I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday 17 June 2021

2.00pm

Council Chamber
Orewa Service Centre
50 Centreway Road
Orewa

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Gary Brown

 

Deputy Chairperson

Victoria Short

 

Members

Andy Dunn

 

 

Janet Fitzgerald, JP

 

 

Gary Holmes

 

 

Julia Parfitt, JP

 

 

Alexis Poppelbaum

 

 

Leanne Willis

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Louise Healy

Democracy Advisor

 

11 June 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 419 205

Email: louise.healy@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     Public Forum: Merv Huxford - Problematic parking at Metropark East        5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Approval of the 2021/2022 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme                                                                7

12        Approval of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board External Partnership - Business Associations work programme 2021/2022                                                                25

13        Approval of the 2021/2022 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme                                                                    31

14        Adoption of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Agreement 2021/2022              41

15        Feedback on Equity of Service Levels and Funding Proposals - Draft Report    65

16        Delegation of feedback to be provided to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project                                                                         115

17        Approval for new private road name for Subdivision at Jack Hawken Lane, Silverdale                                                                                                                    119

18        New public road name in the Neil Construction Limited subdivision at 455 Whangaparaoa Road, Stanmore Bay                                                                      127

19        Urgent decision: Endorse the use of the Chairs' Forum as the selection panel to appoint the local board representative to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Mangere light rail project                                                                         135

20        Eke Panuku Development Auckland - Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Six-Monthly Report to 31 March 2021                                                                                           141

21        Allocation of the remaining 2020/2021 Local Contestable Grants and Facilities Grants budget                                                                                                            147

22        Members' Reports                                                                                                      163

23        Deputations update                                                                                                   171

24        Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshop records                                              173

25        Governance forward work calendar                                                                        179

26        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting held on Thursday 20 May 2021 as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum: Merv Huxford - Problematic parking at Metropark East

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Merv Huxford would like to speak to the local board about parking concerns at Metropark East.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Mr Huxford for his attendance.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Approval of the 2021/2022 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme

File No.: CP2021/04293

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2021/2022 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and approve in principle the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programmes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and associated budgets for approval for the 2021/2022 financial year, and for approval in principle for the subsequent two financial years, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 (Attachment A to the agenda report).

3.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives identified in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020.

4.       The work programme has been developed through a series of workshops between December 2020 and May 2021, where the local board provided feedback to staff on programme and activity prioritisation.

5.       The local board indicated its support for the following activities to be delivered in 2021/2022, with budgets as listed below:

·        EcoNeighbourhoods - $30,000

·        Īnanga spawning sites – survey and restoration - $25,000

·        Ko te wai he taonga: Water is a treasure - $25,000

·        Pest Free Hibiscus Coast - $53,560

·        Pest plans on private land Okura - $15,000

·        Restore Hibiscus and Bays - $133,120

·        Sediment related water quality testing – year three - $25,000

·        Te ao Māori and community led conservation - $5,000

·        Trash free Taiaotea (Browns Bay waste minimisation) - $20,000

·        Zero waste early childhood education programme - $25,200.

6.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $356,880, which can be funded from within the board’s draft locally driven initiatives budget for the 2021/2022 financial year. Approval in principle is also being sought for activities in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

7.       The North-West Wildlink streamside awareness programme from the 2020/2021 programme has a proposed $5,000 carry forward into the 2021/2022 financial year.

8.       The indicative programmes and budgets for 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 are subject to change and will be confirmed on an annual basis through the approval of the respective work programmes.

9.       Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve its 2021/2022 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and associated budgets, as summarised in the table below (Attachment A):

Activity name

2021/2022 budget for approval

EcoNeighbourhoods

$30,000

Īnanga spawning sites – survey and restoration

$25,000

Ko te wai he taonga: Water is a treasure

$25,000

Pest Free Hibiscus Coast

$53,560

Pest plans on private land Okura

$15,000

Restore Hibiscus and Bays

$133,120

Sediment related water quality testing – year three

$25,000

Te ao Māori and community led conservation

$5,000

Trash free Taiaotea (Browns Bay waste minimisation)

$20,000

Zero waste early childhood education programme

$25,200

Total

$356,880

b)      approve in principle the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programmes (Attachment A)

c)      note that the indicative programmes and budgets for 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 are subject to change and will be confirmed on an annual basis through the approval of the respective work programmes.

Horopaki

Context

10.     Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops has informed the development of the Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme.

11.     The proposed work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives identified in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020. The specific objectives reflected in the work programme are:

·        Continue to align and support community and volunteer groups, schools, and iwi to enhance and protect our natural environment

·        Support the development and implementation of ecological and environmental restoration plans

·        Support communities to live more sustainably, and prepare for the impacts of climate change

·        Our waterways and beaches are clean and safe for people and wildlife

·        Hibiscus and Bays communities are supported, connected and vibrant.

12.     The following adopted strategies and plans also guided the development of the work programme:

·        Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan

·        National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management

·        Waste Management and Minimisation Plan

·        Regional Pest Management Plan.

13.     The development of the work programme has been informed by staff assessments and identification of local environmental priority areas, and feedback received from the local board at workshops.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     The proposed work programme is made up of activities continuing from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or ongoing programmes. It also includes new initiatives supported by the local board. These programmes contribute towards the delivery of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020 environmental objectives, as detailed above.

15.     The work programme provides a three-year view that demonstrates the phasing or continuation of programme delivery over the 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

16.     This report seeks local board approval for budgets and activities in year one of the three-year work programme (2021/2022), and approval in principle for 2022/2023 and 2023/2024.

17.     Approving in principle does not commit the local board to funding in future years, as the budget for years two and three will still need to be approved on an annual basis. However approval in principle will help staff, contractors and community groups to plan activities and resourcing in the longer-term.

18.     Budgets for years two and three are subject to change, as the programmes are further refined or if local board priorities shift.

19.     The proposed activities for delivery as part of the board’s 2021/2022 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme are detailed below, alongside indicative plans and budgets for the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years:

EcoNeighbourhoods - $30,000

20.     The local board has indicated it would like to continue to fund the EcoNeighbourhoods project in the 2021/2022 financial year.

21.     EcoNeighbourhoods is a programme that supports six or more neighbours from different households to come together to adopt sustainable, low carbon practices and increase resilience within their homes, lifestyles and neighbourhoods. These activities are decided by the groups and can range from local food production to rainwater collection.

22.     The programme funding supports the groups by providing 12 hours of facilitation support and up to $1,000 worth of incentives, discounts and training to support behaviour change.

23.     Funding in 2021/2022 will continue to support the six existing EcoNeighbourhood groups (should they wish to continue with the programme) and up to two new groups.

24.     The local board allocated $30,000 towards this project in the 2019/2020 and 2020/2021 financial years, and staff recommend the board allocate a further $30,000 towards the programme in 2021/2022. Approval in principle is also sought for $30,000 in both the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

Īnanga spawning sites – survey and restoration - $25,000

25.     The local board has indicated support for the new survey and restoration programme for īnanga spawning sites in the 2021/2022 financial year to help protect the at-risk species through targeted restoration.

26.     The programme involves the collection of data in streams to establish a baseline understanding of the current state of īnanga populations within the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

27.     This work will identify areas in need of urgent protection and restoration, and this will be communicated back to the community as an awareness-raising exercise. The community will then be supported to maintain, enhance and promote the restoration and care of these waterways.

28.     The local board had previously supported this work as one of the programmes funded by the North-West Wildlink streamside awareness project.

29.     Staff recommend the local board allocate $25,000 towards the programme in 2021/2022. Approval in principle is also sought for $27,000 in the 2022/2023 financial year and $29,000 in the 2023/2024 financial years.

Ko te wai he taonga: Water is a treasure - $25,000

30.     The local board has indicated it would like to continue to fund the ko te wai he taonga (water is a treasure) programme in the 2021/2022 financial year to further help children, teachers and their whanāu understand the importance of water.

31.     The programme involves a series of interactive school sessions helping students to understand the impact of stormwater and pollution to receiving environments. Through the programme, students are encouraged to interact with their local streams. At the end of the educational sessions an action piece is decided upon and undertaken by all participating students.

32.     The board allocated $20,000 towards this project in the 2019/2020 financial year and $25,000 in the 2020/2021 financial year. Staff recommend the board allocate $25,000 towards the programme in 2021/2022. Approval in principle is also sought for $25,000 in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

Pest Free Hibiscus Coast - $53,560

33.     The local board has indicated support for the new Pest Free Hibiscus Coast programme in the 2021/2022 financial year to deliver the Pest Free Hibiscus Coast Project Plan 2019-2022 and beyond.

34.     The programme funds Forest and Bird Hibiscus Coast’s proposal for a predator control specialist and support roles. These roles assist the 80 existing volunteers, attract more volunteers, carry out pest animal monitoring and assist six schools in getting involved with trapping.

35.     The roles help to maintain and grow the progress that has been made to date establishing predator control networks, therefore enhancing the local native ecosystems.

36.     Staff recommend the local board allocate $53,560 towards the programme in 2021/2022. Approval in principle is also sought for $54,363 in the 2022/2023 financial year and $55,178 in the 2023/2024 financial year.

Pest plans on private land Okura - $15,000

37.     The local board has indicated support for the new pest plans on private land Okura programme in the 2021/2022 financial year to support Friends of Okura Bush to restore the biodiversity of the Okura Bush, shoreline and surrounds.

38.     The programme funds a coordinator to assist private landowners surrounding the estuary to undertake pest plant and animal control in their properties, creating a pest free buffer zone along the Okura estuary.

39.     The pest control helps protect the biodiversity in the Okura region, and is an essential part in the operation of the North-West Wildlink buffer zone.  

40.     Staff recommend the local board allocate $15,000 towards the programme in 2021/2022. Approval in principle is also sought for $15,225 in the 2022/2023 financial year and $15,453 in the 2023/2024 financial year.

Restore Hibiscus and Bays - $133,120

41.     The local board has indicated support to continue to allocate funding towards a manager and field advisor for the Restore Hibiscus and Bays programme in the 2021/2022 financial year.

42.     These roles are essential to the implementation of the revised 2021 Restore Hibiscus and Bays strategic plan. The roles bring together a wide range of expertise to support a growth in community restoration activities.

43.     The manager focuses on strategic priorities, promoting the groups and applying for funding and gaining support. The field advisor provides technical advice, builds rapport with the community, and supports work on the ground.

44.     The manager role was funded in 2019/2020 as part of the North-West Wildlink restoration funding, but this has been separated out for ease of reporting. In the 2020/2021 financial year the local board allocated $90,000 to the programme.

45.     Staff recommend the local board allocate $133,120 towards the programme in 2021/2022, this increase in cost is the actual cost for two staff at 32 hours a week. Approval in principle is also sought for $135,117 in the 2022/2023 financial year and $137,144 in the 2023/2024 financial year.

Sediment related water quality testing – year three - $25,000

46.     The local board has indicated it would like to continue to fund the sediment water quality monitoring programme in the 2021/2022 financial year.

47.     The programme undertakes water quality testing and analysis of contaminants in waterways related to sediment discharged from small site development. Collecting additional data in future years will allow staff to build a solid programme for reducing sediment that targets both existing and potential sediment issues for the benefit of the local community.

48.     This is the third year of the programme supported, with at least three years total needed for collection before meaningful trends and conclusions can be identified. At the conclusion of the 2021/2022 financial year a report is produced which identifies necessary next steps to reduce sedimentation from small site development to the freshwater environment.

49.     For the last two years (2019/2020 and 2020/2021) the local board allocated $20,000 to the programme. Staff recommend that the board allocate another $25,000 in the 2021/2022 financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $25,000 in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

Te ao Māori and community-led conservation - $5,000

50.     The local board has indicated support for a new te ao Māori and community-led conservation programme in the 2021/2022 financial year.

51.     The programme will support community-led conservation groups to learn about te ao Māori and to grow relationships with local iwi, through a series of te ao Māori workshops.

52.     Community groups are increasingly expressing their wish to connect with local iwi. The workshops will help groups gain an understanding of mātauranga Māori, sites of significance and historical land uses, and be able to establish meaningful relationships to inform their conservation activities.

53.     The first year of this programme is dedicated to planning for the delivery of the workshops, with the first occurring toward the end of the 2021/2022 financial year. The programme will look to build on iwi’s capacity and capability if needed.

54.     Staff recommend the local board allocate $5,000 towards the programme in 2021/2022. Approval in principle is also sought for $3,000 in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

Trash free Taiaotea (Browns Bay Waste Minimisation) - $20,000

55.     The local board has indicated it would like to continue support the Trash Free Taiaotea (Browns Bay waste minimisation) programme in the 2021/2022 financial year.

56.     This programme continues to support Browns Bay residents, community groups and local businesses to care for the local environment and reduce waste.

57.    In 2021/2022, this will involve working alongside a further five businesses to support them to reduce their waste. This will be achieved through encouraging the use of Hibiscus Coast Zero Waste’s food scraps collection services, an awards event to recognise waste champions and businesses, and integration with catchment restoration activities including Restore Hibiscus and Bays.

58.     The local board allocated $19,500 to the programme in 2020/2021 financial year. Staff recommend that the board allocate $20,000 in the 2021/2022 financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $20,300 in the 2022/2023 financial year and $20,605 in the 2023/2024 financial year.

Zero waste early childhood education programme - $25,200

59.     The local board has indicated support to continue to allocate funding to the zero waste early childhood education programme in the 2021/2022 financial year to further support to waste minimisation outcomes.

60.     This programme supports kindergartens, early childhood education centres and residents connected to these centres to reduce their waste and live more sustainably.

61.     After three years, staff aim to have engaged with 100 per cent of centres in the local board area.

62.     The local board allocated $14,200 in the 2020/2021 financial year. Staff recommend the local board allocate $25,200 towards the programme in the 2021/2022. This increase in funding allows for the:

·        ongoing support for centres already part of the programme

·        development of resources for centres

·        translation of materials so all families can connect with the programme

·        hosting of training events for staff members and whānau

·        improved communications to help inspire more centres to participate.

63.     Approval in principle is also sought for $25,578 in the 2022/2023 financial year and $25,962 in the 2023/2024 financial year to continue engaging with these early childhood education centres.

Activities carried forward from 2020/2021:

64.     Staff have indicated a $5,000 carry forward is required for the North-West Wildlink streamside awareness programme from the 2020/2021 financial year to cover the maintenance of 800 plants planted at Stanmore Bay. The funding will be spent before 30 September 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

65.     In June 2019 Auckland Council declared a climate emergency and in response to this the council adopted the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan in July 2020.

66.     Each activity in the work programme is assessed to identify whether it will have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions and contributing towards climate change adaptation

67.     Table 1 outlines the key activities in the 2021/2022 work programme that have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards climate change adaptation.

Table 1: Climate impact assessment of proposed activities

Activity name

Climate impact

EcoNeighbourhoods

This programme aims to reduce emissions and increase community resilience through the priorities identified by the EcoNeighbourhoods such as reducing energy demand, reducing waste, using sustainable transport options, increasing local food production and consumption, improving biodiversity and reducing pests.

Īnanga spawning sites – survey and restoration

When freshwater ecosystems are healthy and thriving, they provide many ecological services such as flood mitigation, habitat for native biodiversity, and carbon sequestration through riparian plants.

Ko te wai he taonga: Water is a treasure

The actions identified by students can range from streamside plantings to rain barrel installation to providing education materials to the wider community. These actions will improve community resilience to future climate change. Plantings will also create carbon sinks and increase biodiversity, decrease erosion and help clean runoff before entering the water system.

Pest Free Hibiscus Coast

These programmes will contribute to fewer native plants being browsed, hence the survival and regeneration of increasing amounts of native vegetation. Plantings will also increase biodiversity and act as a carbon sink.

Pest plans on private land Okura

Restore Hibiscus and Bays

Sediment related water quality testing – year three

This programme will gather information on the levels of sediment entering waterways from small building sites. This data will lead to an improvement in climate resilience for Auckland. Ensuring small building sites have appropriate erosion and sediment controls in place is important to reduce and mitigate flooding events which are expected to increase due to climate change.

Trash free Taiaotea (Browns Bay Waste Minimisation)

The contribution of waste to overall greenhouse gas emissions in the Auckland region is approximately 3.1 per cent as per the Auckland Greenhouse Gas Inventory to 2016. The largest source of emissions within the waste sector in Aotearoa New Zealand is solid waste disposal to landfill. These programmes will assist in taking practical steps to reducing a proportion of these waste-related emissions.

Zero waste early childhood education programme

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

68.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

69.     In particular, the attached Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme reflects the integrated activities developed by Environmental Services, Healthy Waters and Waste Solutions.

70.     The Pest Free Hibiscus Coast and Restore Hibiscus and Bays programmes will be delivered with support from Parks, Sports and Recreation staff to ensure alignment in achieving biodiversity outcomes. The sediment related water quality testing programme will be delivered with support from the Proactive Compliance team to reduce the volume of sediment entering waterways. Māori Outcomes and Connected Communities staff will help to inform the te ao Māori and community-led conservation programme.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

71.     The programmes proposed for inclusion in the local board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme will have positive environmental outcomes across the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area. Particular focus areas for the 2021/2022 work programme include Okura Bush and Browns Bay areas.

72.     The programmes noted above align with the local board plan outcomes including ‘a protected and enhanced environment’ and ‘a connected community’. The proposed work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from December 2020 to May 2021. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

73.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori.

74.     The work programme includes activities that aim to deliver outcomes for and with Māori, in alignment with the strategic priority areas outlined in Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau (Auckland Council’s Māori Outcome Framework). Progress on how the activities are achieving these outcomes will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

75.     Staff recognise that environmental management, water quality and land management have integral links with the mauri of the environment and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

76.     Table 2 outlines the activities in the 2021/2022 work programme that contribute towards the delivery of specific Māori outcomes.

 

 

Table 2: Māori outcome delivery through proposed activities

Activity name

Māori outcome

Māori outcome description

Ko te wai he taonga: Water is a treasure

·   Te reo Māori

·   Kaitiakitanga

 

The interactive sessions will incorporate a te ao Māori perspective and te reo Māori into the delivery.

Te ao Māori and community led conservation

·   Te reo Māori

·   Kaitiakitanga

 

The programme is led by local iwi. The purpose of the programme is to help conservation groups understand the mātauranga Māori approach and foster connections with iwi.

Trash free Taiaotea (Browns Bay Waste Minimisation)

·   Te reo Māori

Te reo Māori will be used throughout promotional material and impact stories.

Zero waste early childhood education programme

·   Kaitiakitanga

The programme will build connections with Te Herenga Waka o Orewa Marae to establish an ongoing relationship throughout the programme. The contractor will seek advice on incorporating te ao Māori into the programme’s delivery and approach.

 

77.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

78.     The proposed environment work programme for 2021/2022 totals to $356,880 of the local board’s locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the local board’s total draft budget for 2021/2022.

79.     Budgets for activities in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years are indicative. While local board approval in principle is being sought for these future years through this report, formal approval will be sought on an annual basis, once budgets and programme costs are confirmed.

80.     In addition to the 2021/2022 budget, staff have indicated a $5,000 carry forward from the 2020/2021 financial year is required for the North-West Wildlink streamside awareness programme. This will be spent on plant maintenance before 30 September 2021.

81.     An overall locally-driven initiatives opex carry-forward provision for projects to be carried forward from 2020/2021 to 2021/2022 was approved by the Finance and Performance committee as part of the 10-year budget adoption. Work programme activities to be carried forward from 2020/2021 will be finalised post 30 June 2021. Local boards will receive detail of carry forwards in their first scheduled performance report for 2021/2022.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

82.     If the proposed Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme is not approved before the start of the financial year, there is a risk that activities may be delayed or not delivered within the financial year.

83.     Risks and mitigations for new activity lines were considered during the scoping phase. There may be risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year. These will be continually assessed and reported to the local board.

84.     The COVID-19 pandemic could have a further negative impact on the delivery of local board work programmes if the COVID-19 alert level changes (New Zealand’s 4-level alert system specifies measures to be taken against COVID-19 at each level). The deliverability of some activities will decrease if there is an increase to the COVID-19 alert level. Drought conditions may also lead to delays in any programmes which involve planting.

85.     Resourcing of the work programme is based on current staff capacity within departments. Therefore, changes to staff capacity may also have an impact on work programme delivery.

86.     Attachment B (to the agenda report) shows the key risks associated with activities in the proposed 2021/2022 work programme, as well as proposed mitigations.

87.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

88.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence once approved and continue until 30 June 2022. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

89.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2021/2022 Hibiscus and Bays Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme

17

b

Key risks and mitgations for activities

23

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Hannah Brightley - Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Approval of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board External Partnership - Business Associations work programme 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/07326

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board External Partnerships - Business Associations work programme 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the board’s External Partnerships – Business Associations work programme and associated budgets for approval for delivery within the 2021/2022 financial year (Attachment A to the agenda report).

3.       The work programme responds to the following outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020:

·    Outcome 2: A strong local economy

o Objective: Our businesses and business centres feel supported and empowered.

4.       The local board provided feedback to staff on the projects it would like to fund in a series of workshops. The board indicated its support for the following projects, with budgets as listed below:

o Supporting business associations, Silverdale Area Business Association - $20,000

§ Preparation towards the establishment of a new Business Improvement District programme in Silverdale business area.

5.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $20,000, which can be funded from within the board’s draft locally driven initiatives budget for the 2021/2022 financial year.

6.       Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the External Partnerships – Business Association work programme 2021/2022 (Attachment A)

Horopaki

Context

7.       Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward, through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops have informed the work programme.

8.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020. The specific outcome that are reflected in the work programme is:

·    Outcome 2: A strong local economy

o Objective: Our businesses and business centres feel supported and empowered.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The proposed activities for delivery as part of the board’s External Partnerships – Business Associations work programme 2021/2022 are detailed below.  Refer to Attachment A for further detail.

Supporting business associations, Silverdale Area Business Association (SABA) - $20,000

10.     To assist and work alongside SABA in the planning and preparation towards the establishment of a new Business Improvement District (BID) programme in Silverdale.

11.     To develop a project plan, timeline and budget for the next 18 months. The plan will include the following:

12.     2021/2022 Year 1: The plan will utilise the $20,000 funding and focus on:

·                membership and engagement

·                increase the association membership and developing a good database of members.

·                focus on communication and engagement to gather information from the businesses

·                communicate the benefits of a BID

·                develop the BID programme two-year business plan including identifying the projects, activities and initiatives that will be delivered to BID members

·                confirm the proposed BID boundary map

·                decide on the targeted rate mechanism

·                confirm the BID income and expenditure budget (including the BID targeted rate grant amount) for the first two years of BID operation.

 Presenting proposals to the local board

13.     When ready the BID Team and SABA will present to the local board an overview of the 18-month project plan, timeline and budget. Progress will be reported directly to the local board as required.

14.     The External Partnerships work programme progress will be reported directly to the local board as part of the quarterly local board work programme report produced by Local Board Services.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.     The proposed work programme does not significantly impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards adapting to the impacts of climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

17.     The External Partnerships Team (BID Team) work collaboratively with the other council departments and council-controlled organisations who are working with business associations and or in the town centre space.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     The proposed External Partnerships – Business Associations work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from November 2020 to May 2021. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

19.     The activities in the proposed work programme align with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     Individual business associations may, through operating their BID programme, identify opportunities for niche support or development of any Māori business sector in their business area.

21.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori, then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The proposed External Partnerships – Business Association work programme budget for 2021/2022 is $20,000 of the boards locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2021/2022.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     Table 3 shows the identified significant risks associated with activities in the proposed 2021/2022 work programme.

Table 3: Significant risks and mitigations for activities

Activity name

Risk

Mitigation

Rating after mitigation

Supporting business associations – SABA

Insufficient support or interest from businesses to engage

Quarterly reporting on progress

Low

 

24.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence on 1 July 2021 and continue until 30 June 2022. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

26.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

External Partnerships Business Associations Work Programme 2021-2022 - Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

29

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Siddens - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Approval of the 2021/2022 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme

File No.: CP2021/07750

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2021/2022 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme and approve in principle the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programmes (Attachment A to the agenda report).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the 2021/2022 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme with associated budget for approval, as well as the subsequent two financial years, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programmes for approval in principle.

3.       The local board approves the work programme each financial year. Delivery of the approved work programme will support the local board to achieve the outcomes and aspirations in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020.

4.       The work programme details the activities to be delivered by departments within the Customer and Community Services directorate.

5.       The work programme has been developed through a series of workshops between December 2020 and May 2021, where the local board provided feedback to staff on project and activity prioritisation.

6.       The work programme development process takes an integrated approach to scoping activity, involving collaboration between staff from across council and the local board.

7.       Several projects in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programme have been identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme. Approval is sought for the planning and design of these projects to commence during 2021/2022, so that they are ready to be delivered early if approved projects for delivery in 2021/2022 are delayed for any unforeseen reason.   

8.       The work programme includes projects proposed to be funded from regional budgets subject to approval by the relevant Governing Body committee. The local board can provide formal feedback on these regional projects through resolution to this report.

9.       The most significant risk to successful delivery of the 2021/2022 work programme is a change in COVID-19 alert levels that would impact delivery timeframes and budget.

10.     Updates on the progress of the work programme delivery will be provided through the local board’s quarterly performance reports.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme and associated budget and approve, in principle, the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programmes (Attachment A).

b)      approve the Risk Adjusted Programme projects identified in the 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme (Attachment A).

c)       note that funding for the Coastal Renewals, Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development and the Natural Environment Targeted Rate budgets are subject to approval by the relevant Governing Body committee.

d)       provide feedback for consideration by the relevant Governing Body committee on projects funded from the Coastal Renewals, Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development and the Natural Environment Targeted Rate budgets (Attachment D to the agenda report).

Horopaki

Context

11.     Customer and Community Services provide a wide range of services, facilities, open spaces and information that support communities to connect, enjoy and embrace the diversity of our people, places and natural environment. These are tailored to the unique needs of the local community in a place-based approach.

12.     The 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme (included as Attachment A) outlines the local board’s priorities to be delivered within the financial year.

13.     The work programme aligns to council plans, policies and strategies. Each activity in the work programme delivers to a specific objective relating to one or more of the following 2020 Local Board Plan outcomes:

·   Outcome 1 - A connected community

·   Outcome 3 - A protected and enhanced environment

·   Outcome 4 - Open spaces to enjoy.

14.    Development of the work programme is based on the understanding of:

·   local community needs

·   service and asset availability

·   funding availability

·   the work performed by other parties, including iwi partners, Council Controlled Organisations, community groups and commercial enterprises

·   risks

·   feedback received from the local board at workshops.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.    Delivery of the work programme is the realisation of the local board’s aspirations for their community, as identified in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020.

16.    The local board has discretion to allocate a portion of their budget to a project or activity that they identify as a priority across the three-year work programme period.

17.    Out of the initiatives signalled in the local board plan, the local board has prioritised the activities to be delivered in the next three years within available budgets.

18.    The work programme provides a three-year view that demonstrates the phasing of programme and project delivery for the following financial years:

·   2021/2022 (to be approved)

·   2022/2023 (to be approved in principle)

·   2023/2024 (to be approved in principle).

19.    The local board can approve the work programme for the first financial year and subsequently, delivery of this activity will commence from 1 July 2021. The local board can approve the following two years in principle only.

20.    This allows the work programme to be presented in a future focused way that shows how the local board plan will be responded to for the entirety of its three-year strategy, without locking down future investment before that activity is properly scoped.

21.    The local board will approve the 2022/2023 work programme in June 2022 and approve the 2023/2024 work programme in June 2023. This will include opportunity to make changes to these work programmes prior to approval, including adding or removing activities and budget allocations, unless funding has already been committed.

22.    However, approval of unique multi-year projects, particularly capital works, in the 2021/2022 work programme will commit the local board to the future funding associated with completing the project in 2022/2023 or 2023/2024.

23.    The work programme includes a continuation of delivery from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or projects, ongoing programmes, new activities and investments, and potential carry-forward items.

24.    Regular updates on the delivery of the programme will be provided to the local board through quarterly performance reports. These updates will identify progress of all projects, highlight risks, and advise if amendments to the budget or delivery timeframes are required.

COVID-19 recovery is a priority for Customer and Community Services

25.     A priority of the work programme is to deliver activities that respond to the impacts of COVID-19 on the following:

·     newly vulnerable communities

·     council financial constraints

·     building community resilience for recovery.

26.     Customer and Community Services is positioned well to deliver services that are key to the economic and social recovery of communities most in need, including by providing:

·     safe and welcoming spaces

·     inclusive events to bring the community back together

·     community supports, including grants

·     stronger connections with other organisations, including Council Controlled Organisations, iwi partners, business associations, community organisations and central government agencies who also serve our communities.

Delivering outcomes for, and with, Māori

27.     Council has important statutory obligations with respect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi – The Treaty of Waitangi. The strategic framework that informs council’s delivery and performance measurement of Māori outcomes is Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau Māori Outcomes Measurement Framework.

28.     Within this strategic framework, Customer and Community Services is responsible for leading activities that deliver against the following outcomes and objectives in Table 1.

Table 1: Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau outcomes and objectives

Mana outcome

Outcome statement

Mahi objective

Kia ora te Marae

Marae are centres of excellence for whānau Māori and have an abundant presence in communities.

Invest in marae to be self-sustaining and thriving hubs for Māori and the wider community.

Kia ora te Whānau

Empowered whānau Māori across Tāmaki Makaurau.

The council group will enable whānau Māori to experience relevant and welcoming public facilities and services. It will support Māori-led services where appropriate.

Kia ora te Reo

Ko te reo Māori te mauri o te mana Māori

The council group supports te reo Māori be seen, heard, spoken and learned throughout Tāmaki Makaurau.

29.     The work programme includes activities that have an objective to deliver moderate to high outcomes for and with Māori in one or more of the following strategic priority areas:

·     Kaitiakitanga

·     Māori business, tourism and employment

·     Māori identity and culture

·     marae development

·     papakāinga and Māori housing

·     realising rangatahi potential

·     te reo Māori

·     whānau and tamariki wellbeing.

30.     Activities in the work programme that aim to achieve high Māori outcomes in one or more of the strategic priority areas are identified in Attachment B to the agenda report.

31.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board work programme includes 23 activities that are identified as delivering moderate to high outcomes for Māori.  

32.     Progress updates on delivery of Māori outcomes will be provided to the local board through quarterly performance reports.

Types of budget

33.     Work programme activities are funded from budget sources dependent on the type of delivery. Some activities within the work programme have budget allocated from two or more sources, including budgets from both local and regional programmes.

34.     Table 2 outlines the different budget types and their purpose that fund the work programme.

Table 2: work programme budget types and purpose

Budget type

Description of budget purpose

Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

A development fund used to advance local operational and capital activities at the discretion of the local board

Asset Based Services (ABS)

Allocated by the Governing Body to deliver local activities based on decisions regarding region-wide service levels, including allocation of funds for local asset-based services

Local renewals

A fund dedicated to the renewal (servicing or replacement) of assets including those in local parks and community facilities

Growth (local parks and sports field development)

Primarily funded through development contributions, a regional fund to improve open spaces, including developing newly acquired land into parks, and existing open space to increase capacity to cater for growing population needs

Coastal

A regional fund for the renewal of Auckland’s significant coastal assets, such as seawalls, wharves and pontoons.

Landslide prevention

A regional fund to proactively develop new assets for the prevention of landslides and major slips throughout the region

Specific purpose funding

Funds received by the council from external sources held for specific local board areas and service agreements including compensation funding from other agencies for land acquisitions required for major projects

One Local Initiative (OLI)

Funds allocated by the Governing Body to a local board priority project in alignment with the Long-term Plan 2018-2028

Long-term Plan discrete

Funds associated with activities specifically named and listed in previous long-term plans, including new libraries, community centres and major sports and community infrastructure

Kauri Dieback Funding

As part of the Natural Environment Targeted Rate (NETR) Fund, this is a regional fund from the Environment and Climate Change Committee used to implement the national kauri dieback programme standards

External funding

Budget from external parties, not yet received and held by Customer and Community Services

Capital projects and budgets

35.    The capital works programmes have been geo-spatially mapped to indicate the location of projects within a local board area.

36.    Attachment C to the agenda report demonstrates the year of the three-year work programme that capital budget is proposed to be allocated to specific projects and indicates the main funding source for each project.

37.    Activity budgets for capital programme delivery are estimates only, as costs are subject to change and to be refined as the activity / project progresses through the design and delivery process. Greater clarity will be determined once activity details are defined with the work programme updated accordingly.

38.    Some projects are unable to be mapped as they reference multiple locations, or the work locations are yet to be determined.

Risk Adjusted Programme

39.    The Risk Adjusted Programme was implemented in 2019 and is designed to mitigate risk so that the total budget is delivered.

40.    Several capex projects in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programme have been identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme as highlighted in Attachment A.

         41.                      Approval is sought for the commencement of these projects in the 2021/2022 financial                year, so that they can replace delays in projects that may not be delivered for unforeseen    reasons.

Regionally funded activities included in the local board work programme

42.     There are activities, from the Coastal Renewals, Landslide Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development and the Natural Environment Targeted Rate budgets, which are funded regionally and will be approved by the Governing Body after 30 June 2021.

43.     These activities are included in the work programme because the local board has decision-making responsibility for that activity within the parameters set by the Governing Body, which include project location, scope and budget.

44.     These activities may be conducted by a number of teams, including within the Customer and Community Services and Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorates.

45.     The local board can provide feedback on the activities outlined in Attachment D. This feedback will be presented to the relevant Governing Body committee when they consider regionally funded activities.

Process for changes to the approved work programme

46.     Staff will provide progress updates to and seek approval from the local board if there are any projects that require scope, budget or timing changes throughout the financial year, or if activities need to be cancelled or added to the work programme.

47.     The work programme includes community leases. Straight-forward lease renewals without variations will be processed in accordance with agreed delegations through a written memo. Expired and more complex community leases will be workshopped with the local board and reported to a business meeting.

48.     For a change to the work programme considered to be minor, in that it does not substantially alter the approved work programme, staff will workshop this with the local board and then implement the change. A description of the change will be included in the following round of quarterly reporting.

49.     A change to the work programme that is considered substantial, will be presented to the local board at a business meeting for approval.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

50.     In June 2019, council declared a climate emergency and in response to this, council adopted the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan in July 2020.

51.     Each activity in the work programme is assessed to identify whether it will have a positive, negative, or neutral impact on greenhouse gas emissions and impact on resilience to climate change.

52.     To deliver on climate goals, Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri includes eight priorities for action:

·     natural environment

·     built environment

·     transport

·     economy

·     communities and coast

·     food

·     Te Puāwaitanga ō te Tātai

·     energy and industry.

53.     The work programme indicates which of these priorities each activity responds to.

54.     Attachment E to the agenda report outlines the activities in the work programme identified to have a positive and negative climate change impact.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

55.     The work programme is presented at a directorate level which reflects the integrated approach to developing the activities between the directorate’s departments of:

·      Connected Communities

·      Community Facilities

·      Community and Social Innovation

·      Parks, Sports and Recreation

·      Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships.

56.     The Customer and Community Services work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by representatives from across council departments, directorates and Council Controlled Organisations.  The integrated team developed the proposed work programme with the local board through a series of workshops.

57.     Some of the activities in the work programme are delivered collaboratively between directorates, for example the Kauri Dieback programme.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

58.     Delivery of the work programme is the local board’s implementation of outcomes and objectives in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020. 

59.     The feedback received from the local board through a series of workshops from December 2020 to May 2021 has informed the proposed Customer and Community Services work programme in Attachment A.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

60.     Consideration is given to how the provision of services, facilities and open spaces can support the aspirations of Māori, promote community relationships, connect to the natural environment, and foster holistic wellbeing of whānau, hapu and iwi Māori.

61.     In the local board area, 6.5 per cent of the total population identify as Māori.

62.     The work programme includes activities that will have an impact on a service, facility, or location of significance to Māori. In these situations, appropriate and meaningful engagement and consultation will be undertaken, including to meet our obligations under Te Tiriti o Waitangi – Treaty of Waitangi.

63.     Activities identified as delivering a moderate and high level of Māori outcomes are presented as Attachment B.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

64.     The financial implications of the COVID-19 pandemic have resulted in a reduced renewals budget per local board and significantly reduced development budgets for growth.

65.    Each activity line has a budget allocation for delivery in one or more of the financial years   (e.g., 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024). Where activity lines show a zero-dollar                budget, this reflects implementation costs met through staff salary or other funding sources.

66.    The 2021/2022 activities recommended for local board approval can be accommodated     within their draft 2021/2022 budgets.

67.     The budgets allocated to activities in the financial years 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 are indicative only and are subject to change due to any increased costs, inflation or reduction to the overall available annual council budget that may occur.

68.     Table 3 summarises the budget sources for each work programme financial year.

Table 3: Hibiscus and Bays Local Board budget allocation

Local budgets

2021/2022 (approve)

2022/2023 (approve in principle)

2023/2024 (approve in principle)

Opex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

 $1,360,317

 $1,381,614

 $1,395,855

Opex: Asset Based Services (ABS)

 $17,372,966

 $17,372,966

 $17,372,966

Capex: Local Asset Renewals - Budget (ABS)

$4,723,228

$7,863,171

$6,044,404

Capex: Local Asset Renewals - Proposed Allocation (ABS)

$4,108,197

$6,412,870

$6,044,404

Capex: Local Asset Renewals - Unallocated budget (ABS)

$615,031

$1,450,301

$0

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) – Budget

$205,000

$205,000

$205,000

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) - Proposed Allocation

$205,000

$205,000

$205,000

Capex: Local Discretionary Initiatives (LDI) - Unallocated budget

$0

$0

$0

Capex: Growth projects Allocation

$25,000

$500,000

$2,000,000

Capex: Coastal projects Allocation

$711,622

$35,000

$285,000

Capex: Landslide Prevention projects Allocation

$20,000

$20,000

$0

Capex: Specific Purpose Funding - Allocation

$0

$0

$0

Capex: External Funding Allocation

$0

$0

$0

Capex: One Local Initiative*

$6,160,000

$8,000,000

$0

Capex: Long-term Plan discrete

$0

$0

$0

Capex: Natural Environment Targeted Rate

$26,422

$612,091

$0

* One Local Initiative (OLI) funding subject to future decisions of the Governing Body

 

69.     The proposed budgets are based on the anticipated budget allocations from the Long-term Plan 2021-2031.

70.     Any 2020/2021 capex budget unspent on 30 June 2021 will be assessed for carry-forward to the 2021/2022 work programme. Carry forwards will be added to the work programme as separate activity lines.

71.     Where an activity is cancelled or no longer required, the local board can reallocate the       budget to an existing work programme activity or create a new activity within that financial         year.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

72.     If approval of the Customer and Community Services work programme is not obtained, there is significant risk that the activities within it will be delayed or not delivered.

73.     Table 4 outlines the key risks and mitigations associated with the work programme.

Table 4: risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

Non-delivery, time delays and budget overspend of activities that are managed through the work programme.

Having agreed processes to amend the work programme if activities need to be changed or cancelled.

Utilising the Risk Adjusted Programme to progress those activities identified as ready to proceed under the Risk Adjusted Programme at the beginning of the financial year.

Unknown risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year.

Risks and mitigations for new activity lines are considered during the scoping phase, continually assessed and reported to the local board.

The COVID-19 pandemic could have a negative impact on the progress of the work programme as some activities cannot be delivered if there is an increase in an alert level.

Development of the work programme has included consideration for all activities regarding potential impacts on delivery in the event of alert level changes.

Some activities may be delayed but still deliverable within the agreed timeframes.

Where activities need to be cancelled the local board can reallocate budget to other activities.

 

74.    The majority of activities in the work programme are ongoing and annually occurring. Risks associated with these activities have been identified in previous years and are managed on an ongoing basis.

75.    Other risks may also exist, including with respect to the health, safety and wellbeing of council staff. Work programmes may also need to be adjusted where these risks exist and cannot be safely mitigated via control measures.

      Ngā koringa ā-muri

      Next steps

76.     Delivery of the work programme will start following approval by the local board and continue until 30 June 2022, with progress reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

77.     Regional projects will commence after approval by the Governing Body in July 2021. The local board will receive the first quarter report in November 2021.

78.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for activities, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2021/2022 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Hibiscus and Bays Māori Outcomes (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Hibiscus and Bays Map (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Hibiscus and Bays - Regional Projects (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Hibiscus and Bays Climate Impacts (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Justine Haves - General Manager Service Strategy and Integration

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Libraries & Information

Gael Surgenor - GM -  Southern Initiative

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Authorisers

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Adoption of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Agreement 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/08073

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the local content for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, which includes the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Agreement 2021/2022, the message from the chairperson, and local board advocacy.

2.       To adopt a local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement, as agreed between the Governing Body and the local board, for each local board area.

4.       From 22 February to 22 March 2021, council consulted on the proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031. Local boards considered this feedback and then held discussions with the Finance and Performance Committee on 12 May 2021 on regional issues, community feedback, and key local board initiatives and advocacy areas.

5.       Local boards are now considering local content for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 which includes a local board agreement, a message from the chair, and local board advocacy, as well as a local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022.

6.       On 29 June 2021, the Governing Body will meet to adopt Auckland Council’s 10-year Budget 2021-2031, including 21 local board agreements.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      adopt the local content for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, which includes the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Agreement 2021/22, the message from the chair, and local board advocacy (refer Attachment A to the agenda report).

b)      adopt a local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022 (refer Attachment B to the agenda report).

c)      delegate authority to the chairperson to make any final changes to the local content for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 (the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Agreement 2021/2022, message from the chair, and local board advocacy).

d)      note that the resolutions of this meeting will be reported back to the Governing Body when it meets to adopt the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, including each local board agreement, on 29 June 2021.

Horopaki

Context

7.       Each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement between the Governing Body and the local board, for each local board area, outlining local priorities, budgets and intended levels of service. They are informed by the local board plans, which are strategic documents that are developed every three years to set a direction for local boards, by reflecting the priorities and preferences of the communities within the local board area. Local board plans can also provide a basis for local board feedback on regional content in the 10-year Budget.

8.       Throughout the development of the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, local board chairs (or delegated local board representatives) have had the opportunity to attend Finance and Performance Committee workshops on key topics and provide local board views on regional issues being considered as part of the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

9.       From 22 February to 22 March 2021, the council consulted with the public on the 10-year Budget 2021-2031. Two locally held events were held in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area to engage with the community and seek feedback on both regional and local proposals.

10.     A report analysing the feedback on local board priorities, as well as feedback from those living in the local board area related to the regional issues, was considered by the local board at its 6 May 2021 business meeting.

11.     The local board then held discussions with the Finance and Performance Committee at a workshop on 12 May 2021 on regional issues, community feedback and key local board initiatives and advocacy areas. The local board input was also reported to the Finance and Performance Committee on 25 May 2021.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Both staff and the local board have reviewed the local feedback received as part of consultation on the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 and local boards have considered a report analysing the local feedback. It is now recommended that local boards adopt local content for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 including the Local Board Agreement 2021/2022, the message from the chairperson, and local board advocacy (Attachment A), as well as a local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022 (Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The decisions recommended in this report are procedural in nature and will not have any climate impacts themselves.

14.     Some of the proposed projects in the local board agreement may have climate impacts. The climate impacts of any projects Auckland Council chooses to progress with will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

15.     Some of the proposed projects in the local board agreement may be specifically designed to mitigate climate impact, build resilience to climate impacts, and restore the natural environment.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     Local boards worked with council departments to develop their local board work programmes for 2021/2022 that will be adopted at June 2021 business meetings. The local board work programmes help inform the local board agreements.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     This report seeks local board adoption of its content for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 and other associated material, including the Local Board Agreement 2021/2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the 10-year budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate council’s responsiveness to Māori. 

19.     Local board plans, which were developed in 2020 through engagement with the community including Māori, form the basis of local priorities. There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi and, where relevant, the wider Māori community.

20.     Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The local board agreement includes the allocation of locally driven initiatives (LDI) funding and asset-based services (ABS) funding to projects and services for the 2021/2022 financial year.

22.     LDI funding is discretionary funding allocated to local boards based on the Local Board Funding Policy (included in the 10-year budget), which local boards can spend on priorities for their communities. Local boards can also utilise LDI funding to increase local levels of service if they wish to do so.

23.     Funding for asset-based services (ABS) is allocated by the Governing Body to local boards based on current levels of service to run and maintain local assets and services including parks, pools and recreation facilities, community facilities, and libraries.

24.     A local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022 is adopted alongside the Local Board Agreement 2021/2022. The fees and charges have been formulated based on region-wide baseline service levels and revenue targets.

25.     Where fees and charges are amended by a local board that results in lower revenue for the council, the shortfall will need to be made up by either allocating LDI funds or reducing expenditure on other services to balance overall budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     Decisions on the local content of the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, including the Local Board Agreement 2021/2022 and a local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022, are required by 17 June 2021 to ensure the Governing Body can adopt the final 10-year Budget 2021-2031, including each local board agreement, at its 29 June 2021 meeting.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     The resolutions of this meeting will be reported to the Governing Body on 29 June 2021 when it meets to adopt the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, which will include the 21 local board agreements.

28.     It is possible that minor changes may need to be made to the attachments before the 10‑year Budget 2021-2031 is adopted, such as correction of any errors identified and minor wording changes. Staff therefore recommend that the local board delegates authority to the chair to make any final changes if necessary.

29.     Local board agreements set the priorities and budget envelopes for each financial year. Work programmes then detail the activities that will be delivered within those budget envelopes. Work programmes will be adopted by the local board under other items on this agenda.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Agreement 2021/2022

45

b

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Fees and Charges 2021/2022

57

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Francis Martin – Advisor Plans and Programmes

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Feedback on Equity of Service Levels and Funding Proposals - Draft Report

File No.: CP2021/08066

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide local board feedback to the Joint Governance Working Party on the funding and decision-making proposals set out in the Equity of Service Levels and Funding - Draft Report.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The local board has received and discussed the Equity of Service Levels and Funding - Draft Report at its April/May 2021 workshop.

3.       The draft report (refer Attachment A to the agenda report) sets out the draft recommendations from the Joint Governance Working Party in relation to:

·        improving the equity of funding allocation across local boards

·        increasing the decision-making responsibility of local boards

·        establishing minimum service levels

·        implications of multi-board services.

4.       The Joint Governance Working Party seeks local board feedback on these proposals to consider in the preparation of a final set of proposals to be reported to the Governing Body.

5.       The local board’s feedback on these proposals (refer Attachment B to the agenda report) has been prepared on the template provided.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      provide feedback using the attached template (Attachment B) to the Joint Governance Working Party on the funding and decision-making proposals set out in the Equity of Service Levels and Funding Proposals – Draft Report.

Horopaki

Context

6.       In October and November 2020 workshops, local boards considered and provided input on the Equity of Service Levels and Funding discussion paper which, in respect of local community services, presented options to:

·        increase local board decision-making responsibility

·        increase equity of funding allocation between local boards

·        establish minimum service levels where required

·        address funding of multi-board services and decision-making on their service levels.

7.       The Joint Governance Working Party considered this local board input and provided direction to staff in the preparation of the funding and decision-making proposals of the Equity of Service Levels and Funding Draft Report (Attachment A).

8.       Staff presented the draft report to local boards in workshops between 6 April and 6 May 2021.

9.       The purpose of this report is to enable the local board to provide formal feedback on the draft recommendations which propose:

·        changes to local board decision-making responsibilities over local community services

·        implementation of an equity-based funding allocation approach for local community services.

10.     These matters will be reported to the Joint Governance Working Party and then to the Governing Body later this year. If adopted, public consultation would be undertaken with the aim of implementing decisions progressively between 2022 and 2024.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     These proposals (refer Attachment A) are significant changes. If adopted by the Governing Body, these recommendations would:

·        increase local board decision-making responsibilities over community services

·        change the allocation of asset-based services (ABS) funding to local boards

·        require collaboration between local boards on some multi-board service decisions

·        have a high community interest

·        not affect existing local board responsibility for local discretionary initiatives (LDI) service decisions or the current LDI funding approach.

12.     Feedback on these proposals is sought from the local board to assist the Joint Governance Working Party in providing direction to staff and the Governing Body on progressing these proposals.

13.     The working party’s final report to the Governing Body will also update illustrative funding outcomes with asset values and ABS budgets updated and adopted under the Long-term Plan 2021-2031. Funding outcomes remain illustrative until funding model and financial inputs are adopted, planned for Long-term Plan 2024-34.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     Providing feedback on the draft report does not have a direct impact on climate change.

15.     Changes made to local community services as a result of the proposed policy may have a climate impact and will be assessed on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     If adopted, the proposed policy will impact on several divisions of the council, including Customer and Community Services, Finance and Governance. Staff from these divisions have been involved in the development of these proposals.

17.     Staff from these divisions will also be significantly involved in the implementation of Governing Body decisions on the proposals. A critical implementation workstream will ensure staff have the capacity and the knowledge required to enable sound advice to be provided to local boards under these proposals.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     Over time, these proposals have the potential to fundamentally change local community service delivery depending on the extent to which local boards and their communities make changes.

19.     Local boards have discussed policy options in workshops in October and November 2021 and considered the proposed policy in workshops in April and May 2021. Local boards can also provide their input and views through their representatives on the Joint Governance Working Party.

20.     This report provides the opportunity for local boards to provide their formal feedback on the draft report proposals.

21.     More detailed discussion of the local implications of the policy proposal is included in the draft report provided as Attachment A.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     As part of increased decision-making for asset-based services and under local government legislation, local boards must demonstrate how Māori are involved and how their needs are reflected in these decisions. This means that in making service decisions, local boards should be able to:

·        demonstrate effective Māori involvement in the local board planning processes

·        clearly articulate Māori priorities in local board funding and delivery of asset-based services.

23.     It is likely that these changes will result in more responsive services for Māori communities at the local level.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     Introduction of the proposed policy would have several significant financial impacts, including:

·        changes to local board funding allocations that may result in funding increases for some local boards and funding decreases for others

·        broader local board decision-making responsibilities that will require greater flexibility in how local boards allocate their funding to service delivery

·        local board decisions which would include service impacts on assets, such as investment, enhancement, renewal, optimisation and removal from service.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     Development of the proposed policy involved several workshops with each local board. Several local boards requested additional workshops on the proposals as their implications became better understood.

26.     A range of risks associated with approval and implementation of these proposals were discussed during workshops and considered in the development of these proposals, including:

·        whether there will be sufficient understanding of the proposals and support for their benefits to enable them to be adopted

·        what alternative approaches might address the issues these proposals seek to address should they not proceed

·        developing alternative funding equity transition options, including implications on local board funding and overall timing

·        developing options to respond to concerns of local boards which might be adversely affected by equity funding proposals

·        addressing local board concerns for the perceived downside of greater decision-making responsibility if the level of decision support does not increase

·        ensuring the organisation is structured, resourced and adequately supported to provide the quality service advice needed by local boards to make well-informed decisions.

27.     Plans are either in place or currently being developed to address these risks. The proposed two-stage implementation timeline (see ‘Next steps’ below) is designed to progressively grow the council capability, develop robust processes, and ensure effective and transparent management of necessary changes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     Staff will report local board feedback to the Joint Governance Working Party which will consider this feedback, along with further staff advice, and provide its recommendations to the Governing Body later this year.

29.     The Governing Body would undertake public consultation on its draft decisions as follows:

·        under the Annual Plan 2022/2023, in the case of changes to the Allocation of Decision-making Responsibilities Policy

·        under the Long-term Plan 2024-2034, in the case of changes to the Local Board Funding Policy.

30.     Proposals adopted by the Governing Body would be progressively implemented from 2022 to 2024.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Equity of Service Levels and Funding - Draft Report

69

b

Governance Framework Review - Service levels and funding feedback template

109

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gary Pemberton - Programme Change Lead

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Service Strategy and Integration

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Delegation of feedback to be provided to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project

File No.: CP2021/08065

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To formally delegate one local board member to provide feedback to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An Establishment Unit is being set up by the Cabinet to provide the public face of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project, undertake stakeholder and community engagement, and take forward work to resolve key outstanding questions in relation to project scope and delivery. A key output of the unit will be to develop a business case over approximately six months which looks at the available options.

3.       The work of the Establishment Unit will be guided by an inclusive governance structure made up of representatives of central and local government, Treaty partners and an independent chairperson.

4.       Minister of Transport Hon Michael Wood wrote to local board members in May 2021 inviting local board members to select a single representative to be appointed to the Establishment Unit Board. At the May 2021 Chairs’ Forum, Margi Watson was selected for this role.

5.       The Establishment Unit now has until early September 2021 to gather the views of local boards, ward councillors, and the public.

6.       Staff are requesting that local boards delegate a member to provide feedback on behalf of the local board, to ensure that feedback can be provided in a short timeframe after public feedback has been collated and provided to the local board.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      delegate one local board member to provide feedback on behalf of the local board to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project.

Horopaki

Context

7.       In March 2021, the Cabinet met to agree how to progress the next steps for the City Centre to Māngere light rail project (CC2M).

8.       To give effect to this, the Cabinet has directed that an Establishment Unit be set up to provide the public face of the project, undertake stakeholder and community engagement, and take forward work to resolve key outstanding questions in relation to project scope and delivery entity.

9.       The Establishment Unit Board will be chaired by an independent chair appointed by the Minister of Transport and the Minister of Finance. Membership will comprise:

·        a single representative (the chief executive or a senior delegate) from Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, Waka Kotahi, Kāinga Ora and the Ministry of Transport

·        a representative from mana whenua

·        a representative of Auckland Council’s local boards (Margi Watson)

·        a representative of Auckland Council’s Governing Body (Chris Darby)

·        Te Waihanga (the New Zealand Infrastructure Commission) and Treasury will support the work of the Establishment Unit Board as observers.

10.     A key output of the unit will be to develop a business case over approximately six months which looks at the available options. This will enable quality decisions on key matters based on evidence, such as mode, route alignment and delivery.

11.     The Mayor and Deputy Mayor have been invited to join Minister of Transport Hon Michael Wood and Minister of Finance Hon Grant Robertson as sponsors of this project. This sponsors group will play an important function in ensuring political alignment on the project between central and local government and setting strategic direction.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The Auckland Light Rail team will be engaging with local boards first so that local board members are clear about the scope and programme of engagement.

13.     This will take place as follows:

·        11 June: briefing the six local boards that are within the planned corridor for light rail - Waitematā, Albert-Eden, Puketāpapa, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki, Māngere-Ōtāhuhu and Ōtara-Papatoetoe

·        14 June: presentation to Chairs’ Forum

·        30 June: inviting local board chairs or their delegate to attend a Planning Committee briefing

·        Further briefings will be organised to take place after the public consultation period in July/ August 2021.

14.     Staff will focus on providing local board members with an understanding of the approach being taken by the Establishment Unit and key constraints, so that local board members can respond to any queries they received and champion the engagement process within their community.

15.     Throughout the engagement period, the Establishment Unit will be seeking broad views, key themes (could be geographically based) and feedback on the outcomes the project is set to achieve. This will mirror the public engagement process that will also focus on outcomes and community experience.

16.     In order to ensure that there is adequate time for local boards to review public feedback ahead of providing local board feedback, staff are recommending that local boards delegate a member to provide the local board’s feedback

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     Delegating to one local board member the authority to provide feedback to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project does not have any quantifiable climate impacts.

18.     The Establishment Unit Board will have an opportunity to consider climate impacts as part of making recommendations on the project.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The Mayor and Deputy Mayor have been invited to join the Minister of Transport Hon Michael Wood and Minister of Finance Hon Grant Robertson as sponsors of the project.  The project sponsors will set the strategic direction for the project, including the project scope and engagement plans, and maintain political cooperation between central government and Auckland Council with regards to the project.

20.     The Governing Body representative and the local board representative will be joined by the Chief Executive as the representatives of Auckland Council on the Establishment Unit Board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     This delegation will provide the opportunity for all local boards to provide formal feedback to the Establishment Unit Board within the given timeframe of this first stage of work.

22.     Margi Watson, as the local board representative on the Establishment Unit Board, will develop good lines of communication with other local board members. Having a local board representative on the Establishment Unit Board is not a proxy for local board engagement on this project and does not replace the need to obtain feedback from local boards.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     The work of the Establishment Unit will be guided by an inclusive governance structure made up of representatives of central and local government, Treaty Partners and an independent chairperson.

24.     A key function of the Establishment Unit will be to undertake high quality engagement with communities, stakeholders, mana whenua and mataawaka. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     Delegating to one local board member the authority to provide feedback to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project does not have any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     No risks have been identified for delegating to one local board member the authority to provide feedback to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project.

27.     The risks of not appointing a delegate may be that formal feedback is not able to be provided by the local board within the relevant timeframe or may need to be provided via the urgent decision mechanism.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     Staff will work with the Establishment Unit to make arrangements for local board briefings ahead of public consultation.

29.     Public consultation will take place in July and August 2021.

30.     Further briefings to provide analysis of the public feedback received will be provided towards the end of August 2021.

31.     Delegated local board members will provide feedback on behalf of their local board by 2 September 2021.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead, Senior Policy Advisor, Local Board Services

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Approval for new private road name for Subdivision at Jack Hawken Lane, Silverdale

File No.: CP2021/06986

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Hibiscus Local Board to name one new private road being a commonly owner access lot, within the subdivision being undertaken by Hawken Lane Development Limited, at Jack Hawken Lane, Silverdale.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines, set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development the applicant shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road names for the local board’s approval that set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region.

3.       Hawken Lane Development Limited has proposed the names presented below for Road 1 as referenced on the attached Scheme Plan, for consideration by the local board:

·        Breeze Lane (applicant’s preference)

·        Weiti Valley Lane (alternative)

·        Patrick Silver Lane (alternative)

·        Seahawk Lane (alternative)

·        Emerald Stream Lane (alternative)

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245. The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana whenua have been consulted in the manner required by these guidelines.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the preferred road name ‘Breeze Lane’ (Road 1) for the new private road within the subdivision being undertaken by Hawken Lane Development Limited, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

Horopaki

Context

5.       The 14-lot subdivision, (Council Ref BUN20461332), currently under construction was approved on 24 July 2017.

6.       Site and location plans of the subdivision can be found in Attachments A and B of the agenda report.

7.       In accordance with the standards, any road including private ways which are commonly owned access lots (COALs) or rights of way, that serve more than five lots, generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region. The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the guidelines) allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

9.       The guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Maori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

 

10.     Theme: Hawken Lane Development Limited has chosen a suite of names they consider appropriate for the area.

11.     In this regard the names and their relevance are detailed as below.

Proposed Names

Meaning (as described by the applicant)

Breeze Lane

(applicant’s preference)

For its proximity to the coast.

Weiti Valley Lane

(alternative)

Weiti Stream is just to the north of the development.

Patrick Silver Lane

(alternative)

The previous landowner is of Irish descent. “Patrick” is suggested in relation to the traditional Irish St Patricks day. “Silver” is in relation to the suburb of Silverdale.

Seahawk Lane

(alternative)

 

The nearby Silverdale rugby and netball club teams are called the “Seahawks” and this club has been a critical part of the Silverdale culture since their establishment back in 1887.

Emerald Stream Lane

(alternative)

“Emerald” and its green colour is in relation to the Irish descent of the previous landowner. “Stream” relates to the Weiti Stream nearby.

12.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the guidelines and the standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

13.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

14.     Road type: The road type ‘Lane,’ is acceptable for the new private road, suiting its form and layout.

15.     Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     To aid local board decision making, the guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

20.     On 12 April 2021, 13 mana whenua groups with an interest in the general area were contacted by Council on behalf of the applicant through the Resource Consent Unit’s central facilitation process as set out in the guidelines.

21.     By the close of the consultation period one response had been received from Manuhiri Kaitiaki Charitable Trust who only supported the suggested name ‘Weiti Valley Lane’.

22.     The level of feedback received from mana whenua is often dependent on the scale of the development and its level of significance.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

24.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Jack Hawken Lane Scheme Plan

123

b

Jack Hawken Lane Locality Plan

125

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bruce Angove – Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

New public road name in the Neil Construction Limited subdivision at 455 Whangaparaoa Road, Stanmore Bay

File No.: CP2021/04928

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Hibiscus Bays Local board to name one new public road in the Neil Construction Limited subdivision at 455 Whangaparaoa Road, Stanmore Bay.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

3.       On behalf of the developer and applicant, Neil Construction, the following names have been presented below for consideration by the local board.

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245. The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana Whenua have been consulted in the manner required by these guidelines

5.       The proposed names for the new public road at 455 Whangaparaoa Road are:

·        Anehana Place (applicant’s preference)

·        Salamander Place (alternative)

·        Copper Skink Place (alternative)

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the name ‘Anehana Place’ for the new road in the Neil Construction Limited subdivision at 455 Whangaparaoa Road, Stanmore Bay, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 and as referenced in Attachments A and B to the agenda report.

Horopaki

Context

6.       The staged subdivision at Whangaparaoa has been approved and the council reference is SUB60357823.

7.       Site and location plans can be found in Attachments A and B.

8.       A condition of the subdivision consent was to suggest to council names for the new public road.

9.       In accordance with the standards all public roads require a name.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region. The guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

11.     Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect:

·        a historical or ancestral linkage to an area

·        a particular landscape, environment or biodiversity theme or feature

·        an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area

·        the use of Māori names is actively encouraged.

12.     In this regard the names and their relevance are detailed in the table below:

Proposed Names

Meaning

Anehana

A familiar figure in nineteenth century in Auckland. Anehana lived northward from Auckland at Silverdale, in the settlement formerly known as Wade near the head of the Weiti River.

Salamander

Refers to the nickname given to one of the historic guns at the Whangaparaoa Battery.

Copper Skink

Native species of skink found in the north island.

 

13.     Assessment: The name ‘Anehana’ has been chosen by Neil Construction Limited (the applicant) as he lived in the general locality of where the subdivision is situated. The lands southern boundary backs on to the Weiti River which was used by local Māori as the entrance way from Weiti for canoes navigating up the river, with easy access to an overland walkway to the eastern side of the Peninsula. The names ‘Salamander’ and ‘Copper Skink’ are also reflective of the local environment.

14.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

15.     Road type: ‘Place’ is an acceptable road type for the new public road, suiting the form and layout of the road.

16.     Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impacts on any council groups.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impacts on the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     To aid local board decision making, the guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate.   The guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

21.     Comment was initially sought on the proposed road names from all mana whenua who have an association with the locality in which the subject subdivision is located. This process was undertaken through the Resource Consent Unit’s central facilitation process as set out in the guidelines. Feedback was received from Nga Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara who deferred to Ngāti Manuhiri. No further responses were received.

22.     However, subsequent to the above process it was discovered that the name ‘Anehana’ has a special connection with another iwi, with Anehana being an ancestor of Ngāti Whātua Te Uri o Hau. This iwi was not initially contacted for comment as the locality of the subdivision is not within their mandated area with their rohe covering only a small area around the Tāmaki Makaurau northern boundary.

23.     In recognition of their connection with the name and in accordance with the guidelines, Ngāti  Whatua Te Uri o Hau have now been contacted for comment. However, following the due process for consultation, no response has been received.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road name.

25.     The road naming process does not raise any other financial implications for the council.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

455 Whangaparaoa Rd Locality Map

131

b

Whangaparaoa Rd Scheme Plan

133

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bruce Angove – Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Urgent decision: Endorse the use of the Chairs' Forum as the selection panel to appoint the local board representative to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Mangere light rail project

File No.: CP2021/06151

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the decision made using the local board’s urgent decision-making process (resolution number (HB/2019/205) to endorse the use of the Chairs’ Forum as the selection panel to appoint the local board representative to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Mangere light rail project.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      endorse the urgent decision to use the Chair’s Forum as the selection panel to appoint the local board representative to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Mangere light rail project made on 12 May 2021 as set out in Attachment A of this agenda report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent decision memo

137

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Matthew Kerr – Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Eke Panuku Development Auckland - Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Six-Monthly Report to 31 March 2021

File No.: CP2021/06696

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board on Eke Panuku Development Auckland activities within the local board area and the region, for the period from 1 September 2020 to 31 March 2021.

2.       This report is for information only and no decision-making is required.

3.       This report covers our urban regeneration programme in relation to the local board area from 1 September 2020 to 31 March 2021.

4.       It also includes information on property management, purchases and sales in relation to the local board area, which Eke Panuku Development Auckland undertakes on behalf of Auckland Council.

5.       Please note that this report is for seven months. This is to align future reports with other Eke Panuku Development Auckland reporting cycles.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

6.       This report is a record of events for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area during the stated period.

7.       Eke Panuku Development Auckland is supporting the urban regeneration in Whangaparāoa, where 60 properties at Mariner Rise are currently being developed, on behalf of Eke Panuku Development Auckland.

8.       While Eke Panuku Development Auckland is an urban regeneration agency, its other function within the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area is to manage properties owned by Auckland Council.

9.       Eke Panuku Development Auckland currently manages 15 leases in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the Eke Panuku Development Auckland - Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Six-Monthly Report from 1 September 2020 to 31 March 2021.

Horopaki

Context

10.     Eke Panuku Development Auckland (Eke Panuku) is the council-controlled organisation that delivers urban regeneration in Tāmaki Makaurau (Auckland). Urban regeneration is the planning of neighbourhoods and the improvement of buildings and spaces to strengthen communities and the economy to make it an even better place to live.

11.     Our city is facing rapid growth. Quality development is required to accommodate this growth and to ensure people love and can afford to live in Auckland. We imagine a city of strong neighbourhoods. We work across many neighbourhoods throughout our city from large, long-term urban regeneration plans to small projects on specific sites to meet the needs of the city’s long-term growth - including more types of homes people can afford. We work alongside the locals, other parts of the council and businesses to regenerate our city in ways that benefit both our local communities and Auckland as a whole.

12.     We deliver returns for the council, and at the same time, we ensure our assets contribute positively to the neighbourhoods of Tāmaki Makaurau. We manage around $2.4 billion of land and buildings owned by the Auckland Council.

13.     In the period 1 September 2020 to 31 March 2021, we continued our urban regeneration programme across the region, brought a $22.8m return to the council via property management, purchased six properties on behalf of the group, and sold nine properties as part of either our neighbourhood regeneration or as directed by Auckland Council.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Urban regeneration – Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area

14.     Eke Panuku supports urban regeneration projects around the region, outside of our priority locations. These sites deliver new homes, quality design and urban regeneration outcomes.

15.     Mariner Rise (20 Link Crescent, Whangaparāoa) provides 60 sections along with a reserve and playground. Fifty-four homes are completed or under construction. The remaining four will be constructed once sale and purchase agreements are signed. 

16.     The subdivision has resource consent for a mix of two, three and four-bedroom terrace and standalone family homes with a focus on design quality. The homes are being built and marketed by Signature Homes, Mike Greer Homes and New Dreamland, priced $650,000 to $800,000.

17.     In addition to the subdivision, Eke Panuku is supporting the ‘daylighting’ of a stream at D’Oyly Reserve, in partnership with Healthy Waters.

Property management and properties of Hibiscus and Bays Local Board interest

18.     Eke Panuku manages 15 leases in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

19.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has expressed interest in updates on properties within the Eke Panuku property portfolio. The table below provides an update on matters of significance for the reporting period.

Table 1: update of matters of significance

Property

Status

4 and 6 Brightside Road.

472, 474, 476, 478, 480, 482, 484, 486, 488, 1/490, 2/491, 492, 494, 496, 498, 498B, 500, 502, 599, 616A Whangaparāoa Road, Stanmore Bay.

750A Whangaparāoa Road, Manly

The Finance and Performance Committee approved the disposal of the properties at its October 2020 meeting as part of the Emergency budget asset recycling programme.

Eke Panuku is currently investigating offer back obligations to former owners in accordance with s40 of the Public Works act 1981 for 19 of the properties.

In parallel with the statutory process, a market strategy is also being prepared for the properties that will be sold in an open market environment.

Acquisitions

20.     On behalf of Auckland Council, Eke Panuku completed a new commercial arrangement at Gulf Harbour Marina. This gives certainty of tenure to Gulf Harbour Investments Limited, which will enable it to upgrade marine facilities at Gulf Harbour in accordance with its existing development licence and Auckland Unitary Plan provisions while ensuring Auckland Council retains ownership and control of the land.

21.     As part of the arrangement, Auckland Council gains full ownership of the Hammerhead Land, which enables the ownership and control of the existing park and ride, yacht club, trailer boat and campervan facilities and control any future development of the Hammerhead land. Auckland Transport benefits from the retention of the strategic location of the current ferry terminal and provides for future expansion opportunities.

Disposals

22.     On behalf of the Auckland Council, Eke Panuku sells properties that are no longer required by the Auckland Council group for service use.

23.     The decision to sell these properties is made by Auckland Council’s Governing Body with advice from its finance team.

24.     Eke Panuku does not have a decision-making role in the sale of properties that are surplus to the council’s requirements.

25.     The role of Eke Panuku is to provide property transaction services. Proceeds from these sales are returned to Auckland Council to be reinvested in council services.

26.     There were no unconditional agreements reached in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area during the reporting period.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.     The Eke Panuku Priority Location programmes support the regeneration of existing town centres while also addressing climate mitigation and adaptation.

28.     Mitigation of climate change involves reducing the carbon emissions that contribute to climate change. Our Priority Locations are transport-oriented communities that utilise existing infrastructure and transport links and we seek to make local walking and cycling safe and viable alternatives to the private vehicle.

29.     Eke Panuku has also adopted a Homestar-6 minimum standard to ensure we can reduce energy, water, and landfill waste. We are working to adopt similar standards for our public realm and commercial developments, whilst also taking guidance from precinct sustainability rating tools like Green Star Communities.

30.     Adaptation to climate change involves planning for the changes to our climate and associated impacts that are already happening or are projected to happen, including sea-level rise, hotter temperatures, extreme weather events, flooding and droughts. Climate change is likely to subject the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area to hotter temperatures and more frequent flooding and drought. Eke Panuku seeks to future-proof our communities by:

·       specifying that infrastructure and developments are designed to cope with warmer temperatures and extreme weather events

·       the use of green infrastructure and water sensitive design to increase flood resilience and provide ecological and biodiversity benefits

·       the provision of increased shade and shelter for storm events and hotter days

·       initiatives to build community resilience.

31.     In October, the Eke Panuku executive team agreed to a work programme of priority actions to help Eke Panuku deliver on the council’s sustainable procurement objectives which Eke Panuku has adopted.

32.     Targeting these objectives will help further leverage the economic, social and environmental benefits of Eke Panuku urban regeneration projects and the products and services we procure as a business. Implementation of these priority projects has commenced which focus on embedding sustainable procurement into Eke Panuku procurement processes and systems, including the inclusion of climate considerations into procurements for capital works and renewals.

33.     The Eke Panuku Climate Change Strategy was adopted by the Eke Panuku Board in November. The strategy guides how Eke Panuku will support the implementation of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

34.     Eke Panuku cannot achieve its vision alone. Our complex operating environment means we need the expertise of others. Therefore, building and maintaining strong relationships and partnerships, and working together with others in general, is an ongoing focus for us.

35.     Eke Panuku Development Auckland works collaboratively with other Auckland Council departments, council-controlled organisations and Crown agencies to deliver joined-up urban regeneration in our neighbourhoods.

36.     Impacts and views are considered both on a programme and project level for the neighbourhoods we work in to maximise community outcomes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

37.     Any local or sub-regional impacts are considered on a programme and project basis.

38.     Eke Panuku regularly engages with local boards on its projects and programmes within local board areas.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     Eke Panuku supports the aspirations described in the Auckland Plan 2050.

40.     Eke Panuku has worked closely with our mana whenua partners to understand their priorities in Tāmaki Makaurau. Mana whenua have shared their top five aspirations with Eke Panuku. Below is a summary:

·       Governance: We involve mana whenua in transparent decision-making

·       Culture: We will increase our practice of kaitiakitanga (by all) and increase the visibility of Māori identity and culture in our projects

·       Economic: We will create more commercial investment, procurement, and engagement opportunities for Māori

·       Social: We will foster a sense of community and connectedness and help enhance the well-being of Māori here in Tāmaki Makaurau

·       Natural environment: We will work together to ensure we are working towards significant improvements to te mauri o te taiao

41.     Eke Panuku continues to make progress on the Eke Panuku Mana Whenua Outcomes Framework actions and presented a six-month status report to mana whenua in February 2021.

42.     Eke Panuku has achieved 36/40 significant initiatives in the 2020-2021 financial year. Highlights include the numerous whakawātea with our mana whenua partners to celebrate significant milestones to build the stage for the 2021 America’s Cup.

43.     Following the Emergency Budget 2020/2021, Eke Panuku is still working with mana whenua to identify potential development and disposal opportunities. Eke Panuku has invited mana whenua to register commercial interests in properties Eke Panuku is preparing to dispose of on the market.

44.     Eke Panuku has started a pilot programme focused on growing the capability of young leaders to enable placemaking activities. The programme, He Pia He Tauira, has hosted several wānanga with tauira to prepare for upcoming activities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

45.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

46.     There are no risks associated with receiving this report.

47.     This report must be received to meet the requirements of the Local Government Act 2002.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

48.     The next six-monthly report will cover the period of 1 April to 30 September 2021.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Perin Gerrand - Engagement Coordinator

Authorisers

Joanna Glasswell - Head of Corporate Affairs

Jacques Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Allocation of the remaining 2020/2021 Local Contestable Grants and Facilities Grants budget

File No.: CP2021/08339

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for one-off grant allocations from the remaining 2020/2021 Local Contestable Grants and Facilities Grants budget to specific community groups and organisations who deliver on the priorities of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In August 2020, the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board allocated a total budget of $552,395 to the Local Contestable Grants and Facilities Grant Hibiscus and Bays for the 2020/2021 financial year (HB/2020/103). A total of $238,709.55 was allocated in Local Grants Round One, and $233,679.11 in Local Grants Round Two including the Facilities Grant Round. There is a remaining balance of $80,006.34 in the contestable grants budget.

3.       At the 20 May 2021 Business Meeting of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board, the following resolution was carried for the remaining contestable grants budget:

Resolution number HB/2021/58

MOVED by Chairperson G Brown, seconded by Member J Fitzgerald:  

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

d) request that staff undertake an assessment to allocate the balance of the Local Contestable Grants and Facilities Grants budget to provide a one-off grant to specific community groups and/or organisations in each subdivision of the local board are to deliver on the local board plan priorities

CARRIED

 

4.       Local Board Services staff have liaised with relevant Auckland Council departments and local board members to develop a list of specific community groups and organisations who have been identified to meet one or more of the local board priorities outlined in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020 and who will benefit from a one-off grant.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline the proposed one-off grant allocation of $5,000 for operational and equipment renewals (a total of $25,000) for each group including; The Stillwater Community Association Incorporated (Stillwater Hall), Stoney Homestead Trust (Stoney Homestead), Okura Residents and Ratepayers Association (Okura Community Hall), Silverdale Hall Committee (Silverdale Community Hall) and Murrays Bay Residents Association Incorporated (Outram Hall - Murray Bays) from the Local Contestable Grants and Facilities Grant Hibiscus and Bays for the 2020/2021

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline the proposed one-off grant allocation of $5,000 to the Silverdale Business Association for the installation of CCTV cameras in Silverdale Village from the Local Contestable Grants and Facilities Grant Hibiscus and Bays for the 2020/2021

c)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline the proposed one-off grant allocation of $27,270 to the Hibiscus Men’s Shed Trust for the fit-out of the new building at Silverdale War Memorial Park from the Local Contestable Grants and Facilities Grant Hibiscus and Bays for the 2020/2021.

Horopaki

Context

5.       This report has been developed as per the resolution of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board requesting Local Board Service (LBS) staff undertake an assessment to allocate the balance of the Local Contestable Grants and Facilities Grants budget to provide a one-off grant to specific community groups and/or organisations in each subdivision of the local board area to deliver on the local board plan priorities.

6.       The list developed by LBS staff of specific groups and organisations, including an amount and reason for a one-off grant, is provided below:

Group/Organisation

Proposed amount

To use towards

The Stillwater Community Association Incorporated (Stillwater Hall)

$5,000

Operational and equipment renewals

Stoney Homestead Trust (Stoney Homestead)

$5,000

Operational and equipment renewals

Okura Residents and Ratepayers Association (Okura Community Hall)

$5,000

Operational and equipment renewals

Silverdale Hall Committee (Silverdale Community Hall)

$5,000

Operational and equipment renewals

Murrays Bay Residents Association Incorporated (Outram Hall - Murray Bays)

$5,000

Operational and equipment renewals

Silverdale Business Association

$5,000

Installation of CCTV cameras in Silverdale Village

Hibiscus Men’s Shed Trust

$27,270

Fit-out of the new Hibiscus Men’s Shed building in Silverdale War Memorial Park

TOTAL

$57,270

Auckland Council owned community halls

7.         After reviewing the  Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020 (and other strategic documents), LBS staff, supported by relevant Auckland Council departments, have identified The Stillwater Community Association Incorporated (Stillwater Hall), Stoney Homestead Trust (Stoney Homestead), Okura Residents and Ratepayers Association (Okura Community Hall), Silverdale Hall Committee (Silverdale Community Hall) and Murrays Bay Residents Association Incorporated (Outram Hall - Murray Bays) as community lead Auckland Council facilities that support the fostering of resilience and allow for community participation enhancing quality of life for the local communities, a priority identified under A Connected Community in the local board plan.

8.       These facilities are tasked with covering annual operational and renewal costs of onsite equipment and furnishings and therefore would benefit from a one-off grant to support these costs, in turn benefiting the communities that connect in these spaces.

9.       Staff would suggest a one-off grant of $5,000 per hall to support the groups with their operational, equipment and renewal costs.

Silverdale Business Association

10.       On behalf of the Silverdale Business Association, Phil Bennett Director at Team Rhapsody has provided a request (Attachment A to the agenda report) for six additional cameras to complete the Silverdale Village CCTV network. This includes a remote power Wi-Fi set up showing the whole of Silverdale Street including the intersection and provides the ability for Auckland Transport (AT) connection, giving AT and hopefully NZ Police direct access.

11.       There is no charge for installation of the new cameras and a local store will provide the power to run them. The images will be stored securely. Mr Bennett has provided an estimated cost of $5,000 for six HIK vision camera (the type of camera used by NZ Police).

12.     This request will support NZ Police to keep our communities safe and supports the 2018-28 Long-term Plan service standard to “provide safe, reliable and accessible social infrastructure for Aucklanders that contributes to placemaking and thriving communities.”

Hibiscus Men’s Shed Trust

13.       Hibiscus Men’s Shed Trust (the Trust) has provided a proposal request (Attachment B to the agenda report) seeking additional funding of $27,270 for the fit-out of their new building at Silverdale War Memorial Park, 12 Hibiscus Coast Highway. Since the initial plans and quotes were put together, the costs of building materials have increased along with regulation updates requiring fire wall boards within the building. The additional costs include:

·     increase in building material $4,700

·     fire rated wall boards $3,300

·     kitchen cabinetries increase $1,400

·     toilets, vanities, and associated components $3,000

·     plumbing $14,870.

14.     The Men's Shed meets the local board priorities of ‘A Connected Community’, acknowledge and support community groups that enhance youth development, family support and older adult connections in our area to create intergenerational participation, and the request meets criteria under the Hibiscus and Bays Facilities Grant as small building works of a community facility.

15.     The exterior of the new Men’s Shed building will be completed in June 2021, and the increases and additional costs of the fit-out is putting the Trusts efforts to complete the full project under heavy financial pressure.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     As remaining grant funding needs to be committed by 30 June 2021, the allocation of funds is best made to groups and organisations that the local board has an existing funding relationship with. This minimises risks from grant monies not being spent upon allocation.

17.     All the listed community groups and organisations qualify under this requirement and no new groups or organisations are being proposed by staff.

18.     Not allocating all or some of the remaining money is also an option available to the local board. If this was to occur, the remaining funds would be offered up to Auckland Council as savings.

19.     If the local board was to consider that there was insufficient information to make an allocation, this would fit with a previously stated position of the local board to be financially prudent during the Emergency Budget.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     The decisions in this report are financial in nature and do not have any direct climate impacts.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     Relevant Auckland Council departments have been engaged to provide feedback on the proposals for the Auckland Council community halls. There are no other identified impacts on Auckland Council and council-controlled organisations and any additional views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Grants Programme 2021-2022 (Attachment C to the agenda report) helps local groups and organisations deliver a positive contribution to the community within the local board area as prioritised by the local board.

23.     In the May 2021 business meeting, the local board decided not to allocate all the funds remaining in this budget line, as not all applicants met the criteria set by the local board.

24.     The investigation and analysis in this report support the aims of the grants programme in the local board area along with the priorities as set out in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.       The local board grant programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to groups and organisations who deliver positive outcomes for Māori within the community.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     In August 2020, the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board allocated a total budget of $552,395 to the Local Contestable Grants and Facilities Grant Hibiscus and Bays for the 2020/2021 financial year (HB/2020/103). A total of $238,709.55 was allocated in Local Grants Round One, and $233,679.11 in Local Grants Round Two including the Facilities Grant Round.

27.     Seven community groups and organisations proposed to receive one-off grants for a total sum of $57,270 from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board remaining contestable grants budget of $80,006.34. There are no other financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grant Policy and the Local Board Grant Programme. The specific groups and organisations identified in this report are identified as low risk as they have all completed previous accountabilities for Hibiscus and Bays Local Board funding allocations in the past.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     Following the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board decision making on funding, part-funding or declining, the grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision and complete the grant funding process.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Silverdale Business Association CCTV request

153

b

Hibiscus Men's Shed Trust fitout request

155

c

Hibiscus and Bays Grants Programme 2021/2022

157

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Saskia Coley – Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Members' Reports

File No.: CP2021/08063

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for members to update the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board on matters they have been involved in over the last month.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for members of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to provide a report on their activities for the month.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the reports from Local Board Members A Dunn and V Short.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Andy Dunn May report

165

b

Victoria Short Apr-Jun 2021 report

167

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gemma Kaldesic - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Deputations update

File No.: CP2021/08064

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       As part of its monthly community forum, Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has set aside time for deputations/presentations during which time members of the public can address the local board on matters within the local board’s delegated authority.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under Standing Orders there is provision for deputations/presentations to the local board. Applications for deputations/presentations must be in writing setting forth the subject and be received by the Relationship Manager at least seven working days before the meeting concerned. Subsequently, requests for deputations are considered and approved by the local board chairperson.

3.       Requests, matters arising and actions from the deputations/presentations are recorded and updated accordingly. The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board deputations/presentations update is attached as attachment A to the agenda report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      note the deputation update for 6 May 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Deputations update May 2021 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gemma Kaldesic - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2021/08062

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Attached are the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshop record for 13 and 27 May 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      note the workshop record for 13 and 27 May 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

HBLB Public Workshop Record 13 May 2021

175

b

HBLB Public Workshop Record 27 May 2021

177

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gemma Kaldesic - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Governance forward work calendar

File No.: CP2021/08061

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months until the end of the electoral term. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·        ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·        clarifying what advice is required

·        clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the governance forward work calendar for June 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Programme June 2021

181

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gemma Kaldesic - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator