local board agreement process to approve funding and expenditure over the next 10 years.

65.     Projects allocated funding through this 10-year Budget process will all have varying levels of potential climate impact associated with them. The climate impacts of projects Auckland Council chooses to progress, are all assessed carefully as part of council’s rigorous reporting requirements.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

66.     The 10-year Budget 2021-2031 is an Auckland Council Group document and will include budgets at a consolidated group level. Consultation items and updates to budgets to reflect decisions and new information may include items from across the group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

67.     The local board’s decisions and feedback are being sought in this report. The local board has a statutory role in providing its feedback on regional plans.

68.     Local boards play an important role in the development of the council’s 10-year Budget. Local board agreements form part of the 10-year Budget. Local board nominees have also attended Finance and Performance Committee workshops on the 10-year Budget.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

69.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the 10-year Budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate the council’s responsiveness to Māori.

70.     Local board plans, developed in 2020 through engagement with the community including Māori, form the basis of local board area priorities. There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and the wider Māori community.

71.     Analysis provided of consultation feedback received on the proposed 10-year Budget includes submissions made by mana whenua and the wider Māori community who have interests in the rohe / local board area.

72.     Ongoing conversations between local boards and Māori will assist to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

73.     Some projects approved for funding could have discernible impacts on Māori. The potential impacts on Māori, as part of any project progressed by Auckland Council, will be assessed appropriately and accordingly as part of relevant reporting requirements.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

74.     This report is seeking the local board’s decisions on financial matters in the local board agreement that must then be considered by the Governing Body.

75.     The local board also provides input to regional plans and proposals. There is information in the council’s consultation material for each plan or proposal with the financial implications of each option outlined for consideration.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

76.     The council must adopt its 10-year Budget, which includes local board agreements, by 30 June 2021. The local board is required to make recommendations on these local matters for the 10-year Budget by mid May 2021, to enable and support the Governing Body to make decisions on key items to be included in the 10-year Budget on 25 May 2021.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

77.     The local board will approve its local board agreement and corresponding work programmes in June 2021.

78.     Recommendations and feedback from the local board will be provided to the relevant Governing Body committee for consideration during decision making at the Governing Body meeting.

79.     The final 10-year Budget 2021-2031 (including local board agreements) will be adopted by the Governing Body on 22 June 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Lee Manaia - Local Board Advisor

Lucy Stallworthy - Local Board Engagement Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 



[1] Resource Management Act 1991, section 8.

[2] Local Government Act 2002, Schedule 7, clause 36D.