I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Rodney Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday 19 May 2021

3.00pm

Warkworth Town Hall
21 Neville Street,
Warkworth

 

Rodney Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Phelan Pirrie

 

Deputy Chairperson

Beth Houlbrooke

 

Members

Brent Bailey

 

 

Steve Garner

 

 

Danielle Hancock

 

 

Tim Holdgate

 

 

Louise Johnston

 

 

Vicki Kenny

 

 

Colin Smith

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Robyn Joynes

Democracy Advisor

 

13 May 2021

 

Contact Telephone: +64 212447174

Email: robyn.joynes@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

Board Member

Organisation

Position

Brent Bailey

Central Shooters Inc

Auckland Shooting Club

Royal NZ Yacht Squadron

President

Member

Member

Steven Garner

Warkworth Tennis and Squash Club

Sandspit Yacht Club

Warkworth Gamefish Club

President

Member

Member

Louise Johnston

Blackbridge Environmental Protection Society

Treasurer

Vicki Kenny

International Working Holidays Ltd

Nannies Abroad Ltd

Waitemata Riding Club

National Party Helensville Electorate

Director/Owner/CEO

Director/Owner/CEO

Member

Treasurer

Danielle Hancock

Kaukapakapa Residents and Ratepayers Association

Pest Free Kaukapakapa

New Zealand Biosecurity Services Limited

Member

 

Pest Free Coordinator

Operations Manager

Tim Holdgate

Landowners Contractors Protection Association

Agricultural & Pastoral Society - Warkworth

Vice Chairman

 

Committee member

Beth Houlbrooke

Kawau Island Boat Club

Matakana Coast Trail Trust

Member

Contractor

Phelan Pirrie

Muriwai Volunteer Fire Brigade

Grow West Ltd

North West Country Incorporated

Officer in Charge

Director

Manager

Colin Smith

 

 

 


Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation: Proposed Warkworth South Plan Change                                   5

8.2     Deputation: Proposed Warkworth Heritage Groups Concept                        6

8.3     Deputation: Mahurangi Sport and Recreation Collective                                6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Renewal and variation of non-exclusive licences to occupy to Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated at Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve                                                                                                  9

12        Landowner approval, agreement to lease and community lease to Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated for the construction of stage one of its multi-sports facility on land at Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve, Warkworth                                                                                                                    21

13        Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate - Dairy Flat School footpath       61

14        Auckland Transport bi-monthly update on the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate - May 2021                                                                                           71

15        Approval for new public road names for subdivision at 151a Rautawhiri Road, Helensville                                                                                                                    77

16        Endorsing Business Improvement District targeted rates 2021/2022                   87

17        Economic Development Action Plan: Draft for feedback                                       95

18        Local board views on Plan Change 60 - Open Space (2020) and Other Rezoning Matters                                                                                                                        155

19        Rodney Local Board Work Programme Reallocations FY2020/2021                  165

20        Urgent Decision – feedback on Auckland Council’s submission on Transport and Infrastructure Committee inquiry into congestion pricing in Auckland             181

21        Approve the appointment a project lead for the Rodney Local Board               191

22        Rodney Ward Councillor update                                                                              199

23        Rodney Local Board workshop records                                                                 201

24        Governance forward work calendar                                                                        207

25        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 21 April 2021 and the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 5 May 2021, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Rodney Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is 10 minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation: Proposed Warkworth South Plan Change

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       David Hay from Osbornehay has requested a deputation to talk about a proposed Warkworth South plan change.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      thank Mr Hay from Osbornehay for his presentation.

 

Attachments

a          Warkworth South Plan Change draft vision document presentation........... 213

b          Warkworth South Plan Change vision introduction letter............................ 221

 

 

8.2       Deputation: Proposed Warkworth Heritage Groups Concept

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Dave Parker has requested a deputation to present the proposed Warkworth Heritage Groups concept.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      thank Mr Parker for his presentation.

 

 

 

8.3       Deputation: Mahurangi Sport and Recreation Collective

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Mahurangi Sport and Recreation Collective have requested a deputation to request and extension to their lease terms at the Warkworth Showgrounds.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      thank Nicola Jones from the Mahurangi Sport and Recreation Collective for their presentation.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

Renewal and variation of non-exclusive licences to occupy to Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated at Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve

File No.: CP2021/04503

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a renewal and variation of the non-exclusive licences to occupy to Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated at Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated has two non-exclusive licences to occupy land within the Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve for siting two port-a-coms for changing rooms and storage.

3.       The port-a-coms are an interim measure until stage two of the collective’s proposed sports complex is constructed and operational on the site. The non-exclusive licences to occupy provide for the option to renew on an annual basis at the sole discretion of the Rodney Local Board.

4.       Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated has formally applied to council to renew its two non-exclusive licences, commencing 1 March 2021. As stage two of the collective’s proposed sports complex will take a number of years to complete, staff recommends that the licence agreements are varied to extend the term of tenure from one year to two years.

5.       Additionally, that the licence renewal agreements are varied to contain an early termination clause allowing the collective three months’ notice to remove the port-a-coms, should stage two of its proposed sports complex be completed prior to the expiration of the term of the licences.

6.       This report recommends that the Rodney Local Board grant Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated a renewal and a variation of its non-exclusive licences to occupy.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      grant a renewal and variation of the two non-exclusive licences to occupy to Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated on a part of Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve legally described as Section 2 SO 509338 (Attachments A and B to the agenda report) subject to the following conditions:

i)        term - two years commencing 1 March 2021 with any further option to renew at the complete discretion of the Rodney Local Board

ii)       rent - $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded

iii)      a Tiriti o Waitangi (Treaty of Waitangi) clause will be included in the deeds of renewal and variation to record the underlying Crown ownership of the land

iv)      an early termination clause will be included in the deeds of renewal and variation allowing the collective three months’ notice to remove the port-a-coms, should stage two of its proposed sports complex be completed prior to the expiration of the term of the licences

b)      note that all other terms and conditions will be in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the operative Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve Management Plan adopted 17 June 2004.

Horopaki

Context

7.       This report considers the community occupancy issues with respect to the option to renew and vary the non-exclusive licences to occupy agreements to Mahurangi Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated on Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve.

8.       The Rodney Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing and licensing matters.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Land

9.       The Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve is located on the eastern side of State Highway One, just north of the Warkworth township.

10.     Most of the reserve is held by the Crown through the Department of Conservation and vested in Auckland Council, in trust, for recreation purposes. The parcel on which the port-a-coms are sited is classified as recreation reserve and subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977. A Tiriti o Waitangi clause will be included in the deeds of renewal and variation of the non-exclusive licences to occupy to recognise the underlying Crown ownership.

11.     The two non-exclusive licence to occupy areas each comprise 21.6 square metres (more or less) of Section 2 SO 509338 which is classified as recreation reserve. This classification supports the collective’s activities.

Warkworth Showground developments and requirement for temporary port-a-coms

12.     Featured in the Warkworth Showgrounds Development Plan is a proposed multi-sports complex. Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated’s planning phase for the proposed multi-sports (staged) complex is underway and includes a requirement for adequate changing rooms and storage.

13.     Port-a-com “one” is sited adjacent to the Mahurangi Rugby Club and provides for storage and port-a-com “two” is sited adjacent to the hockey turfs and provides for changing facilities.

14.     There are no alternative equipment storage options on-site and the only permanent changing facilities at the showgrounds are within the rugby club. These have been upgraded and are shared as scheduling allows. Utilisation of the facilities is at a premium during the winter months with rugby, football, netball and hockey all being winter sports.

15.     An additional consideration for the need for the port-a-coms is that it is inappropriate for some sports (given the mix of age and gender) to share rugby changing room spaces given the internal layout. The port-a-coms will be required until such time as permanent changing room and storage facilities are developed as part of stage two of the collective’s proposed multi-sport development. This objective is described in the collective’s strategic plan.

16.     A feasibility study completed in 2017 recommended that stage one of the multi-sport development be the gymsports facility. This will increase the storage capacity of the site for other sports but given the cost (approximately $4.75 million dollars), it is likely to be several years away.

17.     Once stage two of the collective’s proposed multi-sports complex is constructed the changing facilities for all sports will be incorporated. As such, the port-a-com buildings will no longer be required.

18.     The port-a-coms are standard structures and measure 3.6 metres in width, 6 metres in length and 2.8 metres high.

The Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective (the collective)

19.     Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated was incorporated under the Incorporated Societies Act 1908 on 26 November 2008. The collective’s objects contained within its constitution include the following:

·     to encourage and promote all sports and the welfare of sportspersons

·     to promote and encourage increased levels of physical activity and participation in community sport in the Mahurangi region

·     to promote a sense of community through physical activity and sport by the development of a central sports hub

·     to promote an umbrella organisation for all clubs to work together.

20.     At its inception in 2008, the collective comprised five founding clubs (rugby, hockey, football, netball and athletics). Since 2008, the collective has expanded its objects to focus on representing the interests of the majority of the users on the Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve. 

21.     As a result, the collective has acted as the major community advocate of the development of the Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve on behalf of several sports, initially including gymnastics, netball, hockey, soccer and rugby. Currently, the collective comprises 11 paid up member clubs which equates to approximately 2,000 members.

22.     The collective is not obliged to enter into a community outcomes plan for this occupancy arrangement. The reasons being first, that the occupancy arrangements are of a temporary nature and secondly, community outcome plans are already in place with the relevant existing lessees on the reserve that essentially, are part of the collective.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     The designated impact level of the recommended decision on greenhouse gas emissions falls within the “no impact” category because the proposal continues an existing activity and does not introduce new sources of emissions.

24.     The collective’s licence to occupy areas do not sit directly within a flood plain or flooding zone of a one-in-100 years rainstorm event by river or surface flooding (Attachment C to the agenda report).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     Staff from the parks, sport and recreation teams support the continued siting of the two port-a-coms at the Warkworth Showgrounds. These temporary buildings provide the storage facilities and changing room that support the use of the developed areas for local sport.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     The recommendations in this report support the Rodney Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes for:

a)   Infrastructure and development meet the needs of our growing communities (outcome three).

b)   Our communities are resilient and have access to what they need (outcome four).

c)   Our local parks and recreation facilities meet the needs of our growing community (outcome five).

27.     The renewal of the licences to occupy to Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated is listed on the Rodney Local Board approved 2020/2021 Community Leasing Work Programme as item 2123.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     At the Mana Whenua Forum held via Skype on 4 March 2021, staff presented to mana whenua representatives in attendance about the proposed renewal of the licences to occupy to Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective. During the presentation, mana whenua representatives did not voice any concerns with the proposal.

29.     A Tiriti o Waitangi clause will be included in the deeds of renewal and variation should Section 2 SO 509338 be subject to a tiriti claim in the future.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     There is no direct cost to council associated with this proposal.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     Should the Rodney Local Board resolve not to grant the collective a renewal and variation of the non-exclusive licences to occupy, this decision may affect the current users’ ongoing need for additional storage and change room facilities at Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Subject to the Rodney Local Board granting the renewal and variation of the non-exclusive licences to occupy, council staff will work with the collective to finalise the deeds.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Google aerial view showing licence to occupy area one

15

b

Google aerial view showing licence to occupy area two

17

c

GIS aerial view from Auckland Council's Hazard Viewer

19

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Karen Walby - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Stakeholder and Land Advisory

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

Landowner approval, agreement to lease and community lease to Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated for the construction of stage one of its multi-sports facility on land at Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve, Warkworth

File No.: CP2021/05612

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To request landowner approval, an agreement to lease and community lease to Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated for land at Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve for the purposes of constructing stage one of its multi-sports facility.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Mahurangi Community Sports Collective Incorporated has been planning the construction of its multi-purpose sports complex on Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve for several years.

3.       A feasibility study completed in 2017 recommended that the construction of the multi-purpose sports complex should be undertaken in two stages; with the gymsports facility being developed as stage one. The cost of the gymsports facility is approximately $4.75 million.

4.       The Mahurangi Community Sports Collective Incorporated has prepared its documentation for the regulatory planning and consenting phase for the proposed gymsports facility. The Mahurangi Community Sports Collective Incorporated requires landowner approval, and an agreement to lease, with a draft community lease appended, to enable the application for the necessary consents.

5.       The Mahurangi Community Sports Collective Incorporated has requested a new community lease for an initial term of 10 years with two rights of renewal for 10 years to provide security of tenure commensurate with the significant costs of construction, ongoing maintenance and renewals.

6.       The recommended term of a community lease in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 for a group-owned building is one term of 10 years with one right of renewal for 10 years.

7.       Although the guidelines standard terms and conditions inform the basis of staff recommendations, the guidelines provide that local boards may, at their discretion, choose to vary from these recommendations on a case-by-case basis.

8.       This report recommends that the Rodney Local Board grants Mahurangi Community Sports Collective Incorporated:

·    landowner approval for construction of its gymsports facility (stage one of the multi-sport development)

·    an agreement to lease to enable the Mahurangi Community Sports Collective Incorporated to apply for and obtain all necessary funding and consents and to construct its gymsports facility (stage one of the multi-sport development)

·    a draft community lease appended to the agreement to lease, with the actual lease to take effect on the date of issue of code compliance certificate and certificate of public use for the Mahurangi Community Sports Collective Incorporated’s gymsports facility.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      grant landowner approval to Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated to construct its new gymsports facility on land at Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve legally described as Section 2 SO 509338 comprising 3,084 square metres in general accordance with the plans prepared by BK Design, dated December 2020 (as indicated in Attachment A to the agenda report):

b)      grant an agreement to lease to Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated for 3,084 square metres (more or less) of land at Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve, Warkworth legally described as Section 2 SO 509338 and outlined in red (Attachment B to the agenda report) to enable construction of its new gymsports facility, subject to the following conditions:

i)        term – five years commencing 20 May 2021

ii)       Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated securing all necessary funding and letters of intent for its project prior to the commencement of works

iii)      Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated obtaining all necessary regulatory consents for its project prior to the commencement of work.

c)      grant a community lease to Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated for 3,084 square metres (more or less) of land at Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve, Warkworth legally described as Section 2 SO 509338 and outlined in red (Attachment C to the agenda report), subject to the following conditions:

i)        term - 10 years with one right of renewal for 10 years – commencing on expiry of the agreement to lease; or the date of issue of code compliance certificate/certificate of public use for the gymsports facility (whichever date is the earliest)

ii)       rent – one dollar ($1.00) per annum + GST if demanded

iii)      a Tiriti o Waitangi (Treaty of Waitangi) clause will be included to record the underlying Crown ownership of the land

iv)      a clause will be included to record the existing encumbrance over the land in favour of the Warkworth Agricultural and Pastoral Society Incorporated

d)      delegate authority to the Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson of the Rodney Local Board to approve any minor changes to Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated plans for its new gymsports facility.

Horopaki

Context

9.       This report considers the leasing and landowner matters with respect to Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated (the collective) occupation of land at Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve, Warkworth.

10.     The Rodney Local Board is the delegated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing and landowner decisions.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Land

11.     Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve is located at 2 State Highway 1, Warkworth. The underlying land is legally described as Section 2 SO 509338, held by the Department of Conservation on behalf of the Crown and vested in Auckland Council, in trust, as a classified recreation reserve. The land is subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 and the classification legally supports the proposed activities to be undertaken by way of a community lease.

12.     Similarly, the operative reserve management plan for Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve adopted 17 June 2004 contemplates a multi-purpose building. As such, there is no requirement to publicly notify the proposed new community lease to the Mahurangi Community Sports and Recreation Collective Incorporated.

13.     As is a requirement with proposed leases on Crown-owned land, any agreement to lease and new community lease would contain a Te Tiriti o Waitangi (Treaty of Waitangi) clause, should the land be required for a treaty settlement in the future. Staff engaged with key representatives for mana whenua as identified as having an interest in land in the Rodney Local Board geographical area about the collective’s proposal. Feedback from mana whenua is detailed in paragraphs 29 and 30.

14.     The majority of the land comprising the Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve is subject to an encumbrance in favour of the Warkworth Agricultural and Pastoral Society Incorporated. This allows the society to hold its annual show in January or February each year and entitles the society to exclusive use of the reserve for no more than seven days for the respective show.

15.     Additionally, all leases for any part of reserve must accommodate the encumbrance and underlying rights of the Warkworth Agricultural and Pastoral Society Incorporated. The society has provided Mahurangi Community Sports and Recreation Collective with a letter of support for the proposed multi-sport facility (Attachment D to the agenda report).

The Mahurangi Community Sports and Recreation Collective Incorporated

16.     Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated was incorporated under the Incorporated Societies Act 1908 on 26 November 2008. The collective’s objects contained within its constitution include the following:

·     to encourage and promote all sports and the welfare of sportspersons

·     to promote and encourage increased levels of physical activity and participation in community sport in the Mahurangi region

·     to promote a sense of community through physical activity and sport by the development of a central sports hub

·     to promote an umbrella organisation for all clubs to work together.

17.     In 2006, council commenced the staged development of Warkworth Showgrounds. At the inception in 2008, the collective comprised five founding clubs (rugby, hockey, football, netball and athletics). Since 2008, the collective has expanded its objectives to focus on representing the interests of the majority of the users on the Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve. 

18.     As a result, the collective has acted as the major community advocate of the development on behalf of several sports, initially including gymnastics, netball, hockey, soccer and rugby. Currently, the collective comprises 11 paid up member clubs which equates to approximately 2,000 members.

19.     In 2018, the collective voted to set up a board structure with a focus on its strategic direction. The Board comprises 12 people, all of whom have past and current involvement with sport and recreational pursuits in the Warkworth community and also bring a cross-section of skillsets to the Board.

20.     The collective is not obliged to enter into a community outcomes plan for this occupancy arrangement. The reason being that community outcome plans are already in place with the relevant existing lessees on the reserve that essentially, are part of the collective.

Landowner approval, agreement to lease and community lease

21.     Mahurangi Community Sports and Recreation Collective requires landowner approval, agreement to lease and community lease to enable it to apply for all necessary regulatory consents for its proposed gymsports facility. Each component is detailed in the table below:

Component

Description

Landowner approval

The local board grants approval for the collective to ‘use’ the land, subject to terms and conditions. In turn, landowner approval is required for the collective to implement regulatory resource and building consents once obtained.

Agreement to lease

The agreement evidences council’s and the collective’s intentions for the land which is to be set aside for a lease. The agreement contains strict conditions that must be met within a certain time frame. The agreement allows the collective time and security of tenure to seek and obtain all necessary funding and consents, then construct its gymsports facility. A draft community lease document is appended to the agreement to lease.

Community lease

The community lease proper takes effect on the expiry of the term of the agreement to lease or on the issue of code compliance certificate/certificate of public use, whichever date is the earliest.

 

Proposed gymsports facility (stage one of the multi-sport development)

22.     The construction of a gymsports facility by the collective was primarily driven by the need to provide an appropriate facility to accommodate the growing local gymsports club, which is currently using the Mahurangi College facilities. As student numbers at the college have increased, creating pressure on non-college groups to secure alternative accommodation that can house gymsports.

23.     A gymsports facility typically has space to leave its range of equipment in-situ. As such, the collective needed to consider the best site for a building footprint adequate to accommodate the equipment and with parking provided.

24.     In addition to accommodating gymsports, design plans for the gymsports facility comprise an indoor court toilet, changing facilities, an administration office and a small mezzanine kitchen (Attachment E to the agenda report). The largest court size for the game of netball has been designed so all other ‘indoor’ sports that require a court may be accommodated within the footprint.

25.     An outdoor viewing deck, bleachers and a number of storage cupboards are included in the design. The installation of the storage cupboards would mean that the current port-a-coms on the Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve can be permanently removed.

Landowner approval for the proposed gymsports facility

26.     The new multi-sport facility will provide for many other indoor court sports as well as providing for current user groups at Warkworth Showgrounds including football, basketball, equestrian sports, hockey, netball, arena spots and the dog club. It will allow for other clubs that require space to be included in the future and provide a building that can be used for events/sporting and recreational activities by the wider community.

27.     The area of construction is not currently used by any sport or recreation group but is adjacent to the rugby fields and existing rugby club.  Conditions will be placed on the landowner approval regarding (but not limited to):  

·      health and safety conditions 

·      ensuring the applicant controls rubbish at the site  

·      safety fencing during construction 

·      reinstatement of land. 

Impact of proposed gymsports facility on the Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve environs

28.     The collective is cognisant of the size of the proposed building on the currently green landscape. Landscaping will be a key part of this project to ensure the building blends into its surrounding and is aesthetically and visually pleasing

29.     To balance aesthetics with cost efficiencies and low-maintenance materials, the exterior walls will comprise approximately 60 to 70 percent textured concrete tilt-slab panels incorporating a mural/design where appropriate to reflect the Warkworth area and its history.

30.     In addition to the concrete tilt-slabs, thirty to forty percent of the building exterior will comprise vertical sheet-metal panels. Appropriate planting will ‘soften’ any impacts of the building on the Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve. 

Financing the proposed gymsports facility

31.     At its business meeting of 1 June 2018, the Rodney Local Board resolved to provide Mahurangi Community Sports and Recreation Collective Incorporated with funding in the amount of $150,000.00. This was to contribute to the costs of consents and detailed design of stage one of the collective’s proposed multi-purpose sports facility (resolution number RD/2018/83).

32.     The collective subsequently applied to the Auckland Council 2019/2020 Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund. At its business meeting of 15 October 2020, the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee resolved to fund $2.25 million to contribute towards the construction of the proposed multi-purpose sports facility (resolution number PAC/2020/56).

33.     The collective is now considering additional funding streams. The $2.25 million coupled with the grant of an agreement to lease with a community lease will enable the collective ‘leverage’ to confidently approach a variety of funding organisations.

Future plans (stage two of the multi-sport development)

34.     The collective has detailed plans for stage two of its proposed multi-sport development (Attachment F to the agenda report) in the future. The plans include an additional two indoor courts (again, factoring in the largest court size for the game of netball so all other ‘indoor’ sports that require a court may be accommodated within the footprint being basketball, badminton, pickleball, tennis and futsal). Also included in the plans are administration offices, clubrooms and a catering kitchen.

35.     Any future development of stage two will require the removal of the Mahurangi Rugby Club Incorporated’s existing clubrooms. The Mahurangi Rugby Club Incorporated currently has a community lease for the footprint of its clubrooms which commenced in October 2012 for one term of 10 years and provides for a right of renewal for 10 years.

36.     The lease agreement contains a reference that records the potential for a multi-sport building and a consequential early termination clause providing the club with 12 months notice to vacate. Conversely, the lease agreement also provides for the club to surrender its lease giving council three months written notice. Stage two plans allow for the costs involved in the removal of the Mahurangi Rugby Club’s clubrooms.

37.     The Mahurangi Rugby Club is a member of the collective and would be accommodated in any stage two development.

38.     Plans for stages one and two of the proposed multi-sports complex are contained in Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective’s resource consent application. Note that the grant of any new landowner approval, agreement to lease and community lease will be required to progress stage two.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

39.     As the collective is yet to identify a specific construction company for the facility, any potential to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from the build cannot be quantified. All materials to be used in the construction will meet current building standards and requirements in accordance with the Building Act 2004 and the Resource Management Act 1991.

40.     An obvious and tangible positive effect of constructing a multi-purpose sports complex on the Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve in terms of climate impact is that once built and operational, its primary purpose is to accommodate multi-sports and activities. Stage two of the proposed multi-sport complex will necessitate the removal of the Mahurangi Rugby Club’s existing building. Other recreational groups will be able to utilise the facility, negating the need for the proliferation of buildings on the reserve.

41.     The proposal includes tree planting which can lead to increased carbon capture, resulting in potential reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

42.     The collective’s proposed gymsports facility site sits within a flood plain which may be covered by flood water during a one-in-100 years rainstorm event.

43.     The site is not subject to other potential climate change impacts and hazards such as coastal inundation. (Attachment G to the agenda report).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

44.     Staff from council’s service strategy and implementation and park specialists and parks active recreation teams support the proposed landowner approval and agreement to lease and community lease to Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated.

45.     The proposed landowner approval and agreement to lease with draft community lease appended has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the advice in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

46.     The recommendations in this report support the Rodney Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes for:

a)   Infrastructure and development meet the needs of our growing communities (outcome three)

b)   Our communities are resilient and have access to what they need (outcome four)

c)   Our local parks and recreation facilities meet the needs of our growing community (outcome five); by providing a multi-sport facility to cater for a variety of activities and creating further capacity for sport and recreation in the Warkworth area.

47.     Within the local board’s commitments and key initiatives under outcome five, it has stated its support for the delivery of the multi-sport facility in Warkworth.

48.     The proposed landowner approval, agreement to lease and community lease to Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated is listed on the Rodney Local Board approved 2020/2021 Community Leasing Work Programme as item 3641.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

49.     Staff presented (via Skype) Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective’s proposal to mana whenua representatives in attendance at the North West Mana Whenua forum held on 4 March 2021. During the presentation, staff advised mana whenua representatives of the potential for a longer lease term (i.e.10 years with two rights of renewal for 10 years each). Iwi representatives present did not voice any concerns with the proposal.

50.     The collective engaged directly with Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Trust about its proposal for the multisports facility. Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Trust subsequently provided the collective with a comprehensive and specialist Kaitiaki Report (Attachment H to the agenda report).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

51.     There is no direct cost to council associated with the grant of landowner approval and agreement to lease documentation. Mahurangi Community Sports and Recreation Collective Incorporated will be responsible for all costs involved with its project and ongoing consequential opex.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

52.     Should the Rodney Local Board resolve not to grant the new landowner approval and agreement to lease this would preclude Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated from seeking and obtaining all necessary consents and funding to progress with its works to build its new gymsports facility.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

53.     Subject to the Rodney Local Board granting Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated the new landowner approval, agreement to lease with draft community lease attached, council staff will draft the necessary documentation for signing and sealing by the collective and subsequent execution by council.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Plan showing area for landowner approval in red

29

b

Plan showing area for agreement to lease in blue

33

c

Plan showing area for lease in red

35

d

Letter of support for Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated

37

e

Floor plan stage one

39

f

Plan showing area for stage two in green

41

g

GIS aerial view from Auckland Council's Hazard Viewer

43

h

Kaitiaki Report for the proposal

45

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Karen Walby - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Kim O’Neill - Head of Stakeholder and Land Advisory

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate - Dairy Flat School footpath

File No.: CP2021/05899

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Rodney Local Board for additional funding from the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate for a footpath outside Dairy Flat School on Dairy Flat Highway.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      This report covers:

·      a summary of the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate

·      a summary of Auckland Transport’s advice on a footpath located outside Dairy Flat School that the local board wishes to progress

·      advice on the financial implications of these decisions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      request that Auckland Transport allocate from the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate an additional $100,000 to the previously approved $440,000 budget to deliver the Dairy footpath outside Dairy Flat School on Dairy Flat Highway.

Horopaki

Context

Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate

3.       In May 2018, the local board recommended (resolution number RD/2018/61) that the Governing Body approve a targeted rate to accelerate investment in transport in the Rodney Local Board area. The recommendation was accepted and the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate (RLBTTR) is currently scheduled to run for 10 years (2018 – 2028).

4.       The local board are decision makers for funds raised through the rate, Auckland Council receives the rates payments, and Auckland Transport (AT) provides technical advice and administers the funds on behalf of the local board.

5.       The local board has a delegated project lead for targeted rate matters who acts as the day-to-day contact for AT.

6.       The RLBTTR is ring-fenced for transport projects in the Rodney Local Board area that are not included in the Regional Land Transport Plan 2018-2028. It was established on the basis that the fund is to support:

·    new bus stops and bus services

·    new park and ride community hub facilities

·    new footpaths.

7.      The targeted rate was established on the principle that each subdivision within the Rodney Local Board area receives a proportion of the benefits of the targeted rate that equate to the proportion of the revenue collected from that subdivision.

8.      As the projects develop and firmer cost estimations are prepared, changes will be required to the projects proposed within each subdivision to ensure proportionality is maintained. The Rodney Local Board monitors the performance of the projects and determines whether to re-prioritise its expenditure based on the stated purposes of the funds raised.

Current local board decision making on the Transport Targeted Rate – Dairy Flat School footpath

9.      In November 2020 the local board resolved (resolution number RD/2020/162) to:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport update on the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate – footpaths report November 2020

 

b)      request that Auckland Transport allocate $52,000 from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund for completing the design for the Dairy Flat School footpath with the remaining balance of $440,000 to be allocated from the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     Following the local board’s November 2020 resolution, Auckland Transport completed the detailed design work for a footpath outside Dairy Flat School.

11.     The detailed design layout plan of the proposed footpath and entry treatments is attached to this agenda report as Attachment A.

12.     The tendering for the construction of the footpath was completed in April 2021.

13.     The lowest priced tender received was $478,800, therefore the $440,000 previously allocated is insufficient to cover the construction costs for this project.

14.     In addition to the construction contract there will be professional services required including arboricultural monitoring during construction, a post-construction road safety audit and designer input / design amendments as required. It is estimated that $13,000 should be sufficient to cover professional services costs.

15.     In order for this construction contract to proceed, a total budget of $540,000 will be required (tendered price plus contingency).

16.     The proposed cost breakdown for the construction is outlined in the table below:

Scope of work design

Cost

Site preparations: preliminary and general

$91,767

Site work: including earthworks, drainage, civil works

$322,177

Street works: including road marking, signage, landscaping

$64,856

Professional services: including arborist and road safety audit

$13,000

Construction contingency

$48,200

 

17.     The footpath is ready for construction. A request to allocate an additional $100,000 to proceed with delivery is recommended in this report.

18.     The footpath is expected to be completed by the end of July 2021. The proposed time frame could change due to unforeseen events such as bad weather and poor ground conditions.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.    The RLBTTR contributes to the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 outcome of: “A green Auckland – By reducing our reliance on petrol, air pollution and green-house gas emissions.”

20.    The RLBTTR also supports the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and council’s priorities.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The proposed decision of receiving this update report has no impacts on the wider council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     The local board are decision makers for funds raised through the RLBTTR, Auckland Council receives the rates payments, and Auckland Transport provides technical advice and administers the funds on behalf of the local board.

23.     Auckland Transport also receives regular guidance from the RLBTTR project lead.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     The recommendation advised in this report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual-project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

Overall RLBTTR budget implications

25.     Given the local board has the facility to borrow against future income from the RLBTTR it is also important to understand a high-level estimate of future income per subdivision:

Programme Total Expenditure, Unspent Commitment and Estimated Income

Subdivision

Current expended (2018-April 2021

Current resolved unspent commitment by May 2021

Estimated total expenditure by 2028 (incudes bus services, bus stops, park and rides, footpaths

Estimated total subdivision income by 2028

Estimated total remaining subdivision budget by 2028

Wellsford

$432,789

$1,677,000

$4,168,110

$4,686,323

$518,213

Warkworth

$1,047,659

$6,838,000

$9,943,980

$19,294,190

$9,350,210

Kumeū

$3,147,424

$3,571,000

$19,679,730

$19,759,811

$80,081

Dairy Flat

$552,022

$1,787,000

$4,891,041

$4,155,274

-$735,767

26.    To conform with the principle that each subdivision within the Rodney Local Board area receives a proportion of the benefits of the targeted rate that equate to the proportion of the revenue collected from that subdivision, Auckland Transport and the local board will monitor the spend in all project areas to ensure that spend is equitably distributed.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     Auckland Transport provides regular updates on the RLBTTR with separate decision reports on specific projects. This is to ensure that the local board is fully informed before making any decisions with regard to the fund.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     Following direction from the Rodney Local Board, Auckland Transport will take appropriate steps to enact that direction.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Dairy Flat School footpath design plans

65

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Susan Barakat – Rodney Transport Targeted Rates Programme Manager

Authorisers

Tarun Ahuja – Delivery Manager North/West

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

Auckland Transport bi-monthly update on the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate - May 2021

File No.: CP2021/05869

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Rodney Local Board on the programme being delivered by Auckland Transport using the funding from the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      This report provides information about the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate.

3.      This includes updates on:

·        park and ride / community hub facilities

·        bus stop projects

·        bus service route 128 Helensville to Silverdale

·        footpath projects.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport update on the Rodney Transport Targeted Rate -May 2021

 

Horopaki

Context

Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate

4.       In May 2018, the local board recommended (resolution number RD/2018/61) that the Governing Body approve a targeted rate to accelerate investment in transport in the Rodney Local Board area. The recommendation was accepted, and the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate (RLBTTR) is currently scheduled to run for 10 years (2018 – 2028).

5.       The local board are decision makers for funds raised through the rate, Auckland Council receives the rates payments, and Auckland Transport (AT) provides technical advice and administers the funds on behalf of the local board.

6.       The local board has a delegated project lead for the targeted rate funds, who acts as the day-to-day contact for AT.

7.       The RLBTTR is ring-fenced for transport projects in the Rodney Local Board area that are not included in the Regional Land Transport Plan 2018-2028. It was established on the basis that the fund is to support:

·    new bus stops and bus services

·    new park and ride community hub facilities

·    new footpaths.

8.      The targeted rate was established on the principle that each subdivision within the Rodney Local Board area receives a proportion of the benefits of the targeted rate that equate to the proportion of the revenue collected from that subdivision.

9.      As the projects develop and firmer cost estimations are prepared, changes will be required to the projects proposed within each subdivision to ensure proportionality is maintained. The Rodney Local Board monitors the performance of the projects and determines whether to re-prioritise its expenditure based on the stated purposes of the funds raised.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Park and Ride Community Hub Facilities Projects

10.     The local board has selected Warkworth and Kumeū for park and ride community transport hubs.

11.     The detailed design for the 80 Great North Road site in Warkworth is complete and the local board approved the construction delivery work for the financial year 2020/21.

12.    The table below outlines progress on the community transport hub project for 80 Great North Road site in Warkworth.

                            

13.    The Warkworth community transport hub received resource consent on 17 April 2021. Auckland Transport is in the process of awarding the construction contractor with construction estimated to start towards end of June 2021.

14.    The local board had approved a feasibility study to be undertaken in Kumeū Showgrounds in September 2020 as a potential park and ride site in Kumeū. Following and investigation, Auckland Transport did not recommend the proposed location at the Showgrounds for a park and ride. This is due to potential added traffic in the current corridor caused by rerouting of existing bus services to the proposed park and ride site.

15.    Auckland Transport is in consultation with local board and is undertaking internal planning work to identify a more suitable potential transport hub site in Kumeū

 

Bus Stops Projects          

 

16.    In December 2020 the local board resolved (resolution number RD/2020/182) that Auckland Transport was to allocate RLBTTR funding to:

·    bus stops delivery at 564/571 Coatesville-Riverhead Highway (Kumeū) - allocate $300,000.

17.    Following direction from the project lead, Auckland Transport has also undertaken site assessment and design work of the following:

·    two bus stops on Coatesville-Riverhead Highway (Kumeū).

18.    Auckland Transport initiated the bus stops design work in January 2021.

19.    The detailed design work of those bus stops was completed in April 2021.

20.    The installation and delivery of bus stops at 564/571 Coatesville-Riverhead Highway is expected to be completed by end of June 2021.

Bus Service Projects

 

Bus Route 128 Helensville to Silverdale

 

21.   The local board requested options for bus frequency increases on bus route 128 Helensville to Silverdale. The need for this change was identified by the community due to issues with students using the school bus in this area.

22.  This route was operating using one bus on an hour and a half service, however providing an hourly service would require two buses.

23.   In December 2020, local board approved to the increase in frequency (resolution number RD/2020/180).

24.   The approved option was for the Helensville to Silverdale (128) bus service to change to an hourly weekday service and a two-hourly weekend service, at an approximate additional cost of $313,785 per annum.

25.    The additional bus service started operating in May 2021 and will be reviewed in December 2021.

Footpath Projects

26.      The local board recently resolved on a list of footpaths ready for delivery during FY20/21 – FY21/22. AT works with the local board to offer regular updates on the delivery of these projects.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27.    The table below outlines the progress of footpaths projects in current delivery.

Footpath Project

Subdivision

Progress Update

Omaha Drive 

Warkworth

Current progress: The physical works contract is currently out to tender. Tenders closed on Monday 10 May 2021. 
Current issues: Current approved budget by local board for this project in November 2020 was $645,000.  After completing design in April 2021, the engineer’s estimate has predicted a construction cost close to $858,500. 
Next steps: The construction tenders will be evaluated in mid May 2021. Auckland Transport will report back to the local board to address cost increase if the proposals received deemed higher than approved budget.

Dairy Flat Highway

outside Dairy Flat School

Dairy Flat

Current progress: Tenders were received and are currently being evaluated by Auckland Transport.

Current issues: The prices that have come back are higher than the budget of $440,000 allocated by the local board.

Next steps: Auckland Transport is submitting a separate recommendation report for this month local board business meeting and awaiting local board direction.

School Road

Wellsford

Current progress: Design consultant had been appointed early 2021 and draft detailed design is under review.

Current issues no issues.

Next steps: The aim is to appoint a contractor in end of May 2021 to complete physical works.

Alice Street,

Riverhead

Kumeū

Current progress: Design consultant had been appointed early 2021 and draft detailed design is under reivew.

Current issues no issues.

Next steps: The aim is to complete all design and consultations required by end of May 2021 and to appoint a contractor to complete physical works in June 2021.

Leigh Road 

Warkworth

Current progress: Design consultant had been appointed early 2021 and draft detailed design is under review.

Current issues Due to the location of the proposed footpath the current concerns being worked through include due to the presence of rock outcrops and residual soils. Geotechnical investigations are underway to investigate the upslope geology to assess slope stability and viable alternatives to retaining walls along Leigh Road are being considered.

Next steps: The aim is to to complete all design and consultations required by end of June 2021.

Coatesville Riverhead Highway

Dairy Flat

Current progress: Tender request for offer of consultancy services has been released and expected proposal submission by 7 May 2021.
Current issues: No issues.
Next steps: Proposal evaluation and contract award to successful consultant.

Newton Road, Riverhead

Kumeū

Current progress: Currently awarding contract to design consultant.
Current issues: No issues.
Next steps: Design work is underway.

Rodney Street

Wellsford

Current progress: Tender request for offer of consultancy services was released and expected proposal submission by 14 May 2021.
Current issues: No issues.
Next steps: Proposal evaluation and contract award to successful consultant to undertake design work

Cambridge Street

Kumeū

Current progress: Design scoping document is developed and currently under internal reviewed.
Current issues: No issues.
Next steps: To release Tender request for offer of consultancy services to undertake design work.

Duke Street

 Kumeū

Current progress: Design scoping document is developed and currently under internal reviewed.

Current issues: No issues.

Next steps: To release Tender request for offer of consultancy services to undertake design work.

Matua Rd

Kumeū

Current progress: Design scoping document is developed and currently under internal reviewed.
Current issues: No issues.
Next steps: To release Tender request for offer of consultancy services to undertake design work.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

28.    The RLBTTR contributes to the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 outcome of: “A green Auckland – By reducing our reliance on petrol, air pollution and green-house gas emissions.”

29.    The RLBTTR also supports the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and council’s priorities.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

30.     The appropriate council group inputs were sought by Auckland Transport in the formulation of this update report.

31.     The proposed decision of receiving this update report has no impacts on the wider council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     The local board are decision makers for funds raised through the RLBTTR, Auckland Council receives the rates payments, and Auckland Transport provides technical advice and administers the funds on behalf of the local board.

33.     Auckland Transport also receives regular guidance from the RLBTTR project lead.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     The proposed decision of receiving this report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual-project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     Given the local board has the facility to borrow against future income from the RLBTTR it is also important to understand a high-level estimate of future income per subdivision:

Programme Total Expenditure, Unspent Commitment and Estimated Income

Subdivision

Current expended (2018-April 2021

Current resolved unspent commitment by May 2021

Estimated total expenditure by 2028 (incudes bus services, bus stops, park and rides, footpaths

Estimated total subdivision income by 2028

Estimated total remaining subdivision budget by 2028

 

$432,789

$1,677,000

$4,168,110

$4,686,323

$518,213

 

$1,047,659

$6,838,000

$9,943,980

$19,294,190

$9,350,210

 

$3,147,424

$3,571,000

$19,679,730

$19,759,811

$80,081

 

$552,022

$1,787,000

$4,891,041

$4,155,274

-$735,767

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     Auckland Transport providing regular updates on the RLBTTR, and separate decision reports on specific projects, is a mitigation to ensure the local board is fully informed before making any decisions with regards to the fund.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     Auckland Transport will provide a regular update report to the Rodney Local Board at its July business meeting.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Susan Barakat – Rodney Transport Targeted Rates Programme Manager

Authorisers

Tarun Ahuja – Delivery Manager North/West

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

Approval for new public road names for subdivision at 151a Rautawhiri Road, Helensville

File No.: CP2021/04684

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Rodney Local Board to name four new public roads within the subdivision being undertaken by Urumaraki Residential Limited at 151a Rautawhiri Road, Helensville.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development the Applicant shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road names for the local board’s approval that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       Urumaraki Residential Limited has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the local board:

            Road one

·     Porokaiwhiri Avenue (applicant’s preference)

·     Rohutu Avenue (alternative)

·     Kaikomako Avenue (alternative)

            Road two

·     Awa Avenue (applicant’s preference)

·     Northview Avenue (alternative)

·     Karamu Avenue (alternative)

            Road three

·     Panui Avenue (applicant’s preference)

·     Wheki Avenue (alternative)

·     Manoao Avenue (alternative)

            Road four

·     Kanono Way (applicant’s preference)

·     Manono Way (alternative)

·     Tawheowheo Way (alternative)

 

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines and the Australian and New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245. The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana Whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve Urumaraki Residential Limited’s preferred road names ‘Porokaiwhiri Avenue (road one), ‘Awa Avenue’ (road two), ‘Panui Avenue’ (road three) and ‘Kanono Way’ (road four) for the four new public roads within the subdivision being undertaken by Urumaraki Residential Limited in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

Horopaki

Context

5.       The 54-lot subdivision, (Council Ref SUB60066392-B), currently under construction was approved on 11 August 2020.

6.       Site and location plans of the subdivision can be found in Attachments A and B to the agenda report.

7.       In accordance with the Standards all public roads require a name.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval

9.       The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Maori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

10.     Theme: Urumaraki Residential Limited (the Applicant) has chosen a suite of names they consider appropriate for the area. These include a mix of English names reflecting the pre-development biodiversity of the wider area, and Maori names relating to the surrounding area.

11.     In this regard the names and their relevance are detailed as below.

Proposed Names

Meaning (as described by the applicant)

Porokaiwhiri Avenue

(applicant’s preference Road 1)

A native tree with dark glossy leaves, found in the Kaipara region.

Rohutu Avenue

(alternative Road 1)

A twiggy native shrub found in the Kaipara region 

Kaikomako Avenue

(alternative Road 1)

A native tree with thick leaves found in the Kaipara region

Awa Avenue

(applicant’s preference Road 2)

Awa is “River” in Te Reo Maori, and the Kaipara River is nearby

Northview Avenue

(alternative Road 2)

As the site is located north of Auckland

Karamu Avenue

(alternative Road 2)

A native tree found in the Kaipara region

Panui Avenue

(applicant’s preference Road 3)

To read, speak in Te Reo Maori, this development will be read of in local newspapers and spoken of in the community

Wheki Avenue

(alternative Road 3)

Rough tree fern in Te Reo Maori, found commonly throughout the region and New Zealand

Manoao Avenue

(alternative Road 3)

A silver pine tree that grows up to 15m. Found in the region from sea level up to 950m above sea level

Kanono Way

(applicant’s preference Road No 4)

A large leafed coprosma tree, found in the region and throughout New Zealand

Manono Way

(alternative Road 4)

A large leafed coprosma tree, found in the region and throughout New Zealand

Tawheowheo Way

(alternative Road 4)

A small bushy native tree, found in the Kaipara region

 

12.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the Council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

13.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location. They also note that “Kanono and Manono” are both applicable to use, however, with the similar spelling they recommend to only use one of these options in this location.

14.     Road Type: The road types ‘Avenue’ and ‘Way,’ are acceptable for the new public roads, suiting their form and layout.

15.     Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

20.     On 1 April 2021, nine mana whenua groups with an interest in the general area were contacted by council on behalf of the applicant through the Resource Consent Unit’s central facilitation process as set out in the Guidelines.

21.     By the close of the consultation period no responses had been received.

22.     Dependent on the scale of the development and its level of significance, not all road naming applications receive comments from mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

24.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rautawhiri Road, Helensville Locality Plan

83

b

Rautawhiri Road Scheme Plan

85

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bruce Angove - Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

Endorsing Business Improvement District targeted rates 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/05098

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for the North West Country and One Mahurangi (previously One Warkworth) Business Improvement District programmes for the 2021/2022 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Business Improvement Districts are rohe within Tāmaki Makaurau, where local business and property owners have agreed to work together to improve their business environment, encourage resilience and attract new businesses and customers.

3.       Auckland Council supports business associations operating Business Improvement Districts programmes, including North West Country Incorporated and One Mahurangi Business Association, by collecting a targeted rate from commercial properties within a defined geographic area. The funds from the targeted rate are then provided by way of a Business Improvement Districts grant to the relevant business association.

4.       Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to Business Improvement Districts programmes. One of these is to annually recommend Business Improvement Districts targeted rates to the Governing Body.

5.       Each business association operating a Business Improvement Districts programme sets the grant amount at its Annual General Meeting when members vote to approve an operational budget for the following financial year. This budget funds the implementation of a business plan that delivers programmes based on each association’s strategic priorities.

6.       North West Country members approved a Business Improvement Districts grant sum of $180,000 for 2021/2022. This figure is unchanged from the current financial year.

7.       One Mahurangi Business Association members approved a Business Improvement Districts grant sum of $135,000 for 2021/2022. This figure is unchanged from the current financial year.

8.       The business associations operating Business Improvement Districts programmes are incorporated societies that are independent of the council. However, to sustain public trust and confidence in the council, there needs to be a balance between the independence of the business association and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

9.       For the council to be confident that the funds provided to the Business Improvement Districts -operating business associations are being used appropriately, the council requires they to comply with the Business Improvement District Policy (2016) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi), known as the BID Policy. 

10.     The council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy and this report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds.

11.     Staff are satisfied North West Country and One Mahurangi Business Association sufficiently comply with the BID Policy.

12.     Staff propose the Rodney Local Board receives this report and recommends to the Governing Body the striking (setting) of the Business Improvement Districts targeted rate sought by North West Country and One Mahurangi Business Association as part of the council’s Annual Budget 2021/2022 decision-making.

13.     After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly grant payments, effective from 1 July 2021. This enables North West Country and One Mahurangi Business Association to implement programmes that contribute to Outcome 3: Infrastructure and development meets the needs of our growing communities, thereby supporting the aspirations of the Rodney Local Board Plan 2020.

14.     Rodney’s Business Improvement Districts programmes, managed by the Business Improvement Districts -operating business associations, will continue to play an important role in supporting its members facing two global challenges. A Business Improvement Districts programme can support local businesses to mitigate some of the flow-on effects from the COVID-19 lockdowns through business resilience and recovery initiatives. A Business Improvement Districts programme can also facilitate opportunities that address the climate change emergency, with a focus on sustainability.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      recommends to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for inclusion in the Annual Budget 2021/2022 for the following Business Improvement District programmes:

i)   $180,000 for North West Country Incorporated

ii)  $135,000 for One Mahurangi Business Association Incorporated.

 

Horopaki

Context

Business Improvement Districts programmes (BID’s) promote economic well-being and collaboration with the council

15.     Tāmaki Makaurau is projected to add approximately 660,000 (SOURCE: Auckland Council Growth Model 2021-2051 (“i11v6”) more people in the next 30 years. This level of population growth presents challenges and opportunities for Auckland town centres and commercial precincts.

16.     BIDs are rohe within Auckland where local business and property owners have agreed to work together, with support from the council, to improve their business environment, promote innovation and attract new businesses and customers.

17.     BID programmes provide the opportunity for the council group to partner with business associations to seize on the opportunities from Auckland’s growth. 

18.     BID programmes encourage collaboration to achieve greater local outcomes. They provide a mechanism to enable local boards to engage with the business sector in local town centres and business areas in a co-ordinated way.

BID programmes provide essential support in building business resilience and aiding economic recovery

19.     The economy continues to be impacted by the flow-on effects from the COVID-19 pandemic and related lockdowns, affecting both retail-based town centres and industrial precincts.

20.     BID-operating business associations provide the local business leadership required to help their members to mitigate some of the economic effects of the pandemic through business resilience and recovery initiatives.

BID programmes are funded by a targeted rate on business ratepayers within a set area

21.     BID programmes are funded by a targeted rate applied to all commercially rated properties within a designated area around a town centre or commercial precinct.

22.     Auckland Council supports business associations operating BID programmes by collecting the targeted rates and providing these funds, in their entirety, by way of a BID grant to the relevant business association.

23.     This revenue is paid to the business association every quarter to provide a regular and sustainable income stream to implement an agreed work programme.

The BID Policy is the mechanism to ensure accountability for BID targeted rates

24.     Auckland Council’s Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) ensures accountability for BID targeted rate funding and encourages good governance and programme management.

25.     The policy outlines the principles behind the council’s BID programme; creates the process for establishing, expanding, amalgamating and disestablishing BID programmes; determines rating mechanisms; prescribes operating standards and guidelines; and sets accountability requirements.

 

Diagram A: From calculation to approval, how the BID targeted rate is set.

The business association sets the BID grant amount to deliver its work programme

26.       BID-operating business associations are provided with a rate modelling spreadsheet to help with their budget decision-making. The spreadsheet models any proposed changes to their current BID grant amount and, most importantly, how that influences the BID targeted rate for everyone who will pay it. When considering a change to the BID grant amount, the association’s board must take into account what the local business and property owners can afford.

27.     Each BID-operating business association prepares an annual business plan for the following financial year that will deliver programmes based on their strategic priorities and financial parameters.

28.     The cost of implementing that business plan is set out in an annual budget that the association’s board (governing committee) agrees will be recommended for approval by the business association membership.

29.     The Annual General Meeting (AGM) provides the forum where members vote to approve the operational budget and, in doing so, set the requisite BID grant amount for the following financial year.

Local boards are responsible for recommending the targeted rate if a BID complies with the BID Policy

30.     Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body. The local board should recommend the setting of the targeted rate if it is satisfied that the BID is sufficiently complying with the BID Policy.

31.     The Rodney Local Board approved a similar recommendation for the BID programmes last year (resolution number RD/2020/40), as did 17 other local boards that have BID programmes operating in their rohe.

32.     The recommendation in this report is put into effect with the Governing Body’s approval of the Annual Budget 2021/2022 and its striking (setting) of the targeted rates.

33.     In accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, the Governing Body is authorised to make the final decisions on what BID programme targeted rates, if any, to set in any particular year or property (in terms of the amount and the geographic area to be rated).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

34.     BID programmes are operated by independent business associations, and their programmes and services are provided according to their members’ stated priorities. In recognition of their independent status, the BID Policy does not prescribe standards for programme effectiveness. That is a matter for business association members to determine. Staff, therefore, cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

35.     Staff are satisfied that North West Country and One Mahurangi Business Association have sufficiently met the requirements of the BID Policy.

36.     Staff require BID-operating business associations to provide to the council the following documents, and stay in touch with their local board at least once a year:

·   current strategic plan – evidence of achievable medium- to long-term outcomes

·   audited accounts – assurance that the BID-operating business association is managing its members’ BID targeted rate funds responsibly

·   annual report on the year just completed – evidence that programmes are addressing priority issues that benefit BID targeted ratepayers

·   business plan for the coming year – detailed one-year programme, based on the strategic plan, to be resourced and achieved

·   indicative budget for the following year – Auckland Council’s Annual Budget requires targeted rates to be identified a year in advance to inform the Annual Budget process which sets all rates

·   Board Charter – establishes guidelines for effective board governance and positive relationships between the association and its members

·   Annual Accountability Agreement – certification that these requirements have been met

·   Programme Agreement – a good faith agreement between each BID-operating business association and the council that sets basic parameters of the council-business association relationship

·   AGM minutes – the provisional minutes of each business association’s 2020 AGM meetings which contain the resolution, voted on by members, confirming the BID grant amount for the 2021/2022 financial year.

 

37.     In addition, BID-operating business associations are required to inform the council staff of progress with other compliance requirements, including:

·   Incorporated Society registration – a current registration of the business association along with all required documents up to date

·   resolving problems or issues, if any – problems or issues that have an impact on the governance or operation of the BID programme.

 

38.     The BID Policy sets an annual compliance deadline of 10 March for the information to be forwarded to the council, as summarised in the table below.

 

Table 1: Business associations’ compliance with the BID Policy as of 10 March 2021

 

Requirement

Financial Year 2019/2020

Strategic Plan*

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green 2016 - 2021

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green2020 - 2025

Audited financials

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual Report

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Business Plan

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Indicative budget

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Board Charter

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual Accountability Agreement

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual meeting w/ local board

10 March 2021

10 March 2021

Programme Agreement

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Greenvalid to December 2023

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Greenvalid to December 2023

Incorporated society registration

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

2020 AGM minutes (provisional)

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Resolving problems or issues

Nothing to record

Nothing to record

 

39.     As both North West Country and One Mahurangi Business Association have sufficiently complied with the BID Policy, staff advise the local board to recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates.

 

40.     As shown in Table 2 below, North West Country’s proposed BID targeted rate for 2021/2022 - $180,000 – is unchanged from the current financial year.

41.     One Mahurangi’s proposed BID targeted rate for 2021/2022 - $135,000 – is unchanged from the current financial year.

Table 2: BID targeted rates comparison: 2021/2022 c.f. 2020/2021

 

 

   BID

 

2021/2022

 

2020/2021

 

Increase / %

 

 

 

 

$180,000

 

 

 

$180,000

 

 

Nil increase

No increase since establishing in 2014

 

 

$135,000

 

 

 

$135,000

 

 

Nil increase

New BID in 2020

 

42.     Of Tāmaki Makaurau’s 50 BID-operating business associations, 21 increased their targeted rates for 2021/2022 with the percentage increase ranging between 1.7 per cent to 10 per cent. One reduced their income after a one-off increase in 2020/2021 to fund America’s Cup-related activities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

43.     Through targeted rate-funded advocacy and activities, BID-operating business associations promote and often facilitate environmental sustainability programmes.

44.     From running carbon-reducing ‘shop local’ campaigns to promoting online channels and championing waste reduction and recovery programmes, there are many examples of BID programmes leading the local business sector’s response to the climate change emergency.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

45.     Advocacy is a key service provided by business associations and those with BID programme-funded personnel are at an advantage.  BID-operating business associations ensure the views and ambitions of their members are provided to elected representatives and council teams, including CCOs, on those policies, plans, programmes and projects that impact them.

46.     The BID-operating business associations work with Auckland Unlimited (AU) on economic development initiatives, events and sustainability programmes.

47.     The BID-operating business associations also work constructively with both Panuku and Auckland Transport on often controversial proposals and projects.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

48.     The local board’s views are most frequently expressed by its appointed representative each BID-operating business association. This liaison board member (or alternates) can attend BID board meetings to ensure there is a direct link between the council and the operation of the BID programme.

Visions, plans aligned

49.     The BID-operating business associations and local board share an interest in the local rohe and are ambitious for its future and its people. They also share goals that include economic prosperity, community identity, placemaking and pride.

50.     Rodney’s BID programmes tangibly support the vision and aspirations of the Rodney Local Board Plan 2020, best expressed in Outcome 3: Infrastructure and development meets the needs of our growing communities.

Local rohe, local benefit, local funding

51.     Recommending that the Governing Body sets the targeted rates for North West Country and One Mahurangi Business Association means that the BID programmes will continue to be funded from targeted rates on commercial properties within their rohe. They will provide services in accordance with their members’ priorities as stated in their respective strategic plans.

52.     Rodney Local Board is among several local boards which can consider providing additional funding to local business associations, however accountability for any grants is set by funding agreements between the local board and the business associations. Those contractual obligations are separate from the requirements of the BID Policy and are not covered in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

53.     Māori make up more than 11.4 per cent of the population living in the Rodney Local Board area, compared to 11.5 per cent of Auckland (SOURCE: 2018 CENSUS)Individual business associations may, through operating their BID programme, identify opportunities for niche support or development of any Māori business sector in their rohe.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

54.     There are no financial implications for the local board. Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from commercial ratepayers in the district and used by the business association for improvements within that rohe. The council’s financial role is to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the association every quarter.

55.     The targeted rate is payable by the owners of the commercial properties within the geographic area of the individual BID programmes.  In practice, this cost is often passed on to the business owners who occupy these properties.  This cost may be harder to meet at a time when businesses continue to be financially impacted by the flow-on effects of the COVID-19 lockdown restrictions. 

56.     The council last year extended its Rates Remission and Postponement Policy to commercial property owners as part of the Annual Budget 2020/2021 to help mitigate the impact of the targeted rate on those who are struggling financially. This policy will continue for the 2021/2022 financial year.

57.     If the Governing Body agrees with the BID targeted rates proposed by the business associations, the cost of grants will be met from the existing operational budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

58.     There are no direct financial risks to the local board or the council that could result from this recommendation to endorse the BID targeted rates for these business associations.

59.     To sustain public trust and confidence in the council, there needs to be a balance between the independence of the BID-operating business association and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

60.     The rules and obligations of the BID Policy are intended to help minimise the potential for business associations to misuse BID targeted rate funds by requiring each BID to plan for their intended use, report on its activities to its members and to have its accounts audited.

61.     The council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy and this report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds.

62.     Economic disruption created by the flow-on effects of COVID-19 lockdowns will continue to be felt in Auckland’s town centres and business precincts. The BID programme is an internationally proven approach to engage and empower local businesses.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

63.     If the local board supports this report, it will recommend to the Governing Body that the BID targeted rates be set as part of the Annual Budget 2021/2022.

64.     After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly BID grant payments, effective from 1 July 2021, to North West Country and One Mahurangi Business Association. This enables the BIDs to implement programmes that improve the local business environment and support businesses as they recover from the flow-on effects from the COVID-19 lockdowns and help address the climate change emergency through sustainability initiatives.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Siddens - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

Economic Development Action Plan: Draft for feedback

File No.: CP2021/05652

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on the draft Economic Development Action Plan: Council’s role in Auckland’s recovery 2021-24.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The council organisation and council-controlled organisations have worked collaboratively to develop the draft Economic Development Action Plan. This plan defines and agrees, for the next three years, the council family’s economic objectives and priorities and determines a coordinated course of action. The plan is limited to actions that are within the remit of council and council-controlled organisation activities.

3.       The draft plan aligns with the 10-year budget and will inform the work programmes of relevant council family departments. The work is supported by the chief executives of council and all substantive council-controlled organisations.

4.       The draft plan outlines detailed actions within six areas of focus (‘workstreams’) as outlined in Attachment A to the agenda report. It reflects the guiding principles of transitioning towards a regenerative and low carbon economy, supporting economic opportunities for Māori, and responding to our communities of greatest need.

5.       There will be targeted engagement on the draft plan, including with iwi, advisory panel members and business groups. Feedback will be sought until 14 June 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      receive the draft Economic Development Action Plan: Council’s role in Auckland’s recovery 2021-24

b)      provide feedback by 14 June 2021 for consideration in the final draft Economic Development Action Plan: Council’s role in Auckland’s recovery 2021-24.

Horopaki

Context

6.       In August 2020, the Council-Controlled Organisations Review Panel delivered its report alongside 64 recommendations which were endorsed in full by the Governing Body. The review stated that council and all substantive council-controlled organisations (CCOs) should together define the economic outcomes for Auckland and agree on how to achieve and measure them. The review also acknowledged the need for better coordination and definition of responsibilities for local economic development within the council family. The Economic Development Action Plan forms part of council’s response to that review.

7.       The plan is not a long-term strategy and does not replace the Economic Development Strategy 2012. The priorities and focus over the next three years, however, consider direction from council’s existing strategies i.e., the Auckland Plan 2050, Economic Development Strategy 2012, Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan and Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau: Council’s Māori Outcomes Framework.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       Comprehensive background work to support the development of the action plan has been completed by the Chief Economist Unit (CEU), the Auckland Plan Strategy and Research Department (APSR) and Auckland Unlimited. This includes a report from the CEU providing a profile of Auckland’s economy over the last 10 years, the impact of COVID-19 on the Auckland economy, and the main roadblocks to recovery. The same report also identified areas where the council group can have a material impact on economic development. Key areas are:

·        assets

·        procurement

·        land use and zoning

·        regulatory processes

·        travel network

·        town centres

·        pricing

·        skills and investment attraction

·        tourism attraction

·        social support services

·        coordination of responses through partnerships.

9.       There has also been an extensive review of plans and strategies across the council and CCOs to identify common economic development themes. These were: innovation and technology, Māori economy, regenerative, resilient, low carbon economy, workforce transition, competitive high-value sectors, local economic development, infrastructure, and culture and creativity.

10.     This background work formed the basis for six workstreams:

·        Destination Tāmaki Makaurau: attracting people and investment

·        Local Tāmaki Makaurau: enabling thriving local economies

·        Skilled Tāmaki Makaurau: supporting quality jobs and skill development

·        Future Tāmaki Makaurau: preparing businesses for the future

·        Enabled Tāmaki Makaurau: infrastructure enabling economic development

·        Enabled Tāmaki Makaurau: regulations that enable economic development.

11.     Each workstream has both council and CCO staff representation. These workstreams have developed a set of actions with responsibilities and timeframes as detailed in this draft plan. A monitoring framework will be developed to ensure roles, responsibilities and accountabilities of council and each CCO are clearly defined as they relate to the actions in the draft plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan has provided direction to the development of the draft plan, aspiring to a more resilient economy that is regenerative, inclusive, local and enables Aucklanders to thrive.

13.     The draft action plan has embedded the guiding principle of ‘transitioning to a regenerative and low carbon economy’ into each of its six workstreams. The development of actions is underpinned by kaitiakitanga and considers how resources used give back to nature and increase value through reuse and renewal. Where applicable, actions broadly encourage a decrease in greenhouse gas emissions, low carbon products and services, climate innovation, and less dependency on natural resources.

14.     The actions presented in this draft action plan will go through a further climate impact assessment using tools developed by the Chief Sustainability Office. The results of this assessment will be incorporated into the final plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The draft plan responds to the CCO review recommendation for council and all CCOs to together define the economic outcomes for Auckland and agree on how to achieve and measure them. The actions in the draft plan will be shared and accountabilities of council and each CCO well defined. Some CCOs will have a more active role than others.

16.     The scope and development of the Economic Development Action Plan has been agreed to through the council and CCO Chief Executives’ group. This group is updated with progress on the plan as appropriate. The project team includes a representative and contribution from each CCO. 

17.     The scope of the plan is limited to actions that are within the remit of council and CCO activities. A review and discussion document of the council group’s levers that materially contribute to economic development formed the basis for this draft plan (refer to Attachment B to the agenda report).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     Each workstream of the plan will have a local impact, acknowledging the interdependency of local economies and the regional economy. The draft plan includes the focus area ‘Local Tāmaki Makaurau: enabling thriving local economies’ and has been informed by the recent local board plans’ local economic priorities.

19.     The Local Tāmaki Makaurau workstream seeks to clarify what the Auckland Council group will do to support the local economies of Auckland. This includes setting out the roles that each part of the group plays in delivering actions, while also setting the foundations to help the group identify the economic places (sub-regional and local) of Auckland and deliver outcomes at the local level.

20.     A memo was distributed on 17 February 2021 to inform local board members of the development of council’s Economic Development Action Plan 2021-24 and to outline the process for local board feedback to the plan. At the request of the local board chairpersons, the draft plan will be provided at all local board business meetings in May 2021 with written feedback by formal resolution provided to the project leads by 14 June 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau has provided direction to the development of the draft plan, in particular, the Kia ora te Umanga mahi objective of supporting economic opportunities for Māori businesses and iwi organisations. The draft plan has also considered direction from the Auckland Plan 2050, the Kaitiaki Forum’s strategic plan and the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s Issues of Significance (2017) as they relate to Māori economic development.

22.     The draft action plan has embedded the guiding principle of ‘supporting economic opportunities for Māori’ into each of its six workstreams. The development of actions will consider partnership opportunities with mana whenua and mataawaka, a focus on equity and addressing systemic barriers, and identifying new economic opportunities for Māori.

23.     The project team have communicated with iwi from the commencement of the project to determine and initiate the preferred process of engagement for each iwi. This draft plan will be sent to all iwi for input and feedback through to 14 June 2021.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The scope of the Economic Development Action Plan states that actions will be funded within the existing 10-year Budget 2021-2031 and therefore, no additional funding is required. The draft plan identifies some actions that rely on external funding sources and partnerships.

25.     At the advice of the finance division, budget alignment is demonstrated in the draft plan at both the group of activity and CCO / council directorate level.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     The draft plan outlines actions that require a commitment from the responsible directorate to include in their work programmes and within their existing budgets. The monitoring framework will include regular progress reporting to ensure effective implementation of the action plan.

27.     This action plan is an internal document, outlining work to be done within the remit of council and its CCOs. The content of the plan builds on earlier consultation undertaken in the development of key strategies that have provided direction. Input and feedback for this action plan has therefore been targeted to key groups.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     The draft plan will be distributed to the key groups that have been engaged from the commencement of the project. Feedback will be considered until 14 June 2021.

29.     The final Economic Development Action Plan: Council’s role in Auckland’s recovery 2021-24 and its monitoring framework will be presented to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events committee on 8 July 2021 for adoption.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Economic Development Action Plan

101

b

Auckland's economic recovery and council's role

135

   Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janelle Breckell - Principal Strategic Advisor

James Robinson -Head of Strategy and Planning, Auckland Unlimited

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Jacques Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

Local board views on Plan Change 60 - Open Space (2020) and Other Rezoning Matters

File No.: CP2021/05654

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To invite the local board to provide its views on the council-initiated Plan Change 60 – Open Space (2020) and Other Rezoning Matters.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Decision-makers on a plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan must consider local board views on the plan change if the relevant local boards choose to provide their views.

3.       Each local board has a responsibility to communicate the interests and preferences of people in its area on Auckland Council policy documents, including plan changes. A local board can present local views and preferences when that view is expressed by the whole local board.[1]

4.       On 28 January 2021, Auckland Council notified Plan Change 60. Submissions closed on 1 March 2021. The plan change includes 105 sites (in some cases, a site comprises more than one lot) and aims to rezone land to:

·        recognise land recently vested or acquired as open space

·        correct zoning errors or anomalies (including rezoning land to better reflect its use)

·        facilitate Panuku Development Auckland’s (Panuku) land rationalisation and disposal process, or

·        facilitate Kainga Ora and Auckland Council’s redevelopment of certain neighbourhoods.

5.       One hundred and six submissions have been received on the proposed plan change. The vast majority of these oppose Panuku’s rezoning and land disposal. In summary, there are 15 submissions in support of the plan change, four in support but seeking amendments, 85 in opposition and two out of scope.

6.       No iwi authority has made a submission in support or opposition to Plan Change 60.

7.       This report is the mechanism for the local board to resolve and provide its views on Plan Change 60 should it wish to do so. Staff do not recommend what view the local board should convey.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      provide local board views on Plan Change 60 - Open Space (2020) and Other Rezoning Matters

b)      appoint a local board member to speak to the local board views at a hearing on Plan Change 60.

Horopaki

Context

8.       Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of Auckland Council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards provide their views on the content of these documents. Decision-makers must consider local board views when deciding the content of these policy documents.[2]

9.       If the local board chooses to provide its views, the planner includes those views in the hearing report. Local board views are included in the analysis of the plan change, along with submissions.

10.     If appointed by resolution, local board members may present the local board’s views at the hearing to commissioners who decide on the plan change.

11.     This report provides an overview of the proposed plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) and a summary of submissions’ key themes.

12.     The report does not recommend what the local board should convey, should the local board decide to convey its views on Plan Change 60. The planner must include any local board views in the evaluation of the plan change. The planner cannot advise the local board as to what its views should be, and then evaluate those views.

13.     The key theme from submissions is opposition to the proposed rezonings relating to Kainga Ora/Auckland Council redevelopment and Panuku’s land rationalisation and disposal. Attachment A to the agenda report identifies the land parcels that are the subject of submissions.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Plan Change 60 affects land across the Auckland region.

15.     The purpose of the proposed plan change is to rezone land to either:

·        recognise land recently vested or acquired as open space

·        correct zoning errors or anomalies (including rezoning land to better reflect its use)

·        facilitate Panuku’s land rationalisation and disposal process, or

·        facilitate Kainga Ora and Auckland Council’s redevelopment of certain neighbourhoods.

16.     The Section 32 Report and details of the plan change are available from the council’s website at Plan Change 60. The council’s planner and other experts will evaluate and report on the following:

·        Section 32 Report that accompanies the plan change

·        submissions

·        the views and preferences of the local board should the local board pass a resolution.

17.     Submissions were made by 106 people/organisations as outlined below.

Submissions

Number of submissions

In support

15

In support but requesting change(s)

4

In opposition

85

Out of scope

2

Total

106

18.     Key submission themes are listed below.

19.     Oppose the rezoning of:

·        142 Triangle Road, Massey (maps 4 and 37)

·        1-5 Lippiatt Road, Otahuhu (map 73)

·        23 Waipuna Road, Mount Wellington (map 75)

·        12R Rockfield Road, Ellerslie (map 76)

·        11R Birmingham Road, Otara (map 77)

·        2R Keeney Court, Papakura (map 78)

·        walkway adjacent to 45 Brandon Road, Glen Eden (map 79)

·        45 Georgina Street, Freemans Bay (map 81)

·        36 Cooper Street, Grey Lynn (map 82)

·        13 Davern Lane, New Lynn (map 85)

·        67 East Street, Pukekohe (map 86)

·        Princes Street West, Pukekohe (map 87)

·        R105 Stott Avenue, Birkenhead (map 93)

·        26 Princes Street, Otahuhu (map 96).

20.     Support the rezoning but request an alternative zone:

·        2157 East Coast Road, Stillwater (map 71).

21.     Both support for and opposition to the rezoning:

·        50 Mayflower Close, Mangere East (map 100)

·        62 Mayflower Close, Mangere East (map 105).

22.     Support for rezoning or further information required:

·        1337 Whangaparaoa Road, Army Bay (map 104).

23.     The key reasons for submission opposing the plan change include:

·        opposed to the rezoning of pocket parks – they are needed to support intensification and for social and environmental benefits

·        loss of valuable reserve land

·        few parks in the area

·        significant negative effect on enjoyment of our neighbourhood / adverse effects on property and locality

·        park has significant cultural heritage associations and natural value

·        contradicts Auckland Unitary Plan heritage policies

·        inadequate public notification

·        green areas needed in more intensive housing areas

·        contrary to climate change/greenhouse effects – green spaces are needed for low carbon Auckland Council

·        inconsistent with Auckland Unitary Plan objectives and policies

·        park has trees which will be lost with rezoning and development

·        site is an overland flow path and flood plain

·        property values will be adversely affected

·        loss of walkway and critical linkage

·        sale of spaces is desperate revenue gathering/selling due to Covid is short-sighted

·        subsequent building will severely impact on sunlight and amenities of adjoining sites

·        contrary to Auckland Council’s declaration of a climate emergency, open space network plans, National Policy Statement – Urban Development – well functioning environments, open space provision policy, Auckland Plan 2050, the Urban Ngahere Strategy

·        site is a Significant Ecological Area and part of a wildlife corridor and refuge

·        inconsistent with local boards’ goal of increasing tree canopy.

24.     Information on individual submissions and the summary of all decisions requested by submitters is available from council’s website: Plan Change 60

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     Several submissions raised specific climate concerns. These relate to the loss of locally accessible open space and the associated vegetation, particularly mature trees.

26.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

27.     The local board could consider if Plan Change 60:

·        will reduce, increase or have no effect on Auckland’s overall greenhouse gas emissions (e.g., does it encourage car dependency, enhance connections to public transit, walking and cycling or support quality compact urban form)

·        prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change, i.e., does the proposed plan change elevate or alleviate climate risks (e.g., flooding, coastal and storm inundation, urban heat effect, stress on infrastructure).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     Panuku is a council-controlled organisation that resulted from the merging of Auckland Council Property Limited and Waterfront Auckland. One of the roles of Panuku is the release of land or properties that can be better utilised by others.

29.     In conjunction with Auckland Council’s Stakeholder and Land Advisory team, Panuku have identified 26 council-owned parcels of land which are either surplus to requirements or they are part of a Panuku regeneration project (i.e., a series of projects and initiatives designed to kickstart the transformation process and bring about changes that will help centres prosper in the future). Those parcels considered to be surplus to requirements have been cleared for sale by Auckland Council.

30.     Auckland Council’s decision to dispose of or sell the land parcels is separate from the zoning of the land. Zoning is a method used to implement the Auckland Unitary Plan’s objectives and policies and to achieve the purpose of the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA). The merit of any rezoning of land (from open space to residential or business) therefore must be assessed against the purpose of the RMA and the relevant Auckland Unitary Plan objectives and policies. Other relevant considerations which will be considered in the section 42A hearing report include the Auckland Plan 2050, Auckland’s Climate Plan and the Urban Ngahere Strategy and open space network plans.

31.     Auckland Transport made a submission in relation to the rezoning of 1337 Whangaparaoa Road, Army Bay. The key matter raised is the traffic effects of rezoning the Whangaparaoa golf course from ‘Residential – Single House’ to ‘Open Space – Sport and Active Recreation’ zone.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     The plan change affects sites throughout the Auckland region and feedback is therefore sought from all local boards.

33.     Factors the local board may wish to consider in formulating its views are:

·        interests and preferences of people in the local board area

·        wellbeing of communities within the local board area

·        local board documents, such as the local board plan and local board agreement

·        responsibilities and operation of the local board.

34.     A memo was sent to all local boards on 27 October 2020 outlining the proposed changes, the rationale for them and the likely plan change timeframes.

35.     This report is the mechanism for obtaining formal local board views. The decision-maker will consider local board views, if provided, when deciding on the plan change.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     If the local board chooses to provide its views on Plan Change 60, it may also comment on matters that may be of interest or importance to Māori generally. In the 2018 census, approximately 11.5 per cent (or 181,194) of the Auckland region’s population identified as Māori.

37.     Plans and Places consulted with all iwi authorities when it prepared Plan Change 60. On 27 October 2020, a memorandum outlining the draft proposed plan change was sent to all Auckland’s 19 mana whenua entities and the Tupuna Maunga Authority as required under the RMA.

38.     Comments were received from:

·        Ngāti Manuhiri – asking for an extension of time to 11 December 2020 to enable a discussion with their governance arm

·        Waikato Tainui – they will support mana whenua to take the lead role on such plan changes

·        Tupuna Maunga Authority – their interest is those sites that are within Height Sensitive Areas or regionally Significant Volcanic Viewshafts.

39.     No iwi authorities made a formal submission.

40.     The hearing report will include analysis of part 2 of the RMA which requires that all persons exercising RMA functions shall take into account the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi/Te Tiriti o Waitangi.[3] The plan change does not trigger an issue of significance as identified in the Schedule of Issues of Significance and Māori Plan 2017.[4]

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     Panuku’s land rezoning and rationalisation (26 land parcels) is part of Auckland Council’s financial recovery.

42.     The draft Long-term Plan 2021-2031 proposes the selling of surplus properties and reinvesting the proceeds into critical infrastructure for the city. Over the next three years, Auckland Council is seeking to increase these sales to return $70 million a year to invest in Auckland.

43.     The 26 land parcels that are part of this plan change form part of the $70 million return sought.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.     There is a risk that the local board will be unable to provide its views and preferences on the plan change if it doesn’t pass a resolution. This report provides:

·        the mechanism for the local board to express its views and preferences if it so wishes

·        the opportunity for a local board member to speak at a hearing.

45.     If the local board chooses not to pass a resolution at this business meeting, these opportunities are forgone.

46.     The power to provide local board views regarding the content of a plan change cannot be delegated to individual local board member(s).[5] This report enables the whole local board to decide whether to provide its views and if so, to determine what matters those views should include.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

47.     The planner will include and report on any resolution(s) of the local boards in the section 42A hearing report. The local board member appointed to speak to the local board’s views will be informed of the hearing date and invited to the hearing for that purpose.

48.     The planner will advise the local boards of the decision on the plan change request by memorandum.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

The land parcels in PC60 that are the subject of submissions

163

 

 

 

 

 Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tony Reidy - Team Leader Planning

Authorisers

Eryn Shields - Team Leader  Regional, North West and Islands

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

Rodney Local Board Work Programme Reallocations FY2020/2021

File No.: CP2021/05987

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for reallocation of funding within the Rodney Local Board’s 2020–2021 Locally Driven Initiatives operational work programme

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Rodney Local Board approved its Locally Driven Initiatives operational work programme 2020-2021 on 19 August 2020 (resolutions RD/2020/103, RD/2020/105 and RD/2020/104).

3.      As projects progress through the delivery process the specific work required and the cost of delivery can change. As a result, variations are sought to the work programme to ensure the local board’s locally driven initiatives operational budget is optimised.

4.      Four initiatives within the work programme that are tracking towards an underspend for the 2020/2021 financial year. These initiatives do not require carry forward of funds to support the completion of the initiative, and the underspend is therefore available for reallocation.

5.       The projects identified as tracking towards an underspend are:

a)         Project ID 2329: Customer and Community Services – town centre rapid activations

b)         Project ID 2321: Infrastructure and Environmental Services – onsite wastewater system engagement initiatives

c)         Project ID 3580: Glasgow Park – develop toilet facilities – concept plan stage

d)         Project ID 2828: Riverhead – develop toilet facilities – concept plan stage

6.       The local board also receives income from film revenue during the year. This revenue is received after the adoption of the work programme, and there is currently unallocated revenue available to be allocated.

a)         Project ID N/A - Parks, Sport and Recreation: parks services – film revenue

7.       Underspend must be allocated to projects that can be completed by the end of the 2020/2021 financial year.

8.       It is recommended that the underspend and unallocated funds from the above initiatives are reallocated to support tree maintenance at Green Road. The tree maintenance work is informed by a site assessment funded from the local board’s 2020/2021 work programme, and also aligns with the Green Road master plan which was adopted by the local board on 21 October 2020 (RD/2020/141).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve the reallocation of funding from the following initiatives towards tree maintenance work at Green Road, which is a transfer of funding within the Locally Driven Initiatives operational work programme

i)        Project ID 2329: Customer and Community Services – town centre rapid activations – reallocation of $37,604

ii)       Project ID 232: Infrastructure and Environmental Services – onsite wastewater system engagement initiatives – reallocation of $13,000

iii)      Project ID 2836: Rodney – implement active recreation improvements – concept plan – reallocation of $3,665

iv)      Project ID 2743: Rodney – deliver community-led – professional services – reallocation of $11,175

v)      Project ID 2814: Riverhead War Memorial Park – optimise playspace, renew carpark and minor assets – concept plan – reallocation of $4,045

vi)      Project ID 3580: Glasgow Park – develop toilet facilities – concept plan – reallocation of $2,715

vii)     Project ID 2828: Riverhead – develop toilet facilities – concept plan – reallocation of $14,640

b)      approve the allocation of $4,247 from the local board’s film revenue towards tree maintenance work at Green Road, which is a transfer of funding within the Locally Driven Initiatives operational work programme.

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Rodney Local Board has an approved 2020/2021 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Arts, Community and Events

·        Parks, Sport and Recreation

·        Libraries and Information

·        Community Services: Service, Strategy and Integration

·        Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

·        Community Leases

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services.

10.     The work programme was approved on 19 August 2020, giving a shorter delivery timeframe than in previous years due to COVID-19 and the Emergency Budget.

11.     The local board receives performance updates on the work programme throughout the year; the last report was presented at the April business meeting.

12.     Staff have identified four initiatives within the locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational work programme that will deliver an underspend for the 2020/2021 financial year. These initiatives do not require carry forward of funds to support the completion of the initiatives, and the underspend is therefore available for reallocation.

13.     There is also budget available to be allocated from the film revenue the local board receives annually from Auckland Unlimited for filming activities within the Rodney local board area. A portion of this income ($2,000) was allocated by the local board at its April business meeting to the volunteer libraries in Rodney (ID 1883). The remaining income of $4,247 is available for allocation.

14.     Reallocation of LDI opex funding can be done across departments, but the funding should remain as operational funding, and reallocation should be done on the basis that delivery can be achieved before the end of the financial year.

15.     Any underspend remaining as of 30 June 2021 will be treated as savings by Auckland Council.

16.     It is recommended that the local board reallocate the available underspend and the remainder of the unallocated film revenue to support tree maintenance at Green Road. The tree maintenance work required is informed by a site assessment funded from the local board’s 2020/2021 work programme (ID 3606 – Green Road Park – implement site assessments), and also aligns with the Green Road master plan which was adopted by the local board on 21 October 2020 (RD/2020/141).

17.     A tree assessment carried out at Green Road in April (Attachment A to the Agenda report), identified a large number of trees that pose a health and safety risk. The trees are either dead, in such a poor condition that their health will not recover, a pest plant or within fall reach of proposed walkways, cycleways, boardwalks or an existing fence where farming activities occur. The assessment also included recommendation for replacement planting.

18.     The estimated cost of the tree maintenance work is $182,000, and the reallocation of the underspend identified in the initiatives listed above would allow the work to commence in a phased manner.

19.     Communities Facilities staff are confident the first stage of work can be contracted for delivery and completed prior to 30 June.

20.     It is therefore recommended that the Rodney Local Board supports the reallocation of funding from the four named project lines (2329, 2321, 2828 and 3580) and the remaining budget from the film revenue to enable the tree maintenance work to commence.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

21.     Given the timeframes involved and the need for any funding that is reallocated to be committed before 30 June 2021, staff believe the reallocation of funds to support tree maintenance work in Green Road is the most viable option for completion by the end of the financial year for the local board to consider.

22.     No other initiatives are being proposed by staff due to this requirement.

23.     It is also felt that the reallocation of funds is prudent use of the local board’s funding due to its strong alignment with the local board’s work programme and Rodney Local Board Plan 2020, and it will also reduce the amount of funding required to carry out this work from within a future work programme.

24.     The tree maintenance work will also support the local board’s ambition to work towards opening Green Rd to the public.

25.     It is felt that given the short delivery timeframe (with work programmes being adopted in August due to the COVID-19 pandemic), and the disruption of COVID-19 on delivery of the work programme, achieving a low amount of underspend, and reallocating reallocate this underspend is a positive outcome for the local board.

Breakdown of underspend

26.     The following table provides a breakdown of the underspend against each initiative.

Table 1: Work programme underspend for reallocation by the local board

ID/Ref

Work programme name

Activity name

Reason for underspend

Value of underspend

2329

Customer and Community Services

Town centre rapid activations

Resourcing constraints have impacted timely delivery of this initiative.

There was also insufficient uptake of the shop front artwork in Helensville that was initially proposed. Other options were scoped in line with the intent of the funding; however, these were not able to be progressed. It is not suggested that the initiative is carried forward or funded in 2021/2022. The funding is therefore available for reallocation.

$37,604

3580

 

 

 

 

 

2828

Community Facilities:  Build Maintain Renew

Glasgow Park – develop toilet facilities – concept plan stage

 

Riverhead – develop toilet facilities – concept plan stage

The LDI opex stage of these projects are complete with savings declared this financial year. 

 

 

The physical works stages are proposed to commence in FY22/23 and FY24/25, subject to the Governing Body approval and is growth funded.

$2,715

 

 

 

 

$14,640

2814

Community Facilities:  Build Maintain Renew

Riverhead War Memorial Park - optimise play space, renew carpark and minor assets

 

This initiative is now complete and the unspent LDI opex has been declared as savings for the local board to reallocate to other priority initiatives.  The next stage of delivery is proposed for FY21/22 and subject to the Governing Body approval in July.

$4,045

 

 

2836

Community Facilities:  Build Maintain Renew

Rodney – implement active recreation improvements

The progression of the improvements for the active recreation sites identified will be delivered with capex funding and proposed for delivery in FY21/22. 

$3,665

2743

Community Facilities:  Build Maintain Renew

Rodney – deliver community-led – professional services

This is a budget allowance to support any community led initiatives the local board approve for delivery and allows specialist staff the ability to support the work to ensure the delivery process complies with today’s building standards.

There was little in the way of community-led proposals this financial year and therefore the unspent budget has been declared as savings for the local board to reallocate to other priority outcomes.

$11,175

2321

 

Onsite wastewater system engagement initiatives

This initiative was partially progressed, however costs have been lower than anticipated, and elements of the programme were not delivered. The septic tank subsidy has been undersubscribed and a suitable location could not be identified for planting as part of an engagement event. Where appropriate, some of this work will continue in FY2021/2022 with Water Quality Targeted Rate funding. It is suggested that the local board look to reallocate the funding as opposed to carry forward any remaining funds for continued delivery of the initiative into FY2021/2022.

$13,000

N/A

Parks, Sport and Recreation: park services

Local board film income

The Rodney Local Board received film income of $6,247 during the 2020/2021 financial year. This income is received during the year and is therefore not allocated when the local board approves its work programme at the start of the year. The Rodney Local Board allocated $2,000 of this film income to the volunteer libraries in Point Wells and Leigh (ID 1883) at its April 2021 business meeting to provide additional local board funding of $1,000 to each of these two libraries.

$4,247

 

 

 

TOTAL

$91,091

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.  The reallocation of funding from the identified projects towards the tree maintenance work at Green Road is not expected to negatively impact climate change.

28.  The Green Road masterplan emphasises the importance of ecological restoration and includes actions to improve water quality and increase tree canopy.

29.  These environmental initiatives will improve habitat for insects, birds and bats, and help offset carbon emissions, but are dependent on funding and resources to implement.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

30.  When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the local boards. There are no further impacts to be considered with this reallocation of funding.

31.  Relevant departments within Auckland Council have been consulted regarding the reallocations and no objections or concerns have been raised by delivery staff.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.  The reallocation of funding within the local board’s LDI opex work programme supports strong delivery and optimisation of the local board’s available budget for 2020/2021.

33.  The nature of the reallocation aligns with the local board’s work programme and Rodney Local Board Plan 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.  Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activities of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

35.  Mana whenua had been involved in the drafting of the Green Road masterplan and this is expressed in the masterplan by increasing outcomes for Māori through:

·      the park’s vision and principles, which celebrate the park’s Māori heritage, seek to protect the park’s rural and ecological character, and increased access to the park for all to enjoy

·      acknowledging mana whenua’s role as kaitiaki (guardians) of the park.

36.  It will be important to engage mana whenua throughout the life of the plan, and on future plans for the park, to ensure Māori outcomes remain a priority.

37.  The Community Facilities work programme ensures that all facilities and open space assets continue to be well-maintained to benefit the local community, including Māori. When developing and delivering work programmes consideration is given to how the activities can contribute to Māori well-being, values, culture and traditions.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.  Reallocation of funding is regarded as a prudent step for the local board to take in order to optimise its LDI opex budget for the 2020/2021 financial year.

39.  It is noted that the tree maintenance work at Green Road aligns with the local board’s Local Board Plan and is informed by an assessment funded by the local board through its LDI opex budget in 2020/2021.

40.  Should the local board choose not to support the reallocation of the funding from the initiatives identified above, the funding would be offered up as savings to Auckland Council.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

41.  A risk exists that despite the reallocation of funding, the work is not able to be carried out leading to the loss of funding for the local board. This has been discussed with department staff and has been a key consideration of the initiatives put forward to the local board for consideration.

42.  Delivery staff from the Community Facilities team believe it is feasible to deliver this initiative within the timeframes required, and the risk of non-delivery is considered to be low.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.  The funding will be reallocated according to the local board’s resolution, and the relevant departments will progress with the delivery of the next steps.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Green Road Park - Tree Maintenance Schedule

173

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Anwen Robinson – Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

Urgent Decision – feedback on Auckland Council’s submission on Transport and Infrastructure Committee inquiry into congestion pricing in Auckland

File No.: CP2021/05678

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the Rodney Local Board that an urgent decision was made and approved under delegation to the chairperson and deputy chairperson to provide input into Auckland Council’s submission to Parliament’s Transport and Infrastructure Committee inquiry into congestion pricing in Auckland.

2.       A staff memo providing a brief overview of the Transport and Infrastructure Committee inquiry into congestion pricing in Auckland, the timeframes for developing Auckland Council’s submission and how local boards can provide feedback is contained in Attachment B to the agenda report.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       At the 20 November 2019 Rodney Local Board meeting the local board considered the urgent decision-making process and passed resolution RD/2019/147:

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      adopt the urgent decision-making process for matters that require a decision where it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirement of a quorum

b)      delegate authority to the chairperson and deputy chairperson, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board

c)      agree that the relationship manager, chairperson and deputy chairperson (or any person/s acting in these roles) will authorise the urgent decision-making process by signing off the authorisation memo

d)      note that all urgent decisions will be reported to the next ordinary meeting of the local board.   CARRIED

4.       The Minister of Transport has asked Parliament’s Transport and Infrastructure Committee to undertake an inquiry into congestion pricing in Auckland.

5.       Congestion pricing involves implementing a charge (or charges) to manage demand on the road network. This can encourage users to change their travel behaviour, such as the time, route, or mode by which they travel.   

6.       The select committee has invited public submissions, which close on Thursday 20 May. 

7.       The local board has the opportunity to consider the matters raised by ‘The Congestion Question’ project and to formulate its views for inclusion as part of Auckland Council’s submission to the select committee.

8.       Local boards have a role in representing the views of their communities on issues of local importance, such as proving feedback on the local effects of central government proposals in Auckland Council submissions. 

9.       As a result of local board feedback being due on 10 May, prior to the next business meeting, an urgent decision was required.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note Rodney Local Board’s feedback on Auckland Council’s submission on the Transport and Infrastructure Committee inquiry into congestion pricing in Auckland approved by the chairperson and deputy chairperson under delegation (Attachment A to the agenda report).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rodney Local Board feedback

183

b

Staff memo

187

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Justin Kary – Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

Approve the appointment a project lead for the Rodney Local Board

File No.: CP2021/04968

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve a project lead for the Rodney Local Board 2019-2022 triennium.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 20 November 2019 the Rodney Local Board approved the report on Local board governance work management for the 2019-2022 triennium CP2019/19017 which established a project lead structure to empower members to progress local board initiatives.

3.       The terms of reference allow for individual members to be appointed as project leads to pursue specific priorities or initiatives.

4.       The guidelines for the scope and role of a project lead are contained in the Rodney Local Board project lead guidelines (Attachment A to the agenda report).

5.       The following request to act as project lead has been received from:

i)    Member Danielle Hancock, as lead for Kaukapakapa Town Centre Activation.

6.       Additional project leads may be appointed in the future with the approval of the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve Member Danielle Hancock, as lead for Kaukapakapa Town Centre Activation as set out in the project lead appointment form (Attachment B to the agenda report)

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       On 20 November 2019 the Rodney Local Board approved the report on Local board governance work management for the 2019-2022 triennium CP2019/19017 which outlined options for efficiently and effectively managing the governance work of the Rodney Local Board for the 2019-2022 triennium.

8.       This was a practice started in the 2016-2019 term, where the Rodney Local Board established project leads. In a number of instances, this system sped up and progressed the work programme items or local board initiatives.

9.       Within this report is a description of the role and requirements of a project lead. This system is designed to progress local initiatives and projects outside of formal business meetings. This enables staff to work alongside local board members to progress projects prior to reference back to the full local board for decisions.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The project lead system is a useful tool to improve efficiency. However, it is only useful if the delegated leads adhere to a consistent reporting schedule to the full local board and ensure that they are not providing direction to council staff or community that is beyond the scope of the delegation.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

11.     This decision has no impact on greenhouse gas emissions, as it is a governance monitoring decision and procedural report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.     Where the topic of a project involves a CCO such as Auckland Transport, it is intended that this governance decision will improve communication and decision-making effectiveness.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.     This report has a direct impact on the efficiency and effectiveness of the local board, by ensuring that key projects have stronger supervision by the local board

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

14.     Unless any of the projects identified as needing leads have strong Māori outcomes, there are no further impacts, positive or negative for Māori.

15.     It is recommended that any possible meetings with iwi groups be brought before the local board for approval.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

16.     There are no financial implications, as the project lead structure has no decision-making responsibilities and therefore no ability to change the scope of existing initiatives.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

17.       As per the Project Lead Guidelines, the project leads must not, unless explicitly stated     otherwise in a local board resolution:

a)      approve any expenditure

b)      imply or promise that the local board or council will commit to any future expenditure

c)      make landowner approval for any project to proceed or confirm the details of any final placement or design of any structure

d)      sign off on a project as complete

e)      change the scope of a project from what was agreed to in the project lead appointment.

18.     It is recommended that each project lead include a reporting period in the signed form, and that these are brought to the local board for updates.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

19.     To add update periods for each project lead to the meeting schedule.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rodney Local Board Project Lead Guidelines

195

b

Project lead form - Kaukapakapa Town Centre Activation

197

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

Rodney Ward Councillor update

File No.: CP2021/01374

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Rodney Local Board allocates a period of time for the Ward Councillor, Greg Sayers, to update them on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      receive Cr Sayers’ update on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

Rodney Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2021/01631

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Attached are the Rodney Local Board workshop records for 5 and 12 May 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the workshop records for 5 and 12 May 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop record 5 May

203

b

Workshop record 12 May

205

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

Governance forward work calendar

File No.: CP2021/02927

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present to the Rodney Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Rodney Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months until the end of the electoral term. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

2.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

· ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

· clarifying what advice is required and when

· clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the governance forward work calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work calendar

209

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Warkworth South Plan Change draft vision document presentation                                  Page 213

Item 8.1      Attachment b    Warkworth South Plan Change vision introduction letter                                                               Page 221



Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 









Rodney Local Board

19 May 2021

 

 

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[1] Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, section 15(2)(c)

[2] Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, ss15-16.

 

[3] Resource Management Act 1991, section 8.

[4] Schedule of Issues of Significance and Māori Plan 2017, Independent Māori Statutory Board

[5] Local Government Act 2002, Schedule 7, clause 36D.