I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Albert-Eden Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 15 June 2021

2.00pm

Albert Eden Local Board Office
135 Dominion Road
Mt Eden

 

Albert-Eden Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Lee Corrick

 

Deputy Chairperson

Margi Watson

 

Members

Graeme Easte

 

 

Rachel Langton

 

 

Julia Maskill

 

 

Will McKenzie

 

 

Christina Robertson

 

 

Kendyl Smith

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Michael Mendoza – Democracy Advisor

 

10 June 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 809 149

Email: Michael.Mendoza@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 

 


 


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     Public Forum - Green Tracking Design for Light Rail                                      5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Adoption of the Albert-Eden Local Board Agreement 2021/2022                            7

12        Approval of Plans and Places work programme 2021/2022                                   27

13        Approval of the 2021/2022 Albert-Eden Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme                                                              33

14        Approval of the 2021/2022 Albert-Eden Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme                                                                                          49

15        Proposed exchange of reserve land at Murray Halberg Park, Ōwairaka            111

16        Adoption of the Albert-Eden Urban Ngahere Action Plan 2021                           121

17        Feedback on Equity of Service Levels and Funding Proposals - Draft Report  161

18        Albert-Eden Local Board input into Auckland Council's submission on proposed changes to the Freedom Camping Act 2011                                                          211

19        Feedback on Hīkina te Kohupara – Kia mauri ora ai te iwi. Transport Emissions: Pathways to Net Zero by 2050 discussion document                                           247

20        Feedback on Te Waihanga New Zealand Infrastructure Commission's consultation document He Tūāpapa ki te Ora, Infrastructure for a Better Future, Aotearoa New Zealand Infrastructure Strategy                                                                               249

21        Auckland Unlimited 2020/2021 Quarter Three Performance Report                   253

22        Eke Panuku Development Auckland - Albert-Eden Local Board Six-Monthly Report to 31 March 2021                                                                                                        269

23        Urgent decision - local board representation on the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Mangere light rail project                                                                 275

24        Delegation of feedback to be provided to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project                                                                         285

25        Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors' Updates                                           289

26        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                291

27        Board Members' Reports                                                                                          295

28        Albert-Eden Local Board 2021 Governance Forward Work Calendar                 309

29        Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Records                                                        315

30        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

31        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               327

C1       Urgent decision - Project Whakapai - Services provided by AIM Services        327


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)         confirm the minutes of its meetings held on Tuesday, 18 May 2021 and Tuesday, 8 June 2021 as true and correct records.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Albert-Eden Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Green Tracking Design for Light Rail

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for Ed Clayton - resident, to deliver a presentation during the Public Forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Ed Clayton - resident, will be in attendance to deliver a presentation to the local board regarding Green Tracking of Light Rail and to inform the board about an engineering design for proposed light rail systems that is constructed to filter and treat surface runoff through swales and biofiltration system built into the rail corridor.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      thank Ed Clayton - resident, for his attendance and Public Forum presentation.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Adoption of the Albert-Eden Local Board Agreement 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/07420

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the local content for the 10-year Budget, which includes the Albert-Eden Local Board Agreement 2021/2022, the message from the chair, and local board advocacy.

2.       To adopt a local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement, as agreed between the Governing Body and the local board, for each local board area.

4.       From 22 February to 22 March 2021, council consulted on the proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031. Local boards considered this feedback and then held discussions with the Finance and Performance Committee on 12 May 2021 on regional issues, community feedback, and key local board initiatives and advocacy areas.

5.       Local boards are now considering local content for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 which includes a local board agreement, a message from the chair, and local board advocacy, as well as a local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022.

6.       On 29 June 2021, the Governing Body will meet to adopt Auckland Council’s 10-year Budget 2021-2031, including 21 local board agreements.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      adopt the local content for the 10-year Budget, which includes the Albert-Eden Local Board Agreement 2021/2022, the message from the chair, and local board advocacy (Attachment A).

b)      adopt a local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022 (Attachment B).

c)      delegate authority to the Chair to make any final changes to the local content for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 (the Albert-Eden Local Board Agreement 2021/2022, message from the chair, and local board advocacy).

d)      note that the resolutions of this meeting will be reported back to the Governing Body when it meets to adopt the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, including each Local Board Agreement, on 29 June 2021.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Local board plans are strategic documents that are developed every three years to set a direction for local boards. Local board plans influence and inform the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 which outlines priorities, budgets and intended levels of service over a 10-year period. For each financial year, Auckland Council must also have a local board agreement, as agreed between the Governing Body and the local board, for each local board area.

8.       Throughout the development of the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, local board chairs (or delegated local board representatives) have had the opportunity to attend Finance and Performance Committee workshops on key topics and provide local board views on regional issues being considered as part of the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

9.       From 22 February to 22 March 2021, the council consulted with the public on the 10-year Budget 2018-2028.  One locally held online event was held in the Albert-Eden Local Board area to engage with the community and seek feedback on both regional and local proposals.

10.     A report analysing the feedback on local board priorities, as well as feedback from those living in the local board area related to the regional issues, was included as an attachment on the 4 May 2021 business meeting agenda.

11.     Local boards considered this feedback, and then held discussions with the Finance and Performance Committee at a workshop on 12 May 2021 on regional issues, community feedback and key local board initiatives and advocacy areas.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Both staff and the local board have reviewed the local feedback received as part of  consultation on 10-year Budget 2021-2031 and local boards have received a report analysing the local feedback. It is now recommended that local boards adopt local content for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 (Attachment A), including the Local Board Agreement 2021/2022, the message from the chair, and local board advocacy, as well as a local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022 (Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The decisions recommended in this report are procedural in nature and will not have any climate impacts themselves.

14.     Some of the proposed projects in the Local Board Agreement may have climate impacts. The climate impacts of any projects Auckland Council chooses to progress with will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

15.     Some of the proposed projects in the Local Board Agreement will be specifically designed to mitigate climate impact, build resilience to climate impacts, and restore the natural environment.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     Local boards worked with council departments to develop their local board work programmes for 2021/2022 that will be adopted at June business meetings. The local board work programmes help inform the local board agreements.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     This report seeks local board adoption of its content for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 and other associated material, including the Local Board Agreement 2021/2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the 10-year Budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate council’s responsiveness to Māori. 

19.     Local board plans, which were developed in 2020 through engagement with the community including Māori, form the basis of local priorities. There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and where relevant the wider Māori community.

20.     Of those who submitted to the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 from the Albert-Eden Local Board area 53 identified as Māori.  Five mana whenua and two mataawaka entities made a submission on both the Albert-Eden Local Board priorities and the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.  These submissions were provided to the local board for consideration at local board workshops during the development of their local board agreement.

21.     Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The local board agreement includes the allocation of locally driven initiatives (LDI) funding and asset based services (ABS) funding to projects and services for the 2021/2022 financial year.

23.     LDI funding is discretionary funding allocated to local boards based on the Local Board Funding Policy (included in the 10-year Budget), which local boards can spend on priorities for their communities. Local boards can also utilise LDI funding to increase local levels of service if they wish to do so.

24.     Funding for asset based services (ABS) is allocated by the Governing Body to local boards based on current levels of service to run and maintain local assets and services including parks, pools and recreation facilities, community facilities, and libraries.

25.     A local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022 is adopted alongside of the Local Board Agreement 2021/2022. The fees and charges have been formulated based on region-wide baseline service levels and revenue targets. Where fees and charges are amended by a local board that results in lower revenue for the council, the shortfall will need to be made up by either allocating LDI funds or reducing expenditure on other services to balance overall budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     Decisions on the local content of the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, including the Local Board Agreement 2021/2022 and a local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022, are required by 17 June 2021 to ensure the Governing Body can adopt the final 10-year Budget 2021-2031, including each Local Board Agreement, at its 29 June 2021 meeting.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     The resolutions of this meeting will be reported to the Governing Body on 29 June 2021 when it meets to adopt the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, including 21 local board agreements.

28.     It is possible that minor changes may need to be made to the attachments before the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 is adopted, such as correction of any errors identified and minor wording changes. Staff therefore recommend that the local board delegates authority to the Chair to make any final changes if necessary.

29.     Local board agreements set the priorities and budget envelopes for each financial year. Work programmes then detail the activities that will be delivered within those budget envelopes. Work programmes will be agreed between local boards and operational departments at business meetings in June 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Local content to support the 10-year Budget 2021-2031:
•           Local Board Agreement 2021/2022
•           Message from the Chair
•           Local board advocacy

11

b

Local fees and charges schedule 2021/2022

25

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Francis Martin - Advisor Plans & Programmes

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Approval of Plans and Places work programme 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/07879

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Albert-Eden Local Board Plans and Places work programme 2021/2022

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the Plans and Places work programme for the 2021/2022 financial year for approval by the Albert-Eden Local Board (see Attachment A).

3.       The work programme responds to the following outcome that the local board identified in the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020:

·    Resilient, connected and empowered communities who value diversity.

4.       Plans and Places has one activity on the Albert-Eden Local Board work programme for the 2021/2022 financial year, namely undertaking an integrated area plan for the Mt Roskill redevelopment area, which is part of the Albert-Eden and Puketāpapa local board areas. This is an existing project which is underway and will continue into the 2021/2022 financial year.

5.       This work programme activity is funded through the regional budget and is not from within the board’s draft Locally-driven Initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2021/2022 financial year.

6.       Updates on the delivery of this work programme activity will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      approve the Plans and Places work programme 2021/2022 for the Albert-Eden Local Board (Attachment A to the agenda report).

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward through a series of workshops. The local board feedback at these workshops have informed the work programme.

8.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020. The specific outcome that is reflected in the work programme is:

·        Resilient, connected and empowered communities who value diversity.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The proposed activity for delivery as part of the local board’s Plans and Places work programme 2021/2022 is the undertaking of an integrated area plan for the Mt Roskill redevelopment area, which includes parts of the Albert-Eden and Puketāpapa local board areas. This is an existing project which is underway and will continue into the 2021/2022 financial year. See Attachment A for further detail.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

10.     The decision does not impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards adapting to the impacts of climate change. However the integrated area plan will contribute to the council’s climate goals as set out in Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan which are:

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·    to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

11.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented on the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

12.     The development of the integrated area plan for the Mt Roskill redevelopment area is being undertaken in close collaboration with relevant council departments and CCOs.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.     The proposed Albert-Eden work programme has been considered by the local board at a series of workshops from November 2020 to May 2021.

14.     The development of the integrated area plan for the Mt Roskill redevelopment area aligns with the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

15.     Mana whenua are playing an integral role in the development of the integrated area plan for the Mt Roskill redevelopment area and this will continue until the review has been completed. The following mana whenua have participated closely with the Plans and Places team and the working group guiding the development of the integrated area plan:

·        Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

·        Te Ākitai Waiohua

·        Te Ahiwaru Waiohua

·        Ngaati Whanaunga

·        Te Kawerau ā Maki

·        Ngāti Tamaoho

·        Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

·        Ngati Maru

·        Te Patukirikiri

·        Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua

·        Ngati Te Ata Waiohua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

16.     The development of the integrated area plan is funded through the regional budget and not from within the board’s draft Locally-driven Initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2021/2022 financial year.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

17.     It is envisaged that the development of the integrated area plan for the Mt Roskill redevelopment area will be completed during the 2021/2022 financial year. If due to unforeseen circumstances, this activity is delayed, it will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

18.     Delivery of the activity is currently underway and will continue into the 2021/2022 financial year. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Plans and Places Work Programme 2021/2022

31

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Fiona Sprott - Team Leader - Planning

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Approval of the 2021/2022 Albert-Eden Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme

File No.: CP2021/06760

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2021/2022 Albert-Eden Local Board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme, and approve in principle the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programmes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the Albert-Eden Local Board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and associated budgets for approval for the 2021/2022 financial year, and for approval in principle for the subsequent two financial years, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 (see Attachment A).

3.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives identified in the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020.

4.       The work programme has been developed through a series of workshops between December 2020 and May 2021, where the local board provided feedback to staff on programme and activity prioritisation.

5.       The local board indicated its support for the following activities to be delivered in 2021/2022, with budgets as listed below:

·        Bike hub implementation (Tumeke Cycle Space) - $10,000

·        Climate Action Programme - $20,000

·        EcoNeighbourhoods - $55,000

·        Maungakiekie Songbird - $15,000

·        Te Auaunga / Oakley Creek pest plant control buffer programme - $20,000

·        Urban Ark Strategic Plan implementation - $40,000

·        Waitītiko / Meola Creek restoration - $28,000.

6.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $188,000, which can be funded from within the board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2021/2022 financial year. Approval in principle is also being sought for activities in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

7.       The indicative programmes and budgets for 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 are subject to change, and will be confirmed on an annual basis through the approval of the respective work programmes.

8.       Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      approve its 2021/2022 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and associated budgets, as summarised in the table below (Attachment A to the agenda report):

Activity name

2021/2022 budget for approval

Bike Hub Implementation (Tumeke Cycle Space)

$10,000

Climate Action Programme

$20,000

EcoNeighbourhoods

$55,000

Maungakiekie Songbird

$15,000

Te Auaunga / Oakley Creek pest plant control buffer programme

$20,000

Urban Ark Strategic Plan implementation

$40,000

Waitītiko / Meola Creek Restoration

$28,000

Total

$188,000

 

b)      approve in principle the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programmes (Attachment A to the agenda report).

c)      note that the indicative programmes and budgets for 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 are subject to change, and will be confirmed on an annual basis through the approval of the respective work programmes.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops has informed the development of the Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme (Attachment A).

10.     The proposed work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives identified in the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020. The specific objectives reflected in the work programme are:

·        our environment is protected and restored

·        our community has sustainable lifestyles and takes climate action

·        people are resilient and can adapt to change

·        our community has more transport options and we see a shift in transport modes used by the community.

11.     The following adopted strategies and plans also guided the development of the work programme:

·        Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan

·        Regional Pest Management Plan

·        Waiora Healthy Waterways Programme.

12.     The development of the work programme has been informed by staff assessments and identification of local environmental priority areas, and feedback received from the local board at workshops.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     The proposed work programme is made up of activities continuing from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or ongoing programmes. It also includes new initiatives supported by the local board. These programmes contribute towards the delivery of the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020 environmental objectives, as detailed above.

14.     The work programme (Attachment A) provides a three-year view that demonstrates the phasing or continuation of programme delivery over the 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

15.     This report seeks local board approval for budgets and activities in year one of the three-year work programme (2021/2022), and approval in principle for 2022/2023 and 2023/2024.

16.     Approving in principle does not commit the local board to funding in future years, as the budget for years two and three will still need to be approved on an annual basis. However approval in principle will help staff, contractors and community groups to plan activities and resourcing in the longer-term.

17.     Budgets for years two and three are subject to change, as the programmes are further refined or if local board priorities shift.

18.     The proposed activities for delivery as part of the board’s 2021/2022 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme are detailed below, alongside indicative plans and budgets for the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years:

Bike hub implementation (Tumeke Cycle Space) – $10,000

19.     The local board has indicated that it would like to continue to fund a bike hub programme. The local board allocated $10,000 towards this programme in 2020/2021 and 2019/2020 and $20,000 in 2018/2019.

20.     Staff recommend that the local board allocates $10,000 of its locally driven initiatives operational budget towards the bike hub programme in the 2021/2022 financial year, which will support:

·        the development of a sustainable operating model for the bike hub that will result in predictable operating hours for users

·        funding and support being identified and secured from other sources to enable the development of the bike hub and its programmes.

21.     Approval in principle is also sought for $10,000 towards this programme from the local board in both 2022/2023 and 2023/2024. However, this funding will not be required if other funding sources are successfully identified in 2021/2022.

Climate Action Programme – $20,000

22.     The local board has indicated that it would like to fund a new local climate action programme for the Albert-Eden Local Board area.

23.     Staff recommend that the board provides $20,000 of its locally driven initiatives operational budget towards this programme in the 2021/2022 financial year. This budget would enable:

·        the formation of a stakeholder working group comprising community members, iwi and key business stakeholder representatives and facilitating their input towards identifying and prioritising strategic community-based low carbon outcomes and initiatives

·        the provision of a matrix showing the alignment of existing and proposed local programmes with regional low carbon targets

·        the development of a local low carbon plan detailing targets, actions and a supporting monitoring framework.

24.     Approval in principle is also sought for $40,000 towards this programme from the local board in both 2022/2023 and 2023/2024.

EcoNeighbourhoods – $55,000

25.     The local board has indicated that it would like to continue to fund its EcoNeighbourhoods programme in the 2021/2022 financial year.

26.     An EcoNeighbourhood group comprises of groups of six or more neighbours from different households within the local board area, with an objective to adopt sustainable practices and increase resilience within their homes, lifestyles and neighbourhoods.

27.     Staff recommend that the local board allocate $55,000 of its locally-driven initiatives operational budget towards the continuation of this programme in the 2020/2021 financial year. This will be the eighth year that the local board has provided funding towards this programme, including $55,000 in the 2019/2020 and 2020/2021 financial years.

28.     The 2021/2022 budget will enable up to 22 EcoNeighbourhood groups to receive up to 12 hours of facilitation support from the programme manager. The groups can receive up to $1,000 worth of support including incentives, discounts and training to support behaviour change.

29.     EcoNeighbourhood groups decide what sustainable living actions they wish to undertake and a programme manager supports these groups to take action. The activities that groups have or will undertake include carbon footprinting, beekeeping, sustainable food production, water conservation, waste minimisation, energy reduction, and biodiversity initiatives.

30.     Approval in principle is also sought for $55,000 towards this programme from the local board in both 2022/2023 and 2023/2024.

Maungakiekie Songbird – $15,000

31.     The local board has indicated that it would like to fund the Maungakiekie Songbird programme around the Maungakiekie maunga. The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board established support for this programme in the 2020/2021 financial year, with funding of $20,000.

32.     The $15,000 funding requested for this programme from the Albert-Eden Local Board will be used to support a community coordinator to provide advice, tools and resources to the community, businesses and schools to undertake pest control and monitoring around the Maungakiekie maunga.

33.     This programme will help support native wildlife and birdsong to flourish in and around the maunga.  Schools, communities and businesses will be empowered to take actions to improve their local environment. Funding of $20,000 is also being sought from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board to increase environmental outcomes across the maunga and surrounding areas.

34.     Approval in principle is also sought for $10,000 towards this programme from the Albert-Eden Local Board and $15,000 from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board in 2022/2023 and 2023/2024.

Te Auaunga / Oakley Creek pest plant control buffer programme – $20,000

35.     The local board has indicated it would like to continue to fund the Te Auaunga pest plant buffer programme for the 2021/2022 financial year. The local board allocated $10,000 towards this programme in 2019/2020 and 2020/2021.

36.     This programme will support private landowners living next to high-value parks and reserves to control invasive weeds. The programme will begin with private properties adjoining Te Auaunga (Oakley Creek). 

37.     The aim of the programme is to reduce weed densities on private properties and create a buffer to protect high-value parks and reserves from continued weed invasion. This will include:

·        identifying key buffer areas around Te Auaunga (Oakley Creek), with support from the local community group, Friends of Oakley Creek

·        identifying target weed species to be included for control

·        liaising with, providing advice and support for landowners and occupiers to undertake weed control with permission from the landowner.

38.     Approval in principle is also sought for $20,000 towards this programme from the local board in both 2022/2023 and 2023/2024.

Urban Ark Strategic Plan implementation – $40,000

39.     The local board has indicated it would like to continue to support the Urban Ark programme in the 2021/2022 financial year. This programme will continue to expand the work of Urban Ark Manawa Taiao through funding for a coordinator, facilitator costs and resources.

40.     Funding for this project will support community groups to restore native habitat and protect native biodiversity by undertaking pest control and planting native trees and shrubs.

41.     Urban Ark Manawa Taiao is a collaborative community-led initiative that works at a landscape scale, currently working across both the Albert-Eden and Waitematā Local Board areas. The group helps to coordinate and support community conservation groups in the central suburbs of Westmere, Point Chevalier, Kingsland, Western Springs, Morningside and Grey Lynn, with a goal of providing habitats where indigenous wildlife can thrive.

42.     The programme has been jointly funded with the Waitematā Local Board. In 2020/2021 both local boards provided $15,000 each toward this programme. In 2021/2022, Albert-Eden Local Board has a higher proposed investment of $40,000. This increase in funding in part reflects the programme incorporating the Epsom Rock Forest Landowner Assistance Programme which has $10,000 of funding in 2020/2021.

43.     Approval in principle is also sought for $40,000 towards this programme from the local board in 2022/2023 and $50,000 from 2023/2024.

Waitītiko / Meola Creek restoration – $28,000

44.     The local board has indicated support for the continuation of the Waitītiko / Meola Creek restoration programme in the 2021/2022 financial year. Local community groups and schools across the Albert-Eden and Waitematā Local Board areas will continue to be supported in their work to restore the riparian margins of the Waitītiko awa.  The programme will encourage new groups through community events and education, as well as create linkages to local pest control initiatives.

45.     This programme supports a catchment approach to restoring Waitītiko by empowering community and school groups to undertake water quality monitoring and riparian restoration planting.

46.     This project is jointly funded with the Waitematā Local Board as the stream passes through both local board areas. The Waitematā Local Board has a lower proposed investment of $21,000 for the 2021/2022 financial year due to a higher number of restoration sites in the Albert-Eden Local Board area.

47.     In 2020/2021 the local board funded $28,000 towards this programme, while Waitematā contributed $21,000.

48.     Approval in principle is also sought for $28,000 towards this programme from the Albert-Eden Local Board and $21,000 from the Waitematā Local Board in both 2022/2023 and 2023/2024.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

49.     In June 2019, Auckland Council declared a climate emergency and in response to this the council adopted the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan in July 2020.

50.     Each activity in the work programme is assessed to identify whether it will have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions and contributing towards climate change adaptation.

51.     Table 1 outlines the key activities in the 2021/2022 work programme that have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards climate change adaptation.

Table 1: Climate impact assessment of proposed activities

Activity name

Climate impact

Bike hub implementation (Tumeke Cycle Space)

This programme aims to reduce emissions by increasing community uptake of active transport and reducing carbon footprints. This programme aims to increase community resilience through increased sustainable living and increased community connections.

Climate Action Programme

This programme aims to reduce emissions by identifying gaps and strategic opportunities and collaborations that will build on existing local activity.

EcoNeighbourhoods

This programme aims to reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts, using currently available solutions for immediate progress. Community climate action involves local residents reducing or responding to climate change in personal lifestyle or local community-based ways, creating new social norms.

Maungakiekie Songbird, Te Auaunga / Oakley Creek pest plant control buffer programme and Urban Ark Strategic Plan implementation

Protection of native trees through undertaking pest plant control will increase carbon sequestration. Carbon sequestration is the long-term removal, capture or sequestration of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to slow or reverse atmospheric carbon dioxide pollution and to mitigate global warming.

Waitītiko / Meola Creek restoration

Freshwater ecosystems provide many ecosystem services such as flood mitigation, habitat for native biodiversity and carbon sequestration. These services are enhanced when the ecosystems are restored.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

52.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

53.     In particular, the attached Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme reflects the integrated activities developed by Environmental Services and Healthy Waters.

54.     Several of the proposed programmes will include collaboration with Parks, Sports and Recreation, including the Waitītiko / Meola Creek restoration programme.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

55.     The programmes proposed for inclusion in the board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme will have positive environmental outcomes across the Albert-Eden Local Board area. Particular focus areas for the 2021/2022 work programme include Gribblehirst Park, Maungakiekie, Te Auaunga and Waitītiko.

56.     The programmes noted above aligns with the local board plan outcome ‘high-quality natural environments and sustainable lifestyles’.  The proposed work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from December 2020 to May 2021. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

57.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori.

58.     The work programme includes activities that aim to deliver outcomes for and with Māori, in alignment with the strategic priority areas outlined in Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau (Auckland Council’s Māori Outcome Framework). Progress on how the activities are achieving these outcomes will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

59.     Staff recognise that environmental management, water quality and land management have integral links with the mauri of the environment and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

60.     Table 2 outlines the activities in the 2021/2022 work programme that contribute towards the delivery of specific Māori outcomes.

Table 2: Māori outcome delivery through proposed activities

Activity name

Māori outcome description

Maungakiekie Songbird

The programme will encourage others to be kaitiaki of their place. The Maunga Authority will be collaborated with throughout the programme. Māori will be informed about this programme and encouraged to take part.

Te Auaunga / Oakley Creek pest plant control buffer programme

The programme will protect the local parks and stream and encourage others to be kaitiaki of their place. Future plans to communicate and potentially engage with the local iwi, Ngāti Whātua, who own land adjoining the stream.

Waitītiko / Meola Creek Restoration

Te Mahurehure Marae sits adjacent to the awa and a relationship with the marae is ongoing within the restoration programme and kaitiakitanga of the awa.

61.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

62.     The proposed environment work programme for 2021/2022 totals to $188,000 of the board’s locally-driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2021/2022.

63.     Budgets for activities in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years are indicative. While local board approval in principle is being sought for these future years through this report, formal approval will be sought on an annual basis, once budgets and programme costs are confirmed.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

64.     If the proposed Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme is not approved before the start of the financial year, there is a risk that activities may be delayed or not delivered within the financial year.

65.     Risks and mitigations for new activity lines were considered during the scoping phase. There may be risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year. These will be continually assessed and reported to the local board.

66.     The COVID-19 pandemic could have a further negative impact on the delivery local board work programmes if the COVID-19 Alert Level changes (New Zealand’s 4-level Alert System specifies measures to be taken against COVID-19 at each level).  The deliverability of some activities will decrease if there is an increase to the COVID-19 Alert Level.  Drought conditions may also lead to delays in any programmes which involve planting.

67.     Resourcing of the work programme is based on current staff capacity within departments. Therefore, changes to staff capacity may also have an impact on work programme delivery.

68.     Attachment B shows the key risks associated with activities in the proposed 2021/2022 work programme, as well as proposed mitigations.

69.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

70.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence once approved and continue until 30 June 2022. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

71.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2021/2022 Albert-Eden Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme

43

b

Key risks and proposed mitigations for the Albert-Eden Local Board environmental work programme

47

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Nick FitzHerbert - Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Approval of the 2021/2022 Albert-Eden Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme

File No.: CP2021/07640

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2021/2022 Albert-Eden Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme and approve in principle the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programmes (Attachment A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the 2021/2022 Albert-Eden Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme with associated budget for approval, as well as the subsequent two financial years, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programmes for approval in principle.

3.       The local board approves the work programme each financial year. Delivery of the approved work programme will support the local board to achieve the outcomes and aspirations in the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020.

4.       The work programme details the activities to be delivered by departments within the Customer and Community Services directorate.

5.       The work programme has been developed through a series of workshops between December 2020 and May 2021, where the local board provided feedback to staff on project and activity prioritisation.

6.       The work programme development process takes an integrated approach to scoping activity, involving collaboration between staff from across council and the local board.

7.       Several projects in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programme have been identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme. Approval is sought for the planning and design of these projects to commence during 2021/2022, so that they are ready to be delivered early if approved projects for delivery in 2021/2022 are delayed for any unforeseen reason.   

8.       The work programme includes projects proposed to be funded from regional budgets subject to approval by the relevant Governing Body committee. The local board can provide formal feedback on these regional projects through resolution to this report.

9.       The most significant risk to successful delivery of the 2021/2022 work programme is a change in COVID-19 alert levels that would impact delivery timeframes and budget.

10.     Updates on the progress of the work programme delivery will be provided through the local board’s quarterly performance reports.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      approve the 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme and associated budget and approve, in principle, the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programmes (Attachment A to the agenda report).

b)      approve the Risk Adjusted Programme projects identified in the 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report).

c)      note that funding for the Coastal Renewals, Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development and the Natural Environment Targeted Rate budgets are subject to approval by the relevant Governing Body committee.

d)      provide feedback for consideration by the relevant Governing Body committee on projects funded from the Coastal Renewals, Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development and the Natural Environment Targeted Rate budgets (Attachment D to the agenda report).

Horopaki

Context

11.     Customer and Community Services provide a wide range of services, facilities, open spaces and information that support communities to connect, enjoy and embrace the diversity of our people, places and natural environment. These are tailored to the unique needs of the local community in a place-based approach.

12.     The 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme (included as Attachment A) outlines the local board’s priorities to be delivered within the financial year.

13.     The work programme aligns to council plans, policies and strategies. Each activity in the work programme delivers to a specific objective relating to one or more of the following 2020 Local Board Plan outcomes:

·        Outcome 1 - Resilient, connected and empowered communities who value diversity

·        Outcome 2 - Neighbourhoods that reflect & value our heritage & unique identity now and into the future

·        Outcome 3 - High-quality natural environments and sustainable lifestyles

·        Outcome 4 - A strong local economy with thriving town centres

·        Outcome 5 - Parks and community facilities meet a wide range of needs

14.     Development of the work programme is based on the understanding of:

·        local community needs

·        service and asset availability

·        funding availability

·        the work performed by other parties, including iwi partners, Council Controlled Organisations, community groups and commercial enterprises

·        risks

·        feedback received from the local board at workshops.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     Delivery of the work programme is the realisation of the local board’s aspirations for their community, as identified in the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020.

16.     The local board has discretion to allocate a portion of their budget to a project or activity that they identify as a priority across the three-year work programme period.

17.     Out of the initiatives signalled in the local board plan, the local board has prioritised the activities to be delivered in the next three years within available budgets.

18.     The work programme provides a three-year view that demonstrates the phasing of programme and project delivery for the following financial years:

·        2021/2022 (to be approved)

·        2022/2023 (to be approved in principle)

·        2023/2024 (to be approved in principle).

19.     The local board can approve the work programme for the first financial year and subsequently, delivery of this activity will commence from 1 July 2021. The local board can approve the following two years in principle only.

20.     This allows the work programme to be presented in a future focused way that shows how the local board plan will be responded to for the entirety of its three-year strategy, without locking down future investment before that activity is properly scoped.

21.     The local board will approve the 2022/2023 work programme in June 2022 and approve the 2023/2024 work programme in June 2023. This will include opportunity to make changes to these work programmes prior to approval, including adding or removing activities and budget allocations, unless funding has already been committed.

22.     However, approval of unique multi-year projects, particularly capital works, in the 2021/2022 work programme will commit the local board to the future funding associated with completing the project in 2022/2023 or 2023/2024.

23.     The work programme includes a continuation of delivery from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or projects, ongoing programmes, new activities and investments, and potential carry-forward items.

24.     Regular updates on the delivery of the programme will be provided to the local board through quarterly performance reports. These updates will identify progress of all projects, highlight risks, and advise if amendments to the budget or delivery timeframes are required.

COVID-19 recovery is a priority for Customer and Community Services

25.     A priority of the work programme is to deliver activities that respond to the impacts of COVID-19 on the following:

·     newly vulnerable communities

·     council financial constraints

·     building community resilience for recovery.

26.     Customer and Community Services is positioned well to deliver services that are key to the economic and social recovery of communities most in need, including by providing:

·     safe and welcoming spaces

·     inclusive events to bring the community back together

·     community supports, including grants

·     stronger connections with other organisations, including Council Controlled Organisations, iwi partners, business associations, community organisations and central government agencies who also serve our communities.

Delivering outcomes for, and with, Māori

27.     Council has important statutory obligations with respect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi – The Treaty of Waitangi. The strategic framework that informs council’s delivery and performance measurement of Māori outcomes is Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau Māori Outcomes Measurement Framework.

28.     Within this strategic framework, Customer and Community Services is responsible for leading activities that deliver against the following outcomes and objectives in Table 1.

Table 1: Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau outcomes and objectives

Mana outcome

Outcome statement

Mahi objective

Kia ora te Marae

Marae are centres of excellence for whānau Māori and have an abundant presence in communities.

Invest in marae to be self-sustaining and thriving hubs for Māori and the wider community.

Kia ora te Whānau

Empowered whānau Māori across Tāmaki Makaurau.

The council group will enable whānau Māori to experience relevant and welcoming public facilities and services. It will support Māori-led services where appropriate.

Kia ora te Reo

Ko te reo Māori te mauri o te mana Māori

The council group supports te reo Māori be seen, heard, spoken and learned throughout Tāmaki Makaurau.

29.     The work programme includes activities that have an objective to deliver moderate to high outcomes for and with Māori in one or more of the following strategic priority areas:

·     Kaitiakitanga

·     Māori business, tourism and employment

·     Māori identity and culture

·     marae development

·     papakāinga and Māori housing

·     realising rangatahi potential

·     te reo Māori

·     whānau and tamariki wellbeing.

30.     Activities in the work programme that aim to achieve high Māori outcomes in one or more of the strategic priority areas are identified in Attachment B.

31.     The Albert-Eden Local Board work programme includes eight activities that are identified as delivering moderate to high outcomes for Māori.  

32.     Progress updates on delivery of Māori outcomes will be provided to the local board through quarterly performance reports.

Types of budget

33.     Work programme activities are funded from budget sources dependent on the type of delivery. Some activities within the work programme have budget allocated from two or more sources, including budgets from both local and regional programmes.

34.     Table 2 outlines the different budget types and their purpose that fund the work programme.

Table 2: work programme budget types and purpose

Budget type

Description of budget purpose

Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

A development fund used to advance local operational and capital activities at the discretion of the local board

Asset Based Services (ABS)

Allocated by the Governing Body to deliver local activities based on decisions regarding region-wide service levels, including allocation of funds for local asset-based services

Local renewals

A fund dedicated to the renewal (servicing or replacement) of assets including those in local parks and community facilities

Growth (local parks and sports field development)

Primarily funded through development contributions, a regional fund to improve open spaces, including developing newly acquired land into parks, and existing open space to increase capacity to cater for growing population needs

Coastal

A regional fund for the renewal of Auckland’s significant coastal assets, such as seawalls, wharves and pontoons.

Landslide prevention

A regional fund to proactively develop new assets for the prevention of landslides and major slips throughout the region

Specific purpose funding

Funds received by the council from external sources held for specific local board areas and service agreements including compensation funding from other agencies for land acquisitions required for major projects

One Local Initiative (OLI)

Funds allocated by the Governing Body to a local board priority project in alignment with the Long-term Plan 2018-2028

Long-term Plan discrete

Funds associated with activities specifically named and listed in previous long-term plans, including new libraries, community centres and major sports and community infrastructure

Kauri Dieback Funding

As part of the Natural Environment Targeted Rate (NETR) Fund, this is a regional fund from the Environment and Climate Change Committee used to implement the national kauri dieback programme standards

External funding

Budget from external parties, not yet received and held by Customer and Community Services

Capital projects and budgets

35.     The capital works programmes have been geo-spatially mapped to indicate the location of projects within a local board area.

36.     Attachment C demonstrates the year of the three-year work programme that capital budget is proposed to be allocated to specific projects and indicates the main funding source for each project.

37.     Activity budgets for capital programme delivery are estimates only, as costs are subject to change and to be refined as the activity / project progresses through the design and delivery process. Greater clarity will be determined once activity details are defined with the work programme updated accordingly.

38.     Some projects are unable to be mapped as they reference multiple locations, or the work locations are yet to be determined.

Risk Adjusted Programme

39.     The Risk Adjusted Programme was implemented in 2019 and is designed to mitigate risk so that the total budget is delivered.

40.     Several capex projects in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programme have been identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme as highlighted in Attachment A.

41.     Approval is sought for the commencement of these projects in the 2021/2022 financial year, so that they can replace delays in projects that may not be delivered for unforeseen reasons.

Regionally funded activities included in the local board work programme

42.     There are activities, from the Coastal Renewals, Landslide Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development and the Natural Environment Targeted Rate budgets, which are funded regionally and will be approved by the Governing Body after 30 June 2021.

43.     These activities are included in the work programme because the local board has decision-making responsibility for that activity within the parameters set by the Governing Body, which include project location, scope and budget.

44.     These activities may be conducted by a number of teams, including within the Customer and Community Services and Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorates.

45.     The local board can provide feedback on the activities outlined in Attachment D. This feedback will be presented to the relevant Governing Body committee when they consider regionally funded activities.

Process for changes to the approved work programme

46.     Staff will provide progress updates to and seek approval from the local board if there are any projects that require scope, budget or timing changes throughout the financial year, or if activities need to be cancelled or added to the work programme.

47.     The work programme includes community leases. Straight-forward lease renewals without variations will be processed in accordance with agreed delegations through a written memo. Expired and more complex community leases will be workshopped with the local board and reported to a business meeting.

48.     For a change to the work programme considered to be minor, in that it does not substantially alter the approved work programme, staff will workshop this with the local board and then implement the change. A description of the change will be included in the following round of quarterly reporting.

49.     A change to the work programme that is considered substantial, will be presented to the local board at a business meeting for approval.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

50.     In June 2019, council declared a climate emergency and in response to this, council adopted the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan in July 2020.

51.     Each activity in the work programme is assessed to identify whether it will have a positive, negative, or neutral impact on greenhouse gas emissions and impact on resilience to climate change.

52.     To deliver on climate goals, Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri includes eight priorities for action:

·     natural environment

·     built environment

·     transport

·     economy

·     communities and coast

·     food

·     Te Puāwaitanga ō te Tātai

·     energy and industry.

53.     The work programme indicates which of these priorities each activity responds to.

54.     Attachment E outlines the activities in the work programme identified to have a positive and negative climate change impact.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

55.     The work programme is presented at a directorate level which reflects the integrated approach to developing the activities between the directorate’s departments of:

·     Connected Communities

·     Community Facilities

·     Community and Social Innovation

·     Parks, Sports and Recreation

·     Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships.

56.     The Customer and Community Services work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by representatives from across council departments, directorates and Council Controlled Organisations.  The integrated team developed the proposed work programme with the local board through a series of workshops.

57.     Some of the activities in the work programme are delivered collaboratively between directorates, for example the Kauri Dieback programme.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

58.     Delivery of the work programme is the local board’s implementation of outcomes and objectives in the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020. 

59.     The feedback received from the local board through a series of workshops from December 2020 to May 2021 has informed the proposed Customer and Community Services work programme in Attachment A.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

60.     Consideration is given to how the provision of services, facilities and open spaces can support the aspirations of Māori, promote community relationships, connect to the natural environment, and foster holistic wellbeing of whānau, hapu and iwi Māori.

61.     In the local board area, 7.1 per cent of the total population identify as Māori.

62.     The work programme includes activities that will have an impact on a service, facility, or location of significance to Māori. In these situations, appropriate and meaningful engagement and consultation will be undertaken, including to meet our obligations under Te Tiriti o Waitangi – Treaty of Waitangi.

63.     Activities identified as delivering a moderate and high level of Māori outcomes are presented as Attachment B.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

64.     The financial implications of the COVID-19 pandemic have resulted in a reduced renewals budget per local board and significantly reduced development budgets for growth.

65.     Each activity line has a budget allocation for delivery in one or more of the financial years (e.g. 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024). Where activity lines show a zero-dollar budget, this reflects implementation costs met through staff salary or other funding sources.

66.     The 2021/2022 activities recommended for local board approval can be accommodated within their draft 2021/2022 budgets.

67.     The budgets allocated to activities in the financial years 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 are indicative only and are subject to change due to any increased costs, inflation or reduction to the overall available annual council budget that may occur.

68.     Table 3 summarises the budget sources for each work programme financial year.

Table 3: Albert-Eden Local Board budget allocation

Local budgets

2021/2022 (approve)

2022/2023 (approve in principle)

2023/2024 (approve in principle)

Opex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

$1,467,490

$1,606,729

$1,529,829

Opex: Asset Based Services (ABS)

$14,063,665

$14,063,665

$14,063,665

Capex: Local Asset Renewals - Budget (ABS)

$4,050,515

$3,896,517

$3,892,187

Capex: Local Asset Renewals - Proposed Allocation (ABS)

$4,050,515

$3,896,517

$3,892,187

Capex: Local Asset Renewals - Unallocated budget (ABS)

$0

$0

$0

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) – Budget

$190,000

$190,000

$190,000

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) - Proposed Allocation

$190,000

$190,000

$190,000

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) - Unallocated budget

$0

$0

$0

Capex: Growth projects Allocation

$603,744

$0

$0

Capex: Coastal projects Allocation

$0

$0

$0

Capex: Landslide Prevention projects Allocation

$0

$0

$0

Capex: Specific Purpose Funding - Allocation

$0

$0

$0

Capex: External Funding Allocation

$0

$80,000

$0

Capex: One Local Initiative

$0

$0

$0

Capex: Long-term Plan discrete

$0

$0

$0

Capex: Natural Environment Targeted Rate

$0

$0

$0

 

69.     The proposed budgets are based on the anticipated budget allocations from the Long-term Plan 2021-2031.

70.     Any 2020/2021 capex budget unspent on 30 June 2021 will be assessed for carry-forward to the 2021/2022 work programme. Carry forwards will be added to the work programme as separate activity lines.

71.     Where an activity is cancelled or no longer required, the local board can reallocate the budget to an existing work programme activity or create a new activity within that financial year.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

72.     If approval of the Customer and Community Services work programme is not obtained, there is significant risk that the activities within it will be delayed or not delivered.

73.     Table 4 outlines the key risks and mitigations associated with the work programme.

Table 4: risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

Non-delivery, time delays and budget overspend of activities that are managed through the work programme.

Having agreed processes to amend the work programme if activities need to be changed or cancelled.

Utilising the Risk Adjusted Programme to progress those activities identified as ready to proceed under the Risk Adjusted Programme at the beginning of the financial year.

Unknown risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year.

Risks and mitigations for new activity lines are considered during the scoping phase, continually assessed and reported to the local board.

The COVID-19 pandemic could have a negative impact on the progress of the work programme as some activities cannot be delivered if there is an increase in an alert level.

Development of the work programme has included consideration for all activities regarding potential impacts on delivery in the event of alert level changes.

Some activities may be delayed but still deliverable within the agreed timeframes.

Where activities need to be cancelled the local board can reallocate budget to other activities.

74.     The majority of activities in the work programme are ongoing and annually occurring. Risks associated with these activities have been identified in previous years and are managed on an ongoing basis.

75.     Other risks may also exist, including with respect to the health, safety and wellbeing of council staff. Work programmes may also need to be adjusted where these risks exist and cannot be safely mitigated via control measures.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

76.     Delivery of the work programme will start following approval by the local board and continue until 30 June 2022, with progress reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

77.     Regional projects will commence after approval by the Governing Body in July 2021. The local board will receive the first quarter report in November 2021.

78.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for activities, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2021-2022

59

b

Albert-Eden Māori Outcomes

99

c

Albert-Eden Map

101

d

Albert-Eden - Regional Projects

103

e

Albert-Eden Climate Impacts

105

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Justine Haves - General Manager Service Strategy and Integration

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Libraries & Information

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Gael Surgenor - GM -  Southern Initiative

Authorisers

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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15 June 2021

 

 

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15 June 2021

 

 

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15 June 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Proposed exchange of reserve land at Murray Halberg Park, Ōwairaka

File No.: CP2021/07594

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek the views of the local board on the proposal to exchange reserve land at Murray Halberg Park with comparable Kāinga Ora land.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In December 2020, the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee approved to publicly notify land exchange proposals for:

·        a new pedestrian accessway into Murray Halberg Park from Range View Road (approximately 241m2)

·        an exchange of the current Cassino Terrace accessway into Murray Halberg Park (approximately 108m2), for a wider, realigned accessway (approximately 210m2)

·        an exchange of the current accessways from Olympus Street and Hargest Terrace for a new park-edge road, providing improved access to Murray Halberg Park.

3.       The proposed land exchange has been assessed against council policy and is deemed to be high priority.

4.       To inform decision-making on whether to support the two land exchange proposals, staff called for objections in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977.

5.       Auckland Council received four submissions in support and four submissions against the proposed land exchange. Public objections were assessed according to the Reserves Act 1977.

6.       The objections were considered by staff who concluded that the benefits of the exchange were greater than any issue identified by objectors. No submitter requested a hearing. 

7.       Auckland Council invited 13 iwi that were identified as having connection to the area to provide feedback on the proposed land exchange. No objection was received.

8.       Staff recommend that the local board support the land exchange. The land exchange will improve amenity, safety and functionality of the open spaces.

9.       There is low risk of judicial review of Auckland Council’s decision-making processes if the land exchange proceeds.

10.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee will consider the land exchange on 8 July 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      recommend that the Parks, Arts Community and Events Committee approve:

i.    the transfer of part of Lot 70 DP 38660, comprising approximately 241m2, to be transferred from Kāinga Ora to Auckland Council to form a new accessway from Range View Road to Murray Halberg Park

ii.    the transfer of part of Lot 49 DP 43547, comprising approximately 200m2, to be transferred from Auckland Council to Auckland Transport (receiving 123.8m2) and to Kāinga Ora (receiving 76.1m2) to provide improved access from Olympus Street to Murray Halberg Park

iii.   the transfer of part of Lot 49 DP 43547, comprising approximately 142m2, to be transferred from Auckland Council to Auckland Transport (receiving 58.1m2) and to Kāinga Ora (receiving two parcels of 29.3m2 and 54.4m2) to provide improved access from Hargest Terrace into Murray Halberg Park

iv.  the exchange of part of Lot 138 DP 38659, comprising approximately 210m2, held by Kāinga Ora to be exchanged for part of Lot 49 DP 43547, comprising of approximately 108m2, held by Auckland Council to widen and realign the Cassino Terrace Accessway to Murray Halberg Park. 

Horopaki

Context

There are opportunities to improve open space in the Albert-Eden Local Board area

 

11.     Kāinga Ora is redeveloping its housing stock in the Ōwairaka area. An estimated 1061 new dwellings will replace an existing 217 dwellings to provide housing for approximately 2600 additional residents[1].

12.     Staff have identified opportunities to enhance open space accessibility with exchanges of land with Kāinga Ora. The proposed land exchange areas are provided in Attachment A.

13.     Staff assessed the proposed land exchange against Auckland Council’s Parks and Open Space Provision Policy. It is deemed high priority.

14.     Table 1 provides a summary of the assessments against the Parks and Open Space Acquisition Policy 2013 and the Open Space Provision Policy 2016.

Table 1 – Assessment of the Murray Halberg Park land exchange

Acquisition criteria

Comment

Rating

Meeting community needs, now and in the future

High priority as the proposed land exchange would increase the accessibility of the park that serves an area of high growth

High priority

Connecting parks and open spaces

Medium priority as it will increase pedestrian and cyclist use of the Ōwairaka Connection

Protecting and restoring

Auckland’s unique features and meanings

Not a priority as there is no known ecological, historical heritage, landscape, geological or cultural values of significance

Improving the parks and open spaces we already have

High priority as the proposed land exchange will improve the accessibility and functionality of existing open space

The land exchange would:

·           increase accessibility with additional road frontages

·           enhance amenity value and functionality

·           improve sightlines into the new park

·           provide environmental design for safer, more visible space.

15.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee approved to publicly notify the land exchange in December 2020.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

There were no significant objections following the public notification process

16.     The proposed land exchange was publicly notified in accordance with section 15 of the Reserves Act 1977. The consultation period ran for five weeks between 1 February and 5 March 2021.

17.     A total of eight submissions were received during that period. Section 120 of the Reserves Act 1977 outlines the right of an objector to request, in writing, to present in support of their submission at a hearing. No one requested a hearing.

18.     Four submissions were in favour of the land exchange and four submissions were against.

19.     Staff considered the four objections as follows:

·        Two submitters provided comments on the way the Ōwairaka area was being redeveloped and on the impacts of the redevelopment. Comments included the need for or impacts on surrounding infrastructure such as supermarkets, schools and roads. These matters concern the wider development of the area rather than concerns with the land exchange.

·        One submitter stated that the land exchange was not equitable.

·        One submitter did not provide any reason for their objection.

20.     The following table provides a summary of the opposing arguments and how they can be mitigated.

Table 2 - Summary of submissions that opposed the land exchange

Theme

Number of submitters

In scope

Comment

Development of wider area

2

No

Development of wider area not is not in scope for a land exchange under the Reserves Act 1977

Loss of open space provision

1

Yes

Overall, there is no loss of open space. A small gain of 1.7m2 in open space area will be made.

No explanation provided

1

 

21.     As per the Reserves Act 1977, staff considered objections to this land exchange. After consideration, staff concluded that the improvements to amenity, safety and accessibility were greater than any of the objections raised by members of the public.

22.     Objections based on the surrounding infrastructure were considered to be out of scope for council. Objection based on the loss of land was considered, however, council is making a small gain of 1.7m2.

 There were no objections following the mana whenua consultation process

23.     The 13 iwi identified as having association with Murray Halberg Park and the Ōwairaka area were invited to provide feedback on the proposed land exchange in a letter outlining the proposal on 9 February 2021. This was followed by e-mails sent on 3 March 2021 and 15 March 2021.

24.     No iwi presented any argument to stop the land exchange.

·        Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki advised that they have no issue with the proposed exchange at Murray Halberg Park.

·        Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua advised that they have been engaging directly with Kāinga Ora on its development of Ōwairaka and that they do not oppose the exchange.

·        Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei advised that they have reviewed the proposed exchange and no action is needed from them at this stage. They requested being updated as the project goes forward.

·        Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua advised that they recognise the primary interest of Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei in this area which will restrict any engagement on this matter unless specifically requested by Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei.

·        Waikato-Tainui advised that in matters that are of a localised nature such as this, Waikato-Tainui supports Manawhenua to take the lead role.  To that end Waikato-Tainui withdrew from the discussion.

·        Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara, Ngāti Pāoa, Ngāti Pāoa Trust Board, Ngāti Maru, Ngāti Tamaterā, Ngāti Te Ata, Te Ākitai Waiohua and Te Kawerau ā Maki did not provide feedback on the proposal.

Staff recommend the exchange of land at Murray Halberg Park

25.     Staff recommend that the local board support the proposed land exchange:

·        They are deemed to be high priority against Auckland Council policy.

·        No strategic argument was put forward to stop the land exchange during the consultation with the community and with iwi.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     Climate change is expected to bring increasing temperatures, rising sea levels and changing rainfall patterns. Park and walkway development proposals should reflect these effects and take into consideration the environmentally sensitive ways to manage open space to achieve their benefits, such as conserving water resources.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     Once the land exchange has been completed, Auckland Council’s Customer and Community Services will be responsible for the ongoing maintenance of the site.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     On 17 November 2020, the Albert-Eden Local Board supported the public notification of the proposed land exchange at Murray Halberg Park.

29.     Views from the public were sought on the proposed land exchange. Kāinga Ora will work with the local board to approve the final designs.

30.     There will be no additional costs to Auckland Council from the land exchange process.

31.     Kāinga Ora have indicated that it will provide capital for the development of the new Murray Halberg Park entrances.

32.     There will be minimal changes to the ongoing maintenance costs for the park as a result of the proposed land exchange.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     The following iwi were contacted as part of the engagement process:

·    Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

·    Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua

·    Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei

·    Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua

·    Waikato-Tainui

·    Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

·    Ngāti Pāoa

·    Ngāti Pāoa Trust Board

·    Ngāti Maru

·    Ngāti Tamatera

·    Ngāti Te Ata

·    Te Ākitai Waiohua

·    Te Kawerau ā Maki.

 

 

34.     Eight iwi did not respond. Those who responded did not voice any objection to the land exchange.

35.     The proposed land exchange does not contain any known sites or places of significance to mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     The cost of using an external consultant for mana whenua engagement was met by the existing Community and Social Policy professional services budget.

37.     There will be minor additional maintenance costs associated with the small increase in open space area. The Long-term Plan 2018-2028 provides for maintenance, including for land acquired at no capital cost.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     There is a low legal risk to council as the land exchange process has been managed in accordance with section 15 of the Reserves Act 1977.

39.     With few objections, there is low risk of judicial review of council decision-making processes if the council proceeds with the land exchange.

40.     Kāinga Ora will manage any risks associated with their redevelopment projects in Ōwairaka.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     The process for land exchanges under the Reserves Act 1977 is as follows:

Initiation Phase

·        Auckland Council receives a formal request to pursue the land exchange.

Decision-making to publicly notify the proposed land exchange

·        staff assess the proposed land exchange against council’s policies and make a recommendation

·        report to local board and then to Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to consider the recommendation about public notification of the proposed land exchange.                          

Public Notification Phase                            

·        public consultation opens for a month

·        iwi consultation

·    hearing required if requested by a submitter against the proposed land exchange (independent commissioner appointed by Regulatory Committee).

Decision-making to finalise the land exchange

·    submissions considered and recommendations made

·    report to local board and then to Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to consider the recommendation for the land exchange and acquisition component (We are here)

·    potential recommendation from Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to Finance & Performance Committee to consider the disposal aspect of the land exchange.

Transaction Phase

·    application to the Minister of Conservation for authorisation

·    gazette notification

·    land exchange agreement finalised.

42.     The next step is for Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to consider the land exchange proposal on 15 July 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Indicative plans of the proposed land exchange

117

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dillon O'Brien - Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Carole Canler - Senior Policy Manager

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Adoption of the Albert-Eden Urban Ngahere Action Plan 2021

File No.: CP2021/07492

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek adoption of the Albert-Eden Urban Ngahere 10-Year Action Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The regional Te Rautaki Ngahere ā-Tāone o Tāmaki Makaurau (strategy) responds to changes in ngahere canopy cover and potential climate change impacts. The strategy’s target is to increase tree canopy cover across all local board areas in Tāmaki Makaurau to 30 per cent by 2050. 

3.       In Financial Year 2018/2019, the Albert-Eden Local Board funded an implementation plan to understand the current canopy cover and plan for increasing ngahere cover in the local area. The three stages of the implementation plan are ‘knowing’, ‘growing’ and ‘protecting’.

4.       The first part of the ‘knowing’ stage involved analysis of the 2013 Light Detecting and Ranging Technology (LiDAR) data for the Albert-Eden Local Board tree canopy cover. A report identifying cover of 20 per cent was adopted in 2019.

5.       The work to analyse the 2018 LiDAR data and compare to 2013, has been finalised and the results show that net canopy coverage has remained at 20 per cent between 2013 and 2018 in Albert-Eden Local Board. 

6.       The final part of the ‘knowing’ stage has been to develop a 10-year action plan that identifies target areas where trees can be planted to help increase canopy cover in the local board area.

7.       This report is seeking adoption of the Albert-Eden Urban Ngahere 10-Year Action Plan (Attachment A).

8.       The local board’s adoption of the action plan will set the direction for tree planting over the next 10 years and enable planning and preparation for the ‘growing’ phase to commence in June 2021.

9.       It is recommended the action plan is reviewed every three years to align with local board plan development. This will update the board on planting progress and enable planning for maintaining existing and highlighting next steps to further increasing canopy cover.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      adopt the Albert-Eden Urban Ngahere 10 Year Action Plan.

b)      request that Parks, Sport and Recreation staff review the Albert-Eden Urban Ngahere 10-Year Action Plan every three years and provide a report updating the local board on progress of delivery of the action plan.

c)      request that Parks, Sport and Recreation staff review the Albert-Eden Urban Ngahere Action Plan implementation work programme annually and provide a report to the local board on the delivery of new tree plantings.

d)      delegate authority to the General Manager - Parks, Sport and Recreation, to make minor changes and amendments to the text and design of the Albert-Eden Urban Ngahere (Forest) 10-Uear Action Plan.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     In 2018 staff studied the extent of urban forest canopy coverage across Tāmaki Makaurau using information captured from an aerial flight using LiDAR survey technology.

11.     A detailed tree canopy analysis report was developed by staff from the Research Investigation Monitoring Unit (RIMU) and a regional strategy was developed, which the Governing Body approved in October 2018.

12.     The regional strategy’s objective is to increase regional tree canopy cover to 30 per cent, with no local board area having less than 15 per cent canopy cover by 2050.

13.     Local boards’ role in reaching this target is to develop local implementation plans to address the canopy loss in their local board area. The local implementation plan has three stages: ‘knowing’, ‘growing’ and ‘protecting’.

14.     The ‘knowing’ stage of this planning included analysis of the cover that currently exists across the local board area, and a comparison of net change over a three to five-year period. The percentage canopy cover analysis measures all vegetation on public and private land that is over three metres in height.

15.     The Albert-Eden Urban Ngahere (Forest) Analysis Report was approved by the local board 28 August 2019, Resolution AE/2019/166. It found that the average tree canopy cover across the local board area was 20 per cent based on the findings of the 2013 LiDAR work. 

16.     The findings from the analysis report have been used to help inform development of the Albert-Eden Urban Ngahere 10-Year Action Plan, providing guidance on how to redress the canopy loss.

17.     The action plan will provide long-term direction on planting new trees across the local board area with a goal to increase overall tree canopy coverage.

18.     Adoption and implementation of the action plan will lead to:

·        planting of new specimen trees

·        undertaking enrichment planting in local parks

·        working with Auckland Transport to increase tree cover in the road corridor

·        providing guidance and direction for community groups and council departments undertaking or organising community planting events.

19.     Targets and areas to focus planting efforts are outlined in the action plan. Planting trees in these areas will increase canopy cover, establish or enhance ecological corridors for wildlife and provide shade for key areas in parks and reserves.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

20.     The action plan has been informed by findings from the canopy analysis report. Findings in the analysis report were based on a LiDAR survey that was completed in 2013.

21.     A follow up LiDAR survey was carried out in 2016-2018 and the findings indicate a net overall canopy cover of 20 per cent in the Albert-Eden local board area, the same as when measured in 2013. The equates to no net change in overall tree canopy coverage.

22.     There has however been a net increase in tree canopy cover on public parks and road reserve areas when compared to 2013. The overall net loss of canopy coverage of one per cent took place on privately owned land, this loss was offset by the gains on public land and within the road corridor.

23.     Unfortunately, the findings show negative trends with a net loss of larger trees and net overall decrease of tree canopy coverage on privately owned land.  Comparative analysis of the tree canopy cover changes between 2013 and 2018 data is complete and will be reported to the local board in late June 2021.

24.     Site assessments have been carried out to investigate suitable locations for planting new specimen trees based on the information in the analysis report. The primary areas of assessment were parks with playgrounds and local streets that could provide green corridor connections between local parks.

25.     These investigations, along with extensive site visits and subject matter expert input, have helped to inform the proposed locations and set the target for planting that is outlined in the action plan.

26.     The target for Albert -Eden is to maintain existing and increase tree canopy cover in the road corridor and on public reserve land by five per cent over a 10-year period. This will require the planting of at least 130 large growing specimen trees annually. Doing this annually will increase overall tree canopy coverages on publicly managed land by 2030. 

27.     The adoption of the action plan and its implementation will (over a 30-year period), lead to incremental changes that will help work towards achieving above the regional target of 30 per cent canopy cover.

28.     Reporting on implementation of the plan every three years aligns with local board plan development. This will enable the local board to review the target and planting strategy, plan for the next areas of planting and consider the allocation of budgets required.

29.     Staff have recommended a realistic target for the local board to work towards in the action plan. It is forecast that with small increases in new planting and decreases in tree removal year on year; the current 20 per cent cover is at least maintained with potentially an incremental increase as the new plantings mature over the next 10 years.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

30.     Implementation of the strategy and the action plan is an example of an integrated approach to help mitigate emissions, build resilience longer term and enable adaptation to the impacts of climate change to meet Auckland Council’s climate goals.

31.     The strategy is identified as a key action in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri - Auckland’s Climate Plan 2020.

32.     Increasing stock of trees and vegetation in Tāmaki Makaurau will increase carbon sequestration and contribute towards reducing net greenhouse gas emissions.

33.     Increasing trees and vegetation also provides various natural functions that assist with adaptation to the climate change impacts for humans and other species, such as:

·        providing a shading and cooling effect to counter rising temperatures

·        slowing and reducing stormwater runoff to assist in managing increased rainfall events

·        improve air quality by trapping particulates and filtering vehicle pollutants

·        providing additional habitat for indigenous species to occupy, enhancing their resilience to climate change impacts.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

34.     Collaboration across Parks, Sport and Recreation (PSR), Infrastructure and Environmental Services (I&ES) and Community Facilities (CF) has been key to the development of the action plan.  

35.     CF has helped inform where the current maintenance and renewal programme for trees can be strengthened to improve the overall diversity and increase the extent of the tree canopy cover.

36.     PSR will work with CF in developing the renewals programme to ensure an ongoing programme of tree renewal occurs to replace poor and ailing stock and to replant where dead, dying or diseased trees are removed. 

37.     Staff will continue to collaborate and develop a tree planting programme and implementation plan for the delivery of new tree plantings in the 2021 planting season and beyond.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.     The early draft action plan was workshopped with the local board on 22nd September 2020. At the workshop board members were presented the draft plan and were asked to provide feedback.

39.     The feedback received at the workshop and the details provided by Local Board Services from board members has been incorporated into the final draft of the action plan; Attachment A to this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

40.     The strategy was workshopped with mana whenua during its development in three workshops during 2017 and 2018. Feedback and views discussed at the hui helped to shape the final version of the strategy.

41.     The use of native trees for all new tree planting is a strong view of mana whenua, and as such natives are the first choice for planting as outlined in the strategy. Native trees are also identified as the preference for planting in the action plan.

42.     New tree plantings will benefit local Māori and the wider community by providing increased opportunities for access to nature and providing shade in the local park network.

43.     Mana whenua will be updated in the coming months on the local implementation programme and will be engaged to support tree planting advice and to provide a cultural narrative in the choice of species for local areas.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

44.     The adoption of the action plan will conclude the ‘knowing’ stage of the local board’s implementation of the strategy, which is funded by the Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) OPEX budget.

45.     Delivery of the ‘growing’ stage will be funded by CAPEX from various budgets. These include LDI, Asset Based Services (ABS), the Natural Environment Targeted Rate (NETR) and Mayor’s Million Trees budgets that are allocated by the Governing Body.

46.     In 2021/2022 the local board has proposed to allocate $25,000 LDI CAPEX to Community Facilities for the delivery of the strategy. The adoption of the action plan will direct priorities for this funding and ensure the right trees are planted in the right place in the 2021-2022 planting season.

47.     To ensure the target outlined in the action plan is met, it is recommended that LDI CAPEX is allocated annually to the local board’s CF annual work programme to continue planting new trees. The amount of funding required will be quantified annually based on priorities to advance new tree plantings.

48.     LDI OPEX will not be required for the planting of trees, however further LDI OPEX will be sought for strategic planning, site specific assessment, consultation and work to deliver the strategy through future local board PSR annual work programmes.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     The trajectory of loss of tree canopy cover across Albert-Eden local board area is expected to continue on private land as the area develops and intensifies. New tree planting on public land is necessary to help offset these changes over the longer term.

50.     Sufficient time is required to plan and prepare for planting. Should the local board not adopt the plan there is a risk that the ‘growing’ stage of the strategy will not be able to start in June 2021.

51.     The action plan outlines a detailed ‘Planting Opportunities List’ to ensure the right tree is planted in the right place. Should the local board not adopt the action plan there is a risk that trees planted in 2021 will not be appropriate for their location.

52.     There is a risk of poor maintenance of plants once they are in the ground. Adoption of the action plan will help mitigate this risk and enable staff to employ best practice tree planting and ongoing maintenance methods.  

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

53.     Following adoption of the action plan, site specific assessments will be completed that identify areas for planting in 2021 and 2022. These assessments will advise CF, Auckland Transport and other delivery partners on priorities for the ‘growing’ stage.

54.     Annual updates on the ‘growing’ stage will be reported to the local board. These reports will be provided by departments that are leading the tree planting and collated by Parks Sports and Recreation staff to enable high level reporting on total numbers of new trees planted.

55.     In 2023, staff will review the strategy, report to the board on successes and challenges and recommend direction for planting and funding allocation for the following three years.

56.     Analysis of the 2018 data is complete and the Albert-Eden Urban Ngahere (Forest) Analysis Report 2019 will be updated with an addendum outlining canopy cover change. A finalised update report will be circulated to board members towards the end of June with an overview memo put onto the Knowledge Auckland site by RIMU staff and will be publicly accessible. Staff will seek adoption of the addendum by the local board in June 2021

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Urban Ngahere Action Plan 2021

127

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Howell Davies - Senior Advisor - Urban Forest

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Feedback on Equity of Service Levels and Funding Proposals - Draft Report

File No.: CP2021/07926

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide local board feedback to the Joint Governance Working Party on the funding and decision-making proposals set out in the Equity of Service Levels and Funding - Draft Report.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The local board has received and discussed the Equity of Service Levels and Funding - Draft Report at its April/May 2021 workshop.

3.       The Draft Report (refer Attachment A) sets out the draft recommendations from the Joint Governance Working Party in relation to:

·    improving the equity of funding allocation across local boards

·    increasing the decision-making responsibility of local boards

·    establishing minimum service levels

·    implications of multi-board services.

4.       The Joint Governance Working Party seeks local board feedback on these proposals to consider in the preparation of a final set of proposals to be reported to the Governing Body.

5.       The local board’s feedback on these proposals (refer Attachment B) has been prepared on the template provided.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      provide feedback using the attached template (Attachment B) to the Joint Governance Working Party on the funding and decision-making proposals set out in the Equity of Service Levels and Funding Proposals – Draft Report.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       In October and November 2020 workshops, local boards considered and provided input on the Equity of Service Levels and Funding Discussion paper which presented options, in respect of local community services, to:

·        increase local board decision making responsibility

·        increase equity of funding allocation between local boards

·        establish minimum service levels where required

·        address funding of multi-board services and decision-making on their service levels.

7.       The Joint Governance Working Party considered this local board input and provided direction to staff in the preparation of the funding and decision-making proposals of the Equity of Service Levels and Funding Draft Report (refer Attachment A).

8.       Staff presented the Draft Report to local boards in workshops between 6 April and 6 May 2021.

9.       The purpose of this report is to enable the local board to provide formal feedback on the draft recommendations which propose:

·        changes to local board decision-making responsibilities over local community services

·        implementation of an equity-based funding allocation approach for local community services.

10.     These matters will be reported to the Joint Governance Working Party and then to the Governing Body later this year. If adopted, public consultation would be undertaken with the aim of implementing decisions progressively between 2022 and 2024.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     These proposals (refer Attachment A) are significant changes. If adopted by the Governing Body, these recommendations would:

·        increase local board decision-making responsibilities over community services

·        change the allocation of Asset Based Services (ABS) funding to local boards

·        require collaboration between local boards on some multi-board service decisions

·        have a high community interest

·        not affect existing local board responsibility for Local Discretionary Initiatives (LDI) service decisions or the current LDI funding approach.

12.     Feedback on these proposals is sought from the local board to assist the Joint Governance Working Party in providing direction to staff and the Governing Body on progressing these proposals.

13.     The Working Party’s final report to the Governing Body will also update illustrative funding outcomes with asset values and ABS budgets updated and adopted under Long-term Plan 2021-31. Funding outcomes remain illustrative until funding model and financial inputs are adopted, planned for Long-term Plan 2024-34.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     Providing feedback on the draft report does not have a direct impact on climate change.

15.     Changes made to local community services as a result of the proposed policy may have a climate impact and will be assessed on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     If adopted, the proposed policy will impact on several divisions of the council including Customer and Community Services, Finance and Governance. Staff from these divisions have been involved in the development of these proposals.

17.     Staff from these divisions will also be significantly involved in the implementation of Governing Body decisions on the proposals. A critical implementation workstream will ensure staff have the capacity and the knowledge required to enable sound advice to be provided to local boards under these proposals.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     Over time, these proposals have the potential to fundamentally change local community service delivery depending on the extent to which local boards and their communities make changes.

19.     Local boards have discussed policy options in workshops in October and November 2021 and considered the proposed policy in workshops in April and May 2021. Local boards can also provide their input and views through their representatives on the Joint Governance Working Party.

20.     This report provides the opportunity for local boards to provide their formal feedback on the Draft Report proposals.

21.     More detailed discussion of the local implications of the policy proposal is included in the Draft Report, provided as Attachment A.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     As part of increased decision-making for asset-based services, and under local government legislation, local boards must demonstrate how Māori are involved, and their needs are reflected, in these decisions. This means that in making service decisions, local boards should be able to:

·        demonstrate effective Māori involvement in the local board planning processes

·        clearly articulate Māori priorities in local board funding and delivery of asset-based services.

23.     It is likely that these changes will result in more responsive services for Māori communities at the local level.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     Introduction of the proposed policy would have several significant financial impacts, including:

·        changes to local board funding allocations that may result in funding increases for some local boards and funding decreases for others

·        broader local board decision-making responsibilities that will require greater flexibility in how local boards allocate their funding to service delivery

·        local board decisions which would include service impacts on assets, such as investment, enhancement, renewal, optimisation and removal from service.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     Development of the proposed policy involved several workshops with each local board. Several local boards requested additional workshops on the proposals as their implications became better understood.

26.     A range of risks associated with approval and implementation of these proposals were discussed during workshops and considered in the development of these proposals, including:

·        whether there will be sufficient understanding of the proposals and support for their benefits to enable them to be adopted

·        what alternative approaches might address the issues these proposals seek to address, should they not proceed

·        developing alternative funding equity transition options including implications on local board funding and overall timing

·        developing options to respond to concerns of local boards which might be adversely affected by equity funding proposals

·        addressing local board concerns for the perceived downside of greater decision-making responsibility if the level of decision support does not increase

·        ensuring the organisation is structured, resourced and adequately supported to provide the quality service advice needed by local boards to make well-informed decisions.

27.     Plans are either in place or currently being developed to address these risks. The proposed two stage implementation timeline (see below) is designed to progressively grow the council capability, develop robust processes, and ensure effective and transparent management of necessary changes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     Staff will report local board feedback to the Joint Governance Working Party which will consider this feedback, along with further staff advice, and provide its recommendations to the Governing Body later this year.

29.     The Governing Body would undertake public consultation on its draft decisions as follows:

·        under the Annual Plan 2022/23, in the case of changes to the Allocation of Decision-making Responsibilities policy

·        under the Long-term Plan 2024-2034, in the case of changes to the Local Board Funding policy.

30.     Proposals adopted by the Governing Body would be progressively implemented from 2022 to 2024.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Equity of Service Levels and Funding Draft Report

165

b

Governance Framework Review - Service levels and funding - feedback template

205

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gary Pemberton - Programme Change Lead

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Service Strategy and Integration

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Albert-Eden Local Board input into Auckland Council's submission on proposed changes to the Freedom Camping Act 2011

File No.: CP2021/06472

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Note the feedback provided by the local board on the proposed changes to the Freedom Camping Act 2011.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local boards have the opportunity to provide input into Auckland Council submissions on central government documents.

3.       As the deadline for providing feedback fell prior to the next scheduled local board business meeting, the delegation to the chairperson (resolution number: AE/2020/39) was used to approve formal local board feedback. This delegation allows the Albert-Eden Local Board Chairperson to provide feedback on central government submissions where the timeframes do not allow for local board input to be considered and approved at a local board meeting.

4.       The local board input on this document is noted in this report.

5.       The Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment Innovation (MBIE) released a discussion document outlining four proposals for changes to the Freedom Camping Act 2011. The Freedom Camping Act 2011 defines what freedom camping is and gives effect to the government’s policy to allow freedom camping on all public land by default.

6.       The legislation does empower local authorities to make bylaws to protect areas where freedom camping should be prohibited or restricted, but only for specific reasons contained in the Act. It also sets out councils’ bylaw enforcement powers, and the penalties that apply to freedom campers who break the rules.

7.       In its discussion document, MBIE notes that in recent years the increasing number of freedom campers in New Zealand has raised concerns around the impacts of freedom camping on the places and communities that host them. Nationally, this concern has focused on the subset of freedom campers who stay in cars, or vans with sleeping platforms, that are not self-contained.  MBIE suggests this form of freedom camping is impacting on the social licence for tourism and putting at risk New Zealand’s reputation as a destination that delivers a sustainable, high quality visitor experience. The government considers that while the borders are closed to international visitors, it is a good time to address some of the systemic issues facing freedom camping.

8.       The discussion document presents four proposals for consideration:

·       Make it mandatory for freedom camping in a vehicle to be done in a certified self-contained vehicle, OR

·       make it mandatory for freedom campers to stay in a vehicle that is certified self-contained, unless they are staying at a site with toilet facilities (excluding public conservation lands and regional parks).

·       Improve the regulatory tools for government land managers, including stronger enforcement powers.

·       Strengthen the requirements for self-contained vehicles.

9.       Following the consultation periods the findings will be reported back to Cabinet for consideration. A Bill will be prepared for Parliament with changes to the Act. It is estimated the Bill will be introduced to the House in November 2021.

10.     Local board feedback was due by 11 May 2021 to be considered for incorporation into the final Auckland Council submission. The Auckland Council submission was to be sent on 28 May 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      note its input into the Auckland Council submission on the proposed changes to the Freedom Camping Act 2011 included as Attachment A to this report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Board feedback on the proposed changes to the Freedom Camping Act 2011

213

b

Discussion document: Supporting sustainable freedom camping in Aotearoa New Zealand

215

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Emma Reed - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Feedback on Hīkina te Kohupara – Kia mauri ora ai te iwi. Transport Emissions: Pathways to Net Zero by 2050 discussion document

File No.: CP2021/07231

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the local board the opportunity to provide input into Auckland Council’s submission on Hīkina te Kohupara – Kia mauri ora ai te iwi - Transport Emissions: Pathways to Net Zero by 2050’ discussion document.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Context

2.       The Ministry of Transport is consulting on the discussion document Hīkina te Kohupara – Kia mauri ora ai te iwi: Transport Emissions: Pathways to Net Zero by 2050 (Hīkina te Kohupara).  Hīkina te Kohupara identifies what Aotearoa could do to shift the transport system onto a pathway to zero emissions by 2050.

3.       Hīkina te Kohupara will inform Government’s first Emissions Reduction Plan (due to be released at the end of December 2021) and support the development of a 10-15 year transport emissions action plan for New Zealand.

4.       Auckland Council’s Transport Strategy Team and Auckland Transport are preparing a joint submission on Hīkina te Kohupara. The submission process closes on 25 June 2021.

5.       Consultation is open for public submission with a closing date of 25 June 2021.

6.       Local board formal feedback is due on 23 June 2021 to be appended to the Auckland Council submission.

Summary of consultation document

7.       Hīkina te Kohupara identifies opportunities to reduce emissions across three themes: 

·   Theme 1 – Changing the way we travel (chapter 6), which covers land use planning, transport investments and prioritisation and travel demand management.

·   Theme 2 – Improving our passenger vehicles (chapter 7), which covers clean cars, decarbonising the existing fleet and decarbonising the public transport fleet.

·   Theme 3 – Supporting a more efficient freight system (chapter 8), which covers greening supply chains, low emissions freight modes and decarbonising freight vehicles.

8.       Hīkina te Kohupara includes four potential pathways to zero carbon by 2050 (chapter 10). Each of the pathways place a different weight on intervetions that:

·  avoid or reduce the need to travel by car (e.g. land use planning)

·  support a shift towards the use of low emissions modes (e.g. active travel and public transport), or

·  improve the energy efficiency of vehicle fleets (e.g. electric vehicles).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      consider providing input into Auckland Council’s submission on Hīkina te Kohupara – Kia mauri ora ai te iwi - Transport Emissions: Pathways to Net Zero by 2050’ discussion document.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hīkina te Kohupara – Kia mauri ora ai te iwi Transport Emissions: Pathways to Net Zero by 2050, May 2021 discussion document (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Emma Reed - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Feedback on Te Waihanga New Zealand Infrastructure Commission's consultation document He Tūāpapa ki te Ora, Infrastructure for a Better Future, Aotearoa New Zealand Infrastructure Strategy

File No.: CP2021/07002

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the local board the opportunity to provide input into Auckland Council’s submission on Te Waihanga New Zealand Infrastructure Commission's consultation document He Tūāpapa ki te Ora, Infrastructure for a Better Future, Aotearoa New Zealand Infrastructure Strategy.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Context

2.       The New Zealand Infrastructure Commission, Te Waihanga, is an autonomous Crown entity with an independent board, officially formed on 25 September 2019.  The Commission seeks to lift infrastructure planning and delivery to a more strategic level and by doing so, improve New Zealanders’ long term economic performance and social wellbeing.

3.       A key function of the Commission is to produce a 30-year infrastructure strategy to replace the government’s current 30-year plan. In addition, the Commission has progressively developed a pipeline of infrastructure projects which is published quarterly.

4.       The Commission has released its consultation document He Tūāpapa ki te Ora, Infrastructure for a Better Future, which sets out the approach that it proposes to take in developing its draft 30-year Infrastructure Strategy.

5.       This consultation is open for public submission from 12 May 2021, with a closing date of 24 June 2021.

6.       Local board formal feedback is due on 17 June 2021 to be included in the Auckland Council submission.

Summary of consultation document

7.       The consultation document introduces the extent of New Zealand’s infrastructure problems and highlights the key issue of historic underinvestment in infrastructure. It recognises there is a significant gap between the infrastructure needed and what can be afforded. It notes there are limits to spending and that building all infrastructure desired by communities is not a viable option.

8.       The consultation document sets out a proposed vision that “infrastructure lays the foundation for the people, places and businesses of Aotearoa New Zealand to thrive for generations” and guiding decision-making principles. The document also proposes three focus areas where change is needed:

·   Building a better future - This section talks about preparing infrastructure for climate change, transitioning to renewable energy, adapting to technological change, responding to demographic change, partnering with Māori and ensuring security and resilience of critical infrastructure.

·   Enabling competitive cities and regions - This section talks about how infrastructure can contribute to the success of New Zealand cities by enabling more affordable housing, higher levels of productivity, improved inter-regional and international connectivity, better quality of life and urban environments that provide greater connectivity with employment, social services and recreation opportunities.

·   Creating a better system - This section looks at how New Zealand’s current systems and processes for planning, determining, delivering and operating infrastructure are being challenged, and can be improved. Four categories are discussed – governance and institutions; legislation, regulation and planning; funding and financing; and procurement and delivery.

9.       The consultation document also identifies five areas that have potential to make the biggest difference to New Zealand’s infrastructure system:

·   Institutional and governance reform - mentions better integration and coordination between local and central government infrastructure functions.

·   Getting the price right - mentions congestion pricing, water metering, waste disposal charges and including full cost of carbon in infrastructure business case appraisals.

·   Supporting housing supply - mentions options such as consistent national planning rules, regional spatial planning, merging regional and district plans, creating targets for new housing development in cities, setting housing requirements through national direction.

·   Supporting zero-carbon economy and preparing for climate change - mentions electrification of transport, greater use of public transport and active travel, improving energy efficiency of process heat, investment in energy sector to meet growing demand, and a planning system that enables infrastructure necessary for climate change adaptation and mitigation.

·   A digital future - mentions updating national digital strategy, better data collection and transparency to understand existing infrastructure performance, costs and impacts, as well as future requirements.

10.     The consultation document proposes re-drawing of local and regional authority boundaries (particularly due to expanding labour markets and the ability of local government to provide / fund / maintain / operate social and economic infrastructure).

11.     The consultation document proposes changes to local and central government roles and responsibilities, with more responsibility for councils in some areas (e.g. suggestion that councils could toll roads to manage congestion) and less in other areas (e.g. central government would have more control of housing and urban development outcomes).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      consider providing input into Auckland Council’s submission on Te Waihanga New Zealand Infrastructure Commission's consultation document He Tūāpapa ki te Ora, Infrastructure for a Better Future, Aotearoa New Zealand Infrastructure Strategy.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

He Tūāpapa ki te Ora - Infrastructure for a  Better Future. Aotearoa New Zealand Infrastructure Strategy Consultation Document May 2021 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Emma Reed - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Auckland Unlimited 2020/2021 Quarter Three Performance Report

File No.: CP2021/07047

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the 2020/2021 Quarter Three performance report of Auckland Unlimited.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The report includes the Auckland Unlimited 2020/2021 Quarter Three Performance Report (Attachment A), which outlines the performance of Auckland Unlimited, including regional facilities, economic development and visitor economy-related activities and investments, for the period ending 31 March 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Unlimited 2020/2021 Quarter Three Performance Report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Unlimited 2020/2021 Quarter Three Performance Report

255

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Eke Panuku Development Auckland - Albert-Eden Local Board Six-Monthly Report to 31 March 2021

File No.: CP2021/06718

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Albert-Eden Local Board on Eke Panuku Development Auckland (Eke Panuku) activities within the local board area and the region, for the period from 1 September 2020 to 31 March 2021.

2.       This report is for information only and no decision-making is required.

3.       This report covers our urban regeneration programme in relation to the local board area from 1 September 2020 to 31 March 2021.

4.       It also includes information on property management, purchases and sales in relation to the local board area, which Eke Panuku undertakes on behalf of Auckland Council.

5.       Please note that this report is for seven months. This is to align future reports with other Eke Panuku reporting cycles.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

6.       This report is a record of events for the Albert-Eden Local Board area during the stated period.

7.       Eke Panuku continued supporting development work at 198 Dominion Road and 132 Green Lane East.

8.       Eke Panuku currently manages 46 leases in the Albert-Eden Local Board area.   

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Eke Panuku Development Auckland - Albert-Eden Local Board Six-Monthly Report to 31 March 2021.

b)      note that the report is for information only and no decision-making is required.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Eke Panuku Development Auckland is the council-controlled organisation that delivers urban regeneration in Tāmaki Makaurau (Auckland). Urban regeneration is the planning of neighbourhoods to strengthen communities and the economy to make it an even better place to live.

10.     Our city is facing rapid growth. Quality development is required to accommodate this growth and to ensure people love and can afford to live in Auckland. We imagine a city of strong neighbourhoods. We work across many neighbourhoods throughout our city from large, long-term urban regeneration plans to small projects on specific sites to meet the needs of the city’s long-term growth - including more types of homes people can afford. We work alongside the locals, other parts of the council and businesses to regenerate our city in ways that benefit both our local communities and Auckland as a whole.

11.     We deliver returns for the council, and at the same time, we ensure our assets contribute positively to the neighbourhoods of Tāmaki Makaurau. We manage around $2.4 billion of land and buildings owned by the Auckland Council.

12.     In the period 1 September 2020 to 31 March 2021, we continued our urban regeneration programme across the region, brought a $22.8m return to the council via property management, purchased six properties on behalf of the group, and sold nine properties as part of either our neighbourhood regeneration or as directed by Auckland Council.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Property management and properties of Albert-Eden Local Board interest

13.     Eke Panuku manages 46 leases in the Albert-Eden Local Board area.

14.     The Albert-Eden Local Board has expressed interest in updates on properties within the Eke Panuku property portfolio. The below provides an update on matters of significance for the reporting period:

198 Dominion Road, Mount Eden

 

The Environment Court has approved resource consent for the development. Eke Panuku will now progress next steps to achieve housing and town centre renewal outcomes in 2021.

132 Greenlane East, Greenlane

Conversations between Eke Panuku and a potential development partner are underway. Due diligence will be completed in late 2021.

Acquisitions

15.     Eke Panuku has purchased no properties on behalf of the Auckland Council group, in the Albert-Eden Local Board area, during the reporting period 1 September 2020 to 31 March 2021.

Disposals

16.     On behalf of the Auckland Council, Eke Panuku sells properties that are no longer required by the Auckland Council group for service use.

17.     The decision to sell these properties is made by Auckland Council’s Governing Body with advice from its finance team.

18.     Eke Panuku does not have a decision-making role in the sale of properties that are surplus to the council’s requirements.

19.     The role of Eke Panuku is to provide property transaction services. Proceeds from these sales are returned to Auckland Council to be reinvested in council services.

20.     There were no unconditional agreements reached in the Albert-Eden Local Board area during the reporting period.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The Eke Panuku Priority Location programmes support the regeneration of existing town centres while also addressing climate mitigation and adaptation.

22.     Mitigation of climate change involves reducing the carbon emissions that contribute to climate change. Our Priority Locations are transport-oriented communities that utilise existing infrastructure and transport links and we seek to make local walking and cycling safe and viable alternatives to the private vehicle. Eke Panuku has also adopted a Homestar-6 minimum standard to ensure we can reduce energy, water and landfill waste. We are working to adopt similar standards for our public realm and commercial developments, whilst also taking guidance from precinct sustainability rating tools like Green Star Communities.

23.     Adaptation to climate change involves planning for the changes to our climate and associated impacts that are already happening or are projected to happen, including sea-level rise, hotter temperatures, extreme weather events, flooding and droughts. Climate change is likely to subject the Albert-Eden Local Board Area to hotter temperatures and more frequent flooding and drought. Eke Panuku seeks to future-proof our communities by:

·      Specifying that infrastructure and developments are designed to cope with warmer temperatures and extreme weather events

·      The use of green infrastructure and water sensitive design to increase flood resilience and provide ecological and biodiversity benefits

·      The provision of increased shade and shelter for storm events and hotter days

·      Initiatives to build community resilience.

24.     In October 2020, the Eke Panuku executive team agreed to a work programme of priority actions to help Eke Panuku deliver on the council’s sustainable procurement objectives which Eke Panuku has adopted. Targeting these objectives will help further leverage the economic, social and environmental benefits of Eke Panuku urban regeneration projects and the products and services we procure as a business. Implementation of these priority projects has commenced which focus on embedding sustainable procurement into Eke Panuku procurement processes and systems, including the inclusion of climate considerations into procurements for capital works and renewals.

25.     The Eke Panuku Climate Change Strategy was adopted by the Eke Panuku Board in November 2020. The strategy guides how Eke Panuku will support the implementation of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     Eke Panuku cannot achieve its vision alone. Our complex operating environment means we need the expertise of others. Therefore, building and maintaining strong relationships and partnerships, and working together with others in general, is an ongoing focus for us.

27.     Eke Panuku Development Auckland works collaboratively with other Auckland Council departments, CCOs and Crown agencies to deliver joined-up urban regeneration in our neighbourhoods.

28.     Impacts and views are considered both on a programme and project level for the neighbourhoods we work in, to maximise community outcomes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     Any local or sub-regional impacts are considered on a programme and project basis.

30.     Eke Panuku regularly engages with local boards on its projects and programmes within local board areas.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     Eke Panuku supports the aspirations described in the Auckland Plan 2050.

32.     Eke Panuku has worked closely with our mana whenua partners to understand their priorities in Tāmaki Makaurau. Mana whenua have shared their top five aspirations with Eke Panuku. Below is a summary:

·         Governance: We involve mana whenua in transparent decision-making

·         Culture: We will increase our practice of kaitiakitanga (by all) and increase the visibility of Māori identity and culture in our projects

·         Economic: We will create more commercial investment, procurement, and engagement opportunities for Māori

·         Social: We will foster a sense of community and connectedness and help enhance the well-being of Māori here in Tāmaki Makaurau

·         Natural environment: We will work together to ensure we are working towards significant improvements to te mauri o te taiao.

33.     Eke Panuku continues to make progress on the Eke Panuku Mana Whenua Outcomes Framework actions and presented a six-month status report to mana whenua in February 2021.

34.     Eke Panuku has achieved 36/40 significant initiatives in the 2020-2021 financial year. Highlights include the numerous whakawātea with our mana whenua partners to celebrate significant milestones to build the stage for the 2021 America’s Cup.

35.     Following the Emergency Budget 2020/2021, Eke Panuku is still working with mana whenua to identify potential development and disposal opportunities. Eke Panuku has invited mana whenua to register commercial interests in properties Eke Panuku is preparing to dispose of on the market.

36.     Eke Panuku has started a pilot programme focused on growing the capability of young leaders to enable placemaking activities. The programme, He Pia He Tauira, has hosted several wānanga with tauira to prepare for upcoming activities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     There are no risks associated with receiving this report.

39.     This report must be received to meet the requirements of the Local Government Act 2002.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     The next six-monthly report will cover the period of 1 April to 30 September 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Perin Gerrand - Engagement Coordinator

Authorisers

Joanna Glasswell - Head of Corporate Affairs

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Urgent decision - local board representation on the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Mangere light rail project

File No.: CP2021/06464

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the urgent decision made to endorse using the Chairs’ Forum as the selection panel to appoint a local board representative to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An Establishment Unit Board is being set up by the Cabinet to provide the visible face of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project, undertake stakeholder and community engagement, and take forward work to resolve key outstanding questions in relation to project scope and delivery entity.  A key output of the unit will be to develop a business case, over approximately six months, which looks at the available options.

3.       The work of the Establishment Unit Board will be guided by an inclusive governance structure made up of representatives of central and local government, Treaty partners and an independent chairperson.

4.       Minister of Transport Hon Michael Wood wrote to local board members on 6 May 2021 formally inviting local board members to select a single representative to be appointed to the Establishment Unit Board.

5.       The chair of the Establishment Unit Board was then appointed and Auckland Council was advised that an inaugural meeting of the Establishment Unit Board needs to convene as soon as possible. The work of the Establishment Unit Board will be moving at pace and therefore Auckland Council needs to respond with an expedited process.

6.       A representative of Auckland Council’s local boards needs to be selected to sit on the Establishment Unit Board.

7.       There is no joint forum between local boards so the Chairs’ Forum needs to be used to select a representative. As the Chairs’ Forum does not have a formal mandate to select representatives, there is a procedural requirement to seek mandate from each of the 21 local boards to make this selection.

8.       Therefore, Albert-Eden Local Board was asked to endorse the use of the Chairs’ Forum as the selection panel.

9.       The endorsement of this process was required to occur between 11 – 14 May 2021, in order for Chairs’ Forum to select the local board representative at their meeting on 17 May 2021.

10.     Because the Albert-Eden Local Board May monthly business meeting was scheduled on 18 May 2021, it was necessary to seek an urgent decision to endorse the selection process. This was done on 13 May 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      note the urgent decision to endorse using the Chairs’ Forum as the selection panel to appoint a local board representative to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent decision memo - endorsement of the use of Chairs' Forum as the selection panel to appoint the local board representation to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Mangere light rail project

277

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Emma Reed - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Delegation of feedback to be provided to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project

File No.: CP2021/07860

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To formally delegate one local board member to provide feedback to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An Establishment Unit is being set up by the Cabinet to provide the public face of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project, undertake stakeholder and community engagement, and take forward work to resolve key outstanding questions in relation to project scope and delivery. A key output of the unit will be to develop a business case over approximately six months which looks at the available options.

3.       The work of the Establishment Unit will be guided by an inclusive governance structure made up of representatives of central and local government, Treaty partners and an independent chairperson.

4.       Minister of Transport Hon Michael Wood wrote to local board members in May 2021 inviting local board members to select a single representative to be appointed to the Establishment Unit Board. At the May 2021 Chairs’ Forum, Margi Watson was selected for this role.

5.       The Establishment Unit now has until early September 2021 to gather the views of local boards, ward councillors, and the public.

6.       Staff are requesting that local boards delegate a member to provide feedback on behalf of the local board, to ensure that feedback can be provided in a short timeframe after public feedback has been collated and provided to the local board.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      delegate one local board member to provide feedback on behalf of the local board to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       In March 2021, the Cabinet met to agree how to progress the next steps for the City Centre to Māngere light rail project (CC2M).

8.       To give effect to this, the Cabinet has directed that an Establishment Unit be set up to provide the public face of the project, undertake stakeholder and community engagement, and take forward work to resolve key outstanding questions in relation to project scope and delivery entity.

9.       The Establishment Unit Board will be chaired by an independent chair appointed by the Minister of Transport and the Minister of Finance. Membership will comprise:

·        a single representative (the chief executive or a senior delegate) from Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, Waka Kotahi, Kāinga Ora and the Ministry of Transport

·        a representative from mana whenua

·        a representative of Auckland Council’s local boards (Margi Watson)

·        a representative of Auckland Council’s Governing Body (Chris Darby)

·        Te Waihanga (the New Zealand Infrastructure Commission) and Treasury will support the work of the Establishment Unit Board as observers.

10.     A key output of the unit will be to develop a business case over approximately six months which looks at the available options. This will enable quality decisions on key matters based on evidence, such as mode, route alignment and delivery.

11.     The Mayor and Deputy Mayor have been invited to join Minister of Transport Hon Michael Wood and Minister of Finance Hon Grant Robertson as sponsors of this project. This sponsors group will play an important function in ensuring political alignment on the project between central and local government and setting strategic direction.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The Auckland Light Rail team will be engaging with local boards first so that local board members are clear about the scope and programme of engagement.

13.     This will take place as follows:

·        11 June: briefing the six local boards that are within the planned corridor for light rail - Waitematā, Albert-Eden, Puketāpapa, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki, Māngere-Ōtāhuhu and Ōtara-Papatoetoe

·        14 June: presentation to Chairs’ Forum

·        30 June: inviting local board chairs or their delegate to attend a Planning Committee briefing

·        Further briefings will be organised to take place after the public consultation period in July/ August 2021.

14.     Staff will focus on providing local board members with an understanding of the approach being taken by the Establishment Unit and key constraints, so that local board members can respond to any queries they received and champion the engagement process within their community.

15.     Throughout the engagement period, the Establishment Unit will be seeking broad views, key themes (could be geographically based) and feedback on the outcomes the project is set to achieve. This will mirror the public engagement process that will also focus on outcomes and community experience.

16.     In order to ensure that there is adequate time for local boards to review public feedback ahead of providing local board feedback, staff are recommending that local boards delegate a member to provide the local board’s feedback.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     Delegating to one local board member the authority to provide feedback to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project does not have any quantifiable climate impacts.

18.     The Establishment Unit Board will have an opportunity to consider climate impacts as part of making recommendations on the project.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The Mayor and Deputy Mayor have been invited to join the Minister of Transport Hon Michael Wood and Minister of Finance Hon Grant Robertson as sponsors of the project.  The project sponsors will set the strategic direction for the project, including the project scope and engagement plans, and maintain political cooperation between central government and Auckland Council with regards to the project.

20.     The Governing Body representative and the local board representative will be joined by the Chief Executive as the representatives of Auckland Council on the Establishment Unit Board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     This delegation will provide the opportunity for all local boards to provide formal feedback to the Establishment Unit Board within the given timeframe of this first stage of work.

22.     Margi Watson, as the local board representative on the Establishment Unit Board, will develop good lines of communication with other local board members. Having a local board representative on the Establishment Unit Board is not a proxy for local board engagement on this project and does not replace the need to obtain feedback from local boards.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     The work of the Establishment Unit will be guided by an inclusive governance structure made up of representatives of central and local government, Treaty Partners and an independent chairperson.

24.     A key function of the Establishment Unit will be to undertake high quality engagement with communities, stakeholders, mana whenua and mataawaka. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     Delegating to one local board member the authority to provide feedback to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project does not have any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     No risks have been identified for delegating to one local board member the authority to provide feedback to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project.

27.     The risks of not appointing a delegate may be that formal feedback is not able to be provided by the local board within the relevant timeframe or may need to be provided via the urgent decision mechanism.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     Staff will work with the Establishment Unit to make arrangements for local board briefings ahead of public consultation.

29.     Public consultation will take place in July and August 2021.

30.     Further briefings to provide analysis of the public feedback received will be provided towards the end of August 2021.

31.     Delegated local board members will provide feedback on behalf of their local board by 2 September 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead - Senior Policy Advisor, Local Board Services

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors' Updates

File No.: CP2020/17581

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors to update the local board on Governing Body issues they have been involved with since the previous local board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Standing Orders 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provides provision in the local board meeting for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors Christine Fletcher and Cathy Casey’s verbal updates.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2021/07713

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To facilitate an opportunity for the local board chairperson to provide a written update on projects, meetings and other initiatives relevant to the local board’s interests.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 2.4.7, the chairperson will update board members by way of a written report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Chairperson’s report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairperson Corrick - June 2021 Report

293

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Board Members' Reports

File No.: CP2021/07714

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To facilitate an opportunity for local board members to provide a written update on projects and events-attended since the previous month’s meeting and to discuss other matters of interest to the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This is an information item and it is optional for board members to provide a written board member report for inclusion in the agenda.

3.       Local board members are recommended to use a Notice of Motion, rather than a Board Member Report, should a member wish to propose a recommendation or request action to be undertaken by staff.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the written Board Member Reports for June 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Deputy Chairperson Watson - June 2021 Board Report

297

b

Member Robertson - June 2021 Board Report

303

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Albert-Eden Local Board 2021 Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2021/07717

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Albert-Eden Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar, which is a schedule of items that are expected to be reported to the local board during business meetings and/or workshops for 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Albert-Eden Local Board during business meetings and/or workshops for 2021. The local board’s governance forward work calendar is appended to this report under Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·      ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·      clarifying what advice is required and when

·      clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported to the local board’s monthly business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff.  At times there may be items that will arise that are not programmed or noted in the governance calendar.  Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      note the June edition of the Albert-Eden Local Board 2021 Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Board 2021 Governance Forward Work Calendar - June edition

311

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2021/07719

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the local board to receive the records of its recent workshops held following the previous month’s local board business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance to Standing Order 12.1.4, the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its local board workshops held since the previous month’s business meeting of the local board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Records for the workshops held on 25 May and 1 and 8 June 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Record - 25 May 2021

317

b

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Record - 1 June 2021

321

c

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Record - 8 June 2021

325

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Albert-Eden Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Urgent decision - Project Whakapai - Services provided by AIM Services

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report contains sensitive material of a commerical nature that reflects options being considered by the council that may place potential bidders at an unfair advanatge during negotiations.

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report contains sensitive material of a commerical nature that reflects options being considered by the council that may place potential bidders at an unfair advanatge during negotiations.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 



[1] Based on assumed average household size of 2.5