I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitematā Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 15 June 2021

1.00pm

Waitematā Local Board Office
Ground Floor
52 Swanson Street
Auckland

 

Waitematā Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chair

Richard Northey, (ONZM)

 

Deputy Chair

Alexandra Bonham

 

Members

Adriana Avendano Christie

 

 

Graeme Gunthorp

 

 

Kerrin Leoni

 

 

Julie Sandilands

 

 

Sarah Trotman, (ONZM)

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Priscila Firmo

Democracy Advisor

 

9 June 2021

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 353 9654

Email: Priscila.firmo@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Nicholas Albrecht - chair Victoria Park Sports and Cultural Trust 5

8.2     Deputation - Gael Baldock                                                                                  6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

9.1     Public Forum                                                                                                        6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Ward Councillor's report                                                                                               9

12        Waitematā Local Board Quick Response Round Two 2020/2021 grant allocations                                                                                                                                       33

13        Titoki Street, Parnell - Section 1 SO 62979 disposal recommendation                 41

14        New Community Lease at 192 Parnell Road to Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust 47

15        Approval of the 2021/2022 Waitematā Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme                                                                                          55

16        Approval of the Waitematā Local Board External Partnerships - Business Associations work programme 2021/2022                                                              125

17        Approval of the 2021/2022 Waitematā Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme                                                                                       131

18        Approval of the Waitematā Local Board Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2021/2022                                                                                               149

19        Approval of the Waitematā Local Board Auckland Unlimited work programme 2021/2022                                                                                                                    155

20        Adoption of the Waitematā Local Board Agreement 2021/2022                          163

21        Eke Panuku Development Auckland - Waitematā Local Board Six-Monthly Report to 31 March 2021                                                                                                            171

22        Delegation of feedback to be provided to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project                                                                         183

23        Feedback on Equity of Service Levels and Funding Proposals - Draft Report  187

24        Feedback on Hīkina te Kohupara – Kia mauri ora ai te iwi. Transport Emissions: Pathways to Net Zero by 2050 discussion document                                           239

25        Feedback on Te Waihanga New Zealand Infrastructure Commission's consultation document He Tūāpapa ki te Ora, Infrastructure for a Better Future, Aotearoa New Zealand Infrastructure Strategy                                                                               241

26        Auckland Unlimited Quarter 3 Performance Report                                              245

27        Urgent Decision - Waitematā Local Board feedback on the draft Auckland Fire Plan 2021 – 2024                                                                                                                 261

28        Urgent decision Waitematā Local Board feedback on the George Street mixed use development, COVID-19 Recovery (Fast-Track Consenting) Act 2020               269

29        Chairperson's report                                                                                                 279

30        Board member reports                                                                                              299

31        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      339

32        Waitematā Local Board workshop records                                                            343

33        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 18 May 2021, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waitematā Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Nicholas Albrecht - chair Victoria Park Sports and Cultural Trust

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.    Nicholas Albrecht will address the local board with an update on the Victoria Park Sports & Cultural Trust and its members (including the Grafton United Cricket Club) and highlight concerns on the proposed carpark and shared path upgrade project. 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Nicholas Albrecht, chair Victoria Park Sports and Cultural Trust.

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Gael Baldock

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

Gael Baldock to speak to the Waitematā Local Board about a planting plan as part of the Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai Ōrea - pine tree removal and native forest restoration project.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Gael Baldock for her attendance.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for members of the public to address the 18 May 2021 Waitematā Local Board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Section 7.8 of the Waitematā Local Board’s set of Standing Orders provides for a member of the public to address a Waitematā Local Board meeting in its public forum section of the meeting.

3.       Formal approval from the Chair is not required.

Time

4.       A period of up to 30 minutes, or such other time as the local board or any of its committees may determine, will be set aside for a public forum at the commencement of meetings of the local board which are open to the public.

5.       Each speaker during the public forum section of a meeting may speak for three minutes.

6.       Standing orders may be suspended on a vote of not less than 75 per cent of those present to extend the period of public participation or the period any speaker is allowed to speak.

7.       This Standing Order does not apply to inaugural meetings and, where not appropriate, extraordinary meetings or a special consultative procedure.

Subjects of public forum

8.       The public forum is to be confined to those items falling within the scope or functions of that local board or committee. Speakers must not speak about a matter that is under judicial consideration or subject to a quasi-judicial process.

Questions of speakers during public forum

9.       With the permission of the chairperson, members may ask questions of speakers during the period reserved for public forum. Questions by members, if permitted, are to be confined to obtaining information or clarification on matters raised by the speaker.

10.     Members may not debate any matter raised during the public forum session that is not on the agenda for the meeting, or take any action in relation to it, other than through the usual procedures for extraordinary business if the matter is urgent.

11.     The meeting may not make any resolution on issues raised in public forum except to refer the matter to a future meeting, or to another committee, or to the chief executive for investigation.

12.     [Note: s 76 – 81, LGA 2002, regarding decision-making]

Language for speeches

13.     A member of the public may address a meeting in English, Māori or New Zealand Sign Language. However, the person should advise the chairperson of their intention to speak in a language other than English at least two clear working days before the meeting.

14.     Where practical, Auckland Council will arrange for a translator to be present at the meeting. The chairperson may also order the speech and any accompanying documents to be translated and printed in English or Māori or another language.

Chairperson’s discretion

15.     The chairperson may:

·   direct a speaker to a different committee if they consider this more appropriate, given the proposed subject matter

·   prohibit a speaker from speaking if they are offensive, repetitious or vexatious, or otherwise breach these standing orders.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank all public forum speakers for their presentations and attendance at the meeting.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Ward Councillor's report

File No.: CP2021/07998

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the opportunity for Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor Pippa Coom, Ōrākei Ward Councillor Desley Simpson and Albert-Eden Roskill Ward Councillors Christine Fletcher and Cathy Casey to update the local board on regional issues that they have been involved with since the previous local board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Waitematā Local Board’s Standing Orders clauses 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provide provision in the local board meeting for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board, or on any matter the Governing Body member wishes to raise with the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the written report update from the Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor, Pippa Coom.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ward Councillor P Coom report June 2021

11

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Priscila Firmo - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Waitematā Local Board Quick Response Round Two 2020/2021 grant allocations

File No.: CP2021/07136

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Waitematā Local Board Quick Response, Round Two 2020/2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Waitematā Local Board Quick Response, Round Two 2020/2021 (Attachment B).

3.       The Waitematā Local Board adopted the Waitematā Local Grants Programme 2020/2021 on 19 May 2020. The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants submitted to the local board (Attachment A)

4.       The local board set a total community grants budget of $150,003 for the 2020/2021 financial year. The local board allocated $57,800 in Local Grants Round One 2020/2021 and $16,800 Quick Response Grants Round One.

5.       At the 20 April 2021 business meeting the Waitematā Local Board approved the reallocation of $7,000 for the Franklin Road Christmas Lights event (WTM/2021/66), $5,000 from the Business Growth Accelerator project (WTM/2021/66), and $5,775 from the film permit revenue, to the community grant budget. This leaves a total of $93,178 to be allocated to the local, multiboard and quick response grant rounds.

6.       The local board allocated $66,300.00 for Local Grant Round Two 2020/2021. A total of $26,878.00 remains to be allocated to quick response round two.

7.       Twenty-four applications have been received for Quick Response Round Two 2020/2021, requesting a total of $54,229.08

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a.   agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received for the Waitematā Local Board Quick Response, Round Two 2020/2021, listed in Table One.

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR2120-202

Community Groups Feeding the Homeless

Community

Towards food for the homeless and other people in need every Tuesday from 8 o’clock between 6 July. 2021 to 28 December 2021.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2120-204

Lucie Blazevska

Arts and culture

Towards blank skateboards, and paint and varnish for two workshops on 17 July 2021 and 14 August. 2021.

$986.49

Eligible

QR2120-205

Tupufoou 50+ Knox Parnell

Community

Towards venue hire and material costs for handcrafts and the printing of the weekly minutes for attendees for the Niuean weaving group.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR2120-206

Ghazaleh Golbakhsh

Arts and culture

 Towards venue hire for casting, rehearsals and postproduction operational costs for the “Night Visions” short film.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2120-207

Parnell Community Trust

Community

Towards the facilitator fees and marketing materials for the Sustainable Urban Living workshops from 07 August 2021 to 20 November 2021

$1,001.00

Eligible

QR2120-208

Auckland Seniors Support and Caring Group Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards catering, performance costs and venue hire for the 2021 Chinese Dragon Boat Festival Celebration on 8 June 2021.

$2,000.00

Ineligible as the event has already taken place.

QR2120-210

Lucie Blazevska

Arts and culture

Towards the blank canvases and paint for the art exhibition 'One Love' at Studio One Toi Tu between 19 August 2021 to 16 September 2021.

$488.65

Eligible

QR2120-211

Holding Space Aotearoa Trust

Arts and culture

Towards music recording sessions at Roundhead Studios from 1 July 2021 to 21 December 2021.

$3,105.00

Eligible

QR2120-212

Art Yoga Partnership

under the umbrella of

The Auckland Women's Centre Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards facilitator costs to run a six-week course from 15 February 2022 to 22 March 2022.

$2,476.00

Eligible

QR2120-213

The Basement Theatre Trust

Arts and culture

Towards panelist fees and catering, venue hire, marketing, and technical operator fees.

$2,970.00

Eligible

QR2120-215

Auckland and District Pipe Band Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards hall rent for the band for rehearsals, meetings and storage for equipment and instruments.

$1,226.00

Eligible

QR2120-218

Auckland Horticultural Council

Community

Towards volunteer and participant costs for the spring flower show on 11 September 2021.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2120-219

The Auckland Women's Centre Incorporated

Community

Towards new furniture, including a couch, lamps and a storage cupboard for Te Wāhi Wāhine o Tāmaki Makaurau, Auckland Women's Centre.

$1,366.05

Eligible

QR2120-220

Auckland Indonesian Students' Association (AISA)

Arts and culture

Towards renting sound equipment, audio visual hire, decorations and cutlery for the Auckland University “SEA Festival Week 2021” event on 16 September 2021.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR2120-221

The Operating Theatre Trust

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire for classes for youth theatre at TAPAC from 26 July 2021 to 1 October 2021.

$2,698.69

Eligible

QR2120-222

Social Innovation New Zealand

Community

Towards catering, keynote speaker fees, t-shirts, equipment, sponsored social media posts and outreach costs for the Social Innovation Conference 2021 on 14 August 2021.

$3,339.30

Eligible

QR2120-223

Everybody Eats Charitable Trust

Community

Towards purchasing equipment to continue serving three-course meals to the community for a donation.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2120-224

Auckland Indian Sports Club Incorporated.

Sport and recreation

Towards the annual financial audit fees for the Auckland Indian Sports Club.

$1,425.00

Eligible

QR2120-226

The Yes And Trust

Arts and culture

Towards marketing and advertising costs for short plays for the “Fun Size Festival” from 2 to 18 September 2021.

$2,500.00

Eligible

QR2120-227

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the annual cost for the Youthline Auckland youth worker team and clinical supervision for counsellors to support vulnerable youth.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2120-231

Auckland Youth Orchestra Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards honoraria and expenses for a conductor, manager and assistant manager for the free September symphony concerts: “Glory”

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2120-233

Nightsong

Arts and culture

Towards the purchase of lighting units, controls, rigging, cabling and additional equipment required for the upgrade of the Nightsong's office lighting.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2120-234

New Zealand Blue Light Ventures Incorporated

Community

Towards Rainbows End entry tickets for 110 disadvantaged and at-risk youth and youth participating in leadership roles from primary and intermediate schools in the Waitematā local board area.

$2,774.20

Eligible

QR2120-235

Kalee Jackson

Arts and culture

Towards printing and publication of interviews for a performance culture piece on Karangahape Road from 14 July 2021 to 27 October 2021.

$2,872.70

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$54,229.08

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city

9.       Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme

10.     The local board grants programme sets out:

·     local board priorities

·     lower priorities for funding

·     exclusions

·     grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·     any additional accountability requirements.

 

11.     The Waitematā Local Board adopted their grants programme for 2020/2021 on 19 May 2020 and will operate two quick response and two local grants rounds for this financial year 

12.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement 

14.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way.

15.     Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; decreasing access to single-occupancy transport options, home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

17.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Waitematā Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

19.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states; ‘we will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time’.

20.     A summary of each application received through Waitematā Local Board Quick Response, Round Two 2020/2021 is provided (refer Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements

23.     The local board set a total community grants budget of $150,003 for the 2020/2021 financial year. The local board allocated $57,800 in Local Grants Round One 2020/2021 and $16,800 Quick Response Grants Round One.

24.     At the 20 April 2021 business meeting the Waitematā Local Board approved the reallocation of $7,000 for the Franklin Road Christmas Lights event (WTM/2021/66), $5,000 from the Business Growth Accelerator project (WTM/2021/66), and $5,775 from the film permit revenue, to the community grant budget. This leaves a total of $93,178 to be allocated to the local, multiboard and quick response grant rounds.

25.     The local board allocated $66,300.00 for Local Grant Round Two 2020/2021. A total of $26,878.00 remains to be allocated to quick response round two.

26.     Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified that a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     Following the Waitematā Local Board allocation of funding for Quick Response round two, staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā Grants Programme 2020 2021 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Waitematā Quick Response Round Two 2020/2021 grant applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ruchita Patel - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Titoki Street, Parnell - Section 1 SO 62979 disposal recommendation

File No.: CP2021/01846

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report seeks endorsement from the Waitematā Local Board for Titoki Street, Parnell - Section 1 SO 62979 to be recommended to the Finance and Performance Committee for disposal.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Titoki Street, Parnell - Section 1 SO 62979 is a vacant site with no public access. It was unformed legal road that was stopped by the former Auckland City Council in 1992 for the purposes of a disposal but has remained in council ownership. Following a purchaser enquiry from the adjoining landowner, a council review identified the parcel as suitable for disposal. A rail tunnel runs under the subject parcel and it is subject to an Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) transport designation which applies to the subsoil space only.

3.       Consultation with council and its CCOs (Council Controlled Organisations), iwi authorities and the Waitematā Local Board has now taken place. Feedback received has been supportive of the proposed disposal of the subject parcel.

4.       A resolution approving the disposal of Titoki Street, Parnell - Section 1 SO 62979 is required from the Finance and Performance Committee before the proposed divestment can be progressed. Sales proceeds from disposal of the subject parcel will be allocated towards the asset recycling target contained in Auckland Council’s Emergency Budget and Long-Term Plan 2021-31.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      endorse the proposed disposal of Titoki Street, Parnell - Section 1 SO 62979.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       Asset recycling is an important lever for Auckland Council, providing capital to be invested into the most strategically important activities. The council’s Emergency Budget 2020/2021 includes $244 million to be realised from asset recycling in the 2020/2021 financial year. This is to be comprised of proceeds of sale from surplus council owned property and alternative commercial arrangements.

6.       In accordance with its statement of intent, Eke Panuku is required to undertake an ongoing review of council’s property assets. This includes identifying properties from within council’s portfolio that are no longer required for public work purposes and may be suitable for sale and development.

7.       For all properties that are potentially no longer being required for public work purposes, Eke Panuku engages with council departments and its CCOs through an expression of interest process to establish whether the property must be retained for a strategic purpose or is required for a future funded public work.  Once a property has been internally cleared of any public work requirements, Eke Panuku then consults with local boards, mana whenua and ward councillors. 

8.       The Finance and Performance Committee makes the final decision to approve a property for disposal.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Property information

9.       Titoki Street, Parnell - Section 1 SO 62979 is a vacant 234m2 parcel surrounded on three sides by the adjoining property. It was unformed road vested in the former Auckland City Council. The parcel is fenced off from Domain Drive restricting public access.

10.     In 1992 the former Auckland City Council undertook a road stopping of the subject parcel to facilitate a disposal to the adjacent landowner. However, a sale did not occur and the parcel has remained in council ownership.

11.     Titoki Street, Parnell - Section 1 SO 62979 is not part of the Auckland Domain, nor ever has been. A rail tunnel runs under both the private land and the subject parcel which may restrict future development.

12.     The AUP zoning is Residential - Terrace Housing and Apartment Building zone. The parcel is subject to an AUP designation – Newmarket Branch railway line (6301).

13.     Titoki Street, Parnell - Section 1 SO 62979 has a council rating valuation of $610,000. It is not subject to offer back obligations to the former owner in accordance with section 40 of the Public Works Act 1981.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     The proceeds of sale from the disposal of the subject parcel will be allocated towards the asset recycling target contained in Auckland Council’s Emergency Budget. Asset recycling allows capital to be invested in council’s strategic activities and better allows council to respond to climate impacts through delivery of the Auckland Climate Action Plan.

15.     It is not known at this point what the potential future use of the subject parcel will be and therefore what the potential impacts could be on carbon emissions. A sale of the parcel could lead to land use changes. It is acknowledged that any form of construction and development can increase carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     Council’s Community Investment team confirmed the subject parcel is not required by council to meet open space provision targets or for a recreation purpose. Auckland Transport confirmed there are no known transport projects that would be impacted by a disposal.  Eke Panuku consulted all other relevant council departments and CCOs on the proposed disposal. No substantive feedback was received in response.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Eke Panuku provided the Waitematā Local Board with an information memorandum regarding the subject parcel and attended a local board workshop on 4 May 2021.

18.     In response to queries raised at the workshop, Eke Panuku staff provided advice to the local board confirming no significant trees are located within the subject parcel and reconfirmed earlier advice that any works within the dripline of trees are controlled by regulatory processes separate to a disposal.

 

19.     This report provides the board with an opportunity to formalise its views regarding the subject parcel.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     19 mana whenua iwi authorities were contacted for site-specific feedback on the proposed sale of part of Titoki Street, Parnell - Section 1 SO 62979. This engagement sought to understand if there were any issues of cultural significance with the proposed disposal.  Information regarding the size and configuration of the parcel, and the proposed disposal to the adjoining property owner was provided as part of the engagement undertaken.

21.     Eke Panuku received a notification of cultural significance from Te Runanga o Ngāti Whātua. Eke Panuku has acknowledged the notification and confirmed its interests have been noted on the property file. Eke Panuku further discussed with Te Runanga o Ngāti Whātua on how council can recognise the significance, including recording information council’s Geospatial layers. No further confirmation has been received. Eke Panuku will further discuss the issues raised with Te Runanga o Ngāti Whātua before the property is presented for disposal. In the event the parcel is approved for sale, all iwi entities will be alerted of the decision and council’s intention to sell to the adjacent landowner.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     Capital receipts from the sale of properties not required by Auckland Council contribute to the Emergency and 10-year Budgets by providing the Council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     Titoki Street, Parnell - Section 1 SO 62979 and part of the adjoining privately owned 1 Domain Drive, Parnell are subject to an AUP designation – Newmarket Branch railway line (6301). The purpose of the designation is to develop, operate and maintain railways, railway lines, railway infrastructure, and railway premises as defined in the Railways Act 2005.

24.     The extent of the designation is limited to the subsoil space and is recorded on the certificates of title. Advice received from an AUP planning perspective indicates that this does not appear to restrict future development of the subject parcel at the surface. However, there may be restrictions as to what can be built on the surface from a geotechnical perspective.

25.     If Titoki Street, Parnell - Section 1 SO 62979 is approved for disposal, advice will be provided to the potential purchaser regarding the AUP designation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Subject to receipt of the Waitematā Local Board’s resolution, Titoki Street, Parnell - Section 1 SO 62979 will be presented to the Finance and Performance Committee with a recommendation to divest.

27.     The adjoining landowner is seeking to purchase the subject parcel should it be approved for sale. The terms and conditions of any disposal would be approved under appropriate financial delegation.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Images of Titoki Street, Parnell - Section 1 SO 62979

45

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Anthony Lewis - Senior Advisor, Portfolio Review, Panuku Development Auckland

Authorisers

Letitia Edwards - Head of Strategic Asset Optimisation (Acting)

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

New Community Lease at 192 Parnell Road to Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust

File No.: CP2021/08011

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to grant a new community lease to Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust for the premises at 192 Parnell Road.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Council owns the land and building at 192 Parnell Road. The building has recently been refurbished and provides a spacious internal area, toilets, kitchen area and storage. There is also a small outdoor area. The site is situated in the centre of Parnell Village.

3.       Following the local board’s direction to initiate an Expressions of Interest process for the premises, staff advertised and sought applications including contacting groups on the council interest register. Prospective applicants then had an opportunity to view the premises and complete an application.

4.       After the closing date, staff undertook a review and analysis of the applications. Staff involved in the analysis included the Community Lease Specialist, the Senior Community Lease Advisor, the Senior Local Board Advisor and the board’s Strategic Broker.

5.       Two applications were received.  One was from the current lessee Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust. The other group is Rise and Shine Ministry who may not fully qualify as their primary purpose is religious worship, despite them proposing to provide non-religious services from the premises. Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust is recommended because it is prepared to share the space with other groups and already does so.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      grants a community lease for the building comprising approximately 40m2 and a courtyard of approximately 69m2 to Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust for a term of five years with one right of renewal of five years

b)      concurrently grant a licence to Parnell Business Association Incorporated to use half of the storage space to store items required to activate the adjacent Heard Park.

c)      approve rent of $1 plus GST and subsidised maintenance fee of $250 plus GST per annum to be paid by Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust

d)      request that a community outcomes plan be prepared, for review by the Strategic Broker and approval by the local board chair and deputy chair and this be attached as a schedule to the lease.

e)      note that all other terms and conditions to be in accordance with the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 


 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The premises have been leased to Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust since 1998 to date, where they have been offering play groups for families and babies.

7.       The lease reached final expiry on 30 June 2013 and Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust had been holding over on a month-by-month tenancy since.  Plunket vacated the premises around May 2020 to allow council to undertake renewal and refurbishment works and an expression of interest. The premises have now been refurbished.

8.       Following the local board’s direction to initiate an Expressions of Interest process, staff advertised in January 2021 and conducted viewings of the premises in late January 2021.

9.       Numerous groups inspected the premises and two applicants submitted applications.

10.     An application was received from the current tenant, Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust. The Rise and Shine Ministry was the second applicant. However, given the Ministry’s primary purpose is religious worship, this does not accord with the eligibility criteria prescribed in the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012. It is noted that the group is proposing to provide budgeting and counselling services from the premises.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Property description

11.     The property is legally described as Lot 1 Allotment 73 of Section 1 Suburbs of Auckland, comprising an area of 311 m² (more or less) and contained in Record of Title NA295/228. The land is held in fee simple by the Auckland Council under the Local Government Act 2002.

Assessment of applications received

12.     Applications were assessed in accordance with the criteria stipulated in the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012. This included whether the applicants met the eligibility criteria set out in the guidelines.

13.     The Rise and Shine Ministry has a strong Christian focus offering financial programmes that uses biblical insight and practical tools to eliminate financial stress. Being a religious group, the Ministry is excluded under the guidelines and is not eligible for community occupancy.  The Ministry has proposed to provide non-religious services from the premises such as budgeting and counselling services.

14.     With respect to the broader assessment criteria, applications were assessed according to the services, programmes and activities offered, the extent to which the activities supported the community, the history and sustainability of the applicants, willingness of the community group to share resources and/or space and financial suitability in meeting the obligations under a proposed community lease.

Community Leasing Criteria

15.     The two applicants were measured and scored using a table containing criteria derived from the Expressions of Interest application and the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012. The criteria are shown in the left-hand column in the table below which is a summary of the detailed analysis undertaken by staff.


 

Group name

Plunket

Rise and Shine Ministry

Scores (%)

66%

46%

Activity/ Purpose

Children and whanau services specifically for this site Well-child clinics; playgroups; and parenting education.

Counselling, Educational workshop, Community meeting, Budgeting Free budgeting advice from

trained financial mentors, provide expertise in insolvency and debt and help with creditors and collection agencies.

Group name

Plunket

Rise and Shine Ministry

Catchments served

Plunket is wishing to expand their clinic services from the Jubilee Building to this site and have confirmed the Well-Child clinics will be provided at 192 Parnell Road.

The Rise and Shine Ministry currently operates from Henderson, but they wish to connect with the families they serve from the south, north and eastern parts of the city.

Numbers served

3900 children and their whanau.

135 families locally; approximately 560 nationally; and 1000 internationally, by different branches of the ministry.

Hours of Use per week

28 to 30 hours per week

more than 40 hours per week

Sharing&
Collaboration

References /network within the local community

Plunket is open to sharing with other community groups as their programme timetable allows. Evenings and weekends are free for other community use.

 

Rise and Shine Ministry will not be sharing the premises.

 

 

Eligibility

Both are registered charitable trusts which qualifies them for a community lease.

However, as the Rise and Shine Ministry’s primary purpose is religious worship which does not qualify for a community lease.

Open membership

/users 

Rise and Shine Ministry indicated in their application that they do not have open membership.

 

Plunket does not have members, but rather clients. Clients are also limited to its contract of service provision and the purpose of the organisation- which is looking after children’s health and well-being.

Financial details

Financial stability – accounts, funding and sustainability

Plunket is financially stable, indicated in audited accounts and is affiliated to regional/national bodies providing support. 

Rise and Shine Ministry is not affiliated to a regional/national body. From their support/reference letter, it is ‘supported’, by providing services to other Faith organisations and through donations and charges for services.

 

 


Best fit

Building size, configuration, location

Both groups found that the premises met the needs of the organisation. Both groups have indicated that should they be successful they will install  screens to the interior space to provide privacy for their clients.

 


 

Assessment of the applications/applicants

16.     Plunket scored the highest out of the two applications, as illustrated in the assessment table above. They scored higher because they serve a broader reach, their willingness to share the premises; part of a recognised national organisation focused on health and wellbeing and being more financially stable.

 

17.     The Rise and Shine Ministry are proposing to use the premises for more hours than Plunket. They are proposing to use the premises to provide counselling in general (where spiritual and faith counselling are also available) and general budgeting (there are also programmes about financial freedom and God) for their clients. However, they will not be sharing the premises other than the storage.

 

18.     Whilst Plunket has indicated that its programmes will only utilise approximately 30 hours each week, it will be sharing the space with other community groups to improve the utilisation. During its former occupation, Plunket has made the space available to other community groups and was primarily used by parent, whānau and coffee groups. Ensuring Plunket shares the space with the other groups is vital to achieve the vision of making scarce community building resources available to other community groups. One of the measures in the Community Outcomes Plan will aim to improve utilisation of the building through shared use.

19.     Plunket’s activities align with the following Waitematā Local Board outcomes:

a)           Outcome one: inclusive communities that are vibrant, healthy and connected;

b)           Outcome two: attractive and versatile public places that meet our communities’ needs;

c)           Outcome three:  caring for the environment.

20.     Plunket offers services which promote health and wellbeing for tamariki and whanau. The Well Child clinics are part of a national Ministry of Health programme to meet the demands of communities throughout New Zealand and Plunket has implemented sustainable environmental practices throughout its operations.

21.     The activities of the Rise and Shine Ministry align to outcomes one and two, however to a lesser degree given the limited reach of the organisation.


Other considerations

22.     Staff also considered the cost of access to services provided by each organisation. Plunket's services are free of charge. The Rise and Shine application noted that they offered subsidised counselling to children up to 16; free financial mentorship, but other counselling services would be charged for via donations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     There are no direct impacts to the climate by approving a new lease of the premises. The site is not within a flood prone area and is unlikely to be affected by coastal inundation.

24.     The successful group is required to prepare a community outcomes plan with a specific environmental objective.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     Community Leasing staff has consulted Area Maintenance and Operations, the Parks Specialist and Strategic Broker.

26.     The premises are owned by council and there will be a standard maintenance clause within the Lease.

27.     The Parks Specialist has requested that the part storeroom be made available to The Parnell Business Association to support the activation of the adjacent Heard Park.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     At the local board’s workshop on 27 April 2021, it enquired about Plunket’s provision of its Well-Child Clinic / Tamariki Ora programme from the premises. This is a Ministry of Health programme undertaken by Plunket offering families a series of health assessments and support services offers. Plunket offers this service for free and the Plunket health assessments are completed by a registered Plunket nurse. Plunket has confirmed that they will be providing Well-Child Clinics from the premises.

29.     The local board directed that the Parnell Business Association be granted occupancy for half of the storage area, to support the Heard Park activation.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader statutory obligations to Māori. Support for Māori initiatives and outcomes are detailed in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

31.     Staff discussed the proposed lease at the Central South Mana Whenua Forum on 24 February 2021 and followed up by email on 27 May 2021 requesting written feedback. No submissions were received at the time of reporting.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     Rent is being set at $1 per annum to accord with the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, together with a subsidised maintenance fee of $250 plus GST per annum. On that basis, income from the site remains static at $250 per annum and there are no financial implications for the local board.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     There are no other anticipated risks to the local board in granting a new lease.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Subject to local board approval, staff will prepare the Lease and Community Outcomes Plan for the Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust.

35.     In addition, staff will prepare a licence for use of part of the storage area for The Parnell Business Association.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

192 Parnell Road proposed concept floor plan

53

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tsz Ning Chung - Community Lease Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator



Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Approval of the 2021/2022 Waitematā Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme

File No.: CP2021/07684

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2021/2022 Waitematā Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme and approve in principle the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programmes (Attachment A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the 2021/2022 Waitematā Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme with associated budget for approval, as well as the subsequent two financial years, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programmes for approval in principle.

3.       The local board approves the work programme each financial year. Delivery of the approved work programme will support the local board to achieve the outcomes and aspirations in the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2020.

4.       The work programme details the activities to be delivered by departments within the Customer and Community Services directorate.

5.       The work programme has been developed through a series of workshops between December 2020 and May 2021, where the local board provided feedback to staff on project and activity prioritisation.

6.       The work programme development process takes an integrated approach to scoping activity, involving collaboration between staff from across council and the local board.

7.       Several projects in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programme have been identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme. Approval is sought for the planning and design of these projects to commence during 2021/2022, so that they are ready to be delivered early if approved projects for delivery in 2021/2022 are delayed for any unforeseen reason.   

8.       The work programme includes projects proposed to be funded from regional budgets subject to approval by the relevant Governing Body committee. The local board can provide formal feedback on these regional projects through resolution to this report.

9.       The most significant risk to successful delivery of the 2021/2022 work programme is a change in COVID-19 alert levels that would impact delivery timeframes and budget.

10.     Updates on the progress of the work programme delivery will be provided through the local board’s quarterly performance reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approve the 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme and associated budget and approve, in principle, the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programmes (Attachment A to the agenda report).

b)      approve the Risk Adjusted Programme projects identified in the 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report).

c)      note that funding for the Coastal Renewals, Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development and the Natural Environment Targeted Rate budgets are subject to approval by the relevant Governing Body committee.

d)      provide feedback for consideration by the relevant Governing Body committee on projects funded from the Coastal Renewals, Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development and the Natural Environment Targeted Rate budgets (Attachment D to the agenda report).

Horopaki

Context

11.     Customer and Community Services provide a wide range of services, facilities, open spaces and information that support communities to connect, enjoy and embrace the diversity of our people, places and natural environment. These are tailored to the unique needs of the local community in a place-based approach.

12.     The 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme (included as Attachment A) outlines the local board’s priorities to be delivered within the financial year.

13.     The work programme aligns to council plans, policies and strategies. Each activity in the work programme delivers to a specific objective relating to one or more of the following 2020 Local Board Plan outcomes:

·        Outcome 1 – Māori are empowered, and their identity and culture is visible.

·        Outcome 2 – Connected communities that are inclusive, assessable, and equitable.

·        Outcome 3 – High quality urban development that has accessible, versatile, and sustainable public and private spaces.

·        Outcome 4 – Waitematā is future-focused, green, and resilient to climate change.

14.     Development of the work programme is based on the understanding of:

·        local community needs

·        service and asset availability

·        funding availability

·        the work performed by other parties, including iwi partners, Council Controlled Organisations, community groups and commercial enterprises

·        risks

·        feedback received from the local board at workshops.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     Delivery of the work programme is the realisation of the local board’s aspirations for their community, as identified in the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2020.

16.     The local board has discretion to allocate a portion of their budget to a project or activity that they identify as a priority across the three-year work programme period.

17.     Out of the initiatives signalled in the local board plan, the local board has prioritised the activities to be delivered in the next three years within available budgets.

18.     The work programme provides a three-year view that demonstrates the phasing of programme and project delivery for the following financial years:

·        2021/2022 (to be approved)

·        2022/2023 (to be approved in principle)

·        2023/2024 (to be approved in principle).

19.     The local board can approve the work programme for the first financial year and subsequently, delivery of this activity will commence from 1 July 2021. The local board can approve the following two years in principle only.

20.     This allows the work programme to be presented in a future focused way that shows how the local board plan will be responded to for the entirety of its three-year strategy, without locking down future investment before that activity is properly scoped.

21.     The local board will approve the 2022/2023 work programme in June 2022 and approve the 2023/2024 work programme in June 2023. This will include opportunity to make changes to these work programmes prior to approval, including adding or removing activities and budget allocations, unless funding has already been committed.

22.     However, approval of unique multi-year projects, particularly capital works, in the 2021/2022 work programme will commit the local board to the future funding associated with completing the project in 2022/2023 or 2023/2024.

23.     The work programme includes a continuation of delivery from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or projects, ongoing programmes, new activities and investments, and potential carry-forward items.

24.     Regular updates on the delivery of the programme will be provided to the local board through quarterly performance reports. These updates will identify progress of all projects, highlight risks, and advise if amendments to the budget or delivery timeframes are required.

COVID-19 recovery is a priority for Customer and Community Services

25.     A priority of the work programme is to deliver activities that respond to the impacts of COVID-19 on the following:

·     newly vulnerable communities

·     council financial constraints

·     building community resilience for recovery.

26.     Customer and Community Services is positioned well to deliver services that are key to the economic and social recovery of communities most in need, including by providing:

·     safe and welcoming spaces

·     inclusive events to bring the community back together

·     community supports, including grants

·     stronger connections with other organisations, including Council Controlled Organisations, iwi partners, business associations, community organisations and central government agencies who also serve our communities.

Delivering outcomes for, and with, Māori

27.     Council has important statutory obligations with respect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi – The Treaty of Waitangi. The strategic framework that informs council’s delivery and performance measurement of Māori outcomes is Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau Māori Outcomes Measurement Framework.

28.     Within this strategic framework, Customer and Community Services is responsible for leading activities that deliver against the following outcomes and objectives in Table 1.

Table 1: Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau outcomes and objectives

Mana outcome

Outcome statement

Mahi objective

Kia ora te Marae

Marae are centres of excellence for whānau Māori and have an abundant presence in communities.

Invest in marae to be self-sustaining and thriving hubs for Māori and the wider community.

Kia ora te Whānau

Empowered whānau Māori across Tāmaki Makaurau.

The council group will enable whānau Māori to experience relevant and welcoming public facilities and services. It will support Māori-led services where appropriate.

Kia ora te Reo

Ko te reo Māori te mauri o te mana Māori

The council group supports te reo Māori be seen, heard, spoken and learned throughout Tāmaki Makaurau.

29.     The work programme includes activities that have an objective to deliver moderate to high outcomes for and with Māori in one or more of the following strategic priority areas:

·     Kaitiakitanga

·     Māori business, tourism and employment

·     Māori identity and culture

·     marae development

·     papakāinga and Māori housing

·     realising rangatahi potential

·     te reo Māori

·     whānau and tamariki wellbeing.

30.     Activities in the work programme that aim to achieve high Māori outcomes in one or more of the strategic priority areas are identified in Attachment B.

31.     The Waitematā Local Board work programme includes 11 activities that are identified as delivering moderate to high outcomes for Māori.  

32.     Progress updates on delivery of Māori outcomes will be provided to the local board through quarterly performance reports.

Types of budget

33.     Work programme activities are funded from budget sources dependent on the type of delivery. Some activities within the work programme have budget allocated from two or more sources, including budgets from both local and regional programmes.

34.     Table 2 outlines the different budget types and their purpose that fund the work programme.

Table 2: work programme budget types and purpose

Budget type

Description of budget purpose

Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

A development fund used to advance local operational and capital activities at the discretion of the local board

Asset Based Services (ABS)

Allocated by the Governing Body to deliver local activities based on decisions regarding region-wide service levels, including allocation of funds for local asset-based services

Local renewals

A fund dedicated to the renewal (servicing or replacement) of assets including those in local parks and community facilities

Growth (local parks and sports field development)

Primarily funded through development contributions, a regional fund to improve open spaces, including developing newly acquired land into parks, and existing open space to increase capacity to cater for growing population needs

Coastal

A regional fund for the renewal of Auckland’s significant coastal assets, such as seawalls, wharves and pontoons.

Landslide prevention

A regional fund to proactively develop new assets for the prevention of landslides and major slips throughout the region

Specific purpose funding

Funds received by the council from external sources held for specific local board areas and service agreements including compensation funding from other agencies for land acquisitions required for major projects

One Local Initiative (OLI)

Funds allocated by the Governing Body to a local board priority project in alignment with the Long-term Plan 2018-2028

Long-term Plan discrete

Funds associated with activities specifically named and listed in previous long-term plans, including new libraries, community centres and major sports and community infrastructure

Kauri Dieback Funding

As part of the Natural Environment Targeted Rate (NETR) Fund, this is a regional fund from the Environment and Climate Change Committee used to implement the national kauri dieback programme standards

External funding

Budget from external parties, not yet received and held by Customer and Community Services

Capital projects and budgets

35.     The capital works programmes have been geo-spatially mapped to indicate the location of projects within a local board area.

36.     Attachment C demonstrates the year of the three-year work programme that capital budget is proposed to be allocated to specific projects and indicates the main funding source for each project.

37.     Activity budgets for capital programme delivery are estimates only, as costs are subject to change and to be refined as the activity / project progresses through the design and delivery process. Greater clarity will be determined once activity details are defined with the work programme updated accordingly.

38.     Some projects are unable to be mapped as they reference multiple locations, or the work locations are yet to be determined.

Risk Adjusted Programme

39.     The Risk Adjusted Programme was implemented in 2019 and is designed to mitigate risk so that the total budget is delivered.

40.     Several capex projects in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programme have been identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme as highlighted in Attachment A.

41.     Approval is sought for the commencement of these projects in the 2021/2022 financial year, so that they can replace delays in projects that may not be delivered for unforeseen reasons.

Regionally funded activities included in the local board work programme

42.     There are activities, from the Coastal Renewals, Landslide Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development and the Natural Environment Targeted Rate budgets, which are funded regionally and will be approved by the Governing Body after 30 June 2021.

43.     These activities are included in the work programme because the local board has decision-making responsibility for that activity within the parameters set by the Governing Body, which include project location, scope and budget.

44.     These activities may be conducted by a number of teams, including within the Customer and Community Services and Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorates.

45.     The local board can provide feedback on the activities outlined in Attachment D. This feedback will be presented to the relevant Governing Body committee when they consider regionally funded activities.

Process for changes to the approved work programme

46.     Staff will provide progress updates to and seek approval from the local board if there are any projects that require scope, budget or timing changes throughout the financial year, or if activities need to be cancelled or added to the work programme.

47.     The work programme includes community leases. Straight-forward lease renewals without variations will be processed in accordance with agreed delegations through a written memo. Expired and more complex community leases will be workshopped with the local board and reported to a business meeting.

48.     For a change to the work programme considered to be minor, in that it does not substantially alter the approved work programme, staff will workshop this with the local board and then implement the change. A description of the change will be included in the following round of quarterly reporting.

49.     A change to the work programme that is considered substantial, will be presented to the local board at a business meeting for approval.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

50.     In June 2019, council declared a climate emergency and in response to this, council adopted the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan in July 2020.

51.     Each activity in the work programme is assessed to identify whether it will have a positive, negative, or neutral impact on greenhouse gas emissions and impact on resilience to climate change.

52.     To deliver on climate goals, Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri includes eight priorities for action:

·     natural environment

·     built environment

·     transport

·     economy

·     communities and coast

·     food

·     Te Puāwaitanga ō te Tātai

·     energy and industry.

53.     The work programme indicates which of these priorities each activity responds to.

54.     Attachment E outlines the activities in the work programme identified to have a positive and negative climate change impact.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

55.     The work programme is presented at a directorate level which reflects the integrated approach to developing the activities between the directorate’s departments of:

·     Connected Communities

·     Community Facilities

·     Community and Social Innovation

·     Parks, Sports and Recreation

·     Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships.

56.     The Customer and Community Services work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by representatives from across council departments, directorates and Council Controlled Organisations.  The integrated team developed the proposed work programme with the local board through a series of workshops.

57.     Some of the activities in the work programme are delivered collaboratively between directorates, for example the Kauri Dieback programme.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

58.     Delivery of the work programme is the local board’s implementation of outcomes and objectives in the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2020. 

59.     The feedback received from the local board through a series of workshops from December 2020 to May 2021 has informed the proposed Customer and Community Services work programme in Attachment A.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

60.     Consideration is given to how the provision of services, facilities and open spaces can support the aspirations of Māori, promote community relationships, connect to the natural environment, and foster holistic wellbeing of whānau, hapu and iwi Māori.

61.     In the local board area, 6.1 per cent of the total population identify as Māori.

62.     The work programme includes activities that will have an impact on a service, facility, or location of significance to Māori. In these situations, appropriate and meaningful engagement and consultation will be undertaken, including to meet our obligations under Te Tiriti o Waitangi – Treaty of Waitangi.

63.     Activities identified as delivering a moderate and high level of Māori outcomes are presented as Attachment B.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

64.     The financial implications of the COVID-19 pandemic have resulted in a reduced renewals budget per local board and significantly reduced development budgets for growth.

65.     Each activity line has a budget allocation for delivery in one or more of the financial years (e.g., 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024). Where activity lines show a zero-dollar budget, this reflects implementation costs met through staff salary or other funding sources.

66.     The 2021/2022 activities recommended for local board approval can be accommodated within their draft 2021/2022 budgets.

67.     The budgets allocated to activities in the financial years 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 are indicative only and are subject to change due to any increased costs, inflation or reduction to the overall available annual council budget that may occur.

68.     Table 3 summarises the budget sources for each work programme financial year.


 

Table 3: Waitematā Local Board budget allocation

Local budgets

2021/2022 (approve)

2022/2023 (approve in principle)

2023/2024 (approve in principle)

Opex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

 $1,250,109

 $1,273,109

 $1,306,109

Opex: Asset Based Services (ABS)

 $17,684,357

 $17,684,357

 $17,684,357

Capex: Local Asset Renewals - Budget (ABS)

$11,810,589

$5,918,754

$5,850,114

Capex: Local Asset Renewals - Proposed Allocation (ABS)

$11,810,589

$5,918,754

$5,850,114

Capex: Local Asset Renewals - Unallocated budget (ABS)

$0

$0

$0

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) – Budget

$202,000

$202,000

$202,000

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) - Proposed Allocation

$150,000

$50,000

$50,000

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) - Unallocated budget

$52,000

$152,000

$152,000

Capex: Growth projects Allocation

$0

$0

$0

Capex: Coastal projects Allocation

$0

$0

$0

Capex: Landslide Prevention projects Allocation

$276,149

$245,000

$0

Capex: Specific Purpose Funding - Allocation

$0

$0

$0

Capex: External Funding Allocation

$0

$0

$0

Capex: One Local Initiative

$0

$0

$0

Capex: Long-term Plan discrete

$0

$0

$0

Capex: Natural Environment Targeted Rate

$0

$0

$0

69.     The proposed budgets are based on the anticipated budget allocations from the Long-term Plan 2021-2031.

70.     Any 2020/2021 capex budget unspent on 30 June 2021 will be assessed for carry-forward to the 2021/2022 work programme. Carry forwards will be added to the work programme as separate activity lines.

71.     Where an activity is cancelled or no longer required, the local board can reallocate the budget to an existing work programme activity or create a new activity within that financial year.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

72.     If approval of the Customer and Community Services work programme is not obtained, there is significant risk that the activities within it will be delayed or not delivered.

73.     Table 4 outlines the key risks and mitigations associated with the work programme.

Table 4: risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

Non-delivery, time delays and budget overspend of activities that are managed through the work programme.

Having agreed processes to amend the work programme if activities need to be changed or cancelled.

Utilising the Risk Adjusted Programme to progress those activities identified as ready to proceed under the Risk Adjusted Programme at the beginning of the financial year.

Unknown risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year.

Risks and mitigations for new activity lines are considered during the scoping phase, continually assessed and reported to the local board.

The COVID-19 pandemic could have a negative impact on the progress of the work programme as some activities cannot be delivered if there is an increase in an alert level.

Development of the work programme has included consideration for all activities regarding potential impacts on delivery in the event of alert level changes.

Some activities may be delayed but still deliverable within the agreed timeframes.

Where activities need to be cancelled the local board can reallocate budget to other activities.

74.     The majority of activities in the work programme are ongoing and annually occurring. Risks associated with these activities have been identified in previous years and are managed on an ongoing basis.

75.     Other risks may also exist, including with respect to the health, safety and wellbeing of council staff. Work programmes may also need to be adjusted where these risks exist and cannot be safely mitigated via control measures.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

76.     Delivery of the work programme will start following approval by the local board and continue until 30 June 2022, with progress reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

77.     Regional projects will commence after approval by the Governing Body in July 2021. The local board will receive the first quarter report in November 2021.

78.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for activities, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2021- 2022

67

b

Waitematā Map

109

c

Waitematā - Regional Projects

111

d

Waitematā Climate Impacts

113

e

Waitematā Māori Outcomes

123

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Justine Haves - General Manager Service Strategy and Integration

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Libraries & Information

Gael Surgenor - GM -  Southern Initiative

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Authorisers

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 



Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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15 June 2021

 

 

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15 June 2021

 

 

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15 June 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 



Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Approval of the Waitematā Local Board External Partnerships - Business Associations work programme 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/07179

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Waitematā Local Board External Partnerships - Business Associations work programme 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the board’s External Partnerships – Business Associations work programme and associated budgets for approval for delivery within the 2021/2022 financial year (see Attachment A).

3.       The work programme responds to the following outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2020:

      Outcome 6: Waitemata businesses are sustainable, innovative, and prosperous

      Objective: Create great places that support the local economy

      Objective: Support local and living wage job growth

4.       The board provided feedback to staff on the projects it would like to fund in a series of workshops. The board indicated its support for the following projects, with budgets as listed below:

·   Supporting Grey Lynn Business Association (GLBA) - $20,000. The grant is divided into two parts:

o   $10,000 to be provided to GLBA to continue their capacity building

o   $10,000 to go towards the cost of the pre-BID establishment business survey

5.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $20,000, which can be funded from within the board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2021/2022 financial year.

6.       Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approve the External Partnerships – Business Association work programme 2021/2022 (Attachment A to the agenda report)

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Each year, the local board provides direction on which activities to allocate its annual budget toward, through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops have informed the work programme.

8.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2020. The specific outcome that are reflected in the work programme is:

·    Outcome 6: Waitemata businesses are sustainable, innovative, and prosperous

·    Objective: Create great places that support the local economy

·    Objective: Support local and living wage job growth

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The proposed activities for delivery as part of the board’s External Partnerships – Business Associations work programme 2021/2022 are detailed below. See Attachment A for further detail.

Supporting Grey Lynn Business Association (GLBA) – $20,000

10.     $10,000 for GLBA to continue their capacity building assisting the association to increase their membership base and provide administration support.

11.     The remaining $10,000 to go towards the cost of the pre-BID establishment business survey. The External Partnerships Team (BID Team) will work with GLBA to develop the pre-BID establishment business survey project. The survey project will include identifying the survey area, a business database, the process for conducting the survey (online, face to face etc) and develop the survey questions. A breakdown of the project costs will include the allocation of the $10,000 plus the GLBA contribution (cash, resources or voluntary time etc).

Presenting proposals to the local board

12.     GLBA capacity building - $10,000. Before the end of the first quarter (September 2021), GLBA will present to the local board their detailed proposals on how they propose to utilize the initial $10,000 grant. After local board considerations and feedback has been received, funding agreements will be developed and forwarded to the business association for signing.

13.     Pre-BID establishment business survey project - $10,000. When ready, the BID Team and GLBA will present to the local board an overview of the business survey project and timeline. Progress of the survey project will be reported directly to the local board as required.

14.     The External Partnerships work programme progress will be reported directly to the local board as part of the quarterly local board work programme report produced by Local Board Services.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.     The proposed work programme does not significantly impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards adapting to the impacts of climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

17.     The External Partnerships Team (BID Team) work collaboratively with the other council departments and CCOs who are working with business associations and or in the town centre space.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     The proposed External Partnerships – Business Associations work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from November 2020 to May 2021. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

19.     The activities in the proposed work programme align with the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     Individual business associations may, through operating their BID programme, identify opportunities for niche support or development of any Māori business sector in their business area.

21.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori, then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The proposed External Partnerships – Business Association work programme budget for 2021/2022 is $20,000 of the boards locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2021/2022.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     Table 3 shows the identified significant risks associated with activities in the proposed 2021/2022 work programme.

Table 3: Significant risks and mitigations for activities

Activity name

Risk

Mitigation

Rating after mitigation

Supporting Grey Lynn Business Association - capacity building

Not implementing the planned initiatives.

Quarterly reporting on progress

Low

Supporting Grey Lynn Business Association – pre-BID establishment business survey

Not enough GLBA resources available to complete the survey project.

Quarterly reporting on progress

Medium

 

24.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence on 1 July 2021 and continue until 30 June 2022. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

26.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

External Partnerships: Business Associations Work Programme 2021/2022 - Waitematā Local Board

129

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Siddens - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Approval of the 2021/2022 Waitematā Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme

File No.: CP2021/07051

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2021/2022 Waitematā Local Board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme, and approve in principle the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programmes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the Waitematā Local Board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and associated budgets for approval for the 2021/2022 financial year, and for approval in principle for the subsequent two financial years, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 (see Attachment A).

3.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives identified in the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2020.

4.       The work programme has been developed through a series of workshops between December 2020 and May 2021, where the local board provided feedback to staff on programme and activity prioritisation.

5.       The local board indicated its support for the following activities to be delivered in 2021/2022, with budgets as listed below:

·        climate action activator - $40,000

·        climate action network - $11,000

·        Grey Lynn 2030 Waste Away - $39,000

·        Low Carbon Lifestyles - $30,000

·        Newmarket/Middleton Stream restoration - $6,250

·        Regenerative urban farm and healthy sustainable diet engagement programme - $70,000

·        Te Wai Ōrea lake and wetland restoration - $35,000

·        Urban Ark strategic plan implementation - $30,000

·        Waipapa Stream restoration - $20,000

·        Waipāruru Stream restoration - $13,000

·        Waitītiko/Meola Creek restoration - $21,000.

6.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $315,250, which can be funded from within the board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2021/2022 financial year. Approval in principle is also being sought for activities in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

7.       The indicative programmes and budgets for 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 are subject to change, and will be confirmed on an annual basis through the approval of the respective work programmes.

8.       Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approve its 2021/2022 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and associated budgets, as summarised in the table below (Attachment A to the agenda report):

Activity name

2021/2022 budget for approval

Climate action activator

$40,000

Climate action network

$11,000

Grey Lynn 2030 Waste Away

$39,000

Low Carbon Lifestyles

$30,000

Newmarket/Middleton Stream restoration

$6,250

Regenerative urban farm and healthy sustainable diet engagement

$70,000

Te Wai Ōrea lake and wetland restoration

$35,000

Urban Ark strategic plan implementation

$30,000

Waipapa Stream restoration

$20,000

Waipāruru Stream restoration

$13,000

Waitītiko/Meola Creek restoration

$21,000

Total

$315,250

b)      approve in principle the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programmes (Attachment A to the agenda report)

c)      note that the indicative programmes and budgets for 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 are subject to change, and will be confirmed on an annual basis through the approval of the respective work programmes.

Horopaki

Context

9.       Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops has informed the development of the Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme (Attachment A).

10.     The proposed work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives identified in the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2020. The specific objectives reflected in the work programme are:

·        increase the biodiversity of our land, streams and ocean

·        support Waitematā being a low carbon community

·        increase our urban ngāhere (forest)

·        minimise waste

·        improve our air and water quality and clean our waterways.

11.    The following adopted strategies and plans also guided the development of the work programme:

·        Waitematā Local Board’s ‘Becoming a Low Carbon Community: An Action Plan (2015)

·        Live Lightly Regional Programme

·        Regional Pest Management Plan

·        Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan

·        Urban Ngāhere (forest) Strategy

·        Waste Management and Minimisation Plan.

12.     The development of the work programme has been informed by staff assessments and identification of local environmental priority areas, and feedback received from the local board at workshops.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     The proposed work programme is made up of activities continuing from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or ongoing programmes. It also includes new initiatives supported by the local board. These programmes contribute towards the delivery of the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2020 environmental objectives, as detailed above.

14.     The work programme (Attachment A) provides a three-year view that demonstrates the phasing or continuation of programme delivery over the 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

15.     This report seeks local board approval for budgets and activities in year one of the three-year work programme (2021/2022), and approval in principle for 2022/2023 and 2023/2024.

16.     Approving in principle does not commit the local board to funding in future years, as the budget for years two and three will still need to be approved on an annual basis. However approval in principle will help staff, contractors and community groups to plan activities and resourcing in the longer-term.

17.     Budgets for years two and three are subject to change, as the programmes are further refined or if local board priorities shift.

18.     The proposed activities for delivery as part of the board’s 2021/2022 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme are detailed below, alongside indicative plans and budgets for the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years:

Climate action activator– $40,000

19.     The local board has indicated that it would like to continue to support the climate action activator programme, previously known as the ‘low carbon activator’, in the 2021/2022 financial year. This programme will continue to implement the community climate action  plan that was developed last year. This work will help achieve the local board’s commitment to reduce climate impacts through guiding local action in response to the regional climate emergency.

20.     The activator will:

·        continue to lead the implementation of the climate action work programme across the local board area, and report on implementation progress in alignment to the board’s community climate action plan outcomes 

·        support a range of community-led and local business low carbon activities aligned to the community climate action plan

·        leverage existing community networks and build partnerships, working with the local climate action to align the work programme with community groups and events

·        work with mana whenua and mataawaka to identify and deliver low carbon outcomes for Māori

·        be a dedicated resource to drive implementation of the community climate action plan and guide local actions that respond to the Auckland’s climate emergency declaration

·        create opportunities to amplify local low carbon activities and encourage greater action towards reducing carbon emissions.

21.     This project aims to reduce emissions by enabling implementation of priority actions in the board’s community climate action plan, including reducing energy use, increasing access to active transport, changing purchasing habits and reducing carbon footprints.

22.     When this programme was established in 2020/2021 financial year, the local board provided $40,000 to fund its first year. Staff recommend that the board allocate $40,000 towards this programme in 2021/2022.

23.     Approval in principle is also sought for $40,000 towards this programme in both 2022/2023 and 2023/2024.

Climate action network – $11,000

24.     The board has indicated it would like to continue to support the climate action network programme in the 2021/2022 financial year. The climate action network, previously known as the low carbon network, is a collection of individuals, households, groups and businesses operating within Waitematā Local Board area that promote, support and implement community level low carbon activities.

25.     The network provides an opportunity for networking and collaboration for residents, businesses and practitioners undertaking low carbon activities in or connected to the local board area, as well as a forum for promoting and hosting low carbon events.

26.     This network will continue to be supported by a community climate action broker, who will empower members of the network. A stronger community resilience to climate change will be achieved through building community connections and sharing skills.

27.     The programme will help implement the local climate action plan in collaboration with the local board and neighbouring climate action networks. In particular, the climate action network will help achieve the local board’s commitment to reduce climate impacts through guiding local action in response to the regional climate emergency.

28.     In 2020/2021 the local board provided $11,000 to fund this programme. Staff recommend that the board allocate $11,000 towards this programme in 2021/2022.

29.     Approval in principle is also sought for $11,000 towards this programme in both 2022/2023 and 2023/2024.

Grey Lynn 2030 Waste Away – $39,000

30.     The board has indicated it would like to support a new Grey Lynn 2030 Waste Away programme in the 2021/2022 financial year to help achieve its objective to minimise waste.

31.     Grey Lynn 2030 Waste Away is an action group within the Grey Lynn 2030 Transition Towns Community. The group is comprised of passionate locals that undertake waste minimisation action by promoting food waste reduction and alternatives to plastic.

32.     Funding this programme will support:

·        enabling repair cafés, which helps build a local culture of repair through developing resources and coordinating workshops

·        growing and strengthening The Cup Project – an initiative that educates and supports local cafés, schools and the wider community to reduce single-use cups being sent to landfill

·        developing a network of local waste champions to support their efforts in growing the zero waste movement

·        develop educational zero waste resources in collaboration with local stakeholders

·        help promote Plastic Free July locally and the ‘Trash to Trade’ event that inspires zero waste lifestyle choices.

33.     Staff recommend that the board allocate $39,000 towards this programme in 2021/2022.

34.     Approval in principle is also sought for $34,000 in 2022/2023 and $36,000 in 2023/2024.

Low Carbon Lifestyles – $30,000

35.     The board has indicated it would like to continue to support the Low Carbon Lifestyles programme in the 2021/2022 financial year. The programme will continue to engage in conversation with residents on their doorstep in targeted low-income areas in Waitematā to encourage behavioural changes that will help reduce carbon emissions.

36.     The Low Carbon Lifestyles programme is expanding its climate action advice to include food and transport in addition to home energy advice.

37.     Funding this programme in 2021/2022 will help residents with:

·        improved health and wellbeing through changes in home health and dietary improvements

·        better home performance and more comfortable living conditions

·        savings and reducing carbon emissions through efficiencies such as reducing power bills and food wastage

·        improved health and fitness for residents by exchanging vehicle travel for active and public transport.

38.     In 2020/2021 the local board provided $35,000 to fund this programme. Staff recommend that the board allocate $30,000 towards this programme in 2021/2022.

39.     Approval in principle is also sought for $30,000 in 2022/2023 and $30,000 in 2023/2024.

Newmarket/Middleton Stream restoration – $6,250

40.     The board has indicated it would like to continue to support the Newmarket/Middleton Stream restoration programme in the 2021/2022 financial year.

41.     The work has been jointly funded with Ōrākei Local Board as the stream passes through both local board areas. Ōrākei Local Board has a higher proposed investment of $10,000 for the 2021/2022 financial year as more of the stream is in the Ōrākei Local Board area.

42.     This programme supports a community-led initiative to implement the restoration plan for Newmarket Stream that involves weed control, animal pest control and native planting. This restoration work will continue to improve biodiversity and enhance the waterway by mitigating issues such as contamination, erosion and sedimentation.

43.     In 2020/2021 the Waitematā Local Board provided $8,250 to co-fund this programme, while Ōrākei Local Board contributed $15,000. Staff recommend that the Waitematā Local Board allocate $6,250 towards this programme in 2021/2022.

44.     Approval in principle is also sought for $6,250 towards this programme in both 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 from Waitematā Local Board.

 

 

Regenerative urban farm and healthy sustainable diet engagement programme - $70,000

45.     The board has indicated it would like to continue to support the regenerative urban farm programme in the 2021/2022 financial year. This programme will use the feasibility study and site assessment criteria developed in 2020/2021 to form strategic goals for a regenerative urban farm framework. The framework will provide a detailed plan to implement an urban farm.

46.     Regenerative farming is a system of farming principles and practices that increases biodiversity, enriches soils, improves water quality and enhances the surrounding ecosystem. As such low carbon farming technologies and organic fertilisers can produce food for locals with lower food miles and lower biological emissions that will provide for low carbon diets.

47.     In 2021/2022 the programme will delve deeper into a shortlist of potential sites and assess their land usage criteria. Further analysis of parks, open space plans and public land policies will be conducted to establish this framework.

48.     Relationships with partners and stakeholders and ongoing consultation will inform the plan. This will also involve setting up a working group across a range of council departments. Funding of implementation, guardianship, and ongoing maintenance will be considered in this framework.

49.     This framework will provide a detailed plan that will enable the local board to make informed choices about the implementation of a farm.

50.     In 2020/2021 the local board provided $40,000 to fund this programme. Staff recommend that the board allocate $70,000 towards this programme in 2021/2022.

51.     Approval in principle is also sought for $70,000 towards this programme in both 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 from Waitematā Local Board.

Te Wai Ōrea Lake and Wetland restoration - $35,000

52.     The board has indicated it would like to continue to support the Te Wai Ōrea lake and wetland restoration programme in the 2021/2022 financial year. This restoration programme will continue to improve Te Wai Ōrea lake and wetland. The following activities are planned for 2021/2022:

·        plant maintenance and inspections

·        planting preparation and follow up

·        weed control

·        a community planting day, involving lake edge planting with Conservation Volunteers New Zealand support (2,750 plants)

·        wetland planting trials.

53.     Implementation of the restoration plan will protect this significant waterway with the urban environment from contamination, erosion and sedimentation. The work will also improve lakeside amenity and water quality and provide habitat for native species in the lake.

54.     In 2020/2021 the local board provided $35,000 to fund this programme. Staff recommend that the board allocate $35,000 towards this programme in 2021/2022.

55.     Approval in principle is also sought for $20,000 towards this programme in 2022/2023 and $15,000 in 2023/2024.

Urban Ark strategic plan implementation - $30,000

56.     This programme will continue to expand the work of Urban Ark Manawa Taiao through funding for a coordinator, facilitator costs and resources.

57.     Funding for this project will support community groups to restore native habitat and protect native biodiversity by undertaking pest control and planting native trees and shrubs.

58.     Urban Ark Manawa Taiao is a collaborative community-led initiative that works at a landscape scale, currently working across both Waitematā and Albert-Eden Local Board areas. The group helps to coordinate and support community conservation groups in the central suburbs of Westmere, Point Chevalier, Kingsland, Western Springs, Morningside and Grey Lynn, with a goal of providing habitats where indigenous wildlife can thrive.

59.     The programme has been jointly funded with Albert-Eden Local Board. In 2020/2021 both local boards provided $15,000 each toward this programme. In 2021/2022, Albert-Eden Local Board has a higher proposed investment of $40,000. This increase in funding in part reflects the programme incorporating the Epsom Rock Forest Landowner Assistance Programme which has $10,000 of funding in 2020/2021. Staff recommend that the Waitematā Local Board allocate $30,000 towards this programme in 2021/2022.

60.     Approval in principle is also sought for $40,000 towards this programme in 2022/2023 and $50,000 in 2023/2024.

Waipapa Stream restoration - $20,000

61.     The board has indicated it would like to continue to support the Waipapa Stream restoration programme in the 2021/2022 financial year. This programme will continue pest plant control and replacement native planting along Waipapa Stream. The community will continue to be involved to help with weeding, mulching, planting, water quality testing and pest animal control and monitoring.

62.     This programme is a key initiative to achieve the local board objective ‘improve our air and water quality and clean our waterways’.

63.     Benefits of the project include increasing terrestrial and aquatic biodiversity by creating ecological corridors and restored riparian margins and empowering local communities to advocate for their natural environment.

64.     In 2020/2021 the local board provided $20,000 to fund this programme. Staff recommend that the board allocate $20,000 towards this programme in 2021/2022.

65.     Approval in principle is also sought for $20,000 towards this programme in both 2022/2023 and 2023/2024.

Waipāruru Stream restoration - $13,000

66.     The board has indicated it would like to continue to support the Waipāruru Stream restoration programme in the 2021/2022 financial year. This programme will continue to implement the ecological restoration plan for Waipāruru Stream, which was commissioned by the Waitematā Local Board in 2019.

67.     Pest animal and plant control will be carried out to protect the native flora and fauna present in the riparian margins. The project will continue planting as well as maintenance for previous years’ planting.

68.     The programme will reduce erosion and water contamination and improve biodiversity while providing a green corridor for native species.

69.     In 2020/2021 the local board provided $17,000 to fund the programme. Staff recommend that the board allocate $13,000 towards this programme in 2021/2022.

70.     Approval in principle is also sought for $10,000 towards this programme in both 2022/2023 and 2023/2024.

Waitītiko/Meola Creek restoration - $21,000

71.     Local community groups and schools across the Albert-Eden and Waitematā Local Board areas will continue to be supported in their work to restore the riparian margins of the Waitītiko Awa. The programme will encourage new groups through community events and education, as well as create linkages to local pest control initiatives.

72.     This programme supports a catchment approach to restoring the Waitītiko Stream by empowering community and school groups to undertake water quality monitoring and riparian restoration planting.

73.     This project is jointly funded with Albert-Eden Local Board as the stream passes through both local board areas. Albert-Eden Local Board has a higher proposed investment of $28,000 for the 2021/2022 financial year due to a higher number of restoration sites in the Albert-Eden Local Board area.

74.     In 2020/2021 the local board co-funded $21,000 towards this programme, while Albert-Eden Local Board contributed $28,000. Staff recommend that the Waitematā Local Board allocate $21,000 towards this programme in 2021/2022.

75.     Approval is also sought for $21,000 towards this programme in both 2022/2023 and 2023/2024.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

76.     In June 2019 Auckland Council declared a climate emergency and in response to this the council adopted the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan in July 2020.

77.     Each activity in the work programme is assessed to identify whether it will have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions and contributing towards climate change adaptation.

78.     Table 1 outlines the key activities in the 2021/2022 work programme that have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards climate change adaptation.

Table 1: Climate impact assessment of proposed activities

1.       1.      

Activity name

Risk

Mitigation

Rating after mitigation

Climate action activator

 

These programmes depend on the willingness and availability of key stakeholders to participate in working group meetings and invest their time in helping to develop and implement the local board’s climate action plan.

To ensure there is commitment, the programmes will engage with key stakeholders at the earliest opportunity to enable time for planning and preparation.

Low

Climate action network

Grey Lynn 2030 Waste Away

There is risk in potential lack of uptake from local community.

The risk of lack of commitment from the community is low as the community group has highly respected and skilled local volunteers to carry out the work.

Low

Low carbon lifestyles

Home energy efficiency initiatives are most successful when delivered in colder months as participants are more receptive when power bills are high and houses are cold and damp. This creates a risk for delivering the project in the financial year.

There is the potential for duplication with other healthy homes initiatives.

The project will commence as early as possible in the 2021/2022 financial year.

Recipients of support from previous years' Healthy Rentals projects, the Counties Manukau DHB healthy homes initiative (AWHI) or Kāinga Ora's warm and dry programme would be identified through the doorstep conversation to minimise duplication.

Medium

Newmarket/Middleton Stream restoration

There is risk in potential lack of uptake from local community for these programmes.

79.     There is also a risk of bad weather on the planned community planting days which could reduce public participation.

The potential for lack of community participation is low as the park ranger involved in the programme has built rapport and is well connected to the community.

80.     Contingency plans for bad weather have been included in the project.

81.     Low

Te Wai Ōrea Lake and Wetland restoration

Waipapa Stream restoration programme - Parnell

Waipāruru Stream restoration

Waitītiko (Meola) Stream community restoration project

Regenerative urban farm and healthy sustainable diet engagement programme

This programme is dependent on the results of the feasibility study to determine whether site options in the Waitematā Local Board area are viable and whether they will cater for an urban farm.

To ensure all options are explored, public and private land options will be thoroughly investigated and assessed prior to implementation.

Medium

Urban Ark community conservation coordinator

There is a risk of low community engagement in community conservation.

Urban Ark coordinates multiple established groups in the inner Auckland area, and has been operating since 2016.

Low

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

82.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

83.     In particular, the attached Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme reflects the integrated activities developed by Environmental Services, Healthy Waters and Waste Solutions.

84.     Stream restoration programmes such as Newmarket/Middleton Stream, Te Wai Ōrea lake and wetland restoration, Waipāruru Stream and Waitītiko/Meola Creek restoration will be undertaken on park land and therefore staff will work closely with the Parks, Sports and Recreation and Community Facilities departments.

85.     To build a framework that will involve a range of expertise and consultation across council departments, the regenerative urban farm and healthy sustainable diet engagement programme will establish a cross-council working group. This group will include representatives from the following council departments:

·    Community Empowerment Unit

·    Community Facilities

·    Parks, Sports and Recreation

·    Waste Solutions.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

86.     The projects proposed for inclusion in the board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme will have positive environmental outcomes across the Waitematā Local Board area. Particular focus areas for the 2021/2022 work programme include the city centre, Grey Lynn, Newmarket, Parnell and Westmere.

87.     The projects noted above align with the local board plan outcome ‘Waitematā is future-focused, green and resilient to climate change’. The proposed work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from December 2020 to May 2021. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

88.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori.

89.     The work programme includes activities that aim to deliver outcomes for and with Māori, in alignment with the strategic priority areas outlined in Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau (Auckland Council’s Māori Outcome Framework). Progress on how the activities are achieving these outcomes will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

90.     Staff recognise that environmental management, water quality and land management have integral links with the mauri of the environment and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

91.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

92.     Table 2 outlines the activities in the 2021/2022 work programme that contribute towards the delivery of specific Māori outcomes.

Table 2: Māori impact assessment of proposed activities

Activity name

Māori impact

Climate Change Activator

The activator will work with mana whenua and mataawaka to identify and deliver low carbon outcomes for Māori.

Newmarket/Middleton Stream restoration

This project will help to restore the mauri of the Newmarket Stream by implementing the management plan developed by Te Ngahere. Plants for riparian planting will be sourced from Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei.

Te Wai Ōrea Lake and Wetland restoration

Mana whenua were engaged to develop the Te mahere whakawhanake i te papa rēhia o Te Wai Ōrea Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai Ōrea Park Development Plan. This project was identified in the plan as an opportunity to have a positive impact on water quality. Where possible plants will be eco-sourced from the Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei nursery.

Waipāruru Stream restoration

Mana whenua representatives have provided input into the development of the ecological restoration plan for Waipāruru Stream and a site visit was undertaken with the Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei kaiwhakahaere kaupapa ā iwi (planning manager). Some changes were made to the restoration plan according to feedback from mana whenua. Where possible plants will be eco-sourced from the Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei nursery.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

93.     The proposed environment work programme for 2021/2022 totals to $315,250 of the board’s locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2021/2022.

94.     Budgets for activities in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years are indicative. While local board approval in principle is being sought for these future years through this report, formal approval will be sought on an annual basis, once budgets and programme costs are confirmed.

95.     An overall locally-driven initiatives operational expenditure carry-forward provision for projects to be carried forward from 2020/2021 to 2021/2022 will be approved by the Governing Body as part of the 10-year budget adoption. Work programmes activities to be carried forward from 2020/2021 will be finalised post 30 June 2021. Local boards will receive detail of carry forwards in their first scheduled performance report for 2021/2022.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

96.     If the proposed Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme is not approved before the start of the financial year, there is a risk that activities may be delayed or not delivered within the financial year.

97.     Risks and mitigations for new activity lines were considered during the scoping phase. There may be risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year. These will be continually assessed and reported to the local board.

98.     The COVID-19 pandemic could have a further negative impact on the delivery local board work programmes if the COVID-19 Alert Level changes (New Zealand’s 4-level Alert System specifies measures to be taken against COVID-19 at each level). The deliverability of some activities will decrease if there is an increase to the COVID-19 Alert Level. Drought conditions may also lead to delays in any programmes which involve planting.

99.     Resourcing of the work programme is based on current staff capacity within departments. Therefore, changes to staff capacity may also have an impact on work programme delivery.

100.   Table 3 shows the key risks associated with activities in the proposed 2021/2022 work programme, as well as proposed mitigations.

Table 3: Key risks and mitigations for activities

1.       1.      

Activity name

Risk

Mitigation

Rating after mitigation

Climate action activator

 

These programmes depend on the willingness and availability of key stakeholders to participate in working group meetings and invest their time in helping to develop and implement the local board’s climate action plan.

To ensure there is commitment, the programmes will engage with key stakeholders at the earliest opportunity to enable time for planning and preparation.

Low

Climate action network

Grey Lynn 2030 Waste Away

There is risk in potential lack of uptake from local community.

The risk of lack of commitment from the community is low as the community group has highly respected and skilled local volunteers to carry out the work.

Low

Low carbon lifestyles

Home energy efficiency initiatives are most successful when delivered in colder months as participants are more receptive when power bills are high and houses are cold and damp. This creates a risk for delivering the project in the financial year.

There is the potential for duplication with other healthy homes initiatives.

The project will commence as early as possible in the 2021/2022 financial year.

Recipients of support from previous years' Healthy Rentals projects, the Counties Manukau DHB healthy homes initiative (AWHI) or Kāinga Ora's warm and dry programme would be identified through the doorstep conversation to minimise duplication.

Medium

Newmarket/Middleton Stream restoration

There is risk in potential lack of uptake from local community for these programmes.

101.   There is also a risk of bad weather on the planned community planting days which could reduce public participation.

The potential for lack of community participation is low as the park ranger involved in the programme has built rapport and is well connected to the community.

102.   Contingency plans for bad weather have been included in the project.

103.   Low

Te Wai Ōrea Lake and Wetland restoration

Waipapa Stream restoration programme - Parnell

Waipāruru Stream restoration

Waitītiko (Meola) Stream community restoration project

Regenerative urban farm and healthy sustainable diet engagement programme

This programme is dependent on the results of the feasibility study to determine whether site options in the Waitematā Local Board area are viable and whether they will cater for an urban farm.

To ensure all options are explored, public and private land options will be thoroughly investigated and assessed prior to implementation.

Medium

Urban Ark community conservation coordinator

There is a risk of low community engagement in community conservation.

Urban Ark coordinates multiple established groups in the inner Auckland area, and has been operating since 2016.

Low

104.   Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

105.   Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence once approved and continue until 30 June 2022. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

106.   Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2021/2022 Waitematā Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme

145

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Linh Tra - Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator



Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Approval of the Waitematā Local Board Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/07147

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Waitematā Local Board Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the board’s Auckland Emergency Management work programme and associated budgets for approval for delivery within the 2021/2022 financial year (see Attachment A).

3.       The work programme responds to the following outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2020:

·    Outcome - Connected communities that are inclusive, accessible and equitable.

·    Objective - Empower communities to become more resilient

4.       The board provided feedback to staff on the projects it would like to fund in a series of workshops. The board indicated its support for the following projects, with budgets as listed below:

·          Community emergency resilience programme – $2,000.

·          Business emergency resilience programme - $2,000.

5.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $4,000, which can be funded from within the board’s Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2021/2022 financial year.

6.       Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approve the Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2021/2022 (Attachment A to the agenda report)

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Through a series of workshops each year, the local board provides direction on which activities to allocate its annual budget towards. The local board feedback in these workshops have informed the work programme.

8.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2020. The specific outcomes that are reflected in the work programme are:

·    Connected communities that are inclusive, accessible and equitable.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The proposed activities for delivery as part of the board’s Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2021/2022 are detailed below. See Attachment A for further detail.

Community emergency resilience programme – $2,000   

10.     The Community emergency resilience programme builds upon the initial engagement outcomes that occurred in 2020/2021 with key community led centres and businesses (a three hour business continuity workshop) and schools (preparatory conversations for the Kia Rite, Kia Mau education programme). 

11.     This includes expanding the outreach opportunities for Kia Rite, Kia Mau into libraries and holiday and after-school programmes from 2020/2021, whānau and community resilience building workshop, resources to support other disaster preparedness initiatives as requested by the community, and a business continuity workshop for interested community-led places.

Business emergency resilience programme - $2,000

12.     The Business emergency resilience programme, builds off the learnings from the 2020/2021 pilot, and partner with Waitematā BIDs to provide time-poor small business owners with the information and the motivation they need to develop an emergency plan for their business, undertake business continuity planning and explore opportunities for working together.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     Table 1 outlines the activities in the 2021/2022 work programme that have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards climate change adaptation.

Table 1: Climate impact assessment of proposed activities

Activity name

Climate impact

Community emergency resilience programme

Positive impact on our resilience to climate change, as this work increases community resilience to emergencies and the impacts of climate change.

Business emergency resilience programme

Positive impact on our resilience to climate change, as this work increases the business community’s resilience to emergencies and the impacts of climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     The proposed Auckland Emergency Management work programme has been discussed with the local board in a series of workshops from November 2020 to May 2021. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

16.     The activities in the proposed work programme align with the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     The proposed Auckland Emergency Management work programme budget for 2021/2022 is $4,000 of the boards Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operational budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

19.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

20.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence on 1 July 2021 and continue until 30 June 2022. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

21.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

AEM work programme

153

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bridget Vercoe - Principal Business Resilience

Authorisers

Kate Crawford - General Manager Auckland Emergency Management

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 



Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator



Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Approval of the Waitematā Local Board Auckland Unlimited work programme 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/07526

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Waitematā Local Board Auckland Unlimited (AUL) work programme 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the board’s AUL work programme and associated budgets for approval for delivery within the 2021/2022 financial year (see Attachment A). Attachment B provides further details on the new project proposed. 

3.       The work programme responds to the following outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2020: 

·   Waitematā businesses are sustainable, innovative and prosperous

o Increase prosperity and resiliency of locally owned businesses

o Recover from the impacts of COVID-19 and boost economy

4.       The board provided feedback to staff on the projects it would like to fund in a series of workshops. The board indicated its support for the following projects, with budgets as listed below: 

·   Local Small Business Mentors Programme ($11,000) 

·   Young Enterprise Scheme ($5,000).

5.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $16,000, which can be funded from within the board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2021/2022 financial year.  

6.       Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approve the AUL work programme 2021/2022 (Attachment A to the agenda report).

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward, through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops have informed the work programme. 

8.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2020. The specific outcomes and objectives that are reflected in the work programme are: 

·   Waitematā businesses are sustainable, innovative and prosperous

·   Increase prosperity and resiliency of locally owned businesses

·   Recover from the impacts of COVID-19 and boost economy

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The proposed activities for delivery as part of the board’s AUL work programme 2021/2022 are detailed below. See Attachment A for further detail.  

Local Business Mentors

10.     The Regional Business Partnership Programme (RBP) delivered by Auckland Unlimited has, through the COVID-19 Business Advisory Fund, provided almost $13 million of help to over 5000 businesses across the Auckland region.  The COVID-19 fund has now been exhausted. Many Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs) across the region especially smaller businesses will not now be able to access support via the RBP programme and subsequent research has shown there is still significant demand.

11.     A total of 1738 businesses in Waitematā accessed the RBP over the course of 2020. In the six months July – December 2020, 22 per cent of subscribers to the RBP were from Waitematā an area home to 15.4 per cent of the region’s businesses.  All businesses were eligible under the COVID-19 Response package but that won’t be the case going forward and with average business size in Waitematā of just 4.6 employees many businesses will now become ineligible. 

12.     There are 31,722 businesses in Waitematā.  Waitematā has larger average business size as that seen regionally with 7.0 employees on average compared to 4.5 regionally.  Over 27,000 (85 per cent) of the area’s businesses have 5 employees or less.  These smaller businesses have less access to mainstream government business support and also fewer resources to put towards paying for help to grow their business.  

13.     The Small Business Mentoring service provides up to 12 months of confidential, one-on-one assistance for small business owners who want to grow or need help to solve specific business challenges. Business Mentors have experience and empathy for small business, offering guidance, a sounding board, challenging their thinking, and providing them with an independent and fresh perspective.

14.     Auckland Unlimited (AUL) Business Advisors can make referrals to businesses that contact AUL looking for support for whom the initiative is suited.  Also, AUL is able to promote to businesses e.g. via EDM (Electronic Direct Mail) to Waitematā businesses that we hold on our database of 20,000 businesses.  In addition, AUL will seek to utilise the local board’s own channels to their community.

15.     Business Mentors NZ or AUL Business Advisors will be able to assess whether a business will benefit from the support being made available.  Any recruitment programme would be strengthened by Business Association support in order to reach their membership.

Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days Sponsorship

16.     The Auckland Business Chamber, on behalf of the Young Enterprise Trust, delivers the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) in Auckland. YES is a practical, year-long programme for year 12 and 13 students. 

17.     Fostering youth entrepreneurship is a key requirement for developing an innovative economy and creating employment pathways for our young people. Through the programme, students develop creative ideas into actual businesses, complete with real products and services and real profit and loss. Students learn key work skills and business knowledge including: business fundamentals, planning, interpersonal relations, financial, decision making, reporting, risk management and team work. YES helps create a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship amongst Auckland’s young people.

18.     The funding from the local board will support the delivery of the overall YES program, including the Kick Start days in February 2022 where the Auckland Business Chamber will specifically acknowledge local board support. The Kick start days the first day students get to meet the Young Enterprise team, and find out about their 2022 year, what YES is about, and what is in store for them. All schools in the local board area that have shown an interest in YES are invited. In addition, the invite is extended to those schools who have not shown an interest to enable them to make a decision as to whether to participate.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     The proposed work programme does not significantly impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards adapting to the impacts of climate change. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     The proposed AUL work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from December 2020 to May 2021. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.  

22.     The activities in the proposed work programme align with the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes. Specifically:

·   Support local business networks, business associations and BIDs to strengthen business resilience and economic prosperity.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     Table 1 outlines the activities in the 2021/2022 work programme that contribute towards the delivery of specific Māori outcomes.

Table 1: Māori impact assessment of proposed activities

Activity name

Māori impact

Local Business Mentors

The Local Business Mentors project will ensure Māori businesses identified on our database and that are a part of the Whariki Māori Business Network are made aware of the programme available.  Data on Māori business participation will be collected as part of AUL’s KPI reporting and will be shared with the local board. The current Business Mentors New Zealand Strategic plan identifies aligning the mentoring service with te ao Māori and expanding the pool of Māori mentors through partnerships such as with Te Puni Kōkiri and Poutama Trust as one of its current strategic objectives.

Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days

Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days will support YES Māori students at participating schools to benefit from the experience and learnings from the YES

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

 

24.     The proposed AUL work programme budget for 2021/2022 is $16,000 of the boards locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2021/2022. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     Table 2 shows the identified significant risks associated with activities in the proposed 2021/2022 work programme.

Table 2: Significant risks and mitigations for activities

Activity name

Risk

Mitigation

Rating after mitigation

Local Business Mentors

The programme will not recruit the number of businesses envisaged.

AUL will promote the programme via social media, AUL will also work with local business associations to promote the programme. Business Mentors New Zealand will also refer businesses in where they meet the criteria established for engagement in the local board funded programme.

Medium

Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days

There is a risk that the Kick Start days do not proceed due to changes in the Covid-19 alert levels. As a result, the sponsorship provided to the Auckland Business Chamber may not be required.

To maintain contact with the Auckland Business Chamber on the running of the event to ensure that if the events are cancelled the full impact on the need for the local board support is identified.

Medium

1.          

26.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signaled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence once approved and continue until 30 June 2022. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Unlimited 2021/22 LDI Work Programme

161

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jonathan Sudworth – Local Economic Development Advisor

Authorisers

John Norman – Strategic Planning Manager

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 



Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

PDF Creator



Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Adoption of the Waitematā Local Board Agreement 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/07455

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the local content for the 10-year Budget, which includes the Waitematā Local Board Agreement 2021/22, the message from the chair, and local board advocacy (to be tabled at the meeting).

2.       To adopt a local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement, as agreed between the Governing Body and the local board, for each local board area.

4.       From 22 February to 22 March 2021, council consulted on the proposed 10-year Budget 2021-2031. Local boards considered this feedback and then held discussions with the Finance and Performance Committee on 12 May 2021 on regional issues, community feedback, and key local board initiatives and advocacy areas.

5.       Local boards are now considering local content for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 which includes a local board agreement, a message from the chair, and local board advocacy, as well as a local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022.

6.       On 29 June 2021, the Governing Body will meet to adopt Auckland Council’s 10-year Budget 2021-2031, including 21 local board agreements.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      adopt the local content for the 10-year Budget, which includes the tabled Waitematā Local Board Agreement 2021/22, the message from the chair, and local board advocacy.

b)      adopt a local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022 (Attachment A).

c)      delegate authority to the Chair to make any final changes to the local content for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 (the Waitematā Local Board Agreement 2021/22, message from the chair, and local board advocacy).

d)      note that the resolutions of this meeting will be reported back to the Governing Body when it meets to adopt the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, including each Local Board Agreement, on 29 June 2021.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Local board plans are strategic documents that are developed every three years to set a direction for local boards. Local board plans influence and inform the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 which outlines priorities, budgets and intended levels of service over a 10-year period. For each financial year, Auckland Council must also have a local board agreement, as agreed between the Governing Body and the local board, for each local board area.

8.       Throughout the development of the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, local board chairs (or delegated local board representatives) have had the opportunity to attend Finance and Performance Committee workshops on key topics and provide local board views on regional issues being considered as part of the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

9.       From 22 February to 22 March 2021, the council consulted with the public on the 10-year Budget 2021-2031. Two locally held events and three drop-in sessions were held in the Waitematā Local Board area to engage with the community and seek feedback on both regional and local proposals.

10.     A report analysing the feedback on local board priorities, as well as feedback from those living in the local board area related to the regional issues, was included as an attachment on the 04 May 2021 business meeting agenda.

11.     Local boards considered this feedback, and then held discussions with the Finance and Performance Committee at a workshop on 12 May 2021 on regional issues, community feedback and key local board initiatives and advocacy areas.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Both staff and the local board have reviewed the local feedback received as part of the  consultation on the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 and local boards have received a report analysing the local feedback. It is now recommended that local boards adopt local content for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 (Attachment A), including the Local Board Agreement 2021/2022, the message from the chair, and local board advocacy, as well as a local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The decisions recommended in this report are procedural in nature and will not have any climate impacts themselves.

14.     Some of the proposed project in the Local Board Agreement may have climate impacts. The climate impacts of any projects Auckland Council chooses to progress with will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

15.     Some of the proposed projects in the Local Board Agreement will be specifically designed to mitigate climate impact, build resilience to climate impacts, and restore the natural environment.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     Local boards worked with council departments to develop their local board work programmes for 2021/2022 that will be adopted at June business meetings. The local board work programmes help inform the local board agreements.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     This report seeks local board adoption of its content for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 and other associated material, including the Local Board Agreement 2021/2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the 10-year Budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate council’s responsiveness to Māori. 

19.     Local board plans, which were developed in 2020 through engagement with the community including Māori, form the basis of local priorities. There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and where relevant the wider Māori community.

20.     Of those who submitted to the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 from the Waitematā Local Board area 29 identified as Māori. Seven mana whenua entities made a submission on both the Waitematā Local Board priorities and the 10-year Budget 2021-2031. These submissions were provided to the local board for consideration at local board workshops during the development of their local board agreement.

21.     Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The local board agreement includes the allocation of locally driven initiatives (LDI) funding and asset based services (ABS) funding to projects and services for the 2021/2022 financial year.

23.     LDI funding is discretionary funding allocated to local boards based on the Local Board Funding Policy (included in the 10-year Budget), which local boards can spend on priorities for their communities. Local boards can also utilise LDI funding to increase local levels of service if they wish to do so.

24.     Funding for asset based services (ABS) is allocated by the Governing Body to local boards based on current levels of service to run and maintain local assets and services including parks, pools and recreation facilities, community facilities, and libraries.

25.     A local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022 is adopted alongside of the Local Board Agreement 2021/2022. The fees and charges have been formulated based on region-wide baseline service levels and revenue targets. Where fees and charges are amended by a local board that results in lower revenue for the council, the shortfall will need to be made up by either allocating LDI funds or reducing expenditure on other services to balance overall budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     Decisions on the local content of the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, including the Local Board Agreement 2021/2022 and a local fees and charges schedule for 2021/2022, are required by 17 June 2021 to ensure the Governing Body can adopt the final 10-year Budget 2021-2031, including each Local Board Agreement, at its 29 June 2021 meeting.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     The resolutions of this meeting will be reported to the Governing Body on 29 June 2021 when it meets to adopt the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, including 21 local board agreements.

28.     It is possible that minor changes may need to be made to the attachments before the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 is adopted, such as correction of any errors identified and minor wording changes. Staff therefore recommend that the local board delegates authority to the Chair to make any final changes if necessary.

29.     Local board agreements set the priorities and budget envelopes for each financial year. Work programmes then detail the activities that will be delivered within those budget envelopes. Work programmes will be agreed between local boards and operational departments at business meetings in June 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Fees and Charges schedules

167

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Francis Martin – Advisor Plans & Programmes

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Attachment B – Waitemata Local Board fees and charges schedules 2021/2022

 

Community and Arts Facilities

 

Revenue targets have been set based on following rates and subsidies (discounts):

•     Standard

•     Off peak, 20% off standard**

•     Regular, 20% off standard (10 or more bookings in financial calendar year)

•     LB Priority, 50% off standard

Criteria for the LB priority subsidy is:

§ Activities are contributing to community outcomes, such as those offered by not-for-profit and community groups.

§ Must not be religious ministry related.

 

**Off peak times of the week is 5am to 9.30am, 12pm noon to 6pm Mondays to Fridays; 8pm to 12am midnight Mondays to Thursdays and Sundays. All other times are considered as peak time where the standard rate will apply.

 

Local Board | Category | Name | Description

 FY22 Peak

 FY22 Off-Peak

Waitemata

 

 

Art facility

 

 

Studio One Toi Tū

 

 

Creative space (Room 10)

$106.00

 

Creative workshop 1 (Room 5)

$53.00

 

Creative workshop 2 (Room 6)

$53.00

 

Creative workshop 3 (Room 11)

$53.00

 

Creative workshop 4 (Hopetoun Villa)

$53.00

 

Venues for hire

 

 

Cox's Bay Pavilion

 

 

Clubroom

$17.00

$13.60

Ellen Melville Centre

 

 

Betty Wark Room

$25.50

$20.50

Eleeitino (Paddy) Walker Room

$36.00

$29.00

Elizabeth Yates Room

$25.50

$20.50

Marilyn Waring Room

$25.50

$20.50

Pioneer Women's Hall

$73.00

$58.50

Freemans Bay Community Hall

 

 

Auditorium

$73.00

$58.50

Function Room

$46.50

$37.50

Long Room

$36.00

$29.00

Grey Lynn Library Hall

 

 

Side Room

$52.00

$41.50

Leys Institute Hall

 

 

Lecture Room

$41.30

$33.10

Supper Room

$25.40

$20.40

Outhwaite Hall

 

 

Main Hall

$25.50

$20.50

 

 

Active Recreation - Leisure and Recreation Facilities

The table below show fees and charges for Leisure and Recreation facilities.

Local Board | Category | Name | Description

 FY22 Peak

 FY22 Off-Peak

Waitemata

 

 

10 Visit Pass - Aquatic

 

 

Tepid Baths

 

 

Concessionary Active Swim 10

$59.10

 

TB Adult Supervising 10

$46.80

 

TB Adult Swim 10

$73.00

 

TB Shower 10

$25.50

 

10 Visit Pass - Fitness

 

 

Tepid Baths

 

 

TB Adult 45 mins 10

$606.00

 

TB Adult PT 30 mins 10

$455.00

 

TB Adult PT 60 mins 10

$758.00

 

Casual Entrance Fees - All

 

 

Tepid Baths

 

 

GRX FlexiPass (All Centres)

$5.00

 

Casual Entrance Fees - Aquatic

 

 

Tepid Baths

 

 

Adult - Supervising

$5.20

 

Adult - Swim, Spa, Sauna, Steam

$8.10

 

Child Swim 0-4 yrs

$0.00

 

Child Swim 11-16 yrs

$0.00

 

Child Swim 5-10 yrs

$0.00

 

Concessionary - Swim Spa, Sauna, Steam

$6.60

 

Learn To Swim Spectator

$0.00

 

Shower

$6.10

 

Spectator

$1.00

 

Casual Entrance Fees - Fitness

 

 

Tepid Baths

 

 

Casual Fitness

$22.30

 

PT - Additional Person

$10.10

 

PT 30 mins - Teps

$45.50

 

PT 45 mins - Teps

$60.60

 

PT 60 mins - Teps

$75.80

 

Student Gym

$18.20

 

Teen Gym

$11.20

 

Facility Hireage

 

 

Tepid Baths

 

 

Full Lap pool

 

 

Lane Hire TB

$35.40

 

Learn to Swim - Private Lesson 1 - 1

$101.00

 

Learn to Swim - Private Lesson 2 - 1

$121.20

 

Learn to Swim - Private Lesson 3 - 1

$141.40

 

Learner Pool TB

$22.30

 

Pool lane hire

 

 

Teaching pool - full pool

 

 

Teaching pool - lane

 

 

Membership

 

 

Tepid Baths

 

 

GOLD TB Gym It (Adult) 12 months

$940.00

 

GOLD TB Gym It (Adult) 3 months

$257.00

 

GOLD TB Gym It (Adult) 6 months

$510.00

 

GOLD TB Gym It (Adult) DD fortnightly

$39.40

 

GOLD TB Gym It (Adult) DD monthly

$85.40

 

GOLD TB Gym It (Adult) DD weekly

$19.70

 

GOLD TB Gym It (Teen) 12 months

$705.00

 

GOLD TB Gym It (Teen) 3 months

$192.10

 

GOLD TB Gym It (Teen) 6 months

$385.00

 

GOLD TB Gym It (Teen) DD fortnightly

$29.50

 

GOLD TB Gym It (Teen) DD monthly

$70.00

 

GOLD TB Gym It (Teen) DD weekly

$14.80

 

GOLD TB Gym It Concessionary 12 months

$800.00

 

GOLD TB Gym It Concessionary 3 months

$218.00

 

GOLD TB Gym It Concessionary 6 months

$436.00

 

GOLD TB Gym It Concessionary DD fortnightly

$33.60

 

GOLD TB Gym It Concessionary DD monthly

$72.60

 

GOLD TB Gym It Concessionary DD weekly

$16.80

 

GOLD TB Swim It (Adult) 12 months

$770.00

 

GOLD TB Swim It (Adult) 3 months

$211.00

 

GOLD TB Swim It (Adult) 6 months

$421.00

 

GOLD TB Swim It (Adult) DD fortnightly

$32.40

 

GOLD TB Swim It (Adult) DD monthly

$70.00

 

GOLD TB Swim It (Adult) DD weekly

$16.20

 

GOLD TB Swim It Concessionary 12 months

$655.00

 

GOLD TB Swim It Concessionary 3 months

$178.60

 

GOLD TB Swim It Concessionary 6 months

$358.00

 

GOLD TB Swim It Concessionary DD fortnightly

$27.50

 

GOLD TB Swim It Concessionary DD monthly

$59.50

 

GOLD TB Swim It Concessionary DD weekly

$13.80

 

Legacy TB 2012 AC Staff DD Fortnightly

$34.20

 

Legacy TB 2012 AC Staff DD Monthly

$74.00

 

Legacy TB 2012 AC Staff DD Weekly

$17.10

 

Legacy TB 2012 Community Card DD Fortnightly

$34.20

 

Legacy TB 2012 Community Card DD Monthly

$85.90

 

Legacy TB 2012 Gold Card DD Weekly

$19.40

 

Legacy TB 2012 Standard DD 4 Weekly

$90.90

 

Legacy TB 2012 Standard DD Fortnightly

$45.50

 

Legacy TB 2012 Standard DD Monthly

$98.50

 

Legacy TB 2012 Standard DD Weekly

$22.80

 

Legacy TB 2012 Student DD Fortnightly

$38.80

 

Legacy TB 2012 Student DD Weekly

$19.40

 

Legacy TB 2012 Swim DD Weekly

$15.20

 

Legacy TB Corporate Multi DD Fortnightly

$38.40

 

Legacy TB Corporate Multi DD Monthly

$82.90

 

Legacy TB Corporate Multi DD Weekly

$19.20

 

TB Single Site Facility 1 month

$101.00

 

TB Single Site Facility Concessionary 1 month

$85.90

 

TB Single Site Swim Only 1 month

$75.40

 

TB Single Site Swim Only Concessionary 1 month

$67.90

 

Miscellaneous

 

 

Tepid Baths

 

 

Padlock Hire

$3.00

 

Replacement Membership Card

$5.00

 

Programmes - Aquatic

 

 

Tepid Baths

 

 

Learn to Swim - Babies

 

 

Learn to Swim - Babies & Toddlers

$10.70

 

Learn to Swim - Pre-School

 

 

Learn to Swim - Pre-School/School Age, Teenage & Adults/Squads

$14.70

 

Learn to Swim - School Age

 

 

Learn to Swim - Squads

 

 

Learn to Swim - Teenage & Adult

 

 

Learn to Swim Holiday Programme

$12.00

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Eke Panuku Development Auckland - Waitematā Local Board Six-Monthly Report to 31 March 2021

File No.: CP2021/06687

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Local Board on Eke Panuku Development Auckland (Eke Panuku) activities within the local board area and the region, for the period from 1 September 2020 to 31 March 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report is for information only and no decision-making is required.

3.       This report covers our urban regeneration programme in relation to the local board area from 1 September 2020 to 31 March 2021.

4.       It also includes information on property management, purchases and sales in relation to the local board area, which Eke Panuku undertakes on behalf of Auckland Council.

5.       Please note that this report is for seven months. This is to align future reports with other Eke Panuku reporting cycles.

6.       This report is a record of events for the Waitematā Local Board area during the stated period.

7.       Items in this report relate to the Transform Waterfront programme, Westhaven Marina, the 36th America’s Cup, Maungawhau, Karangahape and Aotea over-station developments as part of the City Rail Link (CRL) and the Downtown Car Park building.

8.       Eke Panuku currently manages 147 leases in the Waitematā Local Board area.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Eke Panuku Development Auckland - Waitematā Local Board Six-Monthly Report to 31 March 2021.

Horopaki

Context

9.       Eke Panuku Development Auckland is the council-controlled organisation that delivers urban regeneration in Tāmaki Makaurau (Auckland). Urban regeneration is the planning of neighbourhoods and the improvement of buildings and spaces to strengthen communities and the economy to make it an even better place to live.

10.     Our city is facing rapid growth. Quality development is required to accommodate this growth and to ensure people love and can afford to live in Auckland. We imagine a city of strong neighbourhoods. We work across many neighbourhoods throughout our city from large, long-term urban regeneration plans to small projects on specific sites to meet the needs of the city’s long-term growth - including more types of homes people can afford. We work alongside the locals, other parts of the council and businesses to regenerate our city in ways that benefit both our local communities and Auckland as a whole.

11.     We deliver returns for the council, and at the same time, we ensure our assets contribute positively to the neighbourhoods of Tāmaki Makaurau. We manage around $2.4 billion of land and buildings owned by the Auckland Council.

12.     In the period 1 September 2020 to 31 March 2021, we continued our urban regeneration programmes across the region, brought a $22.8m return to the council via property management, purchased six properties on behalf of the group, and sold nine properties as part of either our neighbourhood regeneration or as directed by Auckland Council.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Urban regeneration – Waitematā Local Board area

Te Mahere mō te Taha Moana - The Waterfront Plan

13.     The Waterfront Plan sets out the vision and goals for Auckland's city centre waterfront. The plan contains short, medium, and long-term initiatives to transform this part of the city.

Transform Wynyard Quarter

14.     The vision is that Wynyard Quarter will become home to about 3,000 residents and 25,000 workers who will be able to enjoy the new public open spaces with great walking, cycling and transport links throughout this prime waterfront location. Eke Panuku is responsible for revitalising Auckland Council’s landholdings north of Pakenham Street, an area of around 37ha with almost 3km of coastal frontage. Since construction began in 2011, Wynyard Quarter has evolved from an industrial port closed to the public to Auckland’s newest waterfront neighbourhood.

15.     Te Ara Tukutuku (Wynyard Point masterplan) - The draft masterplan was endorsed by the Eke Panuku Board on 23 September 2020.

16.     The proposed timeframe for engagement around Te Ara Tukutuku was altered, after discussions with the Chair of the Planning Committee and the Mayor’s Office, to achieve more appropriate alignment with the Long-term Plan public consultation process. The timing for the Planning Committee to endorse the final draft of the Masterplan is now late 2021.

17.     The Waitematā Local Board was engaged with on Te Ara Tukutuku at a workshop on 10 February 2021. The next phase of engagement with the board will be sometime during September – November before the Te Ara Tukutuku Wynyard Point final draft masterplan goes out for public consultation early next year.

18.     Oram's boatyard (Site 18). The travel lift, piers and seawall were completed during August/September 2020. The first stage of construction for the marine refit facility was completed by the end of October 2020. An 820-tonne travel lift was installed and the first vessel, a 34.8m sailing yacht, was lifted out on 14 January 2021.

19.     Full completion of marine works was reached 31 January 2021.

20.     Willis Bond 30 Madden St – is a residential and commercial building that comprises 150 residences and commercial spaces at ground level. The first stage on the Daldy Street side (stage 2a) achieved practical completion on 26 November 2020.

21.     The second stage of the development on the Beaumont street side (stage 2B) is expected to be complete by 31 October 2021.

22.     Precinct stage three (Site 6) – Is a site that is planned to be a new commercial development on the corner of Pakenham and Halsey Streets. It is being developed by Precinct Properties, which, during the timeframe of this report, had lodged their resource consent amendment for this development following a Technical Advisory Group (TAG) meeting.

23.     Freda Barnes (N. Cole Plaza) – Once named N. Cole Plaza, this small public space outside 10 Madden and the N Cole Building was later officially named the Freda Barnes Plaza by the Waitematā Local Board. It is due for completion in May 2021 and blessing is being organised by Precinct Properties. An invite to attend will be extended to the Waitematā Local Board.

24.     Tiramarama Way stage two – Phase one of this new public laneway achieved project completion on 21 January 2021. The laneway which, once complete, will run between Halsey and Beaumont Streets, will be a public space with retail offerings. Completion of phase two is expected in September 2021 and a blessing for stage two of the project will take place then. An invite will be extended to the Waitematā Local Board.

25.     Silo Park extension phase two - The business case and funding for phase two of Silo Park extension has been approved, which will complete the open space connection in the eastern corner between Silo Park, North Wharf and Wynyard Wharf. Once complete it will feature play elements such as a swing set, water play and tank installations.

26.     Site 14 and Site 19 - Property at this location is considered a strategic asset and therefore a special consultative process is being followed before any disposal. This has commenced as part of the Long-term Plan process with the Auckland Council Legal Team. Strategic asset public consultation closed on 22 March 2021.

27.     Park Hyatt Auckland - A soft opening to the public took place on 15 September 2020 and the Construction Completion Certificate was achieved 23 February 2021, which included Ūrunga Plaza.

28.     Ūrunga Plaza – This new public space opened to the public on 4 September 2020. Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei led a karakia whakawātea under the COVID-19 alert level 2.5. Included on the Park Hyatt, within the new public space are four, nine-metre-tall totara pou whenua which have been erected on the east and west facade of the Park Hyatt Auckland. The Tōhunga Toi Ake (artists) who have created these pou are Vern Rosieur, Wikuki Kingi, Sunnah Thompson, and Lawrence Makoare. Together, the pou whenua tell the stories of Tāmaki Makaurau. 

29.     Vos Shed – The historical shed reached practical completion on 30 October 2020. The Eke Panuku Marina team occupied the space during the 36th America’s Cup. Following the event, Eke Panuku is working with the Maritime Museum and the Percy Vos Trust on options for its use and activation. 

30.     Amey Daldy Park - The new pocket park opened officially on 4 December 2020, following a blessing organised by Auckland Transport. Eke Panuku is the asset holder, and a placemaking programme has been developed with the first event taking place on 14 February 2021 involving the place game activity with nearby residents. Mana whenua approved and accepted artist concepts by Railside Design for the pump station, Janine Williams is to commence her mahi toi on the pump station from 12 April 2021 and will be on-site for four weeks. A public celebration was planned for 11 April from 11:00 am – 2:00 pm with the Mayor and Local Board Chair confirmed to speak. Unfortunately, this event was cancelled due to weather and was held virtually instead. 

31.     William C Daldy Tugboat - As part of the resource consent process for America’s Cup, Auckland Council agreed to find a permanent home for the Daldy tugboat. Options were considered, and the preference was for the tugboat to return home to Victoria Wharf in Devonport. A decision paper was presented to the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board, which agreed to the William C Daldy tugboat having a permanent home at Victoria Wharf. The vessel was relocated from Hobson Wharf in January 2021.

32.     Dockline Tram reinstatement - Eke Panuku has transitioned the operation of the tram to the Museum of Transport and Technology (MOTAT) under a Service Agreement between the two entities.  The Rail Licenses were received from Waka Kotahi on 3 February 2021 and MOTAT began operating the tram on Sunday, 7 February 2021 (Waitangi Weekend). 

33.     Eastern Viaduct and Central wharves - The Eastern Viaduct panelling, now named Waihape, was completed in October 2020 with a few minor setbacks primarily caused by inclement weather.  The mana whenua artwork, designed by Reuben Kirkwood, was celebrated with an unveiling and karakia whakawātea (blessing) on Monday 14 December.

34.     The Eastern Viaduct Quay Street intersection - This intersection is being upgraded to align with the Downtown Infrastructure Development Programme being completed by Auckland Transport. JFC has been appointed as the contractor and works will commence from 22 April 2021 and are expected to take 12 weeks.

35.     Wynyard Quarter transitional use - For the transitional use of the challenger bases after America’s Cup, a business case was presented to the Project Steering Group on 22 March to secure capex funding for the physical works. Programme and design workshops have commenced developing a 'kit of parts which will be used to define the space of the ex-bases and encourage safe public use.

36.     Waterfront tours - On 27 November, Eke Panuku Chief Executive David Rankin and the departing Board Chair Adrienne Young-Cooper hosted a group of key stakeholders including Alexandra Bonham from the Waitematā Local Board, Councillor Chris Darby, Auckland Council’s Chief Executive Jim Stabback, and Viv Beck from Heart of the City on a tour around Wynyard Quarter. 

37.     Waterfront Priority Location Director, Fiona Knox, hosted the newly appointed Eke Panuku Board Chair and Mayor Phil Goff on a waterfront walking tour on 20 January 2021. The tour covered the Westhaven Marine Village, Promenade Stage-two, Percy Vos Shed, new America’s Cup infrastructure, Silo Park extension and Amey Daldy Park.

38.     In addition, a digital, self-guided walking tour was launched in the app AKL City Tours for the public to learn the stories and history of the Wynyard Quarter.

36th America’s Cup (AC36) projects

39.     Community Liaison Group - As required by America’s Cup Resource Consent, Eke Panuku facilitated a series of workshops to go through America’s Cup Events Limited (ACE) Management Plans to seek feedback on the plans from the Community Liaison Group made up of submitters. Stakeholder engagement was a key focus in the lead up to the event, with the first race taking place on 17 December 2020, and the event concluding on 17 March 2021.

40.     Event readiness - Eke Panuku delivered on the Host Venue Agreement (HVA) obligations, including supporting capital works to assist with resource consents and permitting, as well as improving facilities such as toilets and CCTV coverage across the waterfront.

41.     The focus of the Eke Panuku team has been to support event preparation, with America’s Cup Events taking occupation of the waterfront over the duration of the 36th America’s Cup event. 

42.     The Event Steering Group met weekly providing race day reports. The Land and Water Operations ran on race days from December 2020 until the end of the event. Eke Panuku staff were on-site during race days and in the operations centre linking in with Auckland Unlimited (previously ATEED) and America’s Cup Event staff. With no issues reported.

43.     The Christmas Cup was completed in December 2020, The Prada Cup challenger series finished on 21 February. 

44.     The COVID-19 lockdown in Auckland had the race village temporarily closed during alert levels 3 and 2. 

45.     With each successive event, public interest grew both on the water and at the Race Village. Over the Prada Cup, 187,865 patrons in total came through the race village on race days, and there was an average of 355 spectator vessels on the water each race day. Peak crowds being at race times were between 4-6 pm. 

46.     The America’s Cup match racing between Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli and Emirates Team New Zealand started on 6 March, finishing on 17 March with Emirates Team New Zealand winning and over 40,000 patrons reported as attending events at the Race Village on the final day of racing.

47.     Tenant relocation and Wynyard Edge Alliance Works (WEA) - To accommodate the 36th America’s Cup events the Sanford fishing fleet was moved and is now successfully operating at Wynyard Wharf. Works to accommodate Auckland Fishing Ports Limited (AFPL) at Wynyard Wharf and Z Pier at Westhaven were completed by the 14 November 2020 deadline. 

48.     In principle, an agreement has been made for the smaller Auckland Fishing Ports Limited to return to Halsey Wharf inner basin. The larger ocean-going vessels belonging to Sanford will stay at Wynyard Wharf, north of the breakwater. Updates to legal documents are currently underway to reflect these changes.  

49.     Superyacht infrastructure - Silo Marina optimisation works were complete by September 2020 and the new breakwaters and connecting roads were blessed on 7 December 2020. The completion of these works signified the end of Eke Panuku close working relationship with the Wynyard Edge Alliance to deliver the extensive infrastructure works required to make the 36th America’s Cup Event a success. 

50.     COVID-19 continues to impact the superyacht programme being reconsidered due to the effect on international borders. An alternative berthage pricing model was implemented with local and visitor rates. Due to the circumstances, non-refundable bonds paid by vessels not able to attend due to border restrictions were refunded. And a drive to attract domestic vessels to the marina undertaken. 

51.     There was a good level of response to the alternative berthage pricing model, 73 of the 77 berths were booked - with a minimum booking time of February and March. The majority of bookings were locally based, around a third were visitor vessels that met all New Zealand exemption and quarantine requirements.

After the AC36 events

52.     As syndicates depart from the event, Eke Panuku has managed the tenant-landlord relationship between Eke Panuku, Americas Cup Events Ltd (ACE) and the arrangements required under the host venue agreement to exit their bases and water space. 

53.     Work has been undertaken to design and procure services to assist in the extraction of the AC36 infrastructure. This includes fencing, moving pontoon and associated electrical services and getting the waterfront back to business as usual. 

54.     With the Sanford fleet remaining at Wynyard Wharf (approx. 2-4 years) this provides Eke Panuku greater flexibility to activate and programme the Wynyard Basin and will mean that the superyacht infrastructure on Halsey Wharf (west) will remain in place. 

55.     A communications plan will be developed to provide key messages on the plans as they develop and are confirmed.

Support programmes

56.     Eke Panuku supports urban regeneration projects around the region. These sites deliver new homes, quality design and urban regeneration outcomes.

57.     Eke Panuku has an agreed work programme with the Waitematā Local Board, that we have worked together to create. This programme identifies what we will engage with the board on, and these projects include Harbour Bridge Park, Wynyard Point Masterplan, staged upgrade of the Eastern Viaduct and Wynyard Crossing replacement bridge.

Westhaven Marina

58.     The vision - Westhaven Marina, the largest recreational marina in the Southern Hemisphere, is achieving the vision and goals set out in the 2012 Waterfront Plan to have a blue-green waterfront, a public waterfront, a smart working waterfront, a connected waterfront and a liveable waterfront. Eke Panuku manages the marina on behalf of Auckland Council and is charged with developing the space for future generations of Aucklanders to love. 

59.     Northern Pathway and Auckland Harbour Bridge Park - Eke Panuku brought forward its Long-term Plan (LTP) funding request for the Auckland Harbour Bridge Park allowing for the alignment of timelines for both projects. LTP funding has indicated this as an $8m project for the park and public space improvements.

60.     This project will focus on delivering an enhanced public space, particularly looking to optimise public realm outcomes for Harbour Bridge Park and Westhaven Promenade, with native planting and recognition of cultural sites (Te Routu o Ureia). It will also design for, and manage, conflicts between modes - walking, cycling, public transport (buses), private vehicles and the Westhaven Marina operations.

61.     Eke Panuku will continue to work collaboratively with Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency, Watercare and the Northern Pathway Alliance on this project as each stakeholder has landowner and infrastructure interests. Eke Panuku will continue to engage with the Waitematā Local Board on this project when updates are available.

62.     Curran Street - Upgrade works were completed at the end of November except for the Sarsfield Street Road reinstatement. The timing of the reinstatement will align with the completion of the Healthy Waters project. This avoids any duplication of reinstatement work.

63.     The pump station installation (located close to Buoy Café) reached completion in September 2020.

64.     Seawall upgrade - The concept plan for the seawall upgrade in Westhaven along the northern reclamation has been accepted and is now progressing into developed and detailed design. These works take into consideration the potential impacting components such as ground-level increases of Curran St, the roundabout, north-eastern reclamation, balustrade height regulations and the potential landing of the northern pathway.

65.     Westhaven Promenade stage two - The recently completed promenade (stage two) now offers a continuous 'shared path' along the water’s edge between Wynyard Quarter and the Auckland Harbour Bridge. Blessed on 16 November by Ngāti Whātua Orākei, this new promenade section connects the existing promenade stage one boardwalks and opens up a new stretch of boardwalk for the public to experience.

66.     Westhaven Marine Village – A new world-class facility inspired by the area’s marine industrial heritage reached project completion in November 2020. It includes exciting sustainable design elements including rainwater tanks, shaded window glazing, cycle racks and end of trip facilities. The building will be home new tenants Burnsco, Signcorp, Sports Marine, Harken, Fosters, a hospitality offering named Cargo, and the Westhaven Marina office.

67.     The Westhaven Marina Office relocation - Fit-out process for the Westhaven Office to move to the Marine Village has commenced and is expected to be complete by June 2021.

68.     Pile Berth redevelopment - A completion date for reclamation is expected by the end of April.

69.     We are setting a framework for working with mana whenua in establishing a design brief and appointment of a design consultant for the civil and landscape works. The Primacy appeal has temporarily held up decision making. We will progress the appointment of a designer after the hearing, likely to be resolved by end of 2021.

CRL over-station development projects

Midtown/Aotea Station

70.     In early March Eke Panuku reached an agreement with Malaysian property developer Malaysian Resources Corporation Berhad (MRCB), for a mixed-use development on the corner of Mayoral Drive and Wellesley Street, above CRL’s new Aotea Station. The 125-year leasehold site has been sold for $40 million following a fully contestable market process supported by an independent valuation.

71.     Aotea Station City Rail Link (CRL) plans were released and picked up by media in March 2021. Plans comprise a 21-story high rise, named Aotea Central, which includes 60 apartments, commercial and retail space and a public plaza leading out of what will become Aotea Station, part of the CRL.

72.     MRCB will start construction after completion of the station below expected in 2024 and is expected to take three years.

Downtown Car Park

73.     The Downtown Car Park project has been initiated, with the council, Eke Panuku and Auckland Transport working together to find a development partner for the site, which will help realise the vision in the council’s City Centre Masterplan.

74.     The property, on the corner of Lower Hobson Street and Customs St West, has been included as a significant opportunity in the masterplan since 2012. Its redevelopment will continue transformation work following projects in the surrounding area already completed by the Auckland Council group and from private investment.

75.     At its meeting on 3 December 2020, the Planning Committee agreed the outcomes sought from a development on the Downtown Car Park site. The outcomes agreed were grouped under the following headings:

·      Land use

·      Urban form and quality design

·      Movement and access

·      Environmental and social responsibility

·      Māori outcomes

·      Transport

76.     The Downtown Car Park was approved for redevelopment by the Finance & Performance Committee in December 2020 and requested wider engagement on the outcomes.

77.     The project team presented to the local board at a workshop on 9 March 2021, to Heart of the City on 10 March 2021 and the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board on 12 March 2021, gathering feedback on the draft outcomes for the site.

78.     The project team presented to Planning Committee in April, with a decision by the committee being deferred, pending further work by Auckland Transport on the transport outcomes.

79.     A report was submitted to the local board for consideration at their 18 May 2021 business meeting, to obtain feedback on the transport outcomes.

80.     Auckland Transport is currently working on refining the transport outcomes required for the site, with the aim of having them agreed by the Planning Committee in June ahead of a two-step market process for the sale.

Placemaking

81.     Placemaking is a process that fosters the creation of vital public spaces. At Eke Panuku this is done through: 

·      Supporting communities through ongoing change taking place 

·      Building trust and knowledge through relationships to ensure that regeneration fits with the characteristics of a place 

·      Develop an iterative, ‘do-learn-do’ process to inform, test, and foreshadow future design 

·      Foster reciprocal relationships between place and people  

·      Capacity-building towards socio-economic regeneration through sustainable procurement and regenerative economics  

82.     In the Waitematā Local Board area, during the reporting period, there were a lot of placemaking activities around America’s Cup delivered in conjunction with Auckland Unlimited (previously ATEED). Notable events include:

83.     Auckland Marathon – On 1 November, NZ’s biggest iconic running celebration gave runners and walkers a beautiful scenic experience of Auckland city and the waterfront.

84.     New Years’ Eve – Activations included a family-friendly atmosphere, stage entertainment, children’s workshops and local talent in the city for all to celebrate and welcome in the new year including fireworks and a harbour bridge light display.

85.     Auckland Anniversary Weekend - Events this year highlighted the waterfront location and versatility, with activities including dragon boats, waka ama, America's Cup racing, buskers, circus workshops, helicopter flyovers, symphony orchestra, fireworks, and picnics in Silo Park.

Service Property Optimisation

86.     Service Property Optimisation is a self-funding development approach targeting sub-optimal service assets, approved in 2015. The process involves an agreement between Community Services, Eke Panuku and local boards and is led by Eke Panuku. It is designed to equal or enhance levels of service to the local community in a reconfigured form while delivering on strategic outcomes such as housing or urban regeneration, with no impact on existing rate assumptions.

87.     Using service property optimisation, underperforming assets will have increased utility and efficiency, lower maintenance, and operating costs, as well as improved service delivery benefiting from the co-location of other complementary services or commercial activities. Optimisation will free up a range of undercapitalised development opportunities such as air space, full sites or part sites.

88.     Using service property optimisation as a redevelopment and funding tool, the local board can maximise efficiencies from service assets while maintaining levels of service through the release of some or all that property for sale or development.

89.     Local boards are allocated decision making for the disposal of local service property and reinvestment of sale proceeds under the service property optimisation approach.

90.     In this local board area, one new project has been initiated in the programme, being 19 Jervois Road, Herne Bay. The current tenant, Plunket, has indicated they wish to vacate the site.

Property of Waitematā Local Board interest

91.     Eke Panuku manages 147 leases in the Waitematā Local Board area.

92.     The Waitematā Local Board has expressed interest in updates on properties within the Eke Panuku property portfolio. The table below provides an update on matters of significance for the reporting period.

Property

Status

21 Princes Street

Seismic strengthening and refurbishment Resource Consent and Heritage Approvals have been granted. We are working with the childcare centre to determine the best timing to complete this work.

2 Princes Street

Seismic strengthening and refurbishment Resource Consent and Heritage Approvals have been granted. The tender contract is expected to be awarded in late May with works commencing shortly after. Works will take between eight and 12 months.

Queen Street Seismic repairs

Canopy works repairs confirmed to proceed. Expected to complete in April 2021. Significant considerations to be discussed and given for road closures and businesses affected due to this closure.

 

Shed 10

Structural repairs - A heritage architect/structural engineer has been engaged. Design process about to commence and planning for resource and building consent underway.

24 St Marys Road, Ponsonby

Acquired by the council in 1973 using funds from the Leys Family Trust in connection with the adjoining Leys Institute Library. House is being privately rented with a periodic tenancy.

Acquisitions

93.     Eke Panuku has purchased no properties on behalf of Auckland Council departments in the Waitematā Local Board Area during the porting period 1 September 2020 to 31 March 2021.

Disposals

94.     On behalf of the Auckland Council, Eke Panuku sells properties that are no longer required by the Auckland Council group for service use.

95.     The decision to sell these properties is made by Auckland Council’s Governing Body with advice from its finance team.

96.     Eke Panuku does not have a decision-making role in the sale of properties that are surplus to the council’s requirements.

97.     The role of Eke Panuku is to provide property transaction services. Proceeds from these sales are returned to Auckland Council to be reinvested in council services.

98.     There were no unconditional agreements reached in the Waitematā Local Board Area during the reporting period

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

99.     The Eke Panuku Priority Location programmes support the regeneration of existing town centres while also addressing climate mitigation and adaptation.

100.   Mitigation of climate change involves reducing the carbon emissions that contribute to climate change. Our priority locations are designed to become transport-oriented communities that utilise existing infrastructure and transport links and we seek to make local walking and cycling safe and viable alternatives to the private vehicle. Eke Panuku has also adopted a Homestar-6 minimum standard to ensure we can reduce energy, water and landfill waste. We are working to adopt similar standards for our public realm and commercial developments, whilst also taking guidance from precinct sustainability rating tools like Green Star Communities.

101.   Adaptation to climate change involves planning for the changes to our climate and associated impacts that are already happening or are projected to happen, including sea-level rise, hotter temperatures, extreme weather events, flooding and droughts. Climate change is likely to subject the Waitematā Local Board area to hotter temperatures and more frequent flooding and drought. Eke Panuku seeks to future-proof our communities by:

·      Specifying that infrastructure and developments are designed to cope with warmer temperatures and extreme weather events

·      The use of green infrastructure and water sensitive design to increase flood resilience and provide ecological and biodiversity benefits

·      The provision of increased shade and shelter for storm events and hotter days

·      Initiatives to build community resilience

102.   In October, the Eke Panuku executive team agreed to a work programme of priority actions to help Eke Panuku deliver on the council’s sustainable procurement objectives which Eke Panuku has adopted. Targeting these objectives will help further leverage the economic, social and environmental benefits of Eke Panuku urban regeneration projects and the products and services we procure as a business. Implementation of these priority projects has commenced which focus on embedding sustainable procurement into Eke Panuku procurement processes and systems, including the inclusion of climate considerations into procurements for capital works and renewals.

103.   The Eke Panuku Climate Change Strategy was adopted by the Eke Panuku Board in November. The strategy guides how Eke Panuku will support the implementation of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

104.   Eke Panuku cannot achieve its vision alone. Our complex operating environment means we need the expertise of others. Therefore, building and maintaining strong relationships and partnerships, and working together with others in general, is an ongoing focus for us.

105.   Eke Panuku Development Auckland works collaboratively with other Auckland Council departments, CCOs and Crown agencies to deliver joined-up urban regeneration in our neighbourhoods.

106.   Impacts and views are considered both on a programme and project level for the neighbourhoods we work in, to maximise community outcomes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

107.   Any local or sub-regional impacts are considered on a programme and project basis.

108.   Eke Panuku regularly engages with local boards on its projects and programmes within local board areas.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

109.   Eke Panuku supports the aspirations described in the Auckland Plan 2050.

110.   Eke Panuku has worked closely with our mana whenua partners to understand their priorities in Tāmaki Makaurau. Mana whenua have shared their top five aspirations with Eke Panuku. Below is a summary:

·      Governance: We involve mana whenua in transparent decision-making.

·      Culture: We will increase our practice of kaitiakitanga (by all) and increase the visibility of Māori identity and culture in our projects.

·      Economic: We will create more commercial investment, procurement, and engagement opportunities for Māori.

·      Social: We will foster a sense of community and connectedness and help enhance the well-being of Māori here in Tāmaki Makaurau.

·      Natural environment: We will work together to ensure we are working towards significant improvements to te mauri o te taiao.

111.   Eke Panuku continues to make progress on the Eke Panuku Mana Whenua Outcomes Framework actions and presented a six-month status report to mana whenua in February 2021.

112.   Eke Panuku has achieved 36/40 significant initiatives in the 2020-2021 financial year. Highlights include the numerous whakawātea with our mana whenua partners to celebrate significant milestones to build the stage for the 2021 America’s Cup.

113.   Following the Emergency Budget 2020/2021, Eke Panuku is still working with mana whenua to identify potential development and disposal opportunities. Eke Panuku has invited mana whenua to register commercial interests in properties Eke Panuku is preparing to dispose of on the market.

114.   Eke Panuku has started a pilot programme focused on growing the capability of young leaders to enable placemaking activities. The programme, He Pia He Tauira, has hosted several wānanga with tauira to prepare for upcoming activities.

115.   Eke Panuku has undertaken a significant amount of engagement to prepare for the upcoming plan change for Wynyard Point. Mana whenua have input into the storyboard and we are about to start discussions on a process to write the draft masterplan. Mana whenua have gifted this work the project name Te Ara Tukutuku.

116.   Eke Panuku has engaged mana whenua about participating in the design of Harbour Bridge Park and the seawall as part of the enabling works for the proposed Northern pathway.

117.   Eke Panuku is working with mana whenua, the Waitematā Local Board and Albert-Eden Local Board to prioritise and refine the foundation outcomes for the precinct development programme (Karangahape and Maungawhau/Mt Eden). The updated foundation outcomes will form part of the precinct development plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

118.   There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

119.   There are no risks associated with receiving this report.

120.   This report must be received to meet the requirements of the Local Government Act 2002.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

121.   The next six-monthly report will cover the period of 1 April to 30 September 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Perin Gerrand - Engagement Coordinator

Authorisers

Lydia Sheridan - Head of Community Affairs

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Delegation of feedback to be provided to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project

File No.: CP2021/08010

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To formally delegate one local board member to provide feedback to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An Establishment Unit is being set up by the Cabinet to provide the public face of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project, undertake stakeholder and community engagement, and take forward work to resolve key outstanding questions in relation to project scope and delivery. A key output of the unit will be to develop a business case, over approximately six months, which looks at the available options.

3.       The work of the Establishment Unit will be guided by an inclusive governance structure made up of representatives of central and local government, Treaty partners and an independent chairperson.

4.       Minister of Transport Hon Michael Wood wrote to local board members in May 2021 inviting local board members to select a single representative to be appointed to the Establishment Unit Board. At the May Chairs’ Forum, local board member Margi Watson was selected for this role.

5.       The Establishment Unit now has until early September to gather the views of local boards, ward councillors, and the public.

6.       Staff are requesting that local boards delegate a member to provide feedback on behalf of the local board, to ensure that feedback can be provided in a short timeframe after public feedback has been collated and provided to the local board.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      delegate one local board member to provide feedback on behalf of the local board to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project.

Horopaki

Context

7.       In March 2021, the Cabinet met to agree how to progress the next steps for the City Centre to Māngere light rail project (CC2M).

8.       To give effect to this, the Cabinet has directed that an Establishment Unit be set up to provide the public face of the project, undertake stakeholder and community engagement, and take forward work to resolve key outstanding questions in relation to project scope and delivery entity.

9.       The Establishment Unit Board will be chaired by an independent chair appointed by the Minister of Transport and the Minister of Finance. Membership will comprise:

a)    a single representative (the chief executive or a senior delegate) from Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, Waka Kotahi, Kāinga Ora and the Ministry of Transport

b)    a representative from mana whenua

c)    a representative of Auckland Council’s local boards (Margi Watson)

d)    a representative of Auckland Council’s Governing Body (Chris Darby)

e)    Te Waihanga (the New Zealand Infrastructure Commission) and Treasury will support the work of the Establishment Unit Board as observers.

10.     A key output of the unit will be to develop a business case, over approximately six months, which looks at the available options. This will enable quality decisions on key matters such as mode, route alignment and delivery, based on evidence.

11.     The Mayor and Deputy Mayor have been invited to join Minister of Transport Hon Michael Wood and Minister of Finance Hon Grant Robertson as sponsors of this project. This sponsors group will play an important function in ensuring political alignment on the project between central and local government, and setting strategic direction.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The Auckland Light Rail team will be engaging with local boards first, so that local board members are clear about the scope and programme of engagement.

13.     This will take place as follows:

·   11 June: briefing the six local boards that are within the planned corridor for light rail - Waitematā, Albert-Eden, Puketāpapa, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki, Māngere-Ōtāhuhu and Ōtara-Papatoetoe

·   14 June: presentation to Chairs’ Forum

·   30 June: inviting local board chairs or their delegate to attend a Planning Committee briefing

·   Further briefings will be organised to take place after the public consultation period in July/ August.

14.     Staff will focus on providing local board members with an understanding of the approach being taken by the Establishment Unit and key constraints, so that local board members can respond to any queries they received and champion the engagement process within their community.

15.     Throughout the engagement period, the Establishment Unit will be seeking broad views, key themes (could be geographically based) and feedback on the outcomes the project is set to achieve. This will mirror the public engagement process that will also focus on outcomes and community experience.

16.     In order to ensure that there is adequate time for local boards to review public feedback ahead of providing local board feedback, staff are recommending that local boards delegate a member to provide the local board’s feedback.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     Delegating to one local board member the authority to provide feedback to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project does not have any quantifiable climate impacts.

18.     The Establishment Unit Board will have an opportunity to consider climate impacts as part of making recommendations on the project.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The Mayor and Deputy Mayor have been invited to join the Minister of Transport Hon Michael Wood and Minister of Finance Hon Grant Robertson as sponsors of the project.  The project sponsors will set the strategic direction for the project including the project scope and engagement plans and maintain political cooperation between central government and Auckland Council with regards to the project.

20.     The Governing Body representative and the local board representative will be joined by the Chief Executive as the representatives of Auckland Council on the Establishment Unit Board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     This delegation will provide the opportunity for all local boards to provide formal feedback to the Establishment Board within the given timeframe of this first stage of work.

22.     Margi Watson, as the local board representative on the Establishment Unit Board, will develop good lines of communication with other local board members. Having a local board representative on the Establishment Unit Board is not a proxy for local board engagement on this project and does not replace the need to obtain feedback from local boards.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     The work of the Establishment Unit will be guided by an inclusive governance structure made up of representatives of central and local government, Treaty Partners and an independent chairperson.

24.     A key function of the Establishment Unit will be to undertake high quality engagement with communities, stakeholders, mana whenua and mataawaka.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     Delegating to one local board member the authority to provide feedback to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project does not have any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     No risks have been identified for delegating to one local board member the authority to provide feedback to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project.

27.     The risks of not appointing a delegate may be that formal feedback is not able to be provided by the local board within the relevant timeframe or may need to be provided via the urgent decision mechanism.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     Staff will work with the Establishment Unit to make arrangements for local board briefings ahead of public consultation.

29.     Public consultation will take place in July and August 2021.

30.     Further briefings to provide analysis of the public feedback received will be provided towards the end of August.

31.     Delegated local board members will provide feedback on behalf of their local board by 2 September 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead – Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Feedback on Equity of Service Levels and Funding Proposals - Draft Report

File No.: CP2021/08007

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide local board feedback to the Joint Governance Working Party on the funding and decision-making proposals set out in the Equity of Service Levels and Funding - Draft Report.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In 2016 the Governance Framework Review was undertaken to see if the Auckland Council shared governance model was working in the spirit intended under the legislation that formed Auckland Council.

3.       This review found that improvement needed to be made in several areas and one of these was the control that local boards have over their budgets and service levels and ‘that in principle, local boards will be given more flexibility over operational funding and service levels’.

4.       Each local board is funded quite differently, based on the assets they have in their area, how services are provided and what had been allocated to them historically.

5.       To progress this work, the Governing Body commissioned analysis to:

·   establish what service levels existed already in each local board area

·   establish what minimum service levels should be

·   evaluate options for more equitable service levels and the implications of those options

6.       The local board has received and discussed the Equity of Service Levels and Funding - Draft Report at its April/May 2021 workshop.

7.       The Draft Report (refer Attachment A) sets out the draft recommendations from the Joint Governance Working Party in relation to:

·   improving the equity of funding allocation across local boards

·   increasing the decision-making responsibility of local boards

·   establishing minimum service levels

·   implications of multi-board services.

8.       The Joint Governance Working Party seeks local board feedback on these proposals to consider in the preparation of a final set of proposals to be reported to the Governing Body.

9.       The local board’s feedback on these proposals (refer Attachment B) has been prepared on the template provided.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      provide feedback using the attached template (Attachment B) to the Joint Governance Working Party on the funding and decision-making proposals set out in the Equity of Service Levels and Funding Proposals – Draft Report.

Horopaki

Context

10.     In October and November 2020 workshops, local boards considered and provided input on the Equity of Service Levels and Funding Discussion paper which presented options, in respect of local community services, to:

·   increase local board decision making responsibility

·   increase equity of funding allocation between local boards

·   establish minimum service levels where required

·   address funding of multi-board services and decision-making on their service levels.

11.     The Joint Governance Working Party considered this local board input and provided direction to staff in the preparation of the funding and decision-making proposals of the Equity of Service Levels and Funding Draft Report (refer Attachment A).

12.     Staff presented the Draft Report to local boards in workshops between 6 April and 6 May 2021.

13.     The purpose of this report is to enable the local board to provide formal feedback on the draft recommendations which propose:

·   changes to local board decision-making responsibilities over local community services

·   implementation of an equity-based funding allocation approach for local community services.

14.     These matters will be reported to the Joint Governance Working Party and then to the Governing Body later this year. If adopted, public consultation would be undertaken with the aim of implementing decisions progressively between 2022 and 2024.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     These proposals (refer Attachment A) are significant changes. If adopted by the Governing Body, these recommendations would:

·   increase local board decision-making responsibilities over community services

·   change the allocation of Asset Based Services (ABS) funding to local boards

·   require collaboration between local boards on some multi-board service decisions

·   have a high community interest

·   not affect existing local board responsibility for Local Discretionary Initiatives (LDI) service decisions or the current LDI funding approach.

16.     Feedback on these proposals is sought from the local board to assist the Joint Governance Working Party in providing direction to staff and the Governing Body on progressing these proposals.

17.     The Working Party’s final report to the Governing Body will also update illustrative funding outcomes with asset values and ABS budgets updated and adopted under Long-term Plan 2021-31. Funding outcomes remain illustrative until funding model and financial inputs are adopted, planned for Long-term Plan 2024-34.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     Providing feedback on the draft report does not have a direct impact on climate change.

19.     Changes made to local community services as a result of the proposed policy may have a climate impact and will be assessed on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     If adopted, the proposed policy will impact on several divisions of the council including Customer and Community Services, Finance and Governance. Staff from these divisions have been involved in the development of these proposals.

21.     Staff from these divisions will also be significantly involved in the implementation of Governing Body decisions on the proposals. A critical implementation workstream will ensure staff have the capacity and the knowledge required to enable sound advice to be provided to local boards under these proposals.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     Over time, these proposals have the potential to fundamentally change local community service delivery depending on the extent to which local boards and their communities make changes.

23.     Local boards have discussed policy options in workshops in October and November 2021 and considered the proposed policy in workshops in April and May 2021. Local boards can also provide their input and views through their representatives on the Joint Governance Working Party.

24.     This report provides the opportunity for local boards to provide their formal feedback on the Draft Report proposals.

25.     More detailed discussion of the local implications of the policy proposal is included in the Draft Report, provided as Attachment A.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     As part of increased decision-making for asset-based services, and under local government legislation, local boards must demonstrate how Māori are involved, and their needs are reflected, in these decisions. This means that in making service decisions, local boards should be able to:

·   demonstrate effective Māori involvement in the local board planning processes

·   clearly articulate Māori priorities in local board funding and delivery of asset-based services.

27.     It is likely that these changes will result in more responsive services for Māori communities at the local level.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     Introduction of the proposed policy would have several significant financial impacts, including:

·   changes to local board funding allocations that may result in funding increases for some local boards and funding decreases for others

·   broader local board decision-making responsibilities that will require greater flexibility in how local boards allocate their funding to service delivery

·   local board decisions which would include service impacts on assets, such as investment, enhancement, renewal, optimisation and removal from service.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     Development of the proposed policy involved several workshops with each local board. Several local boards requested additional workshops on the proposals as their implications became better understood.

30.     A range of risks associated with approval and implementation of these proposals were discussed during workshops and considered in the development of these proposals, including:

·   whether there will be sufficient understanding of the proposals and support for their benefits to enable them to be adopted

·   what alternative approaches might address the issues these proposals seek to address, should they not proceed

·   developing alternative funding equity transition options including implications on local board funding and overall timing

·   developing options to respond to concerns of local boards which might be adversely affected by equity funding proposals

·   addressing local board concerns for the perceived downside of greater decision-making responsibility if the level of decision support does not increase

·   ensuring the organisation is structured, resourced and adequately supported to provide the quality service advice needed by local boards to make well-informed decisions.

31.     Plans are either in place or currently being developed to address these risks. The proposed two stage implementation timeline (see below) is designed to progressively grow the council capability, develop robust processes, and ensure effective and transparent management of necessary changes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Staff will report local board feedback to the Joint Governance Working Party which will consider this feedback, along with further staff advice, and provide its recommendations to the Governing Body later this year.

33.     The Governing Body would undertake public consultation on its draft decisions as follows:

·   under the Annual Plan 2022/23, in the case of changes to the Allocation of Decision-making Responsibilities policy

·   under the Long-term Plan 2024-2034, in the case of changes to the Local Board Funding policy.

34.     Proposals adopted by the Governing Body would be progressively implemented from 2022 to 2024.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Equity of Service Levels and Funding Draft Report

193

b

Governance Framework Review - Service levels and funding - feedback template

233

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gary Pemberton - Programme Change Lead

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Service Strategy and Integration

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Feedback on Hīkina te Kohupara – Kia mauri ora ai te iwi. Transport Emissions: Pathways to Net Zero by 2050 discussion document

File No.: CP2021/07958

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the local board the opportunity to provide input into Auckland Council’s submission on Hīkina te Kohupara – Kia mauri ora ai te iwi - Transport Emissions: Pathways to Net Zero by 2050’ discussion document.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Context

2.       The Ministry of Transport is consulting on the discussion document Hīkina te Kohupara – Kia mauri ora ai te iwi: Transport Emissions: Pathways to Net Zero by 2050 (Hīkina te Kohupara). Hīkina te Kohupara identifies what Aotearoa could do to shift the transport system onto a pathway to zero emissions by 2050.

3.       Hīkina te Kohupara will inform Government’s first Emissions Reduction Plan (due to be released at the end of December 2021) and support the development of a 10–15-year transport emissions action plan for New Zealand.

4.       Consultation is open for public submission with a closing date of 25 June 2021.

5.       Auckland Council’s Transport Strategy Team and Auckland Transport are preparing a joint submission on Hīkina te Kohupara. The submission process closes on 25 June 2021.

6.       Local board formal feedback is due on 23 June 2021 to be appended to the Auckland Council submission.

Summary of consultation document

7.       Hīkina te Kohupara identifies opportunities to reduce emissions across three themes: 

·   Theme 1 – Changing the way we travel (chapter 6), which covers land use planning, transport investments and prioritisation and travel demand management.

·   Theme 2 – Improving our passenger vehicles (chapter 7), which covers clean cars, decarbonising the existing fleet and decarbonising the public transport fleet.

·   Theme 3 – Supporting a more efficient freight system (chapter 8), which covers greening supply chains, low emissions freight modes and decarbonising freight vehicles.

8.       Hīkina te Kohupara includes four potential pathways to zero carbon by 2050 (chapter 10). Each of the pathways place a different weight on interventions that:

·    avoid or reduce the need to travel by car (e.g. land use planning)

·    support a shift towards the use of low emissions modes (e.g. active travel and public transport), or

·    improve the energy efficiency of vehicle fleets (e.g. electric vehicles).

9.       The Hīkina te Kohupara discussion document can be found here: https://www.transport.govt.nz//assets/Uploads/Discussion/Transport-EmissionsHikinateKohuparaDiscussionDoc.pdf

10.     Further information and summary documents on the Hīkina te Kohupara can be found here: https://www.transport.govt.nz/consultations/hikina-te-kohupara-discussion/

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      provide feedback to be appended to the Auckland Council’s submission on Hīkina te Kohupara – Kia mauri ora ai te iwi - Transport Emissions: Pathways to Net Zero by 2050’ discussion document.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Caroline Teh - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Feedback on Te Waihanga New Zealand Infrastructure Commission's consultation document He Tūāpapa ki te Ora, Infrastructure for a Better Future, Aotearoa New Zealand Infrastructure Strategy

File No.: CP2021/07970

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the local board the opportunity to provide input into Auckland Council’s submission on Te Waihanga New Zealand Infrastructure Commission's consultation document He Tūāpapa ki te Ora, Infrastructure for a Better Future, Aotearoa New Zealand Infrastructure Strategy.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Context

2.       The New Zealand Infrastructure Commission, Te Waihanga, is an autonomous Crown entity with an independent board, officially formed on 25 September 2019. The Commission seeks to lift infrastructure planning and delivery to a more strategic level and by doing so, improve New Zealanders’ long term economic performance and social wellbeing.

3.       A key function of the Commission is to produce a 30-year infrastructure strategy to replace the government’s current 30-year plan. In addition, the Commission has progressively developed a pipeline of infrastructure projects which is published quarterly.

4.       The Commission has released its consultation document He Tūāpapa ki te Ora, Infrastructure for a Better Future, which sets out the approach that it proposes to take in developing its draft 30-year Infrastructure Strategy.

5.       This consultation is open for public submission from 12 May 2021, with a closing date of 24 June 2021.

6.       Local board formal feedback is due on 17 June 2021 to be included in the Auckland Council submission.

Summary of consultation document

7.       The consultation document introduces the extent of New Zealand’s infrastructure problems and highlights the key issue of historic underinvestment in infrastructure. It recognises there is a significant gap between the infrastructure needed and what can be afforded. It notes there are limits to spending and that building all infrastructure desired by communities is not a viable option.

8.       The consultation document sets out a proposed vision that “infrastructure lays the foundation for the people, places and businesses of Aotearoa New Zealand to thrive for generations” and guiding decision-making principles. The document also proposes three focus areas where change is needed:

·   Building a better future - This section talks about preparing infrastructure for climate change, transitioning to renewable energy, adapting to technological change, responding to demographic change, partnering with Māori and ensuring security and resilience of critical infrastructure.

·   Enabling competitive cities and regions - This section talks about how infrastructure can contribute to the success of New Zealand cities by enabling more affordable housing, higher levels of productivity, improved inter-regional and international connectivity, better quality of life and urban environments that provide greater connectivity with employment, social services and recreation opportunities.

·   Creating a better system - This section looks at how New Zealand’s current systems and processes for planning, determining, delivering and operating infrastructure are being challenged, and can be improved. Four categories are discussed – governance and institutions; legislation, regulation and planning; funding and financing; and procurement and delivery.

9.       The consultation document also identifies five areas that have potential to make the biggest difference to New Zealand’s infrastructure system:

·   Institutional and governance reform - mentions better integration and coordination between local and central government infrastructure functions.

·   Getting the price right - mentions congestion pricing, water metering, waste disposal charges and including full cost of carbon in infrastructure business case appraisals.

·   Supporting housing supply - mentions options such as consistent national planning rules, regional spatial planning, merging regional and district plans, creating targets for new housing development in cities, setting housing requirements through national direction.

·   Supporting zero-carbon economy and preparing for climate change - mentions electrification of transport, greater use of public transport and active travel, improving energy efficiency of process heat, investment in energy sector to meet growing demand, and a planning system that enables infrastructure necessary for climate change adaptation and mitigation.

·   A digital future - mentions updating national digital strategy, better data collection and transparency to understand existing infrastructure performance, costs and impacts, as well as future requirements.

10.     The consultation document proposes re-drawing of local and regional authority boundaries (particularly due to expanding labour markets and the ability of local government to provide / fund / maintain / operate social and economic infrastructure).

11.     The consultation document proposes changes to local and central government roles and responsibilities, with more responsibility for councils in some areas (e.g. suggestion that councils could toll roads to manage congestion) and less in other areas (e.g. central government would have more control of housing and urban development outcomes).

12.       The consultation document can be found here: https://infracom.govt.nz/assets/Uploads/Infrastructure-Strategy-Consultation-Document-May-2021.pdf

Further information on the consultation document can be found here: https://infracom.govt.nz/strategy/have-your-say/

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      provide feedback to input into the Auckland Council’s submission on Te Waihanga New Zealand Infrastructure Commission's consultation document He Tūāpapa ki te Ora, Infrastructure for a Better Future, Aotearoa New Zealand Infrastructure Strategy.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Caroline Teh - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Auckland Unlimited Quarter 3 Performance Report

File No.: CP2021/07054

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To outline the quarter 3 performance of Auckland Unlimited.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes the attached Auckland Unlimited Performance Report, which outlines the performance of Auckland Unlimited, including regional facilities, economic development and visitor economy-related activities and investments.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Unlimited Quarter 3 Performance Report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Unlimited Quarter 3 Performance Report

247

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Priscila Firmo - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Urgent Decision - Waitematā Local Board feedback on the draft Auckland Fire Plan 2021 – 2024

File No.: CP2021/07973

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Urgent Decision to approve the Waitematā Local Board feedback on the draft Auckland Fire Plan 2021-2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Fire and Emergency New Zealand is consulting on the draft Auckland Fire Plan 2021-2024, which outlines policies and regions specific to Auckland for the management of public safety and risks relating to fire in the region.

3.       Submissions on the draft plan were due 9 June 2021.

4.       To meet this timeframe, the local board needed to provide feedback by 28 May 2021 to be considered for incorporation into council’s submission on the draft plan. Local board feedback received by 7 June will be appended to the final submission.

5.       The urgent decision process enabled the local board to formalise its feedback to meet the timeframes above.

6.       The local boards formal feedback on the draft Auckland Fire Plan 2021-2024 is attached as Attachment B.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Urgent Decision to approve the Waitematā Local Board feedback on the draft Auckland Fire Plan 2021-2024

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent decision - Feedback on the Auckland Fire Plan 2021-2024

263

b

Waitemata Local Board feedback on the Auckland Fire Plan 2021-2024

267

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Caroline Teh - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

15 June 2021

 

 

Urgent decision Waitematā Local Board feedback on the George Street mixed use development, COVID-19 Recovery (Fast-Track Consenting) Act 2020

File No.: CP2021/08048

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the urgent decision to approve the local board feedback on the George Street mixed use development, COVID-19 Recovery (Fast-Track Consenting) Act 2020

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has received a request from the Ministry for the Environment for comments on an application that is under consideration for the COVID-19 Recovery (Fast-track) Consenting Act 2020.

3.         The Project is to construct and use land for a 65 metre (maximum) mixed use development comprising four buildings, and associated subdivision, including:

• approximately 324 residential units

• a supermarket

• other retail and other commercial tenancy space

• a publicly accessible plaza and pedestrian access through the site

4.       Local board feedback was due by 26 May 2021. The local board June business meeting is due on 15 June 2021. Local board feedback is attached as attachment A

5.       To meet this timeframe, the local board used the agreed urgent decision process to formalise its feedback. Urgent decision is attached as attachment B.