I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Upper Harbour Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 17 June 2021

9.30am

Upper Harbour Local Board Office
30 Kell Drive
Albany

 

Upper Harbour Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Lisa Whyte

 

Deputy Chairperson

Margaret Miles, QSM, JP

 

Members

Anna Atkinson

 

 

Uzra Casuri Balouch, JP

 

 

Nicholas Mayne

 

 

Brian Neeson, JP

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Cindy Lynch

Democracy Advisor

 

11 June 2021

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 4142684

Email: Cindy.Lynch@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

6.1     Acknowledgement - Kim Ward                                                                           5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          6

7.1     Petition - Save the Wasp Hangar                                                                        6

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    7

8.1     North West Toy Library update                                                                          7

8.2     Whangaparaoa Diwali - grant application                                                         7

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  8

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                8

11        Minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held Thursday, 20 May 2021 9

12        Approval of the 2021/2022 Upper Harbour Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme                                                               35

13        Approval of the 2021/2022 Upper Harbour Local Board Auckland Unlimited work programme                                                                                                                   49

14        Approval of the 2021/2022 Upper Harbour Local Board Auckland Emergency Management work programme                                                                                  57

15        Approval of the 2021/2022 Upper Harbour Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme                                                                                          63

16        Greenhithe War Memorial Park: Playground concept design approval              115

17        Approval of developed design for a path at Rosedale Park                                 125

18        Adoption of the Upper Harbour Local Board Agreement 2021/2022                   141

19        Feedback on Equity of Service Levels and Funding Proposals - Draft Report  163

20        Delegation of feedback to be provided to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project                                                                         213

21        Upper Harbour Quick Response round three 2020/2021 grant allocations        217

22        Governance forward work calendar - July to December 2021                             291

23        Record of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 13 May and 3 June 2021                                                                                                                 295

24        Board members' reports - June 2021                                                                      301

25        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the code) requires elected members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy. The policy covers two classes of conflict of interest:

i)          a financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member

ii)         a non-financial conflict interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component. It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968. The guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail, and provide elected members with practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of interest.

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request. 

Any questions relating to the code or the guidelines may be directed to the Local Area Manager in the first instance.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 20 May 2021, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

6.1       Acknowledgement - Kim Ward

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To acknowledge Kim Ward’s substantial services to the community.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Kim is an active, hands-on volunteer in her community of Paremoremo and is a leader for local community activities, fund-raising and organising working bees.

3.       Kim runs an email post which has become the community hub to keep the rural community connected and informed and set up the Paremoremo trade and exchange system. She produced the ‘Pare Publisher’ community newsletter for five years until 2018, coordinated 11 neighbourhood support groups and organises annual events, such as the Anzac dawn service in Paremoremo, the annual children’s Christmas party, local dances, community garage sales and history evenings.

4.       Kim has driven environmental initiatives based around the Sustainable Paremoremo Group (SusPare) of which she has been chairperson since 2018. She has overseen initiatives such as the ‘Pare Spare Fare’ stall for distributing local excess produce, battery recycling and annual community clean-up days.

5.       She developed a partnership with Auckland Prison whereby locals donate old bicycles that inmates refurbish, and which are then given to Women’s Refuge and Oranga Tamariki.

6.       Kim was instrumental in refurbishing the Sanders Community House at Sanders Reserve which has made the space available for community groups and activities. She was also an active member of the Paremoremo Community Club Trust which looked after the operation and governance of the Paremoremo Community Club.

7.       Kim will be relocating to Australia shortly and her contribution to the Paremoremo community over many years will be hugely missed.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      acknowledge the significant contribution of Kim Ward to the Paremoremo community over many years.

 

 

 

7          Petitions

 

7.1       Petition - Save the Wasp Hangar

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Louise Taylor and Errol Haarhoff will be in attendance to present the Change.org petition on ‘Save the Wasp Hangar’.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The petition urges council to retain core principles of the masterplan in its decision to sell blocks of land, including the retention and repurposing of the Wasp Hangar, the creation of proposed new public spaces, and the establishment of other strategic public amenities that enhance the quality of the public realm. The petition also urges council to follow expert advice from its staff to achieve the high-level outcomes written into the original masterplan for Hobsonville Point.

3.       There are 2434 signatures to date and the petition can be accessed online at https://www.change.org/p/auckland-council-kainga-ora-upper-harbour-local-board-save-the-wasp-hangar.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the petition regarding ‘Save the Wasp Hangar’ and thank Louise Taylor and Errol Haarhoff for their attendance.

 

Attachments

a          Save the Wasp Hangar - Change.org petition part I.................................... 305

b          Save the Wasp Hangar - Change.org petition part II................................... 317

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Upper Harbour Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       North West Toy Library update

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide members with an update on the activities and outcomes of the North West Toy Library.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Katherine Wilson, Secretary of the North West Toy Library, will be in attendance to provide an update on the group’s outcomes since she last presented to the local board. Katherine also wishes to acknowledge the local board for its recent grant funding.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from Katherine Wilson and thank her for her attendance and presentation.

Attachments

a          North West Toy Library presentation........................................................... 431

 

 

8.2       Whangaparaoa Diwali - grant application

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To discuss the Whangaparaoa Diwali event in advance of the board considering their grant application.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Jaspal Singh, Senior Manager, Arogya Mantra and Aaja Nachle, will be in attendance to discuss their ideas for the Whangaparaoa Diwali and provide more detail in support of their application to the 2020/2021 Upper Harbour Local Board Quick Response grants round three.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from Jaspal Singh, Arogya Mantra and Aaja Nachle and thank them for their attendance and presentation.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held Thursday, 20 May 2021

File No.: CP2021/06075

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The open unconfirmed minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board ordinary meeting held on Thursday, 20 May 2021, are attached at item 11 of the agenda for the information of the board only.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      note that the open unconfirmed minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held on Thursday, 20 May 2021, are attached at item 11 of the agenda for the information of the board only and will be confirmed under item 4 of the agenda.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board open unconfirmed minutes - 20 May 2021

11

b

Upper Harbour Local Board minutes attachments - 20 May 2021

25

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Cindy Lynch - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Approval of the 2021/2022 Upper Harbour Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme

File No.: CP2021/04297

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2021/2022 Upper Harbour Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and approve in principle the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programmes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the Upper Harbour Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and associated budgets for approval for the 2021/2022 financial year, and for approval in principle for the subsequent two financial years, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 (see Attachment A).

3.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives identified in the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020.

4.       The work programme has been developed through a series of workshops between December 2020 and May 2021, where the local board provided feedback to staff on programme and activity prioritisation.

5.       The local board indicated its support for the following activities to be delivered in 2021/2022, with budgets as listed below:

·        Īnanga spawning sites – survey and restoration - $15,000

·        Restoration of the Waiarohia Stream - $10,000

·        Sediment-related water quality testing - $25,000

·        Sustainable schools project – our local streams - $40,300

·        Construction waste enforcement and leadership - $25,000

·        North-West Wildlink Assistance programme - $80,000.

6.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $195,300 which can be funded from within the board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2021/2022 financial year. Approval in principle is also being sought for activities in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

7.       The restoration of the Waiarohia Stream programme has an additional $10,000 carry-forward from the 2020/2021 financial year.

8.       The New kiwis zero waste education programme has a $9000 carry-forward from the 2020/2021 financial year.

9.       The indicative programmes and budgets for 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 are subject to change and will be confirmed on an annual basis through the approval of the respective work programmes.

10.     Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve its 2021/2022 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and associated budgets, as summarised in the table below (Attachment A to the agenda report):

Activity name

2021/2022 budget for approval

Īnanga spawning sites – survey and restoration

$15,000

Restoration of the Waiarohia Stream

$10,000

Sediment-related water quality testing

$25,000

Sustainable schools project – our local streams

$40,300

Construction waste enforcement and leadership

$25,000

North-West Wildlink Assistance programme

$80,000

Total

$195,300

b)      approve in principle the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programmes (Attachment A to the agenda report).

c)      note that the indicative programmes and budgets for the Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programmes for 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 are subject to change and will be confirmed on an annual basis through the approval of the respective work programmes.

Horopaki

Context

11.     Through a series of workshops each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward. The local board feedback in these workshops has informed the development of the 2021/2022 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme (Attachment A).

12.     The proposed work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives identified in the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020. The specific objectives reflected in the work programme are:

·        our indigenous and culturally valued biodiversity is protected by preserving and enhancing the habitats that support it

·        our communities care for their surrounding environment

·        the lifeforce (mauri) of our harbour and waterways is respected and restored

·        our communities practice te ao Māori guardianship (kaitiakitanga) principles

·        our residents participate and feel a sense of belonging to their community.

13.     The following adopted strategies and plans also guided the development of the work programme:

·        National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 

·        Regional Pest Management Plan 2020-2030

·        Upper Harbour Ecological Connectivity Strategy.

14.     The development of the work programme has been informed by staff assessments and identification of local environmental priority areas and feedback received from the local board at workshops.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The proposed work programme is made up of activities continuing from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or ongoing programmes. These programmes contribute towards the delivery of the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020 environmental objectives as detailed above in the ‘Context’ section.

16.     The work programme (Attachment A) provides a three-year view that demonstrates the phasing or continuation of programme delivery over the 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

17.     This report seeks local board approval for budgets and activities in year one of the three-year work programme (2021/2022), and approval in principle for 2022/2023 and 2023/2024.

18.     Approval in principle does not commit the local board to funding in future years as the budget for years two and three will still need to be approved on an annual basis. However, approval in principle will help staff, contractors and community groups to plan activities and resourcing in the longer term.

19.     Budgets for years two and three are subject to change as the programmes are further refined or if local board priorities shift.

20.     The proposed activities for delivery as part of the board’s 2021/2022 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme are detailed below, alongside indicative plans and budgets for the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years:

Īnanga spawning sites – survey and restoration - $15,000

21.     The board has indicated support for continuing to fund the īnanga spawning sites – survey and restoration programme in the 2021/2022 financial year to help protect at-risk species through targeted restoration.

22.     The programme involves the collection of data in streams to establish a baseline understanding of the current state of īnanga populations within the Upper Harbour Local Board area.

23.     This work will identify areas in need of urgent protection and restoration, and this will be communicated back to the community as an awareness raising exercise. The community will then be supported to maintain, enhance and promote the restoration and care of these waterways.

24.     By supporting this work, increased terrestrial and aquatic biodiversity outcomes will be achieved through the creation of ecological corridors.

25.     The board allocated $15,500 to this programme in 2020/2021. Staff recommend the local board allocates $15,000 to this programme in the 2021/2022 financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $17,000 for the 2022/2023 financial year and $19,000 for the 2023/2024 financial year.

Restoration of the Waiarohia Stream - $10,000

26.     The board has indicated support to continue allocating funding to the restoration of the Waiarohia Stream in the 2021/2022 financial year. This programme is expected to last five years and will involve working with community and iwi to restore the stream.

27.     Environmental Services is funding the creation of a management plan for both the Rawiri Stream and the Waiarohia Stream, and Healthy Waters is undertaking naturalisation work in the Rawiri Stream. These activities will be funded through regional budgets.

28.     It is proposed that the local board funding will be used for the implementation of year two of the five-year schedule of works. This work will include connecting the community and local schools to improve stream health.

29.     Staff recommend the allocation of $10,000 towards this programme in the 2021/2022 financial year.

30.     This funding is in addition to a $10,000 carry-forward from the 2020/2021 financial year. This carry-forward is required to cover plant maintenance and some pest control. This carry-forward funding will be spent before 30 September 2021.

31.     Approval in principle is also sought for $10,000 for the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

Sediment-related water quality testing - $25,000

32.     The board has indicated support for continuing funding the sediment-related water quality testing programme in the 2021/2022 financial year.

33.     Water quality testing and analysis will be carried out to gather evidence around contaminants in waterways derived from sediment discharges from small site developments.

34.     This is the third year of the programme and continues to provide data to the Proactive Compliance Team for investigation and a final report showing all results.

35.     This programme received funding of $25,000 in the 2019/2020 year and 2020/2021 financial years. Staff recommend the allocation of $25,000 for the 2021/2022 financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $25,000 for the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

Sustainable schools project – our local streams - $40,300

36.     The board has indicated support for continuing funding the sustainable schools – our local streams programme in the 2021/2022 financial year.

37.     Funding will support the continued provision of expertise and assistance for schools in the Upper Harbour Local Board area to connect with their local streams. This will be achieved through testing and monitoring water quality and connecting with community restoration groups working in the same catchment.

38.     The programme will work with seven schools and environmental science students from Massey University to undertake action projects, including weed and pest control, planting and awareness raising.

39.     In the 2017/2018 financial year, the board allocated $20,000 towards this programme and $30,000 was allocated in the 2018/2019, 2019/2020 and 2020/2021 financial years.

40.     Staff recommend the allocation of $40,300 to this programme in the 2021/2022 financial year. The additional funding will cover each school receiving a water-saving education session and the costs of purchasing a small rain tank and its installation. 

41.     Approval in principle is also sought for $30,000 for the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

Construction waste enforcement and leadership - $25,000

42.     The local board has indicated support to continue funding the construction waste enforcement and leadership programme in the 2021/2022 financial year.

43.     The construction and demolition sector is the biggest contributor of waste in Auckland. This budget will support a construction and demolition waste advisor to work alongside the council’s waste team to reduce the amount of construction and demolition waste produced from building sites.

44.     The advisor will work with builders and developers in the Scott Point area to improve waste management behaviours on building sites, sorting and separating waste. The advisor will also educate on best practise use of silt and security fences.

45.     This is responding to the board’s concerns about the significant development occurring in the Scott Point and Whenuapai areas.

46.     The board allocated $23,000 to this programme in the 2020/2021 financial year when it was called the construction and demolition waste leaders programme. Staff recommend the allocation of $25,000 to the programme in the 2021/2022 financial year.

47.     Approval in principle is also sought for $25,000 in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

New kiwis zero waste education initiative – carry-forward from 2020/2021

48.     The board allocated $18,000 towards this programme in 2020/2021. The COVID-19 lockdowns have caused several English classes to be postponed over the financial year. The programme received a carry-forward of $9000 into the 2021/2022 financial year to ensure all planned classes can be delivered. Providing there are no changes to alert levels, the carry-forward funding is to be spent before 30 September 2021.

49.     The programme is delivered through the English Language Partners North Shore group. Through their English classes, this group incorporates waste minimisation materials and activities. These initiatives will empower immigrants and former refugees to be champions for Auckland's zero waste target.

50.     The programme will involve classes, writing competitions and site tours of recycling facilities to support migrants and their families to understand waste and its environmental impact. Surveys will be conducted to see what waste minimisation behaviours have been undertaken over the financial year.

51.     Due to the delivery of the carry-forward and resulting contractor availability, funding is not recommended to be allocated to this programme in 2021/2022. However, approval in principle is sought for $21,000 for the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

North-West Wildlink Assistance programme - $80,000

52.     The board has indicated it would like to continue supporting the North-West Wildlink Assistance programme in the 2021/2022 financial year.

53.     Funding for this programme is distributed to community groups for environmental initiatives via the Upper Harbour Ecology Network. Parks, Sport and Recreation staff and Environmental Services staff ensure the funds reach a large number of people and support a large number of restoration and environmental goals.

54.     The Upper Harbour Ecology Network (established in the 2016/2017 financial year) provides a forum for the many local conservation groups to collaborate and plant together. The network is convened by a member of the community and facilitated by Environmental Services staff. The network consists of members from 24 community organisations and reaches individuals across the local board area. This collaboration ensures there are no double-ups and biodiversity outcomes are achieved more effectively.  

55.     Further funding in 2021/2022 will be used to grow the capability of the Upper Harbour community to deliver the Upper Harbour Ecological Connectivity Strategy.

56.     Staff will provide updates at workshops at the end of quarters one and three of the financial year in addition to regular quarterly reporting. In line with the local board’s requests, efforts will be made to work with groups in the Albany area.

57.     In 2018/2019, the network received $80,000 from the local board via the North-West Wildlink Assistance programme and a further $60,000 in 2019/2020.The board allocated $80,000 to this programme in the 2020/2021 financial year.

58.     Staff recommend the allocation of a further $80,000 in the 2021/2022 financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $80,000 for the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

59.     In June 2019, Auckland Council declared a climate emergency and in response to this, the council adopted the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan in July 2020.

60.     Each activity in the work programme has been assessed to identify whether it will have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions and contributing towards climate change adaptation

61.     Table 1 below outlines the key activities in the 2021/2022 work programme that have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards climate change adaptation:

Table 1: Climate impact assessment of proposed activities

Activity name

Climate impact

Īnanga spawning sites – survey and restoration

The implementation of stream restoration and protection efforts will minimise the impact of flooding, improve native biodiversity and enhance carbon sequestration. This will help protect the stream banks from erosion caused by the increased rainfall events resulting from climate change.

Restoration of the Waiarohia Stream

Sediment-related water quality testing

As the weather gets more variable with larger rain events expected, this programme will help to ensure that small building sites have appropriate erosion and sediment controls in place to minimise the risk of flooding and poor water quality.

Sustainable Schools Project – our local streams

Actions to improve local streams that include native planting will enhance carbon sequestration by plants, as well as reducing erosion and increasing the resilience of streams to storm events.

Construction waste enforcement and leadership

The contribution of waste to overall greenhouse gas emissions in the Auckland region is approximately 3.1 per cent as per the Auckland Greenhouse Gas Inventory to 2016. These programmes will reduce waste going to landfill and reduce greenhouse gas production.

New kiwis zero waste education initiative

North-West Wildlink Assistance programme

The programme will contribute to fewer native plants being eaten by pests, hence the survival and regeneration of increasing amounts of native vegetation. Native planting will improve carbon sequestration and pollution absorption.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

62.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

63.     In particular, the attached 2021/2022 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme reflects the integrated activities developed by Environmental Services, Healthy Waters and Waste Solutions.

64.     Environmental Services and Healthy Waters staff working on restoration programmes will work closely with colleagues from Parks, Sports and Recreation as some of the restoration work happens on public land and public parks. The sediment-related water quality testing and the construction waste enforcement and leadership programme will also liaise with the council’s Proactive Compliance Team.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

65.     The programmes proposed for inclusion in the board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme will have positive environmental outcomes across the Upper Harbour Local Board area. Particular focus areas for the 2021/2022 work programme include Scott Point, Whenuapai and the Waiarohia Stream.

66.     The programmes noted above align with the Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes:

·        our unique natural environment is protected and enhanced

·        empowered, connected and resilient Upper Harbour communities.

67.     The proposed work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from December 2020 to May 2021. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

68.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori.

69.     The work programme includes activities that aim to deliver outcomes for and with Māori, in alignment with the strategic priority areas outlined in Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau (Auckland Council’s Māori Outcome Framework). Progress on how the activities are achieving these outcomes will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

70.     Staff recognise that environmental management, water quality and land management have integral links with the mauri of the environment and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

71.     Table 2 below outlines the activities in the 2021/2022 work programme that contribute towards the delivery of specific Māori outcomes:

Table 2: Māori outcome delivery through proposed activities

Activity name

Māori outcome

Māori outcome description

Sustainable Schools Project – our local streams

Te reo Māori

Kaitiakitanga 

Realising rangatahi potential

 

Students will:

·    be taught relevant terms in te reo Māori as they learn about the importance of stream health and biodiversity

·    learn about the concept of kaitiakitanga as they become kaitiaki of their local stream site

·    through learning to be citizen scientists, students will be empowered with confidence and skills, and awareness of environmental science as a potential career pathway

72.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on issues of importance to Māori, then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

73.     The proposed environment work programme for 2021/2022 totals $195,300 of the board’s LDI operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2021/2022.

74.     Budgets for activities in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years are indicative. While local board approval in principle is being sought for these future years through this report, formal approval will be sought on an annual basis, once budgets and programme costs are confirmed.

75.       An overall LDI opex carry-forward provision for projects to be carried forward from 2020/2021 to 2021/2022 was approved by the Finance and Performance Committee as part of the 10-year budget adoption. Work programme activities to be carried forward from 2020/2021 will be finalised post 30 June 2021. Local boards will receive detail of carry-forwards in their first scheduled performance report for 2021/2022.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

76.     If the proposed 2021/2022 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme is not approved before the start of the financial year, there is a risk that activities may be delayed or not delivered within the financial year.

77.     The COVID-19 pandemic could have a further negative impact on the delivery of local board work programmes if the COVID-19 alert level changes (New Zealand’s 4-level alert system specifies measures to be taken against COVID-19 at each level). The deliverability of some activities will decrease if there is an increase to the COVID-19 alert level. Drought conditions may also lead to delays in any programmes which involve planting.

78.     Resourcing of the work programme is based on current staff capacity within departments. Therefore, changes to staff capacity may also have an impact on work programme delivery.

79.     Table 3 below shows the key risks associated with activities in the proposed 2021/2022 work programme, as well as proposed mitigations:

Table 3: Key risks and mitigations for activities

Activity name

Risk

Mitigation

Rating after mitigation

Īnanga spawning sites – survey and restoration

These programmes rely on community members’ willingness to be involved.

 

These programmes build on the positive relationships and momentum that already exist in active conservation groups in Upper Harbour.

Low

80.    

Restoration of the Waiarohia Stream

Sediment-related water quality testing

This programme relies on the contractor’s ability to co-ordinate with the Proactive Compliance Team.

The contractor has a strong and growing relationship with the Proactive Compliance Team.

Low

Sustainable Schools Project – our local streams

This programme relies on the schools wanting to be involved. In addition, the programme is dependent on the contractor’s availability to continue the work.

Schools currently engaged will be asked to confirm their continued involvement, and new schools will be approached if any existing schools do not continue. The current contractor has been approached and is interested in running this programme again.

Low

Construction waste enforcement and leadership

The programme is reliant on the willingness of small site developments to take on the recommendations.

 

The contractor has already had success in working with builders and developers in the 2020/2021 financial year. This same successful approach will be followed in this financial year.

Medium

New kiwis zero waste education initiative

The programme is dependent on students putting the actions into practice.

 

All students will receive appropriate education through the Waste Solutions team and English Language Partners. Waste Solutions staff will help participants identify and overcome any barriers to good waste practice.

Medium

North-West Wildlink Assistance programme

This programme is dependent on the volunteer time of the participants in the Upper Harbour Ecology Network.

The network has been running for a number of years and the amount of volunteer time and engagement is very high.

Low

81.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

82.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence once approved and continue until 30 June 2022. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

83.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2021/2022 Upper Harbour Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme

45

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Hannah Brightley - Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator



Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Approval of the 2021/2022 Upper Harbour Local Board Auckland Unlimited work programme

File No.: CP2021/07383

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2021/2022Upper Harbour Local Board Auckland Unlimited (AUL) work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the Upper Harbour Local Board Auckland Unlimited (AUL) work programme and associated budgets for approval for delivery within the 2021/2022 financial year (refer Attachment A).

3.       The work programme responds to the following outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020: 

·           A resilient local economy – our local businesses and industry are resilient and sustainable.

4.       The local board provided feedback to staff on the projects it would like to fund in a series of workshops. The board indicated its support for the following projects, with budgets as listed below: 

·           Local Small Business Mentors Programme ($11,000) 

·           Young Enterprise Scheme ($2000).

5.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $13,000 which can be funded from within the local board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2021/2022 financial year.  

6.       Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the local board’s quarterly performance reports.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve the 2021/2022 Auckland Unlimited work programme (refer Attachment A to the agenda report).

Horopaki

Context

7.       Each year through a series of workshops, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward. The local board feedback in these workshops have informed the AUL work programme. 

8.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020. The specific outcomes and objectives that are reflected in the work programme are: 

·           A resilient local economy – our local businesses and industry are resilient and sustainable.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The proposed activities for delivery as part of the local board’s AUL work programme 2021/2022 are detailed in the following paragraphs (refer to Attachment A for additional detail):

Local Small Business Mentors programme

10.     The Regional Business Partnership Programme (RBP) delivered by Auckland Unlimited has, through the COVID-19 Business Advisory Fund, provided almost $13 million of assistance to over 5000 businesses across the Auckland region. The COVID-19 fund has now been exhausted. Many small to medium enterprises (SMEs) across the region, especially smaller businesses, will no longer be able to access support via the RBP programme and subsequent research has shown there is still significant demand.

11.     A total of 591 businesses in Upper Harbour accessed the RBP over the course of 2020. In the six months from July to December 2020, 7.3 per cent of subscribers to the RBP were from Upper Harbour; an area which is home to 5.8 per cent of the region’s businesses. All businesses were eligible under the COVID-19 response package but that will not be the case going forward. The average business size in Upper Harbour is just 4.6 employees, so many businesses will now become ineligible. 

12.     There are 11,850 businesses in Upper Harbour and 3867 in the North Harbour statistical area 2 covered by Business North Harbour. Upper Harbour has similar average business size as that seen regionally with 4.6 employees on average compared to 4.5 regionally. Over 10,000 (86 per cent) of the area’s businesses have five employees or less. These smaller businesses have less access to mainstream government business support and fewer resources to put towards paying for assistance to grow their business.  

13.     The Small Business Mentoring service provides up to 12 months of confidential, one-on-one assistance for small business owners who want to grow or need help to solve specific business challenges. Business mentors have experience and empathy for small business offering guidance, a sounding board, challenging their thinking, and providing them with an independent and fresh perspective.

14.     AUL Business Advisors can make referrals to businesses that request support should the business be considered suited to the initiative. AUL is also able to promote businesses (e.g., via email marketing) to its database of 20,000 Upper Harbour businesses. In addition, AUL will seek to utilise the local board’s own channels to reach its community.

15.     Business Mentors NZ or AUL Business Advisors will be able to assess whether a business will benefit from the support being made available. Any recruitment programme would be strengthened by business association support in order to reach their membership.

Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days sponsorship

16.     The Auckland Business Chamber, on behalf of the Young Enterprise Trust, delivers the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) in Auckland. YES is a practical, year-long programme for year 12 and 13 students. 

17.     Fostering youth entrepreneurship is a key requirement for developing an innovative economy and creating employment pathways for our young people. Through the programme, students develop creative ideas into actual businesses, complete with real products and services and real profit and loss. Students learn key work skills and business knowledge, including business fundamentals, planning, interpersonal relations, financial, decision making, reporting, risk management and teamwork. YES helps create a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship amongst Auckland’s young people.

18.     The funding from the local board will support the delivery of the overall YES programme, including the Kick Start Days in February 2022 where the Auckland Business Chamber will specifically acknowledge local board support. The Kick Start Days are the first opportunity for students to meet the Young Enterprise team and find out about the 2022 year, what YES is about, and what is in store for them. All schools in the local board area that have shown an interest in YES are invited. In addition, the invite is extended to those schools who have not shown an interest to enable them to decide whether to participate.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     The proposed AUL work programme does not significantly impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards adapting to the impacts of climate change. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The AUL work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     The proposed AUL work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from December 2020 to May 2021. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.  

22.     The activities in the proposed work programme align with the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes, specifically:

·           Support local business networks, business associations and business improvement districts to strengthen business resilience and economic prosperity.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     Table 1 below outlines the activities in the 2020/2021 AUL work programme that contribute towards the delivery of specific Māori outcomes:

Table 1: Māori impact assessment of proposed activities

Activity name

Impact

Local Small Business Mentors programme

The Local Small Business Mentors project will ensure Māori businesses are identified on the database and the Whariki Māori Business Network are made aware of the programme available.

Data on Māori business participation will be collected as part of AUL’s key performance indicator reporting and will be shared with the local board.

The current Business Mentors NZ strategic plan identifies as one of its current strategic objectives, aligning the mentoring service with te ao Māori and expanding the pool of Māori mentors through partnerships such as Te Puni Kōkiri and Poutama Trust.

Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days

Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days will support YES Māori students at participating schools to benefit from the experience and learnings from the YES.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The proposed AUL work programme budget for 2021/2022 is $13,000 from the local board’s LDI operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2021/2022

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     Table 2 below outlines the identified significant risks associated with activities in the proposed 2021/2022 AUL work programme:

Table 2: Significant risks and mitigations for activities

Activity name

Risk

Mitigation

Rating after mitigation

Local Business Mentors

The programme does not recruit the number of businesses envisaged

AUL will promote the programme via social media and work with local business associations to promote the programme.

Business Mentors NZ will also refer businesses where they meet the criteria established for engagement in the local board funded programme.

Medium

Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days

There is a risk that the Kick Start Days do not proceed due to changes in the COVID-19 alert levels. As a result, the sponsorship provided to the Auckland Business Chamber may not be required.

To maintain contact with the Auckland Business Chamber on organisation of the event to ensure that if it is cancelled, the full impact on the need for local board support is identified.

Medium

26.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Delivery of the activity in the approved AUL work programme will commence once approved and will continue until 30 June 2022. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis. 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2021/2022 Auckland Unlimited work programme

55

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jonathan Sudworth – Local Economic Development Advisor, Auckland Unlimited

Karishma Nair - Senior Advisor Information and Applications, Auckland Unlimited

Authorisers

John Norman – Strategic Planning Manager, Auckland Unlimited

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 



Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator



Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Approval of the 2021/2022 Upper Harbour Local Board Auckland Emergency Management work programme

File No.: CP2021/07157

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2021/2022 Upper Harbour Local Board Auckland Emergency Management work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the local board’s Auckland Emergency Management work programme and associated budgets for approval for delivery within the 2021/2022 financial year (refer Attachment A).

3.       The work programme responds to the following outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020:

·       Outcome - empowered, connected and resilient Upper Harbour communities 

·       Objective - our communities are resilient to adversity and change, such as that caused by the impact of COVID-19

·       Outcome - a resilient local economy

·       Objective - our local businesses and industry are resilient and sustainable.

4.       In a series of workshops, the local board provided feedback to staff on the projects it would like to fund. The board indicated its support for the following projects, with budgets as listed below:

·       Community emergency resilience programme – $0 (budget sits with Connected Communities)

·       Business emergency resilience programme - $7600.

5.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $7600 which can be funded from within the local board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2021/2022 financial year.

6.       Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the local board’s quarterly performance reports.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve the Upper Harbour Local Board 2021/2022 Auckland Emergency Management work programme (refer Attachment A to the agenda report).

Horopaki

Context

7.       Each year through a series of workshops, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward. The local board feedback in these workshops have informed the work programme.

8.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020. The specific outcomes that are reflected in the work programme are:

·       empowered, connected and resilient Upper Harbour communities

·       a resilient local economy.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The proposed activities for delivery as part of the local board’s 2021/2022 Auckland Emergency Management work programme are detailed in the following paragraphs (refer to Attachment A for further detail):

Community emergency resilience programme

10.     In the 2021/2022 financial year, Auckland Emergency Management (AEM) will investigate and commence initial community engagement in hazard risk locations within the local board area (especially eastern areas around Albany and Unsworth Heights) that could be supported to grow their community disaster resilience and social connectedness. This will build on the current work underway in Hobsonville Point and Scott Point.

11.     This work will involve engaging with community organisations such as churches and other community groups and understanding exactly what community disaster resilience planning opportunities and initiatives the community needs. These findings will be presented to the local board by the end of the next financial year, June 2022.

12.     AEM understands this work will link to the budget within the Connected and Resilient Communities activities detailed in the Customer and Community Services work programme available in another report on this business meeting agenda (ID# 462, 464 and 468). All other costs are AEM staff time. 

13.     Work with and delivery of initiatives to interested communities to increase their whānau and neighbourhood disaster resilience and to strengthen social connections will begin in the 2022/2023 financial year and continue into the 2023/2024 financial year.

Business emergency resilience programme

14.     In partnership with Business North Harbour, AEM will deliver information packs designed to encourage small business owners to develop an emergency plan, undertake business continuity planning and explore opportunities to work together for maximum benefit.

15.     The information packs will be developed in English, Korean and Simplified Chinese. All information packs will include Upper Harbour Local Board branding.

16.     AEM will also host an information stand and business engagement activity at Showcase North Harbour.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     Table 1 outlines the activities in the 2021/2022 AEM work programme that have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards climate change adaptation:

Table 1: Climate impact assessment of proposed activities

Activity name

Climate impact

Community emergency resilience programme

Positive impact on our resilience to climate change, as this works increases community resilience to emergencies and the impacts of climate change

Business emergency resilience programme

Positive impact on resilience to climate change as this work increases the business community’s resilience to emergencies and the impacts of climate change

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The proposed AEM work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from November 2020 to May 2021. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

20.     The activities in the proposed work programme align with the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activities of importance to Māori, then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The proposed AEM work programme budget for 2021/2022 is $7600 of operational budget. This amount can be funded from the Upper Harbour Local Board’s draft LDI operational budget for 2021/2022.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     Delivery of the activity in the approved AEM work programme will commence on 1 July 2021 and continue until 30 June 2022. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

25.     Where the AEM work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Emergency Management 2021/2022 work programme

61

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bridget Vercoe - Principal Business Resilience

Authorisers

Kate Crawford - General Manager Auckland Emergency Management

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator



Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Approval of the 2021/2022 Upper Harbour Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme

File No.: CP2021/07795

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2021/2022 Upper Harbour Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme and approve in principle the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programmes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the 2021/2022 Upper Harbour Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme with associated budget for approval, as well as the subsequent two financial years, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024, work programmes for approval in principle (refer Attachment A).

3.       The local board approves the work programme each financial year. Delivery of the approved work programme will support the local board to achieve the outcomes and aspirations in the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020.

4.       The work programme details the activities to be delivered by departments within the Customer and Community Services directorate.

5.       The work programme has been developed through a series of workshops between December 2020 and May 2021, where the local board provided feedback to staff on project and activity prioritisation.

6.       The work programme development process takes an integrated approach to scoping activity, involving collaboration between staff from across council and the local board.

7.       Several projects in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programme have been identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme. Approval is sought for the planning and design of these projects to commence during 2021/2022 so that they are ready to be delivered early if approved projects for delivery in 2021/2022 are delayed for any unforeseen reason.   

8.       The work programme includes projects proposed to be funded from regional budgets subject to approval by the relevant Governing Body committee. The local board can provide formal feedback on these regional projects through resolution to this report.

9.       The most significant risk to successful delivery of the 2021/2022 work programme is a change in COVID-19 alert levels that would impact delivery timeframes and budget.

10.     Updates on the progress of the work programme delivery will be provided through the local board’s quarterly performance reports.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve the 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme and associated budget and approve, in principle, the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programmes (Attachment A to the agenda report).

b)      approve the Risk Adjusted Programme projects identified in the 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report).

c)      note that funding for the Coastal Renewals, Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development and the Natural Environment Targeted Rate budgets are subject to approval by the relevant Governing Body committee.

d)      provide feedback for consideration by the relevant Governing Body committee on projects funded from the Coastal Renewals, Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development and the Natural Environment Targeted Rate budgets (Attachment D to the agenda report).

Horopaki

Context

11.     Customer and Community Services provide a wide range of services, facilities, open spaces and information that support communities to connect, enjoy and embrace the diversity of our people, places and natural environment. These are tailored to the unique needs of the local community in a place-based approach.

12.     The 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme (included as Attachment A) outlines the local board’s priorities to be delivered within the financial year.

13.     The work programme aligns to council plans, policies and strategies. Each activity in the work programme delivers to a specific objective relating to one or more of the following 2020 Local Board Plan outcomes:

·        Outcome 1 – Empowered, connected and resilient Upper Harbour communities

·        Outcome 3 – Healthy and active communities

·        Outcome 4 – Our unique natural environment is protected and enhanced.

14.     Development of the work programme is based on the understanding of:

·        local community needs

·        service and asset availability

·        funding availability

·        the work performed by other parties, including iwi partners, council-controlled organisations, community groups and commercial enterprises

·        risks

·        feedback received from the local board at workshops.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     Delivery of the work programme is the realisation of the local board’s aspirations for their community, as identified in the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020.

16.     The local board has discretion to allocate a portion of their budget to a project or activity that it identifies as a priority across the three-year work programme period.

17.     Out of the initiatives signalled in the local board plan, the local board has prioritised the activities to be delivered in the next three years within available budgets.

18.     The work programme provides a three-year view that demonstrates the phasing of programme and project delivery for the following financial years:

·        2021/2022 (to be approved)

·        2022/2023 (to be approved in principle)

·        2023/2024 (to be approved in principle).

19.     The local board can approve the work programme for the first financial year and subsequently, delivery of this activity will commence from 1 July 2021. The local board can approve the following two years in principle only.

20.     This allows the work programme to be presented in a future-focused way that shows how the local board plan will be responded to for the entirety of its three-year strategy, without locking down future investment before that activity is properly scoped.

21.     The local board will approve the 2022/2023 work programme in June 2022 and approve the 2023/2024 work programme in June 2023. This will include an opportunity to make changes to these work programmes prior to approval, including adding or removing activities and budget allocations, unless funding has already been committed.

22.     However, approval of unique multi-year projects in the 2021/2022 work programme, particularly capital works, will commit the local board to the future funding associated with completing the project in 2022/2023 or 2023/2024.

23.     The work programme includes a continuation of delivery from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or projects, ongoing programmes, new activities and investments, and potential carry-forward items.

24.     Regular updates on the delivery of the programme will be provided to the local board through quarterly performance reports. These updates will identify progress of all projects, highlight risks, and advise if amendments to the budget or delivery timeframes are required.

COVID-19 recovery is a priority for Customer and Community Services

25.     A priority of the work programme is to deliver activities that respond to the impacts of COVID-19 on the following:

·        newly vulnerable communities

·        council financial constraints

·        building community resilience for recovery.

26.     Customer and Community Services is positioned well to deliver services that are key to the economic and social recovery of communities most in need, including by providing:

·        safe and welcoming spaces

·        inclusive events to bring the community back together

·        community supports, including grants

·        stronger connections with other organisations, including council-controlled organisations, iwi partners, business associations, community organisations and central government agencies who also serve our communities.

Delivering outcomes for, and with, Māori

27.     The council has important statutory obligations with respect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi – The Treaty of Waitangi. The strategic framework that informs council’s delivery and performance measurement of Māori outcomes is Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau Māori Outcomes Measurement Framework.

28.     Within this strategic framework, Customer and Community Services is responsible for leading activities that deliver against the outcomes and objectives outlined in Table 1:

Table 1: Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau outcomes and objectives

Mana outcome

Outcome statement

Mahi objective

Kia ora te Marae

Marae are centres of excellence for whānau Māori and have an abundant presence in communities.

Invest in marae to be self-sustaining and thriving hubs for Māori and the wider community.

Kia ora te Whānau

Empowered whānau Māori across Tāmaki Makaurau.

The council group will enable whānau Māori to experience relevant and welcoming public facilities and services. It will support Māori-led services where appropriate.

Kia ora te Reo

Ko te reo Māori te mauri o te mana Māori.

The council group supports te reo Māori to be seen, heard, spoken and learned throughout Tāmaki Makaurau.

29.     The work programme includes activities that have an objective to deliver moderate to high outcomes for and with Māori in one or more of the following strategic priority areas:

·        Kaitiakitanga

·        Māori business, tourism and employment

·        Māori identity and culture

·        marae development

·        papakāinga and Māori housing

·        realising rangatahi potential

·        te reo Māori

·        whānau and tamariki wellbeing.

30.     Activities in the work programme that aim to achieve high Māori outcomes in one or more of the strategic priority areas are identified in Attachment B.

31.     The Upper Harbour Local Board work programme includes 10 activities that are identified as delivering moderate to high outcomes for Māori.  

32.     Progress updates on delivery of Māori outcomes will be provided to the local board through quarterly performance reports.

Types of budget

33.     Work programme activities are funded from budget sources dependent on the type of delivery. Some activities within the work programme have budget allocated from two or more sources, including budgets from both local and regional programmes.

34.     Table 2 below outlines the different budget types and their purpose that fund the work programme:

Table 2: work programme budget types and purpose

Budget type

Description of budget purpose

Locally driven initiatives (LDI)

A development fund used to advance local operational and capital activities at the discretion of the local board

Asset-based services (ABS)

Allocated by the Governing Body to deliver local activities based on decisions regarding region-wide service levels, including allocation of funds for local asset-based services

Local renewals

A fund dedicated to the renewal (servicing or replacement) of assets, including those in local parks and community facilities

Growth (local parks and sports field development)

Primarily funded through development contributions, a regional fund to improve open spaces, including developing newly acquired land into parks, and existing open space to increase capacity to cater for growing population needs

Coastal

A regional fund for the renewal of Auckland’s significant coastal assets, such as seawalls, wharves and pontoons

Landslide prevention

A regional fund to proactively develop new assets for the prevention of landslides and major slips throughout the region

Specific purpose funding

Funds received by the council from external sources held for specific local board areas and service agreements, including compensation funding from other agencies for land acquisitions required for major projects

One local initiative (OLI)

Funds allocated by the Governing Body to a local board priority project in alignment with the Long-term Plan 2018-2028

Long-term plan discrete

Funds associated with activities specifically named and listed in previous long-term plans, including new libraries, community centres and major sports and community infrastructure

Kauri dieback funding

As part of the Natural Environment Targeted Rate (NETR) fund, this is a regional fund from the Environment and Climate Change Committee used to implement the national kauri dieback programme standards

External funding

Budget from external parties, not yet received, and held by Customer and Community Services

Capital projects and budgets

35.     The capital works programmes have been geo-spatially mapped to indicate the location of projects within a local board area.

36.     Attachment C demonstrates the year of the three-year work programme that capital budget is proposed to be allocated to specific projects and indicates the main funding source for each project.

37.     Activity budgets for capital programme delivery are estimates only, as costs are subject to change and to be refined as the activity / project progresses through the design and delivery process. Greater clarity will be determined once activity details are defined, with the work programme updated accordingly.

38.     Some projects are unable to be mapped as they reference multiple locations, or the work locations are yet to be determined.

Risk Adjusted Programme

39.     The Risk Adjusted Programme was implemented in 2019 and is designed to mitigate risk so that the total budget is delivered.

40.     Several capex projects in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programme have been identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme, as highlighted in Attachment A.

41.     Approval is sought for the commencement of these projects in the 2021/2022 financial year, so that they can replace delays in projects that may not be delivered for unforeseen reasons.

Regionally funded activities included in the local board work programme

42.     There are activities from the Coastal Renewals, Landslide Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development and the Natural Environment Targeted Rate budgets which are funded regionally and will be approved by the Governing Body after 30 June 2021.

43.     These activities are included in the work programme because the local board has decision-making responsibility for that activity within the parameters set by the Governing Body which include project location, scope and budget.

44.     These activities may be conducted by a number of teams, including within the Customer and Community Services and Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorates.

45.     The local board can provide feedback on the activities outlined in Attachment D. This feedback will be presented to the relevant Governing Body committee when it considers regionally funded activities.

Process for changes to the approved work programme

46.     Staff will provide progress updates to and seek approval from the local board if there are any projects that require scope, budget or timing changes throughout the financial year, or if activities need to be cancelled or added to the work programme.

47.     The work programme includes community leases. Straightforward lease renewals without variations will be processed in accordance with agreed delegations through a written memo. Expired and more complex community leases will be workshopped with the local board and reported to a business meeting.

48.     For a change to the work programme considered to be minor, in that it does not substantially alter the approved work programme, staff will workshop this with the local board and then implement the change. A description of the change will be included in the following round of quarterly reporting.

49.     A change to the work programme that is considered substantial will be presented to the local board at a business meeting for approval.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

50.     In June 2019, council declared a climate emergency and in response to this, council adopted the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan in July 2020.

51.     Each activity in the work programme is assessed to identify whether it will have a positive, negative, or neutral impact on greenhouse gas emissions and impact on resilience to climate change.

52.     To deliver on climate goals, Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri includes eight priorities for action:

·        natural environment

·        built environment

·        transport

·        economy

·        communities and coast

·        food

·        Te Puāwaitanga ō te Tātai

·        energy and industry.

53.     The work programme indicates which of these priorities each activity responds to.

54.     Attachment E outlines the activities in the work programme identified to have a positive and negative climate change impact.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

55.     The work programme is presented at a directorate level which reflects the integrated approach to developing the activities between the directorate’s departments of:

·        Connected Communities

·        Community Facilities

·        Community and Social Innovation

·        Parks, Sport and Recreation

·        Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships.

56.     The Customer and Community Services work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by representatives from across council departments, directorates and council-controlled organisations. The integrated team developed the proposed work programme with the local board through a series of workshops.

57.     Some of the activities in the work programme are delivered collaboratively between directorates, for example the kauri dieback programme.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

58.     Delivery of the work programme is the local board’s implementation of outcomes and objectives in the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020. 

59.     The feedback received from the local board through a series of workshops from December 2020 to May 2021 has informed the proposed Customer and Community Services work programme in Attachment A.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

60.     Consideration is given to how the provision of services, facilities and open spaces can support the aspirations of Māori, promote community relationships, connect to the natural environment, and foster holistic wellbeing of whānau, hapu and iwi Māori.

61.     In the local board area, 5.1 per cent of the total population identify as Māori.

62.     The work programme includes activities that will have an impact on a service, facility, or location of significance to Māori. In these situations, appropriate and meaningful engagement and consultation will be undertaken, including to meet our obligations under Te Tiriti o Waitangi – Treaty of Waitangi.

63.     Activities identified as delivering a moderate and high level of Māori outcomes are presented as Attachment B.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

64.     The financial implications of the COVID-19 pandemic have resulted in a reduced renewals budget per local board and significantly reduced development budgets for growth.

65.     Each activity line has a budget allocation for delivery in one or more of the financial years (e.g., 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024). Where activity lines show a zero-dollar budget, this reflects implementation costs met through staff salary or other funding sources.

66.     The 2021/2022 activities recommended for local board approval can be accommodated within the draft 2021/2022 budgets.

67.     The budgets allocated to activities in the financial years 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 are indicative only and are subject to change due to any increased costs, inflation or reduction to the overall available annual council budget that may occur.

68.     Table 3 below summarises the budget sources for each work programme financial year:

Table 3: Upper Harbour Local Board budget allocation

Local budgets

2021/2022 (approve)

2022/2023 (approve in principle)

2023/2024 (approve in principle)

Opex: Locally driven initiatives

$960,234

$924,324

$939,324

Opex: Asset-based services

$10,726,971

$10,726,971

$10,726,971

Capex: Local asset renewals - budget

$2,232,630

$3,654,207

$2,178,889

Capex: Local asset renewals - proposed allocation

$1,994,566

$3,654,207

$2,178,889

Capex: Local asset renewals - unallocated budget

$238,064

$0

$0

Capex: Locally driven initiatives - budget

$150,000

$150,000

$150,000

Capex: Locally driven initiatives - proposed allocation

$268,064

$150,000

$150,000

Capex: Locally driven initiatives - unallocated budget

-$118,064

$0

$0

Capex: Growth projects - allocation

$5,950,272

$0

$0

Capex: Coastal projects - allocation

$0

$0

$0

Capex: Landslide prevention projects - allocation

$0

$0

$0

Capex: Specific purpose funding - allocation

$2,350,000

$2,240,000

$624,000

Capex: External funding - allocation

$2,750,000

$2,750,000

$0

Capex: One local initiative

$0

$0

$0

Capex: Long-term plan discrete

$0

$0

$0

Capex: Natural Environment Targeted Rate

$376,955

$356,730

$0

69.     The proposed budgets are based on the anticipated budget allocations from the Long-term Plan 2021-2031.

70.     Any 2020/2021 capex budget unspent on 30 June 2021 will be assessed for carry-forward to the 2021/2022 work programme. Carry-forwards will be added to the work programme as separate activity lines.

71.     Where an activity is cancelled or no longer required, the local board can reallocate the budget to an existing work programme activity or create a new activity within that financial year.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

72.     If approval of the Customer and Community Services work programme is not obtained, there is significant risk that the activities within it will be delayed or not delivered.

73.     Table 4 below outlines the key risks and mitigations associated with the work programme:

Table 4: risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

Non-delivery, time delays and budget overspend of activities that are managed through the work programme.

Having agreed processes to amend the work programme if activities need to be changed or cancelled.

Utilising the Risk Adjusted Programme to progress those activities identified as ready to proceed under the Risk Adjusted Programme at the beginning of the financial year.

Unknown risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year.

Risks and mitigations for new activity lines are considered during the scoping phase, continually assessed and reported to the local board.

The COVID-19 pandemic could have a negative impact on the progress of the work programme as some activities cannot be delivered if there is an increase in an alert level.

Development of the work programme has included consideration for all activities regarding potential impacts on delivery in the event of alert level changes.

Some activities may be delayed but still deliverable within the agreed timeframes.

Where activities need to be cancelled, the local board can reallocate budget to other activities.

74.     The majority of activities in the work programme are ongoing and annually occurring. Risks associated with these activities have been identified in previous years and are managed on an ongoing basis.

75.     Other risks may also exist, including with respect to the health, safety and wellbeing of council staff. Work programmes may also need to be adjusted where these risks exist and cannot be safely mitigated via control measures.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

76.     Delivery of the work programme will start following approval by the local board and continue until 30 June 2022, with progress reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

77.     Regional projects will commence after approval by the Governing Body in July 2021. The local board will receive the first quarter report in November 2021.

78.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for activities, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2021/2022

73

b

Upper Harbour Local Board Māori Outcomes

103

c

Upper Harbour Local Board map

105

d

Upper Harbour Local Board regional projects

107

e

Upper Harbour Local Board climate impacts

109

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Justine Haves - General Manager Service Strategy and Integration

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Libraries & Information

Gael Surgenor - GM -  Southern Initiative

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Authorisers

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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17 June 2021

 

 

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17 June 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Greenhithe War Memorial Park: Playground concept design approval

File No.: CP2021/07627

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the concept design for the renewal of the playground at Greenhithe War Memorial Park, and to progress to detailed design and construction.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Upper Harbour Local Board has allocated $220,000 of locally driven initiatives capital expenditure (LDI capex) towards the renewal of the playground at Greenhithe War Memorial Park. A total of $13,501 was approved by the local board as part of the 2020/2021 Community Facilities work programme and $206,499 in principle for the 2021/2022 Community Facilities work programme (resolution number UH/2020/86). The final 2021/2022 Community Facilities work programme will be approved at the business meeting on 17 June 2021.

3.       The project will deliver on the 2020 Local Board Plan Outcome 3:

Healthy and active communities – people of all abilities have access to a wide variety of sports and recreation opportunities and well-maintained parks and community facilities.

4.       Assessment of the playground at Greenhithe War Memorial Park indicated that the junior play module required replacement due to an ageing structure and increasing maintenance costs to keep the play space compliant and safe.

5.       The draft concept design (Attachment A) has been developed incorporating consultation feedback from residents to provide a neighbourhood playspace catering for junior (0-5 years) and intermediate (5-8 years) levels.

6.       A draft concept design was presented to the local board at a workshop held on 11 March 2021. Feedback received has been incorporated into the design.

7.       The draft concept design was presented by email in April and May 2021 to mana whenua who have an interest in the area. A consultation meeting was held on 18 May 2021 with Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Trust who indicated their support of the draft concept design and will be providing further input during the detailed design stage.

8.       Staff now seek approval for the final concept design before progressing the project to detailed design, consenting and construction.

9.       Following approval of the draft concept design, the development of the detailed design will begin. Physical works to undertake construction of the proposed design is expected to commence in early 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve the concept design for the renewal of the playground at Greenhithe War Memorial Park, Greenhithe (as per Attachment A of the agenda report) and request staff progress the project to detailed design and construction.

Horopaki

Context

10.     The play elements at Greenhithe War Memorial Park have been assessed according to compliance with New Zealand Standards for playground equipment safety requirements (NZS5828:2015). The inspections carried out in 2020 identified the play module is in poor condition, has reached end of life and requires replacement.

11.     The existing double bay swing is in good condition and the draft concept design (Attachment A) is proposing to re-use the swing as part of the renewal.

12.     The edge detail and cushion fall are in poor condition and require replacement.

13.     The volley wall, located near the public toilet within the reserve, is in poor condition and requires renewal.

14.     The 2018 Strategic Play Provisions Assessment carried out by Community Parks and Places identified opportunities for enriched play experience for all ages, cultures and abilities across the whole Upper Harbour area.

15.     The renewal of the playground at Greenhithe War Memorial Park provides an opportunity to diversify the play offering through a creative renewal which will lift the overall quality to be consistent with playgrounds in the wider local area. The draft concept design (Attachment A) has been developed to enhance the play experience and provide for a wider age group.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The Upper Harbour Local Board approved the renewal of the playground at Greenhithe War Memorial Park as part of the 2020/2021 Community Facilities work programme and, in principle, for the 2021/2022 Community Facilities work programme (resolution number UH/2020/86). The final 2021/2022 Community Facilities work programme will be approved at the business meeting on 17 June 2021.

17.     The current playground consists of two separate play areas which are separated by timber edge, a mature Pohutukawa tree and seating. The designated playground area within the overall park is limited by the existing sports fields, lighting and the tennis club leased area.

18.     The volley wall is located between the tennis club building and the public toilet. It is proposed to renew the volley wall and therefore, there is no new design.

19.     Community consultation for the renewal has been undertaken through ‘Have Your Say’ on the Auckland Council website, via a letter drop in the local area, and park signage. A total of 208 letters were sent to residents in the local area. The consultation commenced on 12 October 2020 and closed on 6 November 2020.

20.     A total of 20 individual feedback forms have been received from the community. The feedback included requests for the playground to provide:

·        increased play value and cater for junior and intermediate age group

·        general feedback on Greenhithe playgrounds – Collins Park and skate park

·        more climbing elements, obstacles and structures

·        more natural play elements

·        water play

·        basketball court / or half court

·        fitness equipment.

21.     Greenhithe War Memorial Park currently provides public toilet amenities and sports facilities. The play area is considered a ‘neighbourhood park’ and mainly serves residents of the immediate surrounding location and families using the sports fields. The current budget availability and the use of space does not allow for the addition of a basketball court or fitness equipment.

22.     Based on the consultation feedback, a playground concept design has been developed which will include:

·        re-use of existing swings

·        replacement of the multi-use junior module

·        play module activities: sliding, climbing, balancing, hanging

·        additional climbing elements in the new play area

·        connection of the two play spaces (currently separate) with climbing / balancing and imaginative play

·        seating

·        natural shade provided by an existing tree.

23.     The draft concept design for the playground is illustrated in the following image:

         

24.     The existing playground only caters for ages 0-5 (junior). The renewal of the playground will increase the user experience of the playground and increase the user groups to junior 0-5 and intermediate 5-8 years and beyond.

25.     It is recommended that the local board approve the design option as attached to agenda report (Attachment A) to allow the project to continue to detailed design, procurement and construction.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     Auckland Council is committed to the regional sustainability targets and goals set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

27.     It is anticipated that there will be an increase in carbon emission from construction, including contractor emissions.

28.     Delivery of the project will seek to minimise carbon and contractor emissions and strive for maximum re-use and recycling of existing material aligned with the waste management hierarchy (prevention, reduction, recycle) to ensure minimum impact.

29.     Mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions will be achieved through sourcing of low-carbon material options and use of products with environmental declarations for embodied carbon reductions. 

30.     Recycled timber logs and locally manufactured play equipment will be installed, and natural shade will be provided by an existing tree.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     Council staff from Customer and Community Services (Parks and Places and Community Facilities operational management and maintenance) have been consulted and are supportive of the proposed concept design.

32.     Collaboration with staff will be ongoing to ensure that the development of the playground is appropriately integrated into the operational maintenance and asset management systems once completed. 

33.     The renewal of the playground will deliver significant improvements to the play and recreation needs of the community surrounding the local area.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     The renewal of the playground at Greenhithe War Memorial Park will improve the play experience provided in Greenhithe and cater for the residents in the local neighbourhood as well as enhance the play activity for family and individual park users. 

35.     Renewal of this playground aligns with the 2020 Upper Harbour Local Board Plan Outcome 3:

Healthy and active communities – people of all abilities have access to a wide variety of sports and recreation opportunities and well-maintained parks and community facilities.

36.     A draft concept design and options were presented to the local board at a workshop held on 11 March 2021. The local board indicated their support for the design and feedback received has been incorporated into the design.

37.     The new playground will provide a play facility for the residents in Greenhithe and improve the recreation opportunities in the Upper Harbour area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

38.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori.

39.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2018-2028, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework and local board plans.

40.     The new playground will enable the Māori community, whanau and tamariki, and the wider community in the Greenhithe area, to have safer and easier access to passive recreation and education through play.

41.     The playground design incorporates spaces where caregivers can sit and watch/supervise young children alongside young adult spaces to enable generations to recreate together.

42.     Through engagement with mana whenua, planting suggestions provided by Ngāti Whātua Õrākei have been incorporated into the concept design and Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Trust will be providing further input through the detailed design phase.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

43.     A total budget of $220,000 has been allocated, in principle, by the local board for the design and development of the playground at Greenhithe War Memorial Park in the following financial years:

Budget source

FY2020/21

FY2021/22

Total ($)

Renewals

$13,501

$206,499

 

Total budget

 

 

$220,000

44.     The draft 2021/2022 Community Facilities work programme will be approved by the local board at the 17 June 2021 business meeting.

45.     The cost estimates for the physical works and play equipment based on the draft concept design is $220,000, including a project contingency.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

46.     Should the 2021/2022 Community Facilities work programme not be approved, there will be delays in revising the concept design and reduction of scope.

47.     Should the local board not support the draft concept plan, this will subsequently delay and extend the timeframes to deliver the project as the scope would need to be redefined and further consultation with the community and mana whenua undertaken.

48.     There is a risk that the construction costs could exceed the available budget. The risk will be minimised through the detailed design and procurement process to ensure competitive pricing and to keep construction costs within the budget allocated.

49.     Public expectation has been raised for a new playground at Greenhithe War Memorial Park.

50.     The play area is restricted largely within the existing area due to adjacent sport fields and tennis club area. The design has taken the existing limitation into consideration and used the space creatively to provide connectivity between spaces.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     The local board is requested to approve the 2021/2022 Community Facilities work programme and associated budget allocation to this project on another agenda report at the June 2021 business meeting.

52.     If the draft concept design is approved by the local board, the project will be progressed through the detailed design and procurement phases to enable construction to commence before the end of financial year 2021/2022.

53.     Neighbouring residents will be informed of the local board’s decision and will receive a notification of the proposed timeframe for construction.

54.     The following table summarises the anticipated next steps and estimated delivery timeframes for the project. The estimated timeframes assume successful and timely completion of each identified project step. Unforeseen delays in the procurement of the equipment have the potential to delay completion of the project beyond the identified timeframe. 

Project phase

Planned completion timeframe

Detailed design

Once the concept design option is approved by the local board, the development of the detailed design can be progressed.

August 2021

Procure physical works contractor/build partner

The tender will be submitted a suitable contractor as per the procurement guidelines.

November 2021

Physical works

Accurate commencement and duration of the physical works is not known at this time and will be confirmed at a later stage but is envisaged between the dates specified.

January to July 2022

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Greenhithe War Memorial Park playground concept design

121

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sandra May - Programme Manager

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Approval of developed design for a path at Rosedale Park

File No.: CP2021/06575

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the developed design for the path at Rosedale Park (320 Rosedale Road) and to progress the project to detailed design and construction

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The development of a new path was identified within the 2019 Upper Harbour Greenways Plan. Staff investigated path options within the reserve that aligned with the vision of the Greenways Plan.

3.       The project has been identified for $688,000 capital funding from the Northern Corridor Improvements project (NCI project) funding and is included as part of the draft Upper Harbour Local Board 2021/2022 Community Facilities work programme to be considered for adoption on 17 June 2021.

4.       In February 2020, three path locations within the park were investigated for feasibility. The options were discussed with the Upper Harbour Local Board at a workshop in March 2020. The local board indicated a preference to investigate ‘Path 1’ as the priority which would link the existing pathways to the north, south and west of the park through the main car park area.

5.       In September 2020, three route options for ‘Path 1’ were presented to the local board at a workshop. The options included locating the path to the east of the car park adjacent to a row of large macrocarpa trees, or to the west around the perimeter of the car park. The local board indicated a preference at the workshop for ‘Option A – Raised Path’ adjacent to the macrocarpa trees. 

6.       The draft developed design was presented to the local board at a workshop on 11 March 2021 and further design considerations were discussed. The local board indicated support for the removal of a macrocarpa tree to improve sight lines, safety, and alignment of the path, and for a section of path beneath the macrocarpa trees to be constructed in asphalt to allow for tree root movement.

7.       Engagement with park user groups and local iwi has been completed and the design is supported. Feedback received from the groups requested signage and consideration of appropriate plant species. The detailed design will incorporate these aspects.

8.       Staff now seek approval for the final developed design (refer Attachment B) before progressing the project to detailed design and construction.

9.       Risks associated with the project are minor and able to be mitigated.

10.     Following approval of the proposed developed design, an application for ‘tree asset owner approval’ will be progressed in July 2021. Detailed design will commence when tree approval has been received. Physical works to undertake construction of the proposed design is expected to commence in the 2022/2023 financial year.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve the developed design for a path at Rosedale Park as per Attachment B of the agenda report, and request staff progress to detailed design, procurement and construction.

Horopaki

Context

11.     Rosedale Park is located at Rosedale to the north of the Upper Harbour Highway and is predominantly a sports park with areas of recreational space and undeveloped open land. The park has boundaries on Rosedale Road, Bush Road and Paul Matthews Road and is situated adjacent to the water treatment plant and ponds at Rosedale (refer Attachment A).

12.     The park has a network of paths that provide linkages with the surrounding residential and light industrial areas.

Background

13.     In 2018, the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) compulsorily acquired approximately 3.8ha of open space in the Upper Harbour Local Board area for motorway improvements (the NCI project).

14.     At a meeting on 20 March 2018, the Finance and Performance Committee agreed to consider providing funding to improve parks in the Upper Harbour Local Board area to offset the loss of open space. The service property optimisation approach was used to guide council’s decision-making.

15.     Staff considered that the Upper Harbour Open Space Network Plan meets the requirements of the service optimisation approach and recommended that the Finance and Performance Committee allocate funding for three unfunded/part-funded park improvement projects. The projects scored highly against the decision-making principles and are supported by the Upper Harbour Local Board.

16.     In June 2019, the Upper Harbour Local Board passed a resolution requesting that the Finance and Performance Committee allocate the compensation funding to fund three park improvement projects (resolution number UH/2019/67).

17.     In July 2019, the Finance and Performance Committee resolved to update the capital budget for the allocation of $6.044 million of compensation funding provided by the NZTA to fund park improvement projects. The development of walking and cycling trails (greenways) at Rosedale Park was one of the three recommended projects (resolution number FIN/2019/77).

18.     In September 2019, the Upper Harbour Local Board approved the revised Upper Harbour Greenways Plan that presents a vision of a complete network of shared paths with the aim of significantly improving walking, cycling and ecological connections throughout the community. Greenway routes within Rosedale Park were included within the plan.

19.     Several walkway and cycleway paths have been completed within Rosedale Park over the past few years and an opportunity exists to link these routes and provide an improved network through and around the reserve.

20.     As a part of the draft Upper Harbour Local Board 2021/2022 Community Facilities work programme, the local board identified a project to develop a path at Rosedale Park with funding from the NCI project fund.

Link to local board plan

21.     The project aligns with the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives outlined in Table 1 below:

Table 1: Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives

Outcome

Objective

Outcome 1: Empowered, connected and resilient Upper Harbour communities

Our diverse communities feel connected, confident in their ability to face adversity together and are able to influence what happens in their neighbourhoods

Outcome 2: An efficient and accessible travel network

Our travel network offers multiple transport choices in an accessible and efficient way

Outcome 3: Healthy and active communities

People of all abilities have access to a wide variety of sports and recreation opportunities and well-maintained parks and community facilities

Outcome 4: Our unique natural environment is protected and enhanced

Our communities care for Upper Harbour’s natural environment and are actively involved in preserving and restoring it

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

22.     Three path options were investigated in February 2020 for feasibility and are illustrated below in Figure 1: Proposed future greenway routes:

·        Path 1 (A to B) – a local open space path through the central car park area of the park, connecting existing greenway paths to the north, south and west

·        Path 2 (C to D, and C to E) – an express path along Bush Road and Rosedale Road, connecting with the footpath adjacent to the hockey stadium

·        Path 3 (E to F) – a local open space path to the east of the hockey stadium providing an off-road connection to the northern areas of the park.

Figure 1: Proposed future greenway routes

23.     In March 2020, the three path options were discussed with the Upper Harbour Local Board at a workshop. The local board indicated to staff a preference to investigate Path 1 as the priority, to link the existing pathways to the north, south and west of the park through the main car park area. Alternative route options for Path 1 were raised by local board members. 

24.     Design and options for Path 1 were investigated and a site visit with representatives of the local board was held.

Options assessment

25.     In September 2020, three route options for Path 1 were presented to the local board at a workshop. The options included locating the path to the east of the car park adjacent to a row of large macrocarpa trees, or to the west around the perimeter of the car park. The options are illustrated below in Figure 2: Route options for Path 1:

Figure 2: Route options for Path 1

26.     An assessment of each option considering opportunities, constraints, risks, and estimated cost was discussed and is summarised below in Table 2:

Table 2: Options assessment for the development of Path 1

Option

Opportunities

Constraints

Capex

Comments

Option A - boardwalk

Direct route linking to existing shared paths to the north and south with good visibility

Protection of tree roots

Structure built above ground

 

Length of path underneath trees requires a significant structure

Three car park crossing points required, increasing risk to path users through vehicle movements

Risk of locating a path under mature trees that naturally shed branches

Most expensive option

$931,347

(preliminary estimate only for design, consenting and construction)

This option is not recommended due to the cost

Option A – raised path over tree roots

Direct route linking to existing shared paths to the north and south with good visibility

Path built up with low timber retaining to reduce impact on tree roots

Least expensive option

 

Movement and cracking of the path surface may occur over time due to the movement of tree roots

Three car park crossing points required increasing risk to path users through vehicle movements

Risk of locating a path under mature trees that naturally shed branches

$678,618

(preliminary estimate only for design, consenting and construction)

This option is recommended as it will provide a direct route, with reduced impact on tree roots, and is more cost effective

Option B – west of car park (in front of frisbee/disk golf tee)

Protection of tree roots by routing the path away from the macrocarpa trees

One car park crossing point reducing the risk to path users through vehicle movements

 

 

Less direct route

Risk that park users will bypass the path and take the more direct route through the car park or on the road

Bridge design and construction required

Crosses in front of frisbee golf tee, but does not impact on play

Cost

$809,391

(preliminary estimate only for design, consenting and construction)

This option is not recommended as it will not provide a direct route that aligns with the ‘desire’ line of park users and the cost is greater

Option C – west of car park (behind frisbee/disk golf tee)

Protection of tree roots by routing the path away from the macrocarpa trees

One car park crossing point reducing the risk to path users through vehicle movements

Crosses behind frisbee golf tee

Less direct route

Risk that park users will bypass the path and take the more direct route through the car park or on the road

Bridge design and construction required

Cost

$813,917

(preliminary estimate only for design, consenting and construction)

This option is not recommended as it will not provide a direct route that aligns with the ‘desire’ line of park users and the cost is greater

Preferred option

27.     The local board indicated a preference at the workshop for ‘Option A – Raised Path’ adjacent to the macrocarpa trees. 

28.     In March 2021, the draft developed design was presented to the local board. Further design considerations were discussed and feedback from iwi shared. The local board indicated the following:

·        support for the removal of a macrocarpa tree to improve the sight lines, safety, and alignment of the path

·        support for the construction of the section of path beneath the macrocarpa trees in asphalt to allow for tree root movement based on a recommendation by the project arborists; the remainder of the path will be concrete.

Engagement

29.     Consultation with Albany United Football, Harbour Hockey, North Harbour Softball, Disc Golf NZ and the Rosedale Park Sports and Cultural Trust was initiated via email in April 2021. A meeting was held with Harbour Hockey on 19 April 2021 who indicated support for the developed design of the path.

30.     Email correspondence in support of the path was also received in April 2021 from Albany United Football, North Harbour Softball and the Rosedale Park Sports and Cultural Trust. There was no response received from Disc Golf NZ. Feedback from groups suggested the need for signage for safety and this will be incorporated into the detailed design.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

32.     It is anticipated there will be an increase in carbon emission from construction, including contractor emissions. Staff will seek to minimise carbon and contractor emissions as far as possible when delivering the project.

33.     Maximising the upcycling and recycling of existing material will be prioritised to ensure minimum impact. Tree material from felled and pruned trees will be recycled with timber retained for future use on other projects, and vegetation mulched for use within parks and reserves.

34.     The developed design has incorporated the use of passive principles and natural infrastructure to provide shade benefits for path users from existing trees. The design proposes the planting of native plant species to mitigate the impact on the environment by increasing plant diversity and minimising stormwater flow to adjacent areas.

35.     Mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions will be achieved through sourcing of low-carbon material options (including sourcing materials locally) and the use of products with environmental declarations for embodied carbon reductions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.     Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services teams (Community Facilities operational management, and Parks, Sports and Recreation) have been consulted and support the development. Staff consider the path will improve the quality of the park and provide an improved greenway network with safer routes through and around the park.

37.     Future maintenance of the route was raised due to potential leaf litter and this has been taken into consideration as part of the design development process. Trees overhanging the path will be pruned of dead-wood and lower hanging branches during construction to reduce potential leaf fall on the path in future.

38.     In 2015, the local board granted landowner approval to Watercare for the construction of the Northern Interceptor. The route passes through Rosedale Park close to the location of the proposed path. These works are under construction and will be finished prior to commencement of the path. There will be no impact on the delivery of the path.

39.     Collaboration with staff will be ongoing to ensure that the development of the path is appropriately integrated into the operational maintenance and asset management systems once completed.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

40.     In June 2019, the Upper Harbour Local Board passed a resolution requesting that the Finance and Performance Committee allocate compensation funding provided by the NZTA to fund three park improvement projects (resolution number UH/2019/67).

41.     In July 2019, the Finance and Performance Committee resolved to update the capital budget for the allocation of $6.044 million of compensation funding provided by the NZTA to fund the projects. The development of walking and cycling trails (greenways) at Rosedale Park was one of the three recommended projects and was supported by the local board (resolution number FIN/2019/77). 

42.     The project will deliver significant improvements to benefit the community through increasing accessibility and safety within the park for both pedestrians and cyclists. Sports groups using the park will also benefit from improved connections and safer links from the car park facilities to sports fields and club facilities.

43.     Several options were initially presented to the local board at a workshop in September 2020, along with assessments of each option including constraints, risks and estimated costs. The local board indicated support for the concept design of ‘Option A – Raised Path’.

44.     The revised developed design, incorporating changes suggested by the project engineer, arborists and local iwi, was presented to the local board at a workshop on 11 March 2021. The local board indicated support for the revised developed design of ‘Option A – Raised Path’ at the workshop and the removal of a macrocarpa tree to improve sight lines, alignment, and visibility.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

45.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2018-2028, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework, and local board plans.

46.     Engagement with mana whenua on this project has been undertaken as part of the consultation process. The design for ‘Option A – Raised Path’ was circulated to the following iwi groups in November 2020:

·        Ngai Tai ki Tamaki

·        Ngati Manuhiri

·        Ngati Maru

·        Ngati Paoa

·        Ngati Tamatera

·        Ngati Te Ata – Te Ara Rangatu o Te Iwi o Ngati Te Ata Waiohua

·        Ngati Whanaunga

·        Ngati Whatua o Kaipara

·        Ngati Whatua Orakei

·        Te Akitai Waiohua

·        Te Kawerau a Maki

·        Te Runanga o Ngati Whatua.

47.     On 30 November 2020, a site visit was organised to discuss the proposed path with four iwi who expressed an interest. Ngati Whatua o Kaipara were the only iwi who attended.

48.     Feedback was received from Ngati Whatua o Kaipara following the site visit. The proposed path design was acceptable and planting was strongly recommended along the edge of the path to mitigate the impact of the new path on the natural environment. Ngati Whatua o Kaipara requested the planting palette should consist of natives only and emphasis should be placed on diversity and resilience of species. Feedback on the plant species will be incorporated into the detailed design.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

49.     The project has been identified as one of three park improvement projects to be funded by compensation funding provided by the NZTA. The funding was paid following compulsorily acquiring approximately 3.8ha of open space in the Upper Harbour Local Board area for motorway improvements (the NCI project).

50.     A total budget of $688,000 has been proposed in the draft Upper Harbour Local Board 2021/2022 Community Facilities work programme for this project in the following financial years:

Budget source

FY21/22

FY22/23

Total ($)

Growth (Northern Corridor Improvement funding)

$70,000

$618,000

$688,000

51.     A high-level indicative cost estimate for the design and construction of ‘Option A – Raised Path’ is $678,618 which is achievable within the current allocated budget for the project.

52.     Funding proposed in the 2021/2022 financial year will enable the detailed design and tendering to be completed, with construction scheduled to commence in the 2022/2023 financial year.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

53.     Risks and mitigation measures are outlined below in Table 3:

Table 3: Risks and mitigations

Risks identified

Mitigation

Consenting

Resource consent

A resource consent for the path is not required. The path design has been developed within permitted guidelines.

Tree Asset Owner Approval

The project has been discussed with the Senior Urban Forest Specialist who has indicated support for the project and the removal of one macrocarpa tree for the alignment of the path.

Health and Safety

The location of the path underneath the tree canopy may result in tree branches falling onto path users

The trees will be pruned prior to the start of construction to remove any unsafe, dead, and diseased wood to reduce the risk of falling branches.

Public are exposed to unsafe conditions during the construction phase

The construction area will be fenced off to avoid the public entering the work site and traffic safety measures will be put in place for the safe use of the car park.

Conflict between the users of the path and public crossing the path to access sports areas and car parks

Signage will be installed to promote the safe use of the path. Raised speed tables and traffic safety measures will be incorporated into the detailed design to reduce any potential conflict.

Budget

Insufficient funding

Cost estimates have been prepared through the concept and developed design phases and have included a contingency allowance for unforeseen circumstances. The budget is currently adequate.

Timeframe

Delay to construction due to funding availability

Funding has been included within the Community Facilities Work Programme for financial years 2021/2022 and 2022/2023. The funding has been allocated from the Northern Corridor Improvement fund.

Construction

Poor weather during construction may delay delivery

Construction will be timed for the spring/summer of 2022/23 when the weather is more favourable.

Damage to trees during the construction works

An arborist will monitor the construction works to ensure that any impact on the trees is minimised.

Disruption to the use of the car park

The construction works will be limited to the areas under the macrocarpa trees and an area of the car park adjacent. Most of the carpark and access to it will remain open to the public.

Reputational

Project deferred or cancelled

There is reputational risk to council if the project is deferred or cancelled. Consultation with park user groups has raised an expectation that the project will be delivered.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

54.     Table 4 below summarises the anticipated next steps and estimated delivery timeframes for the project. The estimated timeframes assume successful and timely completion of each identified project step:

 

Table 4:  Project phasing and timelines

Project phase

Planned completion timeframe

Budget confirmation

Approval of the project funding and concept design

June 2021

Tree Asset Owner Approval application

August 2021

Detailed design

Detailed design will be progressed in 2021/2022.

April 2022

Preparation of tender documentation

Tender documents will be prepared.

June 2022

Procure physical works contractor/build partner

The work will be tendered and awarded in alignment with procurement guidelines.

August 2022

Physical works

Accurate commencement and duration of the physical works is not known at this time and will be confirmed at a later stage. It is envisaged to be between the dates specified.

Events planned for the park will be taken into consideration when finalising the construction period to avoid disruption to user groups.

September 2022 – February 2023

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rosedale Park location

135

b

Rosedale path developed design

137

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Angela Levet – Senior Project Manager Community Facilities

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Adoption of the Upper Harbour Local Board Agreement 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/07324

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the local content for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, which includes the Upper Harbour Local Board Agreement 2021/2022, the message from the chair, and local board advocacy.

2.       To adopt a local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement, as agreed between the Governing Body and the local board, for each local board area.

4.       From 22 February to 22 March 2021, council consulted on the proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031. Local boards considered this feedback and then held discussions with the Finance and Performance Committee on 12 May 2021 on regional issues, community feedback, and key local board initiatives and advocacy areas.

5.       Local boards are now considering local content for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 which includes the local board agreement, the message from the chair, as well as a local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022. Local board advocacy was considered and agreed in May 2021 (UHCF/2021/11).

6.       On 29 June 2021, the Governing Body will meet to adopt Auckland Council’s 10-year Budget 2021-2031, including 21 local board agreements.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      adopt the local content for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, which includes the Upper Harbour Local Board Agreement 2021/22, the message from the chair, and local board advocacy (refer Attachment A to the agenda report).

b)      adopt a local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022 (refer Attachment B to the agenda report).

c)      delegate authority to the chair to make any final changes to the local content for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 (the Upper Harbour Local Board Agreement 2021/2022, message from the chair, and local board advocacy).

d)      note that the resolutions of this meeting will be reported back to the Governing Body when it meets to adopt the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, including each local board agreement, on 29 June 2021.

Horopaki

Context

7.       Each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement between the Governing Body and the local board, for each local board area, outlining local priorities, budgets and intended levels of service. They are informed by the local board plans, which are strategic documents that are developed every three years to set a direction for local boards, by reflecting the priorities and preferences of the communities within the local board area. Local board plans can also provide a basis for local board feedback on regional content in the 10-year Budget.

8.       Throughout the development of the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, local board chairs (or delegated local board representatives) have had the opportunity to attend Finance and Performance Committee workshops on key topics and provide local board views on regional issues being considered as part of the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

9.       From 22 February to 22 March 2021, the council consulted with the public on the 10-year Budget 2021-2031. Two locally held events were held in the Upper Harbour Local Board area to engage with the community and seek feedback on both regional and local proposals.

10.     A report analysing the feedback on local board priorities, as well as feedback from those living in the local board area related to the regional issues, was considered by the local board at its 6 May 2021 business meeting. The local board also considered its advocacy items at this time.

11.     The local board then held discussions with the Finance and Performance Committee at a workshop on 12 May 2021 on regional issues, community feedback and key local board initiatives and advocacy areas. The local board input was also reported to the Finance and Performance Committee on 25 May 2021.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Both staff and the local board have reviewed the local feedback received as part of consultation on the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 and local boards have considered a report analysing the local feedback. It is now recommended that local boards adopt local content for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 including the Local Board Agreement 2021/2022, the message from the chair, and local board advocacy adopted in May 2021, UCF/2021/11, (Attachment A), as well as a local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022 (Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The decisions recommended in this report are procedural in nature and will not have any climate impacts themselves.

14.     Some of the proposed projects in the local board agreement may have climate impacts. The climate impacts of any projects Auckland Council chooses to progress with will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

15.     Some of the proposed projects in the local board agreement may be specifically designed to mitigate climate impact, build resilience to climate impacts, and restore the natural environment.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     Local boards worked with council departments to develop their local board work programmes for 2021/2022 that will be adopted at June 2021 business meetings. The local board work programmes help inform the local board agreements.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     This report seeks local board adoption of its content for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 and other associated material, including the Local Board Agreement 2021/2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the 10-year budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate council’s responsiveness to Māori. 

19.     Local board plans, which were developed in 2020 through engagement with the community including Māori, form the basis of local priorities. There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi and, where relevant, the wider Māori community.

20.     Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The local board agreement includes the allocation of locally driven initiatives (LDI) funding and asset-based services (ABS) funding to projects and services for the 2021/2022 financial year.

22.     LDI funding is discretionary funding allocated to local boards based on the Local Board Funding Policy (included in the 10-year budget), which local boards can spend on priorities for their communities. Local boards can also utilise LDI funding to increase local levels of service if they wish to do so.

23.     Funding for asset-based services (ABS) is allocated by the Governing Body to local boards based on current levels of service to run and maintain local assets and services including parks, pools and recreation facilities, community facilities, and libraries.

24.     A local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022 is adopted alongside the Local Board Agreement 2021/2022. The fees and charges have been formulated based on region-wide baseline service levels and revenue targets.

25.     Where fees and charges are amended by a local board that results in lower revenue for the council, the shortfall will need to be made up by either allocating LDI funds or reducing expenditure on other services to balance overall budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     Decisions on the local content of the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, including the Local Board Agreement 2021/2022 and a local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022, are required by 17 June 2021 to ensure the Governing Body can adopt the final 10-year Budget 2021-2031, including each local board agreement, at its 29 June 2021 meeting.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     The resolutions of this meeting will be reported to the Governing Body on 29 June 2021 when it meets to adopt the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, which will include the 21 local board agreements.

28.     It is possible that minor changes may need to be made to the attachments before the 10‑year Budget 2021-2031 is adopted, such as correction of any errors identified and minor wording changes. Staff therefore recommend that the local board delegates authority to the chair to make any final changes if necessary.

29.     Local board agreements set the priorities and budget envelopes for each financial year. Work programmes then detail the activities that will be delivered within those budget envelopes. Work programmes will be adopted by the local board under other items on this agenda.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2021/2022 draft Upper Harbour Local Board Agreement

145

b

2021/2022 Upper Harbour Local Board fees and charges schedules

159

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Francis Martin – Advisor Plans and Programmes

Rita Bento-Allpress - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Feedback on Equity of Service Levels and Funding Proposals - Draft Report

File No.: CP2021/08005

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide local board feedback to the Joint Governance Working Party on the funding and decision-making proposals set out in the Equity of Service Levels and Funding - Draft Report.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The local board has received and discussed the Equity of Service Levels and Funding - Draft Report at its April/May 2021 workshop.

3.       The draft report (refer Attachment A) sets out the draft recommendations from the Joint Governance Working Party in relation to:

·        improving the equity of funding allocation across local boards

·        increasing the decision-making responsibility of local boards

·        establishing minimum service levels

·        implications of multi-board services.

4.       The Joint Governance Working Party seeks local board feedback on these proposals to consider in the preparation of a final set of proposals to be reported to the Governing Body.

5.       The local board has the opportunity to provide feedback on these proposals using the template provided at Attachment B.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      provide feedback using the attached template (Attachment B) to the Joint Governance Working Party on the funding and decision-making proposals set out in the Equity of Service Levels and Funding Proposals – Draft Report.

Horopaki

Context

6.       In October and November 2020 workshops, local boards considered and provided input on the Equity of Service Levels and Funding discussion paper which, in respect of local community services, presented options to:

·        increase local board decision-making responsibility

·        increase equity of funding allocation between local boards

·        establish minimum service levels where required

·        address funding of multi-board services and decision-making on their service levels.

7.       The Joint Governance Working Party considered this local board input and provided direction to staff in the preparation of the funding and decision-making proposals of the Equity of Service Levels and Funding Draft Report (refer Attachment A).

8.       Staff presented the draft report to local boards in workshops between 6 April and 6 May 2021.

9.       The purpose of this report is to enable the local board to provide formal feedback on the draft recommendations which propose:

·        changes to local board decision-making responsibilities over local community services

·        implementation of an equity-based funding allocation approach for local community services.

10.     These matters will be reported to the Joint Governance Working Party and then to the Governing Body later this year. If adopted, public consultation would be undertaken with the aim of implementing decisions progressively between 2022 and 2024.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     These proposals (refer Attachment A) are significant changes. If adopted by the Governing Body, these recommendations would:

·        increase local board decision-making responsibilities over community services

·        change the allocation of asset-based services (ABS) funding to local boards

·        require collaboration between local boards on some multi-board service decisions

·        have a high community interest

·        not affect existing local board responsibility for local discretionary initiatives (LDI) service decisions or the current LDI funding approach.

12.     Feedback on these proposals is sought from the local board to assist the Joint Governance Working Party in providing direction to staff and the Governing Body on progressing these proposals.

13.     The working party’s final report to the Governing Body will also update illustrative funding outcomes with asset values and ABS budgets updated and adopted under the Long-term Plan 2021-2031. Funding outcomes remain illustrative until funding model and financial inputs are adopted, planned for Long-term Plan 2024-34.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     Providing feedback on the draft report does not have a direct impact on climate change.

15.     Changes made to local community services as a result of the proposed policy may have a climate impact and will be assessed on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     If adopted, the proposed policy will impact on several divisions of the council, including Customer and Community Services, Finance and Governance. Staff from these divisions have been involved in the development of these proposals.

17.     Staff from these divisions will also be significantly involved in the implementation of Governing Body decisions on the proposals. A critical implementation workstream will ensure staff have the capacity and the knowledge required to enable sound advice to be provided to local boards under these proposals.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     Over time, these proposals have the potential to fundamentally change local community service delivery depending on the extent to which local boards and their communities make changes.

19.     Local boards have discussed policy options in workshops in October and November 2020 and considered the proposed policy in workshops in April and May 2021. Local boards can also provide their input and views through their representatives on the Joint Governance Working Party.

20.     This report provides the opportunity for local boards to provide their formal feedback on the draft report proposals.

21.     More detailed discussion of the local implications of the policy proposal is included in the draft report provided as Attachment A.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     As part of increased decision-making for asset-based services and under local government legislation, local boards must demonstrate how Māori are involved and how their needs are reflected in these decisions. This means that in making service decisions, local boards should be able to:

·        demonstrate effective Māori involvement in the local board planning processes

·        clearly articulate Māori priorities in local board funding and delivery of asset-based services.

23.     It is likely that these changes will result in more responsive services for Māori communities at the local level.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     Introduction of the proposed policy would have several significant financial impacts, including:

·        changes to local board funding allocations that may result in funding increases for some local boards and funding decreases for others

·        broader local board decision-making responsibilities that will require greater flexibility in how local boards allocate their funding to service delivery

·        local board decisions which would include service impacts on assets, such as investment, enhancement, renewal, optimisation and removal from service.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     Development of the proposed policy involved several workshops with each local board. Several local boards requested additional workshops on the proposals as their implications became better understood.

26.     A range of risks associated with approval and implementation of these proposals were discussed during workshops and considered in the development of these proposals, including:

·        whether there will be sufficient understanding of the proposals and support for their benefits to enable them to be adopted

·        what alternative approaches might address the issues these proposals seek to address should they not proceed

·        developing alternative funding equity transition options, including implications on local board funding and overall timing

·        developing options to respond to concerns of local boards which might be adversely affected by equity funding proposals

·        addressing local board concerns for the perceived downside of greater decision-making responsibility if the level of decision support does not increase

·        ensuring the organisation is structured, resourced and adequately supported to provide the quality service advice needed by local boards to make well-informed decisions.

27.     Plans are either in place or currently being developed to address these risks. The proposed two-stage implementation timeline (see ‘Next steps’ below) is designed to progressively grow the council capability, develop robust processes, and ensure effective and transparent management of necessary changes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     Staff will report local board feedback to the Joint Governance Working Party which will consider this feedback, along with further staff advice, and provide its recommendations to the Governing Body later this year.

29.     The Governing Body would undertake public consultation on its draft decisions as follows:

·        under the Annual Plan 2022/2023, in the case of changes to the Allocation of Decision-making Responsibilities Policy

·        under the Long-term Plan 2024-2034, in the case of changes to the Local Board Funding Policy.

30.     Proposals adopted by the Governing Body would be progressively implemented from 2022 to 2024.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Equity of Service Levels and Funding - Draft Report

167

b

Governance Framework Review - Service levels and funding feedback template

207

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gary Pemberton - Programme Change Lead

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Service Strategy and Integration

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Delegation of feedback to be provided to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project

File No.: CP2021/07826

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To formally delegate one local board member to provide feedback to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An Establishment Unit is being set up by the Cabinet to provide the public face of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project, undertake stakeholder and community engagement, and take forward work to resolve key outstanding questions in relation to project scope and delivery. A key output of the unit will be to develop a business case over approximately six months which looks at the available options.

3.       The work of the Establishment Unit will be guided by an inclusive governance structure made up of representatives of central and local government, Treaty partners and an independent chairperson.

4.       Minister of Transport Hon Michael Wood wrote to local board members in May 2021 inviting local board members to select a single representative to be appointed to the Establishment Unit Board. At the May 2021 Chairs’ Forum, Margi Watson was selected for this role.

5.       The Establishment Unit now has until early September 2021 to gather the views of local boards, ward councillors, and the public.

6.       Staff are requesting that local boards delegate a member to provide feedback on behalf of the local board, to ensure that feedback can be provided in a short timeframe after public feedback has been collated and provided to the local board.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      delegate one local board member to provide feedback on behalf of the local board to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       In March 2021, the Cabinet met to agree how to progress the next steps for the City Centre to Māngere light rail project (CC2M).

8.       To give effect to this, the Cabinet has directed that an Establishment Unit be set up to provide the public face of the project, undertake stakeholder and community engagement, and take forward work to resolve key outstanding questions in relation to project scope and delivery entity.

9.       The Establishment Unit Board will be chaired by an independent chair appointed by the Minister of Transport and the Minister of Finance. Membership will comprise:

·        a single representative (the chief executive or a senior delegate) from Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, Waka Kotahi, Kāinga Ora and the Ministry of Transport

·        a representative from mana whenua

·        a representative of Auckland Council’s local boards (Margi Watson)

·        a representative of Auckland Council’s Governing Body (Chris Darby)

·        Te Waihanga (the New Zealand Infrastructure Commission) and Treasury will support the work of the Establishment Unit Board as observers.

10.     A key output of the unit will be to develop a business case over approximately six months which looks at the available options. This will enable quality decisions on key matters based on evidence, such as mode, route alignment and delivery.

11.     The Mayor and Deputy Mayor have been invited to join Minister of Transport Hon Michael Wood and Minister of Finance Hon Grant Robertson as sponsors of this project. This sponsors group will play an important function in ensuring political alignment on the project between central and local government and setting strategic direction.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The Auckland Light Rail team will be engaging with local boards first so that local board members are clear about the scope and programme of engagement.

13.     This will take place as follows:

·        11 June: briefing the six local boards that are within the planned corridor for light rail - Waitematā, Albert-Eden, Puketāpapa, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki, Māngere-Ōtāhuhu and Ōtara-Papatoetoe

·        14 June: presentation to Chairs’ Forum

·        30 June: inviting local board chairs or their delegate to attend a Planning Committee briefing

·        Further briefings will be organised to take place after the public consultation period in July/ August 2021.

14.     Staff will focus on providing local board members with an understanding of the approach being taken by the Establishment Unit and key constraints, so that local board members can respond to any queries they received and champion the engagement process within their community.

15.     Throughout the engagement period, the Establishment Unit will be seeking broad views, key themes (could be geographically based) and feedback on the outcomes the project is set to achieve. This will mirror the public engagement process that will also focus on outcomes and community experience.

16.     In order to ensure that there is adequate time for local boards to review public feedback ahead of providing local board feedback, staff are recommending that local boards delegate a member to provide the local board’s feedback

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     Delegating to one local board member the authority to provide feedback to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project does not have any quantifiable climate impacts.

18.     The Establishment Unit Board will have an opportunity to consider climate impacts as part of making recommendations on the project.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The Mayor and Deputy Mayor have been invited to join the Minister of Transport Hon Michael Wood and Minister of Finance Hon Grant Robertson as sponsors of the project.  The project sponsors will set the strategic direction for the project, including the project scope and engagement plans, and maintain political cooperation between central government and Auckland Council with regards to the project.

20.     The Governing Body representative and the local board representative will be joined by the Chief Executive as the representatives of Auckland Council on the Establishment Unit Board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     This delegation will provide the opportunity for all local boards to provide formal feedback to the Establishment Unit Board within the given timeframe of this first stage of work.

22.     Margi Watson, as the local board representative on the Establishment Unit Board, will develop good lines of communication with other local board members. Having a local board representative on the Establishment Unit Board is not a proxy for local board engagement on this project and does not replace the need to obtain feedback from local boards.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     The work of the Establishment Unit will be guided by an inclusive governance structure made up of representatives of central and local government, Treaty Partners and an independent chairperson.

24.     A key function of the Establishment Unit will be to undertake high quality engagement with communities, stakeholders, mana whenua and mataawaka. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     Delegating to one local board member the authority to provide feedback to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project does not have any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     No risks have been identified for delegating to one local board member the authority to provide feedback to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project.

27.     The risks of not appointing a delegate may be that formal feedback is not able to be provided by the local board within the relevant timeframe or may need to be provided via the urgent decision mechanism.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     Staff will work with the Establishment Unit to make arrangements for local board briefings ahead of public consultation.

29.     Public consultation will take place in July and August 2021.

30.     Further briefings to provide analysis of the public feedback received will be provided towards the end of August 2021.

31.     Delegated local board members will provide feedback on behalf of their local board by 2 September 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead – Senior Policy Advisor Local Board Services

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Upper Harbour Quick Response round three 2020/2021 grant allocations

File No.: CP2021/07154

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide information on applications to the Upper Harbour Quick Response round three 2020/2021 to enable a decision to fund, part-fund or decline each application.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in the Upper Harbour Quick Response Grants round three 2020/2021 (refer Attachment B).

3.       The Upper Harbour Local Board adopted the Upper Harbour Local Board Community Grants Programme 2020/2021 on 21 May 2020 (refer Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $237,383 for the 2020/2021 financial year. A total of $212,611.83 has been allocated to the Upper Harbour Local Board Quick Response Grants round one, Local Grants round one, Quick Response Grants round two and Local Grants round two 2020/2021. This leaves a total of $24,771.17 to be allocated to the remaining quick response grant round.

5.       Fifteen applications were received for the Upper Harbour Quick Response Grants round three 2020/2021 requesting a total of $46,023.38.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received in the 2020/2021 Upper Harbour Quick Response Round Three as follows:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR2117-310

East Coast Bays' and Districts Cricket Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards indoor net hire for Massey University and Westlake Boys' High School

$3570

Eligible

QR2117-301

East Coast Bays Hockey Club

Sport and recreation

Towards subscription and administration costs to support the club’s operations

$5000

Eligible

QR2117-307

Hobsonville Hall Society Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards hall insurance fees for the Hobsonville Hall

$3000

Eligible

QR2117-317

The Operating Theatre Trust

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire and lead tutor costs for the ‘Extraordinarily Creative’ drama classes at Meadowood Community Centre from 26 July to 17 December 2021

$3374

Eligible

QR2117-305

North Shore City Baseball Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards hire of the indoor sport facility space at Rangitoto College to facilitate the head coach role for the duration of the programme from 27 June 2021 to 12 September 2021

$2640

Eligible

QR2117-313

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the programme resources, counselling and clinical supervision for vulnerable youth in the Upper Harbour area

$5000

Eligible

QR2117-306

Japan Kauri Education Trust

Community

Towards operational costs for the workshops teaching origami in English, held on 1, 15, and 29 August 2021

$1764.88

Eligible

QR2117-308

Kay Mathewson
(under the umbrella of Kaipatiki Project incorporated)

Environment

Towards funding for 26 boxes, including courier costs for the battery recycling and education programme

$1705.50

Eligible

QR2117-303

Big Buddy Mentoring Trust

Community

Towards the purchase of a computer for the north Auckland mentor manager to recruit volunteers

$5000

Eligible

QR2117-302

Herald Island Community Wharf Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards the Herald Island wharf insurance fees and council’s annual functions, powers and duties charge

$1249

Eligible

QR2117-309

Soha Mansour

Arts and culture

Towards art workshop costs including materials, refreshments, venue hire, advertising, petrol and wages

$1000

Eligible

QR2117-311

Albany Senior High School

Arts and culture

Towards ‘Tumanako 2021’ including children's artwork for T‑shirts, a banner and velcro dots for the Albany Senior High School

$2630

Eligible

QR2117-315

Badminton New Zealand Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire and shuttlecocks for the Badminton New Zealand Junior Secondary School event at Badminton North Harbour

$4090

Eligible

QR2117-316

Arogya Mantra

Events

Towards performances, rehearsals, decorations, marketing, photography and videography, donations and henna artist fees for the Whangaparaoa Diwali event

$5000

Eligible

QR2117-318

Richard Raj

Environment

Towards plants and labour for the Oakford Gardens native bush restoration

$1000

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$46,023.38

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·        any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Upper Harbour Local Board adopted the Upper Harbour Local Board Community Grants Programme 2020/2021 on 21 May 2020 (refer Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

10.     The community grants programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The aim of the local board grants programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include:

·        local food production and food waste reduction

·        increasing access to single occupancy transport options

·        home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation

·        local tree planting and stream-side revegetation

·        educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

14.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore, their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Upper Harbour Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with the priorities identified in its local board grants programme.

16.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states:

We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time.

17.     A summary of each application received through the Upper Harbour Quick Response Grants round three (Attachment B) is provided.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2018‑2028 and local board agreements.

20.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $237,383 for the 2020/2021 financial year. A total of $212,611.83 has been allocated to the Upper Harbour Local Board Quick Response Grants round one, Local Grants round one, Quick Response Grants round two and Local Grants round two 2020/2021. This leaves a total of $24,771.17 to be allocated to the remaining quick response grant round.

21.     Fifteen applications were received for Quick Response Grants round three 2020/2021 requesting a total of $46,023.38.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

22.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

23.     Following the Upper Harbour Local Board allocation of funding for the Upper Harbour Quick Response Grants round three 2020/2021, grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board Grants Programme 2020/2021

223

b

Upper Harbour Quick Response Grants round three 2020/2021 grant applications

227

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ruchita Patel - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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17 June 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Governance forward work calendar - July to December 2021

File No.: CP2021/06344

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Upper Harbour Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·     ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·     clarifying what advice is expected and when

·     clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the Upper Harbour Local Board governance forward work calendar for the period July to December 2021, as set out in Attachment A to this agenda report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work calendar - July to December 2021

293

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Cindy Lynch - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Record of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 13 May and 3 June 2021

File No.: CP2021/06345

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Upper Harbour Local Board workshops were held on Thursday, 13 May and 3 June 2021. Copies of the workshop records are attached (refer to Attachments A and B).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the records of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 13 May and 3 June 2021 (refer to Attachments A and B to the agenda report).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 13 May 2021

297

b

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 3 June 2021

299

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Cindy Lynch - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

Board members' reports - June 2021

File No.: CP2021/06346

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for members to update the Upper Harbour Local Board on projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

[Note: This is an information item and if the board wishes any action to be taken under this item, a written report must be provided for inclusion on the agenda.]

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal and written board members’ reports.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Cindy Lynch - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 7.1      Attachment a    Save the Wasp Hangar - Change.org petition part I Page 305

Item 7.1      Attachment b    Save the Wasp Hangar - Change.org petition part II Page 317

Item 8.1      Attachment a    North West Toy Library presentation            Page 431


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 June 2021

 

 

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