I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee will be held on:

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 8 July 2021

10.00am

Reception Lounge
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Kōmiti Whakarite Pārae, Mahi Toi, Hapori, Kaupapa

Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

MEMBERSHIP

Chairperson

Cr Alf Filipaina

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

 

Members

Cr Josephine Bartley

IMSB Member Tony Kake

 

Deputy Mayor Cr Bill Cashmore

Cr Tracy Mulholland

 

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Cr Pippa Coom

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Angela Dalton

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Chris Darby

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

Cr John Watson

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

Cr Paul Young

 

Cr Shane Henderson

 

 

Cr Richard Hills

 

 

IMSB Member Mr Terrence Hohneck

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

Maea Petherick

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

5 July 2021

Contact Telephone: (09) 890 8136

Email: maea.petherick@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

Terms of Reference

 

Responsibilities

 

This committee deals with the development and monitoring of strategy, policy and action plans associated with community, social and cultural activities. The committee will establish an annual work programme outlining key focus areas in line with its key responsibilities, which include:

 

·         The Southern Initiative and The Western Initiative

·         sports and recreation, including parks and reserves

·         community facilities and community services

·         acquisition of property relating to the committee’s responsibilities and in accordance with the LTP

·         grants for regional events, arts and cultural and heritage organisations, indoor sports and leisure and for the regional community development programme

·         economic development

·         arts and culture

·         community safety

·         community engagement

·         community development

·         homelessness

·         working with the six demographic advisory panels to give visibility to the issues important to their communities and help effect change

·         working with the Auckland Domain Committee to give visibility to the issues important to the Domain and to help effect change.

 

Powers

 

(i)         All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities, including:

(a)        approval of a submission to an external body

(b)        establishment of working parties or steering groups.

(ii)        The committee has the powers to perform the responsibilities of another committee, where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee.

(iii)       If a policy or project relates primarily to the responsibilities of the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee, but aspects require additional decisions by the Planning Committee and/or the Environment and Climate Change Committee, then the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee has the powers to make associated decisions on behalf of those other committee(s). For the avoidance of doubt, this means that matters do not need to be taken to more than one of these committees for decisions.

(iv)       The committee does not have:

(a)        the power to establish subcommittees

(b)        powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2).

 

 

 


 

 

Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·           Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·           Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·           Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·           In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·           The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·           However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·           All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·           Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·           Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·           All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·           Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·           Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·           Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

08 July 2021

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          7  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    7

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          7

6.1     Local Board Input:  Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board - Economic Development Action Plan                                                                                                            8

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                8

8          Summary of Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee Information - updates, memos and briefings - 8 July 2021                                                                              9

9          Economic Development Action Plan 2021-24                                                          25

10        Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau - Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework                                                                                                                                       79

11        Cultural Initiatives Fund - 2021/22 Grants                                                              101

12        Proposed land exchange - Bellgrove Reserves, Avondale                                  141

13        Proposed exchange of reserve land at Murray Halberg Park, Ōwairaka            151

14        Reserve revocation recommendation for 34R Blanes Road, Weymouth            163

15        Community Facilities Regional Work Programmes 2021-2024                            169

16        2021/2022 Arts and Culture Regional Work Programme                                      243

17        Regional Sport and Recreation Facilities Operating Grant                                  265

18        Allocation of the Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme 2021/2022 277

19        Supporting Auckland's sport sector                                                                       285

20        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Apologies

 

Apologies from Cr C Casey and Cr E Collins have been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 13 May 2021, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public input had been received.

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 


 

 

6.1       Local Board Input:  Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board - Economic Development Action Plan

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Chair of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board, Apulu Reece Autagavaia will address the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee regarding the Economic Development Action Plan 2021-2024.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      receive the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board input regarding the Economic Development Action Plan 2021-2024 and thank Chair Apulu Reece Autagavaia for his attendance.

 

 

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

08 July 2021

 

Summary of Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee Information - updates, memos and briefings - 8 July 2021

File No.: CP2021/06458

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A.

2.       To provide a public record of memos, workshops or briefing papers that have been distributed for the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee’s (PACE) information since 13 May 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This is regular information-only report which aims to provide public visibility of information circulated to committee members via memo or other means, where no decisions are required.

4.       The following papers/memos were circulated to members:

Date

Subject

18/5/2021

Boarding House Inspection Programme Update

16/6/2021

New Zealanders and the Arts

29/6/2021

Thriving Communities Engagement Findings

30/6/2021

Library Fines Removal Update

 

5.       The following workshops/briefings have taken place:

Date

Workshop/briefing

26/5/2021

Regional Parks Management Plan Review: Key Shifts

16/6/2021

Marae Infrastructure Programme & Cultural Initiatives Operational Policy

30/6/2021

Auckland Council Investment ($552k) into Regional Sports Trusts

 

6.       These documents can be found on the Auckland Council website, at the following link: http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

·   at the top of the left page, select meeting “Park, Arts, Community and Events Committee” from the drop-down tab and click ‘view’;

·   under ‘attachments’, select either the HTML or PDF version of the document entitled ‘extra attachments’.

7.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary. Committee members should direct any questions to the authors.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      receive the summary of the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee report – 8 July 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee Forward Work Programme

11

b

MEMO: Boarding House Inspection Programme Update (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

MEMO: New Zealanders and the Arts - Ko Aotearoa me ona Toi: Research Summary for Auckland (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

MEMO: Thriving Communities Engagement Findings (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

MEMO: Library Fines Removal Update (Under Separate Cover)

 

f

WORKSHOP: Regional Parks Management Plan Review: Key Shifts (Under Separate Cover)

 

g

WORKSHOP: Marae Infrastructure Programme & Cultural Initiatives Operational Policy (Under Separate Cover)

 

h

WORKSHOP: Auckland Council Investment in Regional Sports Trust (Under Separate Cover)

 

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maea Petherick - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

08 July 2021

 

 

Kōmiti Whakarite Parae, Mahi Toi, Hapori, Kaupapa / Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee
Forward Work Programme 2021

This committee deals with the development and monitoring of strategic policies and action plans associated with regional parks, libraries, arts, communities and events.

The full terms of reference can be found here: Auckland Council Governing Body Terms of Reference

This committee meets bi-monthly commencing in March 2021

 

Area of work and Lead Department

Reason for work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Expected timeframes

Highlight the month(s) this is expected to come to committee in 2021

 

no meeting

Mar

No meeting

May

No meeting

Jul

No meeting

Sept

No meeting

Nov

No meeting

2022

 

The Demographic Advisory Panels

Democracy and Engagement

The six demographic panels will engage and report to the committee on a regular basis. The Panels play a key role in influencing council policies, plans and initiatives

Decision: Endorsement of panel strategic work programmes. Expecting this to be split across two meetings. Co-chairs to present where possible.

 

Progress to date:

Demograpic Advisory Panel work programme
Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

ü

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Sport and Recreation Facilities Operational Grant

Allocate $1,023,000 per annum (allowed for in the LTP) following community Access Scheme being repurposed to a contestable grant

Decision: funding allocation approval for 2021/2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community Access Scheme

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Review of the Community Access Scheme.

The review will also seek evidence to determine whether the current funding agreements are being used in the most strategic and effective way to address the greatest access needs in the system.

Reports:

·    Community Access Scheme Review - extension to current funding agreements

·    Community Access Scheme Review

Decision: to approve the extension of the current Community Access Scheme funding agreements for one year, from 1 July to 30 June 2021, while a review of the scheme continues.

 

Progress to date:

Extension of the current Community Access Scheme funding agreements for one year 20 August 2020
link to decision

Approve repurposing the existing Community Access Scheme to a contestable operational grant 10 December 2020
link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Status report on implementation plan

Update: implementation and progress update, joint report with the Parks and Open Spaces Strategic Action Plan update

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sport and Rec Strategic Partnership Grant to Aktive Auck Sports Recreation

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Approval of $552,000 strategic partnership grant to Aktive Auckland & Sport to deliver on agreed priority initiatives.

Update: will be provided to the committee via memo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aktive and the Auckland Regional Sports Trusts

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Approval of $552,000 strategic partnership grant to Aktive Auckland & Sport to deliver on agreed priority initiatives.

Decision: allocation of strategic partnership grant funding

 

 

 

July

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Sport and Recreation grants programme

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Review of previous grants allocation and recommendation for next round

Decision: funding allocation approval for 2021/2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Sport & Recreation Facility Investment Fund

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Purpose of the fund is the allocate $120 million over ten years to support the development of regional and sub-regional sport and recreation facilities across Auckland.

Decision: funding allocation approval for 2021/2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Golf Investment Plan

Community and Social Policy

Council’s strategic approach to outcomes, priorities and investment in golf.

Decision: approval to consult publicly on a draft investment plan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Options to expand revenue streams for sport facilities investment

Community and Social Policy

Provide strategic direction to expand revenue streams to fund future sports facilities investment in the draft Sports Facilities Investment Plan

Decision or Update Direction to expand revenue streams to fund future sports facilities investment in the draft Sports Facilities Investment Plan  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Active Recreation Investment and Visitor Experience

Community and Social Policy

Councils strategic approach to outcome, priorities and investment for active walking, cycling, waterways and visitor experience on open space, parks, and regional parks

Decision: on scope and phasing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Takaro – Investing in play discussion document

Community and Social Policy

Development of a play investment plan

Decision: consider and approve for public release - timing to be confirmed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Parks Management Plan Review

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships

Reserve Act Classification update for Regional Parks

 

Decision:  Reserves Act classifications

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Parks Management Plan Review

Service Strategy and Integration

Statutory review of the omnibus regional parks’ management plan

Reports:

·      Regional Parks Management Plan - approval to notify intent to prepare new plan

Decision: consider and approve scope, phasing and engagement approach

 

Progress to date:

Public notification of discussion paper for consultation 20 August 2020
link to decision

Information Memorandum – Regional Parks Management Plan 15 October 2020
link to memo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Auckland Paths

Parks, Sports and Recreataion

Report on implementation plan

Inform: note progress (workshop or memo) - Timing to be confirmed

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Governance of Colin Dale Park

Community and Social Policy

To decide on the governance arrangements for Colin Dale Park. The loical board has asked that the committee consider regional governance for the park.

Decision: Agree whether or not Colin Dale Park should be regionally governed.

 

Progress to date:

Agreement to lease and subsequent lease for The Colin Day Kartsport Development Charitable Trust 11 March 2021
link to decision

 

 

ü

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One Local Initiatives (OLIs)

One Local Initiatives

Community and Social Policy, as well as Community Facilities

 

Status update on non-transport “One Local Initiatives”. 

Inform:update on progress and implementation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Economic Development

The Southern Initiative (TSI)

Chief Planning Office

 

Provide an update on both the The Southern Initiative and The Western Initiative approach, priorities and achievements.

Inform: Strategic direction regarding both the Southern Initiative and the Western Initiative approach to social and community innovation in South Auckland and West Auckland.

 

 

 

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Social, Community, Cultural Services and Infrastructure

Marae Programme

Māori Outcomes

Council partners with marae in a number of ways.  A large part of the marae programme across council is in two parts - the Marae Infrastructure Programme, which seeks to deliver safe, healthy and warm marae, and the Cultural Initiatives Fund, which is a contestable grant open to marae and papakāinga.  The interim guidelines for both programmes have been adopted by PACE.  Both are due for review.  .

Reports:

·    Marae Infrastructure Programme- Funding Allocation Guideline

·    Cultural Initiative Fund

·    Te Atatū Marae – land tenure

Decision:  adopt revised/updated guidelines for Marae Infrastructure Programme and Cultural Initiatives Fund

 

Progress to date:

Marae Infrastructure Programme – Interim Funding Guideline 13 February 2020
link to decision

Revise out of date resolutions in relation to the development of a marae on Te Atatū Peninsula 15 October 2020
link to decision

 

 

 

 

July

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cultural Initiatives Fund

Māori Outcomes

The Cultural Initiatives Fund is open annually for applications for marae and papapkainga housing.  This report will provide an overview of the process, applications and recommend decisions on grants for committee endorsement

Reports:

·    Cultural Initiative Fund

 

Decision:  confirm the grants to be made to marae and papakāinga housing from the CIF contestable grant round for 2021/22

Committee for their consideration by mid-2020.

 

Progress to date:

June deferred to August

Cultural Initiatives Fund grants for marae pakāinga/ Māori housing 2020/2021 20 August 2020
link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Māori Outcomes Framework

Nga Matarae

Development of the Māori Outcomes Framework to guide Council’s evolved approach to achieving outcomes for Māori

Decision: July report on the final measures for ‘Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau – a Māori performance measurement framework

November – quarter 1 report on measures

 

Progress to date:

Māori outcomes framework - Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau  20 August 2020
link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community Facilities Network Plan and Action Plan

Service Strategy and Integration

Update on progress of delivery.

Priority actions will be reflected in 2019/2020 work programmes and draft 2020/2021 work programmes subject to available resources

Consider: Annual update on progress of the Community Facilities Network Plan Delivery.

 

Progress to date:

Report progress on implementation of the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan (2019) 15 October 2020
 link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Facility Partnerships Policy Implementation

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

Update and approval of facility partnership opportunities progressed through the application of the Facility Partnerships Policy

Consider:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Citizens Advice Bureaux Services

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

(Arts, Community & Events)

Review of the Citizens Advice Bureaux Services

Staff to negotiate new funding and strategic relationship agreements with Auckland Citizens Advice Bureaux Services (ACABx) for the 2019-2021 period. This will also include working with ACABx to develop a regional network service provision framework to be completed by 30 September 2020.

Reports:

·      Formation of a political advisory group for the Citizens Advice Bureaux Service Framework

Decision:on review

 

Progress to date:

Form Citizens Advice Bureaux Service Framework Political advisory group  13 February 2020
link to decision

Update about development of the Citizens Advice Bureaux (CAB) regional service provision framework nd CAB insights report 15 October 2020
link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Graffiti Prevention Action Plan

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

(Arts Community & Events)

A regional, integrated approach to preventing graffiti vandalism was confirmed through the 2012 Auckland Graffiti Vandalism Prevention Plan.

This approach has been reviewed and updated in 2019, in the context of a refreshed approach to prevention and enforcement and an acknowledgment of the significant success of the rapid removal methodology.

Decision: on the strategic direction

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Homelessness

Arts, Community & Events & Community & Social Policy

 

Implementing position and role on homelessness

Reports:

·    Implementing a cross-sectoral approach to homelessness

 

Decision:on council commitment and implementation action

 

Progress to date:

June 2020 – deferred to August

Endorsement of the Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa (Auckland’s regional cross-sectoral homelessness plan) Strategic Framework 20 August 2020
link to decision

Update on COVID19 and post-COVID19 support for people who are homeless 20 August 2020
link to memo

A Night Shelter in Auckland 15 October 2020
link to memo

Snapshot Homelessnes Statistics 13 May 2021
 link to memo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Safe Communities

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

(Arts Community & Events) 

In February 2019 the Community Development and Safety Committee endorsed the draft application (COM/2019/2), and Auckland became and accredited Safe Community in May 2019. This is now in operation through the Safety Collective Tamaki Makaurau I Auckland of which Auckland Council is a member.

Decision: On strategic direction. The committee will be asked to consider and endorse the work of the Safety Collective since Safe Communities Accreditation was achieved in mid-2019.

Consider: Committee-police regular engagement via this committee.

 

Progress to date:

20 August 2020 deferred to October 2020

The Safety Collective, 20 August 2020
link to memo

Public Input from the Safety Collective Tamaki Makaurau 15 October 2020
Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Event Fund Grants Allocation

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

(Arts, Community & Events)

Regional Events grants

2019/20 Round 2 - 2020/21 Round 1

Two rounds per year

The two annual funding rounds held in recent years have been combined into one round for the 2020/2021 year

Reports:

·    Regional Event Fund Grants Allocation 2019/2020 - Round Two, Strategic Priorities

·      Regional Event Fund Grants Allocation 2020/2021

Decision: Funding allocations for the regional event fund 2019/2020 round two and 2020/2021 round one for approval.

 

Progress to date:

Grant allocations for 2019/2020 Regional Event Fund round two 13 February 2020
link to decision

Report June 2020 – deferred to August

Grant allocations for the 2020/2021 Regional Event Grant Programme 20 August 2020
link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Arts & Culture Grants

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships (Arts, Community & Events)

Regional Arts & Culture grants

2019/20 Round 2

2020/21 Round 1

Two round per year

Reports:

·    Regional Arts and Culture grant allocation: Round two 2019/2020

·      Regional Arts and Culture grant allocation 2020/2021

Decision: Funding allocations for the regional arts and culture fund 2019/2020 round two and 2020/2021 round one for approval.

 

Progress to date:

Workshop to review grant priorities scheduled for May 2020 June 2020 – deferred to August ???

2019/2020 Regional Arts and Culture grants programme 20 August 2020
 link to decision

2020/2021 Regional Arts and Culture grants programme 10 December 2020
link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Community Development Grants

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

(Arts, Community & Events)

Regional Community Development grants

2019/2020 – one round per year

Reports:

·    Regional Community Development grants 2019/2020

·    ACE regional contestable grants priorities FY 20/21

·    Regional Community Development grants 2020/2021

 

Decision: Funding allocations for the regional community development fund 2019/2020 for approval.

 

Progress to date:

Allocations for the Regional Community Development grants 2019/2020 13 February 2020
link to decision

Regional Arts and Culture, Events, and Community Development grants programmes FY2020/2021 – 2021/2022 20 August 2020
link to decision

Allocations for the Regional Community Development grants 2020/202110 December 2020
link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arts & Culture Work Programme FY22

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

To present the Arts & Culture work programme for approval for FY22.

This will include public art outside the city centre.

Note:public art within the city centre will be considered by the Planning Committee.

Decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Events Work Programme FY22

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

To present the regional events work programme for FY22

July 2021

Regional Events Work Programme FY22

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

 

 

 

 

 

sept

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Implementation of improvements resulting from the review of the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012

Community & Social Policy

The committee resolved that staff report back on the implementation of approved improvementsresulting from the  review of the Community Occupancy Guideline 2012.

Decision: current state review and agree next steps

 

 

 

sept

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Intercultural Cities Network

Community & Social Policy

Consideration of a proposal to join the Intercultural Cities Network to support implementation and monitoring of progress on ‘Inclusive Auckland’ actions.

Decision: Consider and decide whether Auckland should be a member of the network

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Investing in Aucklanders (Age Friendly City)

Community & Social Policy

Identify issues and opportunities for an inclusive friendly city

The pilots will be designed and implemented over the next 18 months. Regular progress updates will be provided to this Committee.

Direction: on the approach to a friendly, inclusive, diverse city.

A draft Auckland Age-friendly Action Plan will be presented to PACE for approved consultation in early 2021. A final Action Plan is expected to come to PACE for endorsement in late 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHO Age Friendly City

Community & Social Policy

To develop an Age-friendly plan for Auckland and join the WHO Age-Friendly Cities and Communities Network

Decision: on the Age-friendly plan to join the WHO Age-Friendly Cities and Communities Network

 

Progress to date:

Update on the Age-friendly Auckland Project, Tāmaki tuawhi kaumatua – 15 October 2020
link to memo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thriving Communities Plan Refresh

Community & Social Policy

To implement the improvements identified in the 2018 Thriving Communities Status report including a refresh of the Thriving Communities Plan

Direction approve draft plan for public consultation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am Auckland Implementation and Evaluation Plan monitoring

Community & Social Policy

Annual implementation and evaluation report

Direction: approve three year status review

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grant Policy Monitoring

Community & Social Policy

Audit of the application of the Grants Policy

Decision:  on audit results

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Toi Whitiki / Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan Strategy?

Community and Social Policy

Review of progress made on Toi Whitiki strategy. What has been achieved, what isworking well and what needs to change to improve investment and outcomes.

Decision: approve current state review and agree next steps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mt Albert Pool Indicative Business Case

Community and Social Policy

 

 

Indicitive Business Case approved for preparation.

Decision: approve preferred option

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol Strategy three yearly review

Community and Social Policy

Three year review is due

Decision: approve refreshed alcohol strategy

Progress to date:

2021 Review of the Strategy to Minimise Alcohol Harm 13 May 2021
Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

ü

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Smokefree Update Report

Community and Social Policy

 

 

 

Smokefree report back is due

Decision: approve priorities for 2021/2022

 

 

 

July

 

Sept

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Public Art Policy

Community and Social Policy

Review of the Public Arts Policy: what’s working what’s not.

Decisions relating to major public arts

Staff will report back to the committee on implementation progress within 18 months.

 

 

Decision:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Investigation in North-west Community Provision

Community and Social Policy

Investigation to identify andy current gaps in services or facilities or in the future

Reports:

Indicative Business Case: Aquatic Provision in Northwest Auckland

Decision: on investigation findings

 

Progress to date:

Business case for a destination aquatic facility with leisure components 10 December 2020
link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Libraries and Information Services

Community Facilities Network Plan Sub Action: Central library strategic review

Libraries and Information and Community Social Policy

A strategic review of the Central Library has been commissioned to understand how the current building can meet future need and demand for services, assess the Central Library’s current and potential future role in the region, and guide decision making about future investment and development opportunities

Reports:

·      Investigtion of the central library

Decision: consider the strategic review and decide on the direction of the plan, as well as receive the strategic review

 

Progress to date:

Approval to develop a indicative business case for the central library / Tāmaki Pātaka Kōreo 10 December 2020
link to decision

Memo – Central City Library Closure 6 April 2021
link to memo

Memo – Central Library Closure Update – 9 April 2021
link to memo

Memo – Central Library Closure Update – 20 April 2021
link to memo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fines and Charges

Libraries and Information

Case developed for removing overdue fines from Auckland Libraries

Decision: to move case forward for consideration

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Libraries

Libraries and Information

Work around the integration with customer services

Decision: on matters relating to regional aspects of the proposed integration (local boards will decide on local outcomes)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Investment and 10-Year Budget work programme

Community Facilities Network Plan priorities for Long-term Plan consideration

Service Strategy and Integration

Indicative business cases for CFNP priority actions to consider as part of the 2021-2031 Auckland Council Long-term Plan

Decision: on indicative business cases relating to CFNP priorities.

LTP – have a separate process

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strategic acquisition issues and opportunities

Community and Social Policy

Understanding current acquisition issues and options.

Inform:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Growth programme

Community and Social Policy

Update on proposed growth funding allocation for 2021-2022

Decision: on growth funding allocation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OTHER

Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women.

In early 2019, council affirmed its commitment to advancing the goals of the Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW).

Inform:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Food Policy Alliance

Community and Social Policy

To consider food policy alliance

Decision: on food policy alliance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community Engagement

Democracy Services & Communication and Engagement

Community engagement, advance participatory democracy

Inform: progress and issues associated with enhancing community engagement and participation  (Significance and Engagement Policy)

(workshop):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Completed

Lead Department

Area of work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Decision

Regional Sport and Recreation grants programme 2018/2020

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Review of previous grants allocation and recommendation for next round

Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme 2020/2021

·      opens for applications on 24 January 2020 closes on 6 March 2020

·      allocating $508,00 from July 2020, in accordance with the Community Grants Policy 2014.

allocating $508,000 from July 2020, in accordance with the Community Grants Policy 2014.

Decision: on sport and recreation grants programme objectives and approach

 

 

allocation of funding 2020/2021.

approve funding budget of $508,000.

20 August 2020 link to decision

 

Youth Centres Review

 

Community & Social Policy

Review councils assistance to youth centres

Reports:

Youth Centre Investigation

Decision on review findings

 

council’s support to youth centres and non-council youth services 

11 June 2020 - link to decison

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

08 July 2021

 

Economic Development Action Plan 2021-24

File No.: CP2021/06449

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present a summary of feedback and subsequent changes to the draft Economic Development Action Plan: Auckland Council group’s role in Auckland’s recovery 2021-24 (the Plan) and to present the final Plan for the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee approval.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The council and its council-controlled organisations (CCOs) have worked collaboratively to develop the Economic Development Action Plan: Auckland Council group’s role in Auckland’s recovery 2021-24. The Plan defines and agrees, for the next three years, the council group’s economic objectives and priorities and determines a coordinated course of action. The Plan is limited to actions that are within the remit of council and CCO activities.

3.       The Plan aligns with the 10-year budget and will inform the work programmes of relevant CCOs. The work is supported by the chief executives of council and all substantive CCOs.

4.       The Plan details 25 action areas within six themes as outlined in Attachment A. It reflects the guiding principles of transitioning towards a regenerative and low carbon economy, supporting economic opportunities for Māori, and responding to our communities of greatest need.

5.       The Plan framework was workshopped with the PACE committee on 24 March and a draft Plan was presented to this committee on 13 May for receipt and feedback.

6.       Since then, there has been targeted engagement on the draft Plan, including with iwi, local boards, advisory panel members and staff across the council group. Feedback was received until 18 June 2021.

7.       The most frequent comments received through the feedback were centered around:

·      support for the guiding principles and a need for greater visibility of their application in the Plan

·      lack of adequate support for local boards in delivering local economic outcomes, including concerns with prioritising some localities over others

·      visibility of some communities (e.g., disabled, seniors) and their value add to Auckland’s economy

·      support for the group’s sustainable/social procurement objectives

·      desire for the Plan to be more ambitious and reflect our changing economic environment

8.       Changes have been made to the draft Plan to address this feedback. Key improvements to the document also include development of a comprehensive monitoring framework, application of the guiding principles and future considerations beyond the scope of the Plan.

 


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      approve and adopt the Economic Development Action Plan: Council’s role in Auckland’s recovery 2021-24.

Horopaki

Context

9.       In August 2020, the CCO Review Panel delivered its report containing 64 recommendations, which were endorsed in full by the Governing Body. The review stated that council and all substantive council-controlled organisations should together define the economic outcomes for Auckland and agree on how to achieve and measure them. The review also acknowledged the need for better coordination and definition of responsibilities for local economic development within the council group. The Economic Development Action Plan 2021-24 forms part of council group’s response to that review.

10.     The Plan is not a long-term strategy. The priorities and focus over the next three years, however, consider direction from our existing strategies i.e., the Auckland Plan 2050, Economic Development Strategy 2012, Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan and Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau: Council’s Māori Outcomes Framework.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     Comprehensive background work to support the development of the Plan was completed by the Chief Economist Unit (CEU), the Auckland Plan Strategy & Research Department (APSR) and Auckland Unlimited. An extensive review of plans and strategies across the council and CCOs to identify common economic development themes was also undertaken. This foundational work formed the basis for six themes:

·      Destination Tāmaki Makaurau: attracting people and investment

·      Local Tāmaki Makaurau: enabling thriving local economies

·      Skilled Tāmaki Makaurau: supporting quality jobs and skill development

·      Future Tāmaki Makaurau: preparing businesses for the future

·      Enabled Tāmaki Makaurau: infrastructure that enables economic development

·      Enabled Tāmaki Makaurau: regulations that enable economic development.

12.     This framework was workshopped with the PACE committee on 24 March 2021 and the draft Plan developed and presented to committee on 13 May 2021. Since then, significant work has been done to revise and refine the Plan based on consultation with and feedback received from a range of groups.  This has included:

·      formal feedback received via workshops and meeting resolutions from 18 Local Boards

·      feedback received (via meeting and written) from 5 Auckland Council Advisory Panels

·      feedback received from 3 Iwi groups.

·      feedback from other groups including the Auckland Policy Office and the Auckland Unlimited Board.

13.     Around 350 feedback points were received with local boards representing most of the feedback (74%). Our youth, ethnic, seniors, disability and Pacific People advisory panels and Iwi provided well considered and valuable input. In addition, elected members and staff across the council group contributed at various stages in the development of the Plan.

 

14.     A detailed analysis of the feedback grouped responses by topics of feedback, themes, and sentiment (support/concern). The most mentioned theme of the Plan was Local Tāmaki Makaurau. Concerns were most often expressed in the Destination theme, largely related to too much focus on the City Centre. Least concerns were raised in Skilled Tāmaki Makaurau.

15.     Other than general feedback, the most frequently mentioned topics were skills (support for communities of focus), local board support, destination management and local economic places. The most frequent comments were centered around:

·      support for the guiding principles and a need for greater visibility of their application in the Plan

·      lack of adequate support for local boards in delivering local economic outcomes, including concerns with prioritising some localities over others

·      visibility of some communities (e.g., disabled, seniors) and their value add to Auckland’s economy

·      support for the group’s sustainable/social procurement objectives

·      desire for the Plan to be more ambitious and reflect our changing economic environment

·      unclear connections between the commentary, levers, outcomes and actions.

16.     As a result of feedback and ongoing Plan refinement, the following key changes have been made:

·      consolidation of some actions and addition of some new actions

·      providing a clearer link between the actions and the outcomes they aim to achieve

·      a clearer link between council levers and the actions

·      the introduction of a ‘Plan on a page’ as a one-page overview of key Plan content

·      clarity and further detail on the application of the guiding principles

·      details of the Plan’s monitoring framework and associated measures.

17.     The Plan now contains detailed sub-actions that sit under 25 action areas within the six themes defined in the original framework. Of these sub-actions:

·      the majority are led by either Auckland Council or Auckland Unlimited.

·      just under half are categorised as current activity (BAU) while the remainder are either an enhancement of current BAU or new activity.

·      over half of the actions support one or more of the guiding principles.

18.     The monitoring framework is now detailed in the Plan to ensure its successful implementation. This framework includes three layers of evaluation and aligns with existing measures and council group reporting processes and timelines.  The three layers are:

·      strategic outcomes: measured and reported annually through existing strategy frameworks (i.e. Auckland Plan 2050 scorecard, Māori Outcomes report, and Auckland Climate Plan indicators of progress).

·      the Plan’s theme objectives: using measurable progress indicators against the 6 theme objectives. Lack of progress or improvement of these indicators gives us the opportunity to evaluate the influence or focus of our actions.

·      the Plan’s actions: The accountable CCO or council directorate (action owner) will report progress on the deliverables. Where applicable, performance measures and targets from the 10-year budget and/or Statement of Intents are aligned to the actions.

19.     Reporting against the council group delivered actions, performance measures and progress indicators will occur annually to both the CCO Chief Executive’s group and the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee, in line with Annual Plan and Statement of Intent reporting (beginning August 2022 and each year thereafter).

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan provided direction to the development of the Plan, aspiring to a more resilient economy that is regenerative, inclusive, local and enables Aucklanders to thrive.

21.     The Plan embedded the guiding principle of ‘transitioning to a regenerative and low carbon economy’ into each of its six themes. The development of actions are underpinned by kaitiakitanga and considers how resources used give back to nature and increase value through reuse and renewal. Where applicable, actions broadly encourage a decrease in greenhouse gas emissions, low carbon products and services, climate innovation, and less dependency on natural resources.

22.     The actions presented in the Plan have been assessed by the Chief Sustainability Office to determine how each sub-action contributes to a regenerative and low carbon economy. The results of this assessment have been summarised in the final Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     The Plan responds to the CCO review recommendation for council and all CCOs to together define the economic outcomes for Auckland and agree on how to achieve and measure them. The actions in the Plan have been developed by representatives from a range of council departments and all CCOs.  Actions are shared and accountabilities of council and each CCO is well defined. Some CCOs have a more active role than others.

24.     The scope of the Plan is limited to actions that are within the remit of council and CCO activities. A review and discussion document of the council groups levers that materially contribute to economic development formed the basis for this Plan.

25.     The Plan has been endorsed by the Chief Executives of the council and all substantive CCOs and is reflected in each Statement of Intent (2021-24). The accountable CCO or council directorate are responsible for including the actions in their work programmes and within their existing budgets and will report progress on the deliverables.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     Each theme of the Plan will have a local impact, acknowledging the interdependency of local economies and the regional economy. The Plan includes the focus area ‘Local Tāmaki Makaurau: enabling thriving local economies’ and has been informed by the recent local board plans’ local economic priorities.

27.     The Local Tāmaki Makaurau theme seeks to clarify what the Auckland Council group can do to support the local economies of Auckland within existing resources. This includes actions around regenerating our town centres, support for local boards, establishing a consistent approach to local economic places, and support for local businesses.

28.     The draft Plan was considered at all local board business meetings and/or workshops in May and June with written feedback by formal resolution provided to the project leads by 18 June 2021. Feedback from 18 of our local boards represented the majority of all feedback.

29.     Most of the feedback was supportive of the overall direction of the Plan, particularly in relation to the Plan’s guiding principles and a focus on our communities of greatest need. However, there remains concerns around the lack of adequate support for local boards in delivering their local economic outcomes, including concerns with prioritising some localities over others.

 

30.     The Plan acknowledges the significant role of local boards in local economic development and the continued concerns raised by local boards for local economic development support from the Auckland Council group. Some of the concerns are in part met through actions within the Plan, however, some issues remain outside of the scope of the Plan and current resourcing.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau has provided direction to the development of the Plan, in particularly, the Kia ora te Umanga mahi objective of supporting economic opportunities for Māori businesses and Iwi organisations. The Plan has also considered direction from the Auckland Plan 2050, the Mana Whenua Forum’s strategic plan and IMSB’s Issues of Significance (2017) as they relate to Māori economic development.

32.     The Plan has embedded the guiding principle of ‘supporting economic opportunities for Māori’ into each of its six themes. The actions have been assessed on how they consider partnership opportunities with mana whenua and mataawaka, focus on equity and addressing systemic barriers, and identify new economic opportunities for Māori. A summary of this assessment is provided in the final Plan.

33.     The project team have communicated with Iwi from the commencement of the project (January 2021) to determine and initiate the preferred process of engagement for each Iwi. The draft Plan was sent to all Iwi for input and feedback through to 18 June 2021, and all Iwi were individually followed up to prompt feedback.

34.     Follow up conversations were had with several Iwi representatives, with formal feedback provided from 3 Iwi groups, providing valuable insight into the significant contribution that mana whenua already make to Auckland’s economy including initiatives underway with Auckland Council. These Iwi have expressed a desire to continue to work with the Council group, particularly in the implementation of this Plan. Some of the matters raised are broader and deeper than the scope of this Plan and will be followed up through existing engagement channels including Relationship Agreements.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     The scope of the Economic Development Action Plan 2021-24 states that actions will be funded within the existing 10-year budget 2021-31 and therefore no additional funding is required. The Plan identifies some actions that rely on external funding sources and partnerships.

36.     At the advice of the finance division, budget alignment is demonstrated in the Plan by the Long Term Plan 2021-31 activity area and the respective CCO and/or council.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     The Plan outlines actions that require a commitment from the responsible CCO / council directorate to include in their work programmes and within their existing budgets. The monitoring framework includes annual progress reporting (deliverables and measures) to ensure effective implementation of the Plan.

38.     This Plan is an internal document, outlining work to be done within the remit of council and its CCOs. The content of the Plan builds on earlier consultation undertaken in the development of key strategies that have provided direction. Input and feedback for the Plan has therefore been targeted to key groups.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     The Plan will require some minor corrections or edits to the attachment presented, including an addition of te reo headings, before being published on the Auckland Council website.

41.     The Economic Development Action Plan: Auckland Council group’s role in Auckland’s recovery 2021-24 will be distributed to the groups that have been engaged from the commencement of the project.

42.     The project leads will respond, where appropriate, to groups that have provided feedback to follow up on any outstanding issues or further opportunities as they relate to Tāmaki Makaurau’s economic development.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Economic Development Action Plan July 2021

31

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janelle Breckell - Principal Strategic Advisor

James Robinson - Head of Strategy and Planning, Auckland Unlimited

Authorisers

Jacques Victor – General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

08 July 2021

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

08 July 2021

 

Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau - Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework

File No.: CP2021/09458

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of ‘Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau – Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework’.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau – a Māori outcomes performance measurement framework (the Framework) for final approval. The Framework was approved as draft in August 2020 subject to the performance measures being finalised. 

3.       The Framework aligns with the Auckland Plan’s ‘Māori Identify and Wellbeing outcome’ and the 10 Māori Outcome Strategic Priorities in the 2018-2021 Long-Term Plan (LTP).

4.       Included in Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau are Mana Outcomes for each priority. The Mana Outcomes identify what matters most for Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau. The Mahi Objectives set out how the council group will contribute to the Mana Outcome.

5.       A core purpose of the Framework is to set performance measures to monitor the council group’s progress towards delivering Māori outcomes through the Mahi Objectives and more broadly the Mana Outcomes. The proposed measures are attached in Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau (Attachment A).

6.       While developing the performance measures, it was critical to consider:

·    whether the measure was able to be defined or clearly scoped

·    the relevant data was available and accessible to support the measure

·    a supporting process was already in place to collect the data, or could be introduced relatively easily

·    how the measure aligned across the reporting cycles including the 3-yearly review of the LTP measures.

7.       The first year of monitoring the Framework will create an evidence baseline for the council group to assess its performance in delivering on Māori Outcomes. This baseline draws on data and information that is currently being collected across the council group or can be easily introduced.

8.       Ongoing refinement and review of the Framework and performance measures will continue to build the evidence base and better reflect progress on the Mana Outcomes. Subsequent reviews will lift the performance reporting standard by including a mix of qualitative and quantitative measures and incorporating key indicators for each priority outcome.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      approve ‘Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau – Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework’ including the performance measures.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       In 2012, the Governing Body confirmed the council’s policy position on the Treaty of Waitangi through Whiria Te Muka Tangata, the Māori responsiveness framework.

10.     Ngā Mātārae undertook a review of the Māori Responsiveness Framework and found that while the council’s internal capability to respond to Māori had improved, there was a need to transition from internally focused responsiveness to an external focus on outcomes for and with Māori.

11.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau is an evolution of the Māori responsiveness framework. It is a performance measurement framework named for its overall outcome: holistic wellbeing for Tāmaki Makaurau. The Framework supplements the responsiveness approach to be relevant to the expectations and aspirations of Māori under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and responds to a 2015 Independent Māori Statutory Board Treaty Audit recommendation for council to develop a performance measurement framework. 

12.     The 10 Māori priorities in the Long-Term Plan 2018-2028 provide the foundation for Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau (Attachment B). The priorities seek to accelerate the council group’s role in advancing the Auckland Plan Māori identity and wellbeing outcome.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau

13.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau captures how the council group will contribute to the outcomes that Māori have identified as mattering most for their whānau, marae, iwi and communities through the lenses of the 10 Māori Outcomes Strategic Priorities.

14.     The Framework supports the evolution and shift in focus from internal facing responsiveness to an outcomes-based lens by enabling a clearer understanding of how the council group can be more effective in achieving outcomes for and with Māori.

15.     The Framework includes three components:

·    Mana outcomes: includes a high-level aspirational statement developed in consultation with Māori for each priority.

·    Mahi objectives sets how the council will contribute towards each Mana Outcome.

·    Measures: a group of measures for each mahi objective to monitor performance and report on progress.

16.     Each priority is included in the Framework as a Mana Outcome, with te reo Māori titles provided in consultation with a Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum steering group.

17.     The Framework is based on ora – wellbeing; promoting positive wellbeing for Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau results in positive wellbeing for all Aucklanders.

18.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau was developed with input from the Mana Whenua Forum steering group, and through engagement and direct input from the secretariat of the Independent Māori Statutory Board, council subject matter experts and Māori outcome leads, CCOs, and Māori communities.

Performance measures

19.     Across the 10 priorities, the 32 draft performance measures have been refined to 24 measures.


 

 

20.     In finalising the measures, the following criteria was considered:

·    the measure was able to be defined or clearly scoped

·    relevant data was available and accessible to support the measure

·    a supporting process is in place to collect the data

·    how the measure aligned across the reporting cycles including the 3-yearly review of the LTP measures

·    feedback from the relevant Māori outcome lead.

21.     Through refinement of the measures, it is evident that the measures will need to be developed in phases. The first year of monitoring the framework will create an evidence baseline for the council group to assess its performance in delivering on Māori Outcomes. This baseline draws on data and information that is currently collected across council or can be easily introduced. 

22.     The Framework measures are the first tier of measures for reporting on progress for Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau. A second tier of sub-group measures are currently being developed and will also inform progress on the priority outcomes.

23.     As the framework matures and as the capacity of the council group to collect data improves, the measures will be refined to better reflect the aspirations of Māori. Subsequent reviews will lift the performance reporting standard by including a mix of qualitative and quantitative measures and incorporating key indicators for each priority outcome.

24.     The focus for continued improvement of the performance measurement framework will:

·    Lift performance through improved monitoring and reporting

·    Evolve the measures to support a growing evidence base

·    Improve the evaluation of council performance on the Mana Outcomes

·    Share the Māori outcomes story widely

·    Integrate intervention logic into the measure methodology.

25.     Work continues across the council group to understand what data is currently being collected on Māori Outcome performance and work towards addressing systemic gaps and solutions. The performance measures will be reviewed annually to identify gaps in the framework and areas for improvement.

26.     Other than finalising the performance measures, no other changes have been made to Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau from the August 2020 draft framework.

Reporting

27.     Some of the Framework performance measures are included in the 2021-2031 LTP and form part of the LTP reporting. In addition, a six monthly reporting cycle for Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau will be introduced with monitoring commencing in July 2021. The first report will be available in early 2022.

28.     The annual review of the measures commences in March 2022 and will inform any changes or additions required to enhance the Framework.

29.     Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori - The Māori Outcomes annual report will then provide both qualitative and quantitative data to report on the council groups progress toward achieving Māori outcomes.


 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

30.     Climate change has a significant impact across several of the Māori Outcome Strategic Priorities including Kia Ora Te Taiao and Kia Ora Te Marae. Feedback from the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum and internal discussions have highlighted the need to have a stronger focus on climate change within the Framework. This will be a core part of the review of Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau and the performance measures. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau provides clarity and guidance to the council group on the delivery of Māori outcomes, and enable the monitoring and measurement of the council group’s contribution towards these outcomes. 

32.     The Framework and the measures provide clear direction for the council group in the development of their work programmes and Māori Responsiveness Plans. 

33.     Monitoring and reporting sits across the council group, and discussions with the respective CCO Māori outcome leads will continue as the Framework and measures are reviewed.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     The Framework provides direction on the council group commitment to the Māori outcome priorities and will assist local boards with their own planning and activities to support Māori outcomes.

35.     Further engagement will occur with the local boards as Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau and the performance measures are reviewed.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau is a critical mechanism to support the council group delivering outcomes for mana whenua and Māori communities. The Framework was developed with mana whenua and mataawaka to ensure their aspirations are reflected.

37.     An alignment exercise was completed to highlight the synergies between the Māori outcomes framework and the strategic documents of mana whenua entities and Māori community groups including:

·    Iwi strategic plans

·    Iwi management plans

·    Mataawaka strategies

·    Marae development plans

·    Environment management plans.

38.     A Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum steering group contributed to the development of the Framework, and feedback from the Forum was sought on the proposed measures. The feedback provided by the Forum on the measures identified several areas for improvement including:

·    Inclusion of additional mana whenua specific measures, especially for the Kia Ora Te Taiao outcome

·    Enhancing the type of data being collected and including qualitative as well as quantitative measures

·    Clarity on the monitoring and reporting process for the Framework, and next steps for the review of the measures

·    Ensuring there is sufficient resource available to collect and analyse the data, and review the measures

·    Incorporating a te ao Māori perspective

·    Clarification on how the Forum, iwi and mataawaka will have access to reporting, and ongoing involvement in the Framework as it evolves and matures.

39.     The Forum has requested a further report on Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau. The feedback raised by the Forum will form part of ongoing discussions and provide direction on the future development of the Framework.

40.     The Framework has previously been presented at the Independent Māori Statutory Board and Governing Body joint meeting. The Framework takes account of the board’s Issues of Significance and includes measures from the Māori Values reports. Officers will continue to work alongside the board’s secretariat as the Framework is implemented, monitored, and reviewed. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     The LTP has identified a Māori Outcomes fund of $150m over a 10-year period and is a key enabler for the council group to deliver on Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau. In addition to the fund, the Māori outcomes portfolio includes council and CCO baseline budgets used towards programmes and projects specifically targeted at delivering outcomes for Māori.

42.     It is expected that Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau will drive LTP bids for funding to deliver outcomes and identify opportunities for existing budgets to be reviewed and aligned to the Māori Strategic Priority Outcomes.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

43.     There is a risk the council group may be unable to meet its responsibilities to Māori, resulting in a range of significant impacts and consequences including social inequality, breach of statutory obligations and a loss of trust and confidence in council.

44.     Māori outcomes is included in council’s top risk register.

45.     The framework recommends initiatives under Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau be cognisant of the COVID-19 recovery effort.  Data to understand the economic, cultural, social and environmental impacts on Māori of Tāmaki Makaurau should be prioritised, collected and reported. 

46.     The performance measurement framework for Māori outcomes meets the requirements specified in the 2018 Treaty Audit recommendation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

47.     Monitoring of the performance measures will commence in July with the first report available in early 2022.

48.     The review of the performance measures and the Framework will commence in March 2022.

49.     A report will be presented to the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum and direction sought on the preferred approach to progress the feedback provided by the Forum on the Framework.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau

85

b

Māori Outcome Strategic Priorities

99

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lou-Ann Ballantyne - Te Tiriti & Maori Responsiveness Hub Lead

Authorisers

Simone Andersen – General Manager Nga Matarae - Maori Outcomes

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

08 July 2021

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

08 July 2021

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

08 July 2021

 

Cultural Initiatives Fund - 2021/22 Grants

File No.: CP2021/09549

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To review and approve the Cultural Initiatives Funding grants for marae development and papakāinga/Māori housing for the 2021/ 2022 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Marae offer a range of services that contribute to and support whānau and community well-being. They are a critical cultural connection for mana whenua and Māori communities. 

3.       In recognition of the critical role marae provide in the community and the wide range of unmet needs of marae, a funding envelope for contestable grants for marae and papakāinga/Māori housing is included in the Long-Term Plan 2018-2028 and the draft Long-Term Plan 2021-31. This is known as the Cultural Initiatives Fund.

4.       The Cultural Initiatives Fund for 2021/2022 opened for applications for seven weeks from 1 March 2021.

5.       Auckland Council received 16 applications for the 2021/2022 funding round. Eleven of these were for marae development and five were for papakāinga/Māori housing.  The total funding requested across the 16 applications was $2,582,196.  The available budget for 2021/22 is $1,200,000.

6.       It is recommended that 12 of the applications be granted funding.  Nine of these are recommended for part funding only, three are recommended for full funding.  The reasons for recommendations to grant part funding vary but in general are due to either:

·        identifying specific activities within applications that are out of scope (of the grant criteria)

·        removing non-essential works

·        grants having been given in the recent past

·        there is less confidence that the funding will be able to be spent within the year

7.       It was necessary to consider these measures to either decline or part fund applications because of the oversubscription of the fund. 

8.       Of the remaining four applications one was withdrawn after applying and one applicant was ineligible leaving two applications where it is recommended to decline.  The reasons for declining are:

·        Te Aroha Pā put in two applications (one for marae development and one for papakāinga).  They asked that, if there is a need to prioritise due to an oversubscribed fund, priority be given to the marae application. 

·        Te Kopu Incorporated (Tahuna Marae) application had several discrepancies.  The panel had concerns that the funding applied for would not deliver what was intended as there is further work needed on the scope and cost of works. 


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      approve the following 2021/2022 Cultural Initiatives Fund grants, at a total value of $1.2m, for marae and papakāinga/Māori housing development:

CIF marae development

 

Motairehe Marae

$25,000

Ngā Tai Umupuia Te Waka Totara Trust

$105,000

Te Aroha Pā Marae

$100,000

Te Kawerau-ā-Maki

$150,000

Ngāti Ōtara Marae

$75,000

Auckland Tuhoe Society trading as Te Tira Hou Marae

$15,000

Te Herenga Waka ō Ōrewa

$150,000

Ngā Whare Waatea Marae

$55,000

Te Puea Memorial Marae

$35,000

CIF papakāinga/Māori housing

 

Te Motu-ā-Hiaroa

$170,000

Whai Rawa Development Ltd Partnership

$170,000

Manurewa Parish

$150,000

Total amount of funding

$1,200,000

 

b)      request that the Director Customer and Community Services set appropriate conditions, including timing for releasing funds, for each of the grants identified in a).

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Auckland Plan identifies “investment in marae to be self-sustaining and prosperous” as  a priority. Marae are hubs for the Māori community and many marae support the community as a whole. They physically and spiritually anchor Māori identity, and function as focal points for Māori social, economic and cultural leadership. Hapū and iwi marae provide the tūrangawaewae for their people.

10.     Marae manaaki (host/welcome) the wider community in times of need. As the region grows and we look to build a more resilient region marae are likely to play an increasing role as community hubs. 

 

 

 

11.     The Auckland Plan also identifies the need to “grow intergenerational wealth”. The Auckland Plan identifies ways that this can be done including whānau-centric housing models (such as papakāinga which grow hapū and iwi asset bases) and improving regulatory processes and collaboration for Māori land development.

12.     The Long-Term Plan (LTP) 2015-2025 established a funding envelope to enable thriving and self-sustaining marae and to support establishment of papakāinga/Māori housing across Auckland. This funding was reaffirmed in the current LTP and is included in the draft LTP 2021-2031. This is known as the Cultural Initiatives Fund (CIF).  CIF is a contestable grant fund. 

13.     In relation to the current financial year (2020/2021) there were nine grants awarded in August 2020.  Five of these applicants have fully expended their funding. Three marae and one papakāinga/Māori housing applicant have requested an extension of their contracts due to varying but reasonable circumstances including the ongoing impacts of Covid19.  These are currently been varied and funding has been accrued.

14.     The funding round for 2021/2022 opened for applications on 1 March 2021 and was kept open until 24 April 2021.

15.     Applicants were invited to submit their applications using the Smarty Grants website, which is the platform used for council community grants. The Marae Advisor and Principal Papakāinga/Māori Housing provided guidance and support to applicants throughout the application period.

16.     The applications were advertised and assessed under the CIF interim funding guidelines.  These guidelines are included as Attachment A and B and summarised here:

·    marae or papakāinga/Māori housing applicants must be a trust, authority, or other formally recognized body or gazetted or set apart as a Māori reservation

·    the maximum grant value is $170,000

·    for marae applications, a marae must be one of the 32 included in the guidelines or be a new marae where they meet the criteria

·    marae development grants support:

capital works (including purchase of small assets and mahi toi/artwork)

maintenance (including materials and labour)

project management (contractor or marae staff) up to $20,000

feasibility and concept design reports

strategic, financial or business planning

first year of audited accounts

governance and asset management planning

·    papakāinga/Māori housing grants support:

planning and regulatory costs

development costs (development contributions and infrastructure growth charges)

feasibility and concept design

strategic planning.

17.     At a workshop on 16 June 2021 the PACE Committee discussed options for the review of these guidelines and the potential need for an overall marae investment framework.  This will be reported back to PACE Committee at the end of the year.

 

Assessment panel and process

18.     The assessment panel, who have put forward the recommendations in this report, is made up of three members. All three members have previously participated in the CIF grant assessment panel and have experience in working with marae and/or papakāinga development.  Two of the panel are staff members and the third is an independent contractor and qualified quantity surveyor. 

19.     Three subject matter experts: the Marae Advisor; the Principal Papakāinga and Māori Housing, and the Programme Principal Marae Development, provided advice to the panel where needed. They were not involved in assessing applications.  This separation of roles enables these specialist staff to be independent of the assessment panel and continue to support applicants through the grant process. 

20.     The CIF application process for the funding round 2021 / 2022 is included in Attachment D. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

21.     16 applications were received for the 2021/2022 funding round. The total funding requested across the 16 applications was $2,582,196.  The available budget for 2021/22 is $1,200,000.

22.     One papakāinga/Māori housing applicant was deemed ineligible, and one marae applicant withdrew. 

23.     A summary of each of the applications, which are considered in this report, are included in Attachment C.

24.     The initial assessment identified a number of questions and gaps and these were put back to the applicants to respond to.  As a result of the feedback received the assessment panel were able to reach a consensus on the recommendations for funding which are included in this report.  

25.     It is recommended that twelve applications are supported. Three of these are at the value requested and nine are at a reduced value based on a revised scope of works.  The rationale for part funding is varied but in general the reduction in value reflects one or more these elements:

·        identifying and removing specific activities within applications which are either out of scope or less essential works

·        reducing the value to marae where grants have been given in the recent past

·        reducing value where there is less confidence that the funding will be able to be spent within the year. 

26.     Panel members considered reducing the value across these nine applications was practical, reasonable and preferable to declining more applications given that the fund was significantly oversubscribed.  

27.     It is recommended that two applicants be declined based on the following assessment:

·        Te Aroha Pā Marae applied to both funds this year.  They requested that their marae development application for their wharekai be given precedence over their papakāinga/Māori housing application if funding was limited or both applications were not able to be supported.  The assessment panel noted that they were eligible and fit the criteria for papakāinga/Māori housing however due to oversubscription have followed through with the marae request and prioritised funding for the wharekai.  The application for funding for the wharekai is recommended at a reduced level.  This is due to the fact that the wharekai is dependent on multiple funders (as currently designed and consented) and any amount of council funding under the CIF programme would be insufficient to meet their needs.  The recommendation provides a reasonable contribution within the budget constraint and knowing there is a risk this funding may not be expended without a range of other funders coming forth. 

·        Te Kopu Incorporated (Tahuna Marae) application had discrepancies with the documentation provided and the panel had concerns that the funding applied for would not deliver what was intended and there is further work needed on the scope and cost of works.  Panel members were also advised that the marae has a Development Agreement in place with council to complete significant works under a parallel programme – the Marae Infrastructure Programme (MIP). 

28.     The combined recommendations seek to support as many marae as possible, distribute money as widely as possible and favour applications where there is a higher likelihood of completing the works within the financial year.  It also seeks to fully expend the available budget ($1,200,000). 

29.     The graphs below show the recommended distribution of funds by geographic location (figures include papakāinga/Māori housing) and by affiliation as a mana whenua or mataawaka marae (marae only).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

30.     The CIF grant is a contestable grant intended to enable marae to have the capacity to realise their own vision.  Application and assessment criteria include consideration of sustainability. This section of the application is about ensuring that any council investment has an enduring effect, and it also supports the principles of reducing emissions and adapting to climate change, which are goals of the Auckland Climate Plan. 

31.     No applications were received this year for solar panels, water storage, revegetation or mara kai. The applications predominately were for future planning or replacement of existing assets.

32.     Past applications have included raising and upgrading sewerage treatment plants; developing māra kai (food gardens) to enable food sovereignty for the whānau and the community; reducing energy consumption or switching to renewable energy; para kore (a vision for all marae to be working towards zero waste 2025) and ecological restoration.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     Auckland Transport and Watercare Services both partner with marae to support the upgrade of infrastructure from time to time. These are generally more reactive programmes of work and undertaken when marae request support from the council group. These works focus on compliance, safety and ensuring current infrastructure is fit for purpose.  There is good communication between the teams running these programmes to ensure a coordinated effort.

34.     There are no other council group impacts. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

35.     Applicants are invited to engage with local boards and include any local board support in their application.  Most applicants indicated they have a good working relationship with local boards. This is included in the application summaries in Attachment C.

36.     Marae play a critical role in all communities. This was strongly demonstrated over the Covid19 lockdown period when marae mobilised their services quickly to support communities with essential food, social and health services. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, the Māori Outcomes Performance Framework, includes Kia Ora te Marae as a priority outcome. This framework has had input from mana whenua and mataawaka. This input is captured in the following mana outcome statement:

Marae are centres of excellence for whānau Māori and have an abundant presence in communities.

Marae in Tāmaki Makaurau aspire to be self-sustaining and thriving. They provide cultural connection and kaitiakitanga for mana whenua and Māori communities. Mana whenua marae carry the responsibility of ahikā; mataawaka marae manaaki whānau and the community.

Marae offer services that contribute to and support whānau and community wellbeing, such as civil defence centres, kōhanga reo and early childhood education. Marae often deliver a range of health, education and social services. Marae have a leadership role to manaaki and foster whanaungatanga for Māori and the wider community, this requires appropriate resource and support.

38.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau also includes Kia Ora te Kāinga as a priority outcome. Mana whenua and mataawaka input is captured in the following mana outcome statement:

Whānau Māori live in warm, healthy and safe homes. Housing options meet the individual and communal needs of whānau in Tāmaki Makaurau. Public sector, iwi and communities work together to ensure Māori housing is fit-for-purpose.

 

39.     The scope and intent of the CIF grant aligns closely with these mana statements which capture the aspirations of Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau.  The contestable grant was publicly advertised and those organisations most likely to benefit from the grant were contacted directly. 

40.     The range of benefits and impacts from the proposed grants are included in the summary of applications included in Attachment C. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     The 2018-2028 LTP and the draft 2021-2031 LTP both include a Māori outcomes budget of $150m across the 10-year life of the plan.  A total of $1.2m has been ringfenced annually within this budget for the contestable Cultural Initiatives Fund.

42.     A parallel programme, called the Marae Infrastructure Programme, is also funded as part of the $150m Māori outcomes funding in the LTP.  This is a non-contestable programme that seeks to deliver safe, healthy and warm marae as part of the wider council focus of marae being self-sustaining and prosperous. The programme supports the physical infrastructure development of marae. 

43.     There are other initiatives across council, not included in the Māori outcomes funding line; that contribute towards supporting marae.  These include leasing parkland, local grants and support from staff with their time and specialist knowledge. 

44.     Within the $1.2m annual funding for the CIF grants there is no split between papakāinga/Māori housing and marae development. It is the role of the assessment panel to recommend to the PACE Committee the split between these two outcomes based on the applications received.

45.     The value of grant funding sought in 2021/2022 versus the recommended value is detailed

in Attachment E.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

46.     The processes supporting the CIF grants align with the community grants processes which have been audited. These processes include high levels of transparency and accountability.

47.     This is a current operational programme and no new risks have been identified.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

48.     Following the funding decisions made by this committee, staff will work with the relevant councillors and notify all applicants of the outcome. 

49.     Funding agreements will be prepared for all successful applicants. Recipients must provide council with regular updated reports including photos. Payments will be made on receipt of invoices from third party suppliers in line with applicant’s funding agreements. This will occur throughout the year as work is completed.

50.     The funding agreement requires recipients to acknowledge Auckland Council’s support.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Cultural Initiave Fund Marae Guidelines

109

b

Cultural Initiave Fund Papakāinga and Māori Housing Guidelines

115

c

Summary of Cultural Initiave Fund applications

121

d

Cultural Initiave Fund grant funding process

135

e

Summary of recommended grants

137

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jane Aickin - Māori Outcomes Lead | Nga Matarae – Customer and Community Services

Authoriser

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

08 July 2021

 

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08 July 2021

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

08 July 2021

 

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08 July 2021

 

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08 July 2021

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

08 July 2021

 

Proposed land exchange - Bellgrove Reserves, Avondale

File No.: CP2021/07735

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the proposal to exchange Bellgrove Reserve West and part of Bellgrove Reserve East for open space located on Bellgrove Place in Avondale.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In March 2021 the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee approved the public notification of the proposal to exchange Bellgrove Reserve West and part of Bellgrove Reserve East for open space located on Bellgrove Place in Avondale.

3.       The exchange of 397m2 of land at Bellgrove Reserve West and part of Bellgrove Reserve East would enable the creation of a new pocket park (1144m2) and accessway (228m2) in the same area. 

4.       The proposed land exchange could benefit the community by:

·    increasing amenity values and open space (net gain of 975m2 open space)

·    providing a more multifunctional and useable recreational space

·    delivering better sightlines and pedestrian access to open space.

5.       To inform decision-making on whether to support the land exchange proposal, staff called for objections in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977.

6.       Auckland Council received three submissions in support of the proposal and one objection. There were no objections from iwi.

7.       The Reserves Act 1977 requires Auckland Council to give full consideration to every objection before deciding to proceed with the proposal.

8.       The objector expressed concern the new pocket park would be enclosed within the new development.

9.       As the proposal increases access, road frontage and sightlines into the open space, staff recommend the land exchange proposal proceeds.

10.     The Whau Local Board supported the proposal at their 27 May 2021 business meeting. 

11.     There is a low risk of judicial review of council decision-making processes as the process has been run in accordance with section 15(2) of the Reserves Act 1977.

12.     The Finance and Performance Committee will consider the land disposal of Bellgrove Reserve West and part Bellgrove Reserve East on 19 August 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      approve the exchange of 397m2 of reserve land as follows:

i)        Bellgrove Reserve West, 12A Bellgrove Place, 245m2, LOT 5 DP 100239

ii)       Bellgrove Reserve East in part, 15A Bellgrove Place, 152m2, LOT 2 DP 100239

for a 1372m2 new pocket park and pedestrian accessway situated on:

iii)      part of 30-36 Bellgrove Place, 242m2, LOT 6 DP 96572

iv)      part of 35-40 Bellgrove Place, 906m2, LOT 5 DP 96572

v)      part of 27-33 Bellgrove Place, 44m2, LOT 4 DP 96572

vi)      part of 7-13 Bellgrove Place, 54m2, LOT 3 DP 100239

vii)     part of Bellgrove Place Road Reserve, 126m2

b)      recommend that the Finance and Performance Committee:

i)        note that Auckland Council staff have assessed the disposal of Bellgrove Reserve West and part of Bellgrove Reserve East against council’s open space provision policy

ii)       note that staff recommend the disposal as the subsequent land exchange will:

A)        increase amenity values and open space (net gain of 975m2 open space)

B)        provide a more multifunctional and useable recreational space

C)        deliver better sightlines and pedestrian access to open space

iii)      note that the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee approved public notification under section 15(2) of the Reserves Act 1977 in March 2021 (PAC/2021/3)

iv)      note that staff and the Whau Local Board considered all submissions to the proposal (three in support and one in objection) and recommended the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee proceed with the land exchange (WH/2021/50)

v)      approve the disposal of Bellgrove Reserve West (245m2 / LOT 5 DP 100239) to Kāinga Ora

vi)      approve the disposal of part of Bellgrove Reserve East (152m2 / LOT 2 DP 100239) to Kāinga Ora

vii)     note that if the Finance and Performance Committee approve the disposals, staff will progress the land exchange agreement and apply to the Minister of Conservation to authorise and complete the land exchange.

Horopaki

Context

Kāinga Ora has proposed a land exchange

13.     Kāinga Ora is redeveloping the site centred around Bellgrove Place, Avondale. This redevelopment presents opportunities for Auckland Council to improve the amenity and functionality of existing open space around Bellgrove Place.

14.     Auckland Council currently owns two small unclassified recreation reserves off Bellgrove Place. Figure 1 shows the location, size, and layout of these two lots.

Figure 1: Bellgrove Reserve East and Bellgrove Reserve West

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


15.     To facilitate the implementation of the masterplan, Kāinga Ora requests to exchange Bellgrove Reserve West (245m2) and parts of Bellgrove Reserve East (152m2) for 1372m2 of Kāinga Ora land.

16.     This exchange would enable the development of a pocket park and a six-metre wide accessway with footpath wider at the southern end to accommodate an existing tree.

17.     Bellgrove Reserve East currently contains a playground and a large Eucalyptus cinerea tree. The proposed land exchange allows for the tree to be retained.

18.     Figure 2 shows the proposed Kāinga Ora land (shaded blue) to be exchanged to Auckland Council as a recreational reserve. Shaded in red is Auckland Council reserve land to be exchanged to Kāinga Ora.

  Figure 2: Proposed land exchange areas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Land to be exchanged to Auckland Council as local purpose reserve (recreation) (SHADED BLUE)

Shown

Legal Name

Area (Total = 1,372m2)

Current owner

S1 (Lot A)

LOT 6 DP 96572

242m2

Kāinga Ora

S2 (Lot B)

LOT 5 DP 96572

906m2

Kāinga Ora

S3 (Lot C)

LOT 4 DP 96572

44m2

Kāinga Ora

S4 (Road)

ROAD RESERVE (see note)

84m2

Auckland Transport

S5 (Lot D)

LOT 3 DP 100239

54m2

Kāinga Ora

S6 (Road)

ROAD RESERVE (see note)

42m2

Auckland Transport

Note: Kāinga Ora has proposed Bellgrove Place road reserve, including S4 and S6, is stopped and acquired by Kāinga Ora. S4 and S6 would then be exchanged to Auckland Council. This process is already underway with Auckland Transport.

 

Land to be exchanged to Kāinga Ora (SHADED RED)

Shown

Legal Name

Area (Total = 397m2)

Current owner

S7 (B.R.West)

LOT 5 DP 100239

245m2

Auckland Council

S8 (B.R.East)

LOT 2 DP 100239

81m2

Auckland Council

S9 (B.R.East)

LOT 2 DP 100239

71m2

Auckland Council

Note: S10, currently part of Bellgrove Reserve East, will remain Auckland Council open space.

 

The proposed land exchange was assessed as high priority against council’s policy

19.     Staff assessed the proposed land exchange against the Parks and Open Space Acquisition Policy 2013 and the Open Space Provision Policy 2016. It is deemed high priority due to the potential benefits arising from the proposed exchange.

20.     Table 1 provides a summary of the assessment of the proposed disposal of Bellgrove Reserve West and parts of Bellgrove Reserve East in exchange for a new pocket park and pedestrian accessway.

Table 1: Initial assessment of the open space benefits that could result from the proposed land exchange

 

Acquisition criteria

 

Comment

Total Rating

Meeting community needs, now and in the future

·   Bellgrove Reserve West and Bellgrove Reserve East are currently too small to meet open space provision policy

·   1000m2 is the smallest suggest size for a pocket park and the current combined Bellgrove reserves are 630m2

·   The proposed new pocket park would be 1140m2 which meets provision policy

The land exchange is a high priority

Connecting parks and open spaces

·   Bellgrove Reserve West and Bellgrove Reserve East currently provide no benefit to connecting parks and open spaces

·   The proposed pocket park and thoroughfare would provide a central pedestrian link across the proposed residential superlot and then further access for the community to Riversdale Road and Reserve

Protecting and restoring Auckland’s unique features and meanings

·   Bellgrove Reserve West and Bellgrove Reserve East have no known historic heritage, landscape, geological or cultural values

·   Bellgrove Reserve East has a large Eucalyptus cinerea which provides a unique ecological feature

·   The proposed new pocket park and thoroughfare accommodate the retention of this tree on site which aligns with protecting unique features

Improving the parks and open spaces we already have

·   Bellgrove West Reserve provides no benefit as a park and is unlikely to in the future

·   Bellgrove East Reserve currently provides play equipment for the area but does not offer sizable open space. The benefits of the play equipment should be retained.

·   The proposed pocket park indicative plans include new play equipment, multi-functional outdoor space, seating areas and bike racks.

·   The proposed pocket park and walkway would provide a larger (+975m2) more useful, and better multifunctional space than the currently split Bellgrove East Reserve and Bellgrove West Reserve

21.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee approved to publicly notify the land exchange in March 2021.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Public consultation

22.     The four-week public notification period ran from 22 March to 18 April 2021.

23.     Public notification on the proposal included:

·    a public notice in the Western Leader (25 March and 1 April) and NZ Herald (22 March)

·    posters in the Whau Local Board office and Avondale Library

·    a webpage on the Auckland Council Have Your Say website to be able to provide written submissions.

Consultation feedback

24.     Four submissions were received through the online portal. Three supported the proposal and one objected. The submission comments are provided below in Table 2.

Table 2: Comments from public engagement submissions

Support/ Oppose

Comments

Support

“This particular part of Avondale needs a lot of awhina and I think this is a great start. I do however believe the residents in the area need to be consulted in person and not via an online feedback form as they are usually from a low socio-economic background. I'm sure they would appreciate being kept in the loop.”

Support

“I am pleased to see that the tree will be saved and that some of the hard won playing area will be retained.  I look forward to the regeneration of the area. I am pleased to see provision for community activities.”

Support

No comment provided

Oppose

“Exchange of public open space for space enclosed within the proposed development.”

 

Iwi consultation

25.     The following 13 iwi were contacted as part of the engagement process:

·    Te Kawerau a Maki

·    Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

·    Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

·    Waikato-Tainui

·    Ngāti Pāoa

·    Ngāti Pāoa Trust Board

·    Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

·    Ngāti Maru

·    Ngāti Tamaterā

·    Ngāti Te Ata

·    Te Ahiwaru - Waiohua

·    Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua

·    Te Ākitai Waiohua

 

 

26.     A letter was sent on 22 March, followed by two reminder letters on 13 April and 27 April.

27.     Nine iwi did not respond to the letters.

28.     The following iwi provided responses:

·   Te Kawerau a Maki advised that they had no concerns regarding the reserve exchange, and that the transaction does not conflict with any of their culturally significant sites, guiding principles or future projects.

·   Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara advised the proposal seems a sensible arrangement, however they defer to those with current connections to the Avondale area.

·   Waikato-Tainui advised that they support mana whenua to lead in these localised matters.

29.     No iwi voiced any objection to the proposed land exchange.

Staff have considered the objection to the proposal and recommend the exchange of land at Bellgrove Reserves

30.     Section 15 of the Reserves Act 1977 requires council to consider the objections to any reserve land exchange.

31.     One submitter objected on the ground that the proposed new open space would be enclosed within the future development. Staff have considered this objection and rejected it as the proposed land exchange would increase access, road frontage and sightlines into the open space. 

Staff recommend both the disposal and the acquisition of the land exchange proposal 

Disposal

32.     Assessment against council’s policy indicated that the disposal was recommended as Bellgrove Reserve West and part Bellgrove Reserve East:

·  are too small to meet open space provision targets

·  provide no benefit to connecting parks and open spaces

·  have no unique ecological, historical or heritage features. 

Acquisition

33.     Assessment against council’s policy indicated that the acquisition would benefit the local community by:

·     increasing amenity values and open space (net gain 975m2)

·     providing more multifunctional and useable recreational space

·     delivering better sightlines and pedestrian access to open space.

34.     Staff recommend the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee approve the proposed land exchange­.

35.     Assessment against council’s policy indicated that the land exchange would benefit the local community by:

·     increasing amenity values and open space (net gain 975m2)

·     providing more multifunctional and useable recreational space

·     delivering better sightlines and pedestrian access to open space.

36.     Staff recommend the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee approve the proposed land exchange.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

37.     Vegetation on parks and open space can serve as temperature regulators through shade and evapotranspiration. Plants and woodlands can also process and store carbon, helping to offset the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

38.     Parks and open space also act as collection points for surface and run-off water, reducing flood risks during storms.

39.     Climate change is expected to bring increasing temperatures, rising sea levels and changing rainfall patterns. Park development proposals will need to reflect these effects and take into consideration the environmentally sensitive ways parks and open space must be managed to achieve their benefits. This includes energy and waste reduction, and conserving water resources.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     Once the land exchange has been completed, Customer and Community Services will be responsible for the ongoing maintenance of the site.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     The Whau Local Board at their 27 May 2021 business meeting formally supported that the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee approve the proposed land exchange.

42.     Views from the local community were sought during the public notification process. Four submissions were received, and staff have considered the one objection. 

43.     The local board has allocated authority for the development of the park. The local board will consider the proposed designs presented by Kāinga Ora after the land exchange process concludes.

44.     The Whau Open Space Network Plan 2017 identifies Bellgrove Reserve East and West as low priority for ecological restoration and a need to upgrade play equipment in the next eight to ten years.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

45.     A total of 13 iwi were contacted as part of the engagement process.

46.     Four iwi provided a response, and none objected to the proposed land exchange.

47.     The proposed land exchange does not contain any known sites or places of significance to mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     There are no additional costs to council associated with the exchange process.

49.     Should the land exchange proceed, Kāinga Ora has indicated that it would provide capital investment to develop the pocket park with approval from the Whau Local Board.

50.     It is estimated that there will be additional maintenance costs associated with the increase in open space area if the land exchange proceeds. The Long-term Plan 2018-2028 provides for maintenance, including for land acquired at no capital cost.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

51.     There is a low legal risk to council as the land exchange process has been managed in accordance with section 15 of the Reserves Act 1977.

52.     Kāinga Ora will manage any risks associated with their redevelopment projects in Avondale.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

53.     If the Parks, Arts Community and Events Committee approve the land exchange, the Finance and Performance Committee will consider the disposal of Bellgrove Reserve West and part of Bellgrove Reserve East at their 19 August 2021 meeting.

54.     Table 3 below shows the stages of the land exchange process.

Table 3: Land exchange process

Initiation Phase

·           Auckland Council receives a formal request to pursue the land exchange

Decision-making to publicly notify the proposed land exchange

·      Staff assess the proposed land exchange against council’s policies

·      Report to local board to seek support for public notification of the proposed land exchange

·      Report to Parks Arts Community and Events committee to seek agreement to publicly notify the proposed land exchange

Public Notification Phase

·      Public consultation opens for a month

·      Iwi consultation

·      Hearing required if requested by a submitter against the proposed land exchange (independent commissioner appointed by Regulatory Committee)

Decision-making to finalise the land exchange

·      Staff assess the submissions against the Reserves Act 1977 and make a recommendation

·      Report to local board to seek support for or against the proposed land exchange

·      Report to PACE to resolve to approve (or not) the proposed land exchange

·      Recommendation to Finance & Performance Committee to resolve to dispose of council land

Transaction Phase

·      Application to the Minister of Conservation for authorisation

·      Gazette notification

·      Land Exchange Agreement finalised

·      Open space final designs authorised by the local board

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Kāinga Ora indicative designs

149

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maclean Grindell - Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Carole Canler - Senior Policy Manager

Kataraina Maki – General Manager - Community & Social Policy

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

08 July 2021

 

PDF Creator


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

08 July 2021

 

Proposed exchange of reserve land at Murray Halberg Park, Ōwairaka

File No.: CP2021/09375

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval on the proposal to exchange reserve land at Murray Halberg Park with comparable Kāinga Ora land.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In December 2020, the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee approved to publicly notify land exchange proposals for:

·        a new pedestrian accessway into Murray Halberg Park from Range View Road (approximately 241m2)

·        an exchange of the current Cassino Terrace accessway into Murray Halberg Park (approximately 108m2), for a wider, realigned accessway (approximately 210m2)

·        an exchange of the current accessways from Olympus Street and Hargest Terrace for a new park-edge road, providing improved access to Murray Halberg Park.

3.       The proposed land exchange would increase accessibility with additional road frontages, enhance amenity value and functionality, improve sightlines into the park and provide environmental design for safer, more visible space.

4.       To inform decision-making on whether to support the land exchange proposal, staff called for objections in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977.

5.       Auckland Council reviewed four submissions in support of the proposal and four submissions against. There were no objections from iwi.

6.       The Reserves Act 1977 requires Auckland Council to give full consideration to every objection before deciding to proceed with the proposal.

7.       The four objections are as follows:

·    Two submitters expressed concerns with regards to the development of the wider Ōwairaka area.

·    One submitter stated that the land exchange was not equitable.

·    One submitter did not provide any reason for their objection.

8.       Staff considered the four objections to the land exchange.

·    The objections related to the development of the wider area were not considered relevant to the proposed land exchange.

·    The objection on the ground that the land exchange was not equitable was considered, however council is making a small gain of 1.7m2.

9.       Staff concluded that the benefits of the proposed land exchange were greater than the objections and recommend the proposed land exchange proceeds.

10.     The Albert-Eden Local Board supported the land exchange at their business meeting on 15 June 2021.

11.     There is a low risk of judicial review of council decision-making processes as the process has been run in accordance with section 15(2) of the Reserves Act 1977.

12.     The Finance and Performance Committee will consider the land disposal aspect of the proposed land exchange on 19 August 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)         approve:

i)          the transfer of part of Lot 70 DP 38660, comprising approximately 241m2, to be transferred from Kāinga Ora to Auckland Council to form a new accessway from Range View Road to Murray Halberg Park

ii)         the transfer of part of Lot 49 DP 43547, comprising approximately 200m2, to be transferred from Auckland Council to Auckland Transport (receiving 123.8m2) and to Kāinga Ora (receiving 76.1m2) to provide improved access from Olympus Street to Murray Halberg Park

iii)        the transfer of part of Lot 49 DP 43547, comprising approximately 142m2, to be transferred from Auckland Council to Auckland Transport (receiving 58.1m2) and to Kāinga Ora (receiving two parcels of 29.3m2 and 54.4m2) to provide improved access from Hargest Terrace into Murray Halberg Park

iv)        the exchange of part of Lot 138 DP 38659, comprising approximately 210m2, held by Kāinga Ora to be exchanged for part of Lot 49 DP 43547, comprising of approximately 108m2, held by Auckland Council to widen and realign the Cassino Terrace Accessway to Murray Halberg Park. 

b)         recommend to the Finance Performance Committee to:

i)          note that Auckland Council staff have assessed the disposal of part of Murray Halberg Park against council’s open space provision policy

ii)         note that staff recommend the disposal as the subsequent land exchange will:

A)        increase amenity values and open space (gain of 1.7m2)

B)        deliver better sightlines and pedestrian access to open space.

iii)        note that the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee approved public notification under section 15 (2) of the Reserves Act 1977 in December 2020 (PAC/2020/76)

iv)        note that staff and the Albert-Eden Local Board considered all submissions to the proposal (four in support and four in objection) and recommended the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee proceed with the land exchange (AE/2021/81)

v)         approve the disposal of part of Lot 49 DP 43547, comprising approximately 200m2

vi)        approve the disposal of part of Lot 49 DP 43547, comprising approximately 142m2

vii)       note that if the Finance and Performance Committee approve the disposals, staff will progress the land exchange agreement and apply to the Minister of Conservation to authorise and complete the land exchange.


 

Horopaki

Context

There are opportunities to improve open space in the Albert-Eden Local Board area

 

13.     Kāinga Ora is redeveloping its housing stock in the Ōwairaka area. An estimated 1061 new dwellings will replace an existing 217 dwellings to provide housing for approximately 2600 additional residents[1].

14.     Staff have identified opportunities to enhance open space accessibility with exchanges of land with Kāinga Ora. The proposed land exchange areas are provided in Attachment A.

15.     Staff assessed the proposed land exchange against Auckland Council’s Parks and Open Space Provision Policy 2016. It is deemed high priority as the land exchange would:

·        increase accessibility with additional road frontages

·        improve sightlines into the new park

·        provide environmental design for safer, more visible space.

16.     Table 1 provides a summary of the assessments against the Parks and Open Space Acquisition Policy 2013 and the Open Space Provision Policy 2016.

Table 1 – Assessment of the Murray Halberg Park land exchange

Acquisition criteria

Comment

Rating

Meeting community needs, now and in the future

High priority as the proposed land exchange would increase the accessibility of the park that serves an area of high growth

High priority

Connecting parks and open spaces

Medium priority as it will increase pedestrian and cyclist use of the Ōwairaka Connection

Protecting and restoring

Auckland’s unique features and meanings

Not a priority as there is no known ecological, historical heritage, landscape, geological or cultural values of significance

Improving the parks and open spaces we already have

High priority as the proposed land exchange will improve the accessibility and functionality of existing open space

The land exchange would:

·           increase accessibility with additional road frontages

·           improve sightlines into the new park

·           provide environmental design for safer, more visible space.

17.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee approved to publicly notify the land exchange in December 2020.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Public consultation was carried out from February to March 2021

18.     The five-week public notification period ran from 2 February to 9 March 2021.

19.     Public notification on the proposal included:

·    a public notice in the Central Leader (4 February and 11 February) and NZ Herald (4 February)

·    posters in the Mt. Albert Library

·    a webpage on the Auckland Council Have Your Say website to be able to provide written submissions.

20.     Staff have considered the objections to the proposal. A total of eight submissions were received during that period. No one requested a hearing.

21.     Four submissions were in support of the land exchange and four submissions were against.

22.     The four objections are as follows:

·        Two submitters provided comments on the way the Ōwairaka area was being redeveloped and on the impacts of the redevelopment. Comments included the need for or impacts on surrounding infrastructure such as supermarkets, schools and roads. These matters concern the wider development of the area rather than concerns with the land exchange.

·        One submitter stated that the land exchange was not equitable.

23.     One submitter did not provide any reason for their objection. The following table provides a summary of the opposing arguments and considerations by staff.

Table 2 - Summary of submissions that opposed the land exchange

Theme

Number of submitters

In scope

Comment

Development of wider area

2

No

Development of wider area not is not in scope for a land exchange under the Reserves Act 1977

Loss of open space provision

1

Yes

Overall, there is no loss of open space. A small gain of 1.7m2 in open space area will be made.

No explanation provided

1

 

24.     Section 15 of the Reserves Act 1977 requires council to consider the objections to any land exchange.

·        Objections based on the surrounding infrastructure were considered to be out of scope for council.

·        Objection based on the loss of land was considered, however, council is making a small gain of 1.7m2.

25.     After consideration, staff concluded that the improvements to amenity, safety and accessibility were greater than any of the objections raised by members of the public.

There were no objections following iwi consultation

26.     The 13 iwi identified as having association with Murray Halberg Park and the Ōwairaka area were invited to provide feedback on the proposed land exchange in a letter outlining the proposal on 9 February 2021. This was followed by e-mails sent on 3 March and 15 March 2021.

27.     The following iwi provided responses:

·        Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki advised that they have no issue with the proposed exchange at Murray Halberg Park.

·        Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua advised that they have been engaging directly with Kāinga Ora on its development of Ōwairaka and that they do not oppose the exchange.

·        Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei advised that they have reviewed the proposed exchange and no action is needed from them at this stage. They requested being updated as the project goes forward.

·        Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua advised that they recognise the primary interest of Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei in this area which will restrict any engagement on this matter unless specifically requested by Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei.

·        Waikato-Tainui advised that in matters that are of a localised nature such as this, Waikato-Tainui supports mana whenua to take the lead role.  To that end Waikato-Tainui withdrew from the discussion.

28.     Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara, Ngāti Pāoa, Ngāti Pāoa Trust Board, Ngāti Maru, Ngāti Tamaterā, Ngāti Te Ata, Te Ākitai Waiohua and Te Kawerau ā Maki did not provide feedback on the proposal.

29.     No iwi voiced any objection to the proposed land exchange.

Staff recommend the exchange of land at Murray Halberg Park

30.     Land exchanges are assessed against criteria in the Parks and Open Space Acquisition Policy 2013 and Parks and Open Space Provision Policy 2016.

31.     Staff recommend that the committee support the proposed land exchange:

·        they are deemed to be high priority against Auckland Council policy.

·        no strategic argument was put forward to stop the land exchange during the consultation with the community and with iwi.

32.     The land exchange could benefit the local community by:

·     increasing amenity values and open space (small gain of 1.7m2)

·     delivering better sightlines and pedestrian access to open space.

33.     Staff recommend the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee approve the proposed land exchange.

Staff recommend both the disposal and the acquisition of the land exchange proposal

Disposal

34.     Staff assessed the entrances of Murray Halberg Park proposed to be disposed of against council policy. The assessment recommended disposal because current entrances:

·     do not provide good lines of site into the park

·     do contribute to park connection

·     have no ecological, historical or heritage features.

Acquisition

35.     Staff assessed the proposed land to be acquired at Murray Halberg Park against council policy. The assessment concluded that the acquisition would benefit the local community by:

·     increasing amenity values and open space (net gain of 1.7m2)

·     providing better, safer park design through improved lines of sight and pedestrian access.

36.     Staff recommend the Parks, Art, Community and Events Committee approve the proposed land exchange.

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

37.     Vegetation on parks and open space can serve as temperature regulators through shade and evapotranspiration. Plants and woodlands can also process and store carbon, helping to offset the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

38.     Parks and open space also act as collection points for surface and run-off water, reducing flood risks during storms.

39.     Climate change is expected to bring increasing temperatures, rising sea levels and changing rainfall patterns. Park development proposals will need to reflect these effects and take into consideration the environmentally sensitive ways parks and open space must be managed to achieve their benefits. This includes energy and waste reduction, and conserving water resources.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     Once the land exchange has been completed, Auckland Council’s Customer and Community Services will be responsible for the ongoing maintenance of the site.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     On 15 June 2021, the Albert-Eden Local Board supported the approval of the proposed land exchange at Murray Halberg Park.

42.     Views from the public were sought on the proposed land exchange. Four submissions were received in favour of the land exchange and four submissions were received against.

43.     The local board has allocated decision-making for the development of the park. The local board will consider the proposed designs presented by Kāinga Ora after the land exchange process concludes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     The following iwi were contacted as part of the engagement process:

·    Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

·    Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua

·    Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei

·    Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua

·    Waikato-Tainui

·    Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

·    Ngāti Pāoa

·    Ngāti Pāoa Trust Board

·    Ngāti Maru

·    Ngāti Tamatera

·    Ngāti Te Ata

·    Te Ākitai Waiohua

·    Te Kawerau ā Maki.

 

 

45.     Eight iwi did not respond. Those who responded did not voice any objection to the land exchange.

46.     The proposed land exchange does not contain any known sites or places of significance to mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

47.     There are no additional costs to council associated with the exchange process.

48.     Should the land exchange proceed, Kāinga Ora has indicated that it will provide capital for the development of the new Murray Halberg Park entrances.

49.     It is estimated that there will be minimal changes to the ongoing maintenance costs for the park as a result of the proposed land exchange. The Long-term Plan 2018-2028 provides for maintenance, including for land acquired at no capital cost.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

50.     There is a low legal risk to council as the land exchange process has been managed in accordance with section 15 of the Reserves Act 1977.

51.     Kāinga Ora will manage any risks associated with their redevelopment projects in Ōwairaka.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

52.     If the Parks, Arts Community and Events Committee approve the land exchange, the Finance and Performance Committee will consider the disposal of part of Murray Halberg Park at their 19 August 2021 meeting.

53.     Table 3 below shows the stages of the land exchange process.

Table 3: Land exchange process

Initiation Phase

·           Auckland Council receives a formal request to pursue the land exchange

Decision-making to publicly notify the proposed land exchange

·      Staff assess the proposed land exchange against council’s policies

·      Report to local board to seek support for public notification of the proposed land exchange

·      Report to Parks Arts Community and Events committee to seek agreement to publicly notify the proposed land exchange

Public Notification Phase

·      Public consultation opens for a month

·      Iwi consultation

·      Hearing required if requested by a submitter against the proposed land exchange (independent commissioner appointed by Regulatory Committee)

Decision-making to finalise the land exchange

·      Staff assess the submissions against the Reserves Act 1977 and make a recommendation

·      Report to local board to seek support for or against the proposed land exchange

·      Report to PACE to resolve to approve (or not) the proposed land exchange

·      Recommendation to Finance & Performance Committee to resolve to dispose of council land

Transaction Phase

·      Application to the Minister of Conservation for authorisation

·      Gazette notification

·      Land Exchange Agreement finalised

·      Open space final designs authorised by the local board

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Indicative plans of proposed exchange of reserve land at Murray Halberg Park.

159

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dillon O'Brien - Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Carole Canler - Senior Policy Manager

Kataraina Maki – General Manager - Community & Social Policy

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

08 July 2021

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

08 July 2021

 

Reserve revocation recommendation for 34R Blanes Road, Weymouth

File No.: CP2021/09054

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report seeks approval to commence the reserve revocation process for 34R Blanes Road, Weymouth.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       34R Blanes Road, Weymouth is a small 17m2 vacant parcel of land that was vested upon subdivision with the former Manukau County Council as road reserve in 1955 but has never been formed as road.

3.       The road reserve status of a larger adjoining site was revoked by the former Manukau City Council (MCC) in 1980, leaving the subject parcel redundant.

4.       As 34R Blanes Road is a road reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977, the reserve status of the land needs to be revoked prior to the proposed transfer occurring.  Final revocation of the reserve status would be subject to completing the statutory requirements of the Reserves Act 1977 and Local Government Act 2002, including public advertising.

5.       Subject to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) Committee approving the commencement of the reserve revocation process, Eke Panuku Development Auckland (Eke Panuku) will undertake public notification of the proposed reserve revocation and consultation with council departments, council-controlled organisations (CCOs), mana whenua iwi authorities and the Manurewa Local Board on the proposed reserve revocation. 

6.       Kāinga Ora is seeking to acquire this parcel of land together with the privately owned adjacent property for community housing purposes.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      approve commencement of the reserve revocation process for 34R Blanes Road, Weymouth comprising approximately 17m2 more or less being Lot 5 DP 41663 contained in NA35D/1310, under section 24(1)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       34R Blanes Road is a road reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977. Accordingly, the reserve status needs to be revoked in accordance with section 24 of the Reserves Act 1977. Public notification is required for a proposal to revoke a reserve, with such notice to include the reason for the proposal. This will give the public the opportunity to consider the proposal and submit comments or objections. If any objections are received, they will be referred back to the PACE Committee for consideration. If necessary, an independent commissioner will be appointed to consider any objections.


 

8.       Eke Panuku will report to the PACE Committee on the results of the public notification of the proposal to revoke the reserve status and seek a formal resolution to request to the Minister of Conservation that the reserve status be uplifted. The decision of the PACE Committee must be forwarded to the Department of Conservation for completion of the revocation process and approval by the Minister of Conservation.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Property information

9.       34R Blanes Road is a small 17m2 vacant, triangular shaped parcel. It was vested upon subdivision with the former Manukau County Council as road reserve in 1955 and remains a road reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

10.     Council records indicate that plans existed to incorporate this parcel with a larger adjoining road reserve in 1957. However, the adjoining site was never formed as road. The reserve status of the adjoining site was revoked by the former MCC in 1980 and it was sold, leaving the subject parcel redundant. 34R Blanes Road has continued to be held by council as vacant land subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

11.     Council’s Community Investment team (formerly the Parks and Recreation Policy team) assessed the site in December 2020 against council’s open space provision and open space acquisition policies and confirmed it is not required by council for open space network purposes. This is on the basis that this parcel has no open space amenity value or function.

12.     The Auckland Unitary Plan zoning is Road. 34R Blanes Road has a council rating valuation of $4,500. It is not subject to offer back obligations in accordance with s40 Public Works Act 1981.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The parcel is not located in a flood prone area and is not a coastal property likely to be impacted in the future by rising sea levels. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Eke Panuku will undertake consultation with Auckland Transport and relevant council departments regarding the proposed reserve revocation of 34R Blanes Road concurrently with the public notification of the reserve revocation process.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     Eke Panuku will undertake consultation with the Manurewa Local Board regarding the proposed reserve revocation of 34R Blanes Road concurrently with the reserve revocation process.

16.     The board’s views relating to the proposed reserve revocation will be reported back to the to the PACE Committee.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.     Site specific mana whenua engagement will be undertaken regarding the proposed reserve revocation of 34R Blanes Road should the PACE Committee approve the commencement of the reserve revocation process. If any objections are received, they will be referred to the independent commissioner for consideration and reported back to the committee.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     Kāinga Ora has advised it can contribute to costs associated with the revocation process as part of the sale and purchase agreement.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

19.     There is a risk that the Minister of Conservation may not approve the proposed reserve revocation. In such a circumstance this parcel would remain as vacant land subject to the subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

20.     Subject to the approval from the PACE Committee to revoke the reserve status of 34R Blanes Road, Eke Panuku will commence the reserve revocation process.

21.     Eke Panuku will report back to the committee on the results of the public notification of the proposal to revoke the reserve status, and to seek approval to submit a request to the Minister of Conservation to uplift the reserve status for the parcel.

22.     Kāinga Ora has expressed interest in acquiring this parcel if it is not required to be retained by council for road reserve purposes.

23.     Following the successful completion of the proposed reserve revocation process and consultation with the council group, Manurewa Local Board and mana whenua, Eke Panuku will report to the Finance and Performance Committee seeking approval to transfer 34R Blanes Road to Kāinga Ora, which is seeking to acquire this property from council for housing purposes.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Images of 34R Blanes Road, Weymouth

167

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Anthony Lewis - Senior Advisor, Portfolio Review, Panuku Development Auckland

Authorisers

Letitia Edwards - Head of Strategic Asset Optimisation (Acting)

Marian Webb – General Manager Assets and Delivery

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

08 July 2021

 

PDF Creator


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

08 July 2021

 

Community Facilities Regional Work Programmes 2021-2024

File No.: CP2021/05181

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2021-2024 Community Facilities Regional Capital Work Programmes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report sets out the proposed Community Facilities regional capital work programmes, incorporating:

·    programmes for parks and facilities for which the Governing Body is the decision maker, including Regional Parks, Holiday Parks, Auckland Botanic Gardens, Auckland Domain and active Cemeteries

·    regional programmes that the Governing Body allocate budget to specific projects for which local boards may be the decisions maker, including coastal renewals, slips prevention, and local parks and sports fields development (growth).

3.       This report recommends approval of the Community Facilities regional work programmes and associated budgets for the 2021/2022 financial year, and approval in principle for the subsequent two financial years of 2022/2023 and 2023/2024.

4.       The work programmes provided in Attachments A - F reflect the projects that were presented at a workshop with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in March 2021.

5.       Projects that form the local and sports field development (growth), coastal, and slips prevention programmes will be incorporated into local board work programmes. Local boards have provisionally approved these projects in their work programmes and provided feedback for the committee’s consideration.

6.       Several projects in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programme have been identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP). Approval is sought for the planning and design of these projects to commence during 2021/2022, so that they are ready to be delivered early if approved projects for delivery in 2021/2022 are delayed for any unforeseen reason.

7.       The most significant risk to successful delivery of the 2021/2022 work programme is a change in COVID-19 alert levels that would impact delivery timeframes and budget.

8.       To expedite delivery of the work programme, and to manage changes that may be required in a timely way, staff recommend that the committee delegate decision making for amendments to the approved programme to the General Manager Community Facilities.

 


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      approve the 2021/2022 financial year Community Facilities Regional Work Programme and approve in principle the subsequent two financial years of 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 as detailed in the following attachments to the agenda report:

i)        Attachment A – Regional Renewals and Development Work Programme

ii)       Attachment B – Cemeteries Work Programme

iii)      Attachment C – Commercial and Residential Leases Work Programme

iv)      Attachment D – Coastal Renewals Work Programme

v)      Attachment E – Slips Prevention Work Programme

vi)      Attachment F – Local Parks and Sportsfields Development Work Programme

b)      approve the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) projects identified in the work programme (Attachments A - F to the agenda report) as projects that will commence and may be delivered in advance of the expected delivery year, if required to meet expected financial expenditure for the 2021/2022 financial year.

c)      note that approval of budget allocation in the 2021/2022 year for multi-year projects implies the Committee’s support for the projects in their entirety.

d)      note that where budget is allocated to a project in the regional work programme that falls within a local board decision making allocation (e.g. a local park), that project is included in the local board work programme and the local board then has decision making responsibility for that project, within the parameters set by the Governing Body, namely location, scope and budget.

e)      note the feedback provided by local boards in relation to the projects funded from the regional coastal renewals, slips prevention and local parks and sportsfields development (growth) budgets in Attachment G to the agenda report.

f)       note that budget allocations for all projects in the Community Facilities work programme are best current estimates, and amendments may be required to the work programme to accommodate final costs as the year progresses.

g)      delegate to the General Manager Community Facilities authority to approve amendments to the 2021-2024 Community Facilities Regional Work Programme.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Local work programmes are presented to local boards and regional work programmes are presented to the Governing Body for approval each year. The 2021–2024 Community Facilities Work Programme, detailed in the attachments, sets out the proposed regional work programmes to be delivered by Community Facilities.

10.     The projects identified in the work programmes have been prioritised for investment based on a combination of local board and Governing Body feedback through a series of workshops, staff assessments of assets and key stakeholder input.

 


 

 

11.     The Community Facilities regional programmes include:

·    Regional renewals and development

Regional Parks (including farming and holiday places)

Holiday Parks

Botanic Gardens

Auckland Domain

·    Cemeteries

·    Residential and commercial leases

·    Coastal renewals

·    Slips prevention and remediation

·    Local parks and sports fields development (growth)

12.     The Governing Body (or relevant committee) has two distinct decision-making roles for these programmes:

·    For the regional parks and cemetery programme, the Governing Body is allocated full decision making and is responsible for both budget allocation to specific projects and subsequent governance decision making regarding the delivery of those projects.

·    For coastal renewals, slips prevention and remediation, and local parks and sports fields development budgets, the Governing Body is responsible for the prioritisation and allocation of budget to specific projects. Where specific projects relate to assets within the local park network, subsequent governance decision making regarding the delivery of those projects is allocated to the relevant local board, who are responsible for delivery within the location, scope and budget defined by the Governing Body.

13.     The programmes and related budgets considered in this report refer only to those for which the Community Facilities department is responsible and accountable. Budgets where responsibility and accountability lie with other parts of the organisation are not included in these regional programmes.

14.     It should be noted that the Auckland Domain Committee has decision making regarding the Auckland Domain, with funding being allocated from the above regional budgets. The regional work programme was endorsed by the Auckland Domain Committee on 14 May 2021 (ADC/2021/12).

15.     Staff engaged with the committee regarding the draft programme at a workshop in March 2021 and the draft work programmes reflect the projects that were presented and the feedback received.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The proposed work programmes are made up of activities continuing from previous financial years and new initiatives.

Regional renewals and development programme

17.     The regional renewals and development programme includes all asset investment relating to parks, facilities and activities for which the Governing Body is the allocated decision maker, apart from active cemeteries, which are considered as a separate work programme.

18.     These include the Auckland wide network of Regional Parks including areas allocated to farming activities, the Auckland Botanic Gardens, Auckland Domain, three council operated Holiday Parks, and street gardens.

19.     Staff have prepared the recommended programmes through an iterative process, in consideration of service outcomes sought, the condition of existing assets and demands for new assets. The process of prioritisation has included engagement with staff responsible for delivering both assets and services ‘on the ground’.

20.     Pressures facing this programme include:

·    balancing demands across the regional portfolio

·    increasing visitation/use and changing visitor profile and expectations

·    addressing the impact of historic deferred maintenance.

Regional Parks

21.     The Regional Parks programme includes the renewal of existing assets across the region, with a focus on track renewals, park infrastructure and ensuring our holiday place accommodation facilities are fit for purpose.

Botanic Gardens

22.     The Botanic Gardens programme focuses on reinstatement of a covered events area and general small-scale renewal of assets such as the nursery, roading, CCTV and car park lighting.

Pukekawa Auckland Domain

23.     The Pukekawa Auckland Domain programme includes significant investment for the renewal and seismic remediation of the Wintergardens and a renewing the lighting system throughout the domain.

Holiday parks

24.     Priorities for the holiday parks programme include several general renewal projects to address historic deferred maintenance. These include the renewal of the amenities blocks at Martins Bay Holiday Park and the northern amenities block at Orewa Holiday Park.

Regional street gardens

25.     The budget allocation is proposed to renew street gardens infrastructure across the region with a focus on tree pits across the region.

Consolidated budget and proposed allocation

26.     The regional parks programme budget and proposed allocation is summarised in Table 1 below.

Table 1 – Regional parks programme budget and allocation

Regional park

2021/2022

2022/2023

2023/2024

Consolidated regional renewal budget

$9,015,268

$9,054,317

$9,396,950

Consolidated regional development budget

$900,000

$900,000

$1,900,000

Proposed allocation – Regional Parks

$5,302,092

$4,455,284

$7,647,046

Proposed allocation – Holiday Parks

$700,000

$2,700,000

$2,225,000

Proposed allocation – Botanic Gardens

$1,307,183

$882,929

$822,000

Proposed allocation – Auckland Domain

$2,312,167

$1,492,290

$400,000

Proposed allocation – Street Gardens

$200,000

$250,000

$0

Total proposed allocation

$9,821,442

$9,780,503

$11,094,046

Balance available

$93,826

$173,814

$202,904

 

27.     In addition to the above consolidated regional budgets, two projects funded by LTP discrete budgets are included in the regional parks programme (Attachment A). These are ‘A Million Trees’ planting programme and the ‘Colin-Dale Park Development’ project.

Cemeteries programme

28.     The cemeteries work programme (Attachment B) deals with the renewal and development of active cemeteries. Closed cemeteries form part of the local park network and are addressed within local board work programmes. The programme is driven by the intended service outcomes such as demand for lawn burials, as well as asset condition and input from operational staff.

29.     Pressures on this programme include the growing demand for burial plots, the modest budget provision available for renewals, and heritage constraints and implications for some projects.

30.     It should be noted that a separate budget is allocated for new cemetery land purchase and development, and that this is not included in the budget table below.

31.     Key renewal priorities in the cemeteries programme include refurbishment of the Manukau Memorial Gardens administration building and assets across the cemeteries network such as cremators, roading, heritage assets, footpaths and furniture, fixtures and fittings.

32.     Key development projects include the provision of berms and walls across the Auckland Cemeteries network.

33.     The cemeteries budget and proposed allocation summarised in Table 2.

Table 2 – Cemeteries programme budget and allocation

Cemeteries Renewal and Development

2021/2022

2022/2023

2023/2024

Budget

$2,528,504

$4,086,971

$5,607,519

Proposed allocation

$2,494,415

$4,085,000

$5,573,928

Balance available

$34,089

$1,971

$33,591

Commercial and residential leasing renewals programme

34.    The commercial and residential leasing renewals programme (Attachment C) includes the properties that were formerly maintained by Panuku Development Auckland (Panuku) and are now the responsibility of Community Facilities to maintain. These properties have either a commercial or residential lease and are situated on either regional or local parks.

35.    This programme has an allocated budget which was transferred from Panuku to Community Facilities. As well as necessary renewal work to maintain these assets, the programme will incorporate works required to meet the Healthy Homes Standards 2019.

36.    As these buildings are considered non-service assets, the Governing Body is the allocated decision maker over these assets.

37.    This budget is summarised in Table 3.

Table 3 – Leasing renewals programme budget and allocation

Residential and Commercial Leasing

2021/2022

2022/2023

2023/2024

Budget

$1,212,521

$1,540,712

$1,280,945

Proposed allocation

$1,212,521

$1,540,712

$1,280,945

Balance available

$0

$0

$0

 

 

Coastal renewals programme

38.    Projects within the coastal programme (Attachment D) have been identified and prioritised based on asset condition, coastal hazard mitigation and the nature of the use or function of existing assets. 

39.    Current pressures on this programme include the scale of work required, the challenges of working within the marine environment, continued community expectation for coastal protection structures, and mitigating climate change impacts.

40.    The proposed programme is made up of renewals of coastal protection structures such as seawalls, and access structures e.g. boat ramps, wharfs and stairs.

41.    In future, the programme will be guided by Coastal Compartment Management Plans.

42.    The coastal renewals budget and proposed allocation is summarised in Table 4.

Table 4 – Coastal renewals programme budget and allocation

Coastal renewals

2021/2022

2022/2023

2023/2024

Budget

$7,000,000

$11,500,000

$11,500,000

Proposed allocation

$7,000,000

$11,498,743

$10,764,870

Balance available

$0

$1,257

$735,130

 

Slip prevention and remediation programme

43.    The focus in the slips prevention and remediation programme (Attachment E) is split between remediating existing slips, prioritised according to risk and use, and preventing future slips based on assessments by the Geotechnical team.

44.    The current slips programme includes projects arising from previous storm events and needs to remain responsive to possible future events. The focus is on completing priority projects that have already commenced. The programme is under pressure from a general expectation for repair/remediation in all circumstances, the cost and technical challenge for some slips, and mitigating climate change impacts.

45.    The slips budget and proposed allocation is summarised in Table 5.

 

Table 5 – Slips prevention and remediation programme budget and allocation

Slips prevention and remediation

2021/2022

2022/2023

2023/2024

Budget

$1,000,000

$1,000,000

$1,000,000

Proposed allocation

$1,000,000

$985,191

$933,698

Balance available

$0

$14,809

$66,302

 

Local parks and sportsfields development (growth)

46.    The 10-Year Budget 2021-2031 (LTP) includes the ‘Local Parks and Sportsfield Development’ budget. This budget is often referred to as the ‘growth’ budget, and the projects funded from this budget are often collectively referred to as the ‘growth programme’ (Attachment F).

47.    The local parks and sportsfield development (growth) budget is 75% funded by development contributions and 25% funded by rates. This funding mix means that the programme delivered by this budget must meet the requirements of the Local Government Act for the use of development contributions.

48.    The Local Government Act specifies the type of project that development contributions can be used for and requires that projects can only be funded by the development contribution portion of the budget to the extent that the ‘cause’ and ‘benefit’ from the project is attributable to “new and future communities” (i.e. residential growth only).

49.    Development contributions also part-fund other specific projects in the Long-term Plan 2021-2031. The local parks and sportsfield development (growth) budget, however, provides a general budget source that allows council more flexibility in allocating budget to projects that meet the changing demands arising from growth.

50.    Projects to be funded from the local parks and sportsfield development budget are prioritised (i.e. included in the programme) based on the:

·    alignment with the requirements of the Local Government Act, including assessment of cause and benefit of projects attributable to growth

·    alignment with the aims and objectives of the Long-term Plan 2021-2031

·    approved Governing Body or local board priorities

·    delivery of agreed service outcomes

·    assessment of current provision and existing capacity to meet future need

·    projects currently committed or with high expectation for delivery.

51.    The amount and timing for budget allocation of prioritised projects (i.e. how much budget is allocated when) is based on:

·    the appropriate design to meet the needs of new and future communities

·    the area in which residential growth is occurring

·    delivery dependencies (e.g. third-party development, other funding sources)

·    project readiness

·    overall budget availability.

52.    Where and when future growth will take place is predicted based on:

·    projections from the Auckland Plan, the Future Urban Land Supply Strategy and the i11 Auckland Transport (AT) growth model

·    analysis of resource consent and building consent applications granted

·    ‘on the ground’ knowledge of staff.

53.    There are several pressures on this programme, including:

·    the scale and phasing of the budget in the short/medium term, which limits the number and extent of projects proposed

·    the expectation for growth investment from developers, local boards and the community

·    the challenge of adequately meeting additional need generated by dispersed growth

·    providing for the development of new open space in an appropriate timeframe following acquisition.

54.    Local boards were asked to provide their formal feedback relating to the growth programme at their June business meetings. A copy of all resolutions is included as Attachment G to this report, along with an initial staff responses.

55.    Key themes from local board feedback include: 

·    support for those projects included in the programme

·    a desire from some local boards to change proposed projects to better meet local needs or to address local community concerns, including deferring some proposed projects’ start dates, or swapping one project with another

·    requests that staff consult with iwi before proceeding any further with some projects, particularly in the coastal renewals programme

·    requests to add new projects to the programme, or to increase the budget for some projects

56.    Staff have provided an initial response to feedback received. Staff will undertake further and ongoing refinement of the programme, which will include responding to the relevant local board proposal for new or expanded projects, and additional funding allocations.

57.    The local parks and sportsfields development budget and proposed allocation is summarised in Table 6.

Table 6 – Local parks and sportsfields development programme budget and allocation

Local parks and sports field development

2021/2022

2022/2023

2023/2024

Budget

$17,913,965

$14,333,320

$10,310,321

Proposed allocation

$16,534,631

$13,877,305

$9,479,785

Balance available

$1,379,334*

$456,015

$830,356

       * $1,200,000 has been left as unallocated in 2021/2022 to cover early delivery in 2020/2021 and will be removed as a part of the year end process.

Capital programme delivery

Cost estimates subject to change

58.     Budget allocations within the work programme are best estimates only. Project costings are subject to change and refinement as projects progress through the design and delivery process. Greater clarity will be determined around the specific work required and the cost of delivery of that work once the details are defined.

59.     The delivery of individual projects is managed within the overall work programme budget. Where significant changes to project budgets may need to be considered, or if new projects are added to the work programme, changes may be required to the programme to accommodate final project costs as the year progresses.

Locational mapping of projects

60.     The capital works programmes have been geo-spatially mapped to indicate the location of projects across the region.

61.     Attachment H includes two maps indicating the location of projects in the proposed three year work programme that capital budget is proposed to be allocated to, and indicates the main funding source for each project. The first map is for those programmes reported to local boards including Growth, Coastal and Slips and the second includes the Regional parks network, cemeteries and leases.

62.     Some projects are unable to be mapped as they reference multiple locations, or the work locations are yet to be determined.

Risk adjusted programme

63.     The Risk Adjusted Programme was implemented in 2019 and is designed to mitigate risk so that the total budget is delivered.

64.     Several capex projects in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programme have been identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme as highlighted in Attachments A-F.

65.     Approval is sought for the commencement of these projects in the 2021/2022 financial year, so that they can replace delays in projects that may not be delivered for unforeseen reasons.

Delegation for approval of changes to the work programme

66.     The delivery of the proposed work programme in an efficient and timely manner may require amendments to be made to the agreed work programme during the year. Such amendments could include:

·    changes to project scope, budgets, timing

·    addition of new projects within available budget

·    cancelling or putting approved projects on hold

67.     Any changes to the approved work programme would normally require approval from the committee by resolution at a business meeting. However, the committee can delegate authority to approve some or all amendments to the work programme to the chairperson, to another member of the committee, or to staff. Such delegation would allow changes to be made without the timeframes required to provide formal reports and would support the efficient delivery of the work programme.

68.     It is requested that the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee delegate authority to staff to approve changes to the work programme, in this case the General Manager Community Facilities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

69.     In June 2019, council declared a climate emergency and in response to this, council adopted the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan in July 2020.

70.     Each activity in the work programme is assessed to identify whether it will have a positive, negative, or neutral impact on greenhouse gas emissions and impact on resilience to climate change.

71.     To deliver on climate goals, Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri includes eight priorities for action:

·    natural environment 

·    built environment

·    transport

·    economy

·    communities and coast

·    food

·    Te Puāwaitanga ō te Tātai

·    energy and industry.

72.     Many of the activities in the 2021/2022 work programme will have impacts on greenhouse gas emissions and contribute towards climate change adaptation. The sorts of impacts to be considered include:

·    maximum upcycling and recycling of old material

·    installation of energy efficiency measures

·    building design to ensure the maximum lifetime and efficiency of the building is obtained

·    lifecycle impacts of construction materials (embodied emissions)

·    exposure of building location to climate change hazards (sea level rise, flooding (floodplains), drought, heat island effect)

·    anticipated increase in carbon emissions from construction, including contractor emissions

·    lifecycle impacts of construction materials.

73.     These impacts will be considered as projects progress and will be reported at future reporting opportunities.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

74.     The 2021-2024 Community Facilities regional work programme has been developed in consultation with other council departments such as Parks Sports and Recreation, Regional Service Planning Investments and Partnerships, the Development Programme Office, and Engineering and Technical Services.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

75.     The Community Facilities regional work programme has been considered by the local boards in a series of workshops from November 2020 to May 2021. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

76.     Community facilities and open spaces provide important community services to the people of the local board area. They contribute to building strong, healthy and vibrant communities by providing spaces where Aucklanders can participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art and recreational activities. These activities improve lifestyles and a sense of belonging and pride amongst residents.

77.     All relevant regional work programme projects have been included in local board work programmes for approval, subject to committee approval. Formal feedback on the regional programmes has also been sought from local boards. A copy of all resolved feedback has been included in Attachment G to this report created.

78.     The feedback has been discussed in Attachment G and in the Analysis and Advice section of this report, and any necessary changes as a result have been incorporated into the recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

79.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori.

80.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2012-2022, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework, Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau - Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework and Local Board Plans.

81.     The projects in the Community Facilities Work Programme will benefit Māori and the wider community. The benefits will be realised through the provision and continued maintenance of quality facilities and open spaces that promote good health, the fostering of whānau and community relationships and connection to the natural environment.

82.     When developing and delivering work programmes, consideration is given to how the activities can contribute to Māori well-being, values, culture and traditions.

83.     Where aspects of the work programme are anticipated to have an impact on an activity, facility, or location of importance to Māori, appropriate and meaningful engagement will then be undertaken.


 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

84.     The proposed budgets are based on the budget allocations from the Long-term Plan 2021-2031.

85.     The proposed work programme can be accommodated within the available budgets. Approval of the work programme does not have significant financial implications, unless projects experience a significant overspend or underspend.

86.     Table 7 outlines the overall budget summary:

Table 7: Budget

Programme  

2021/2022

2022/2023

2023/2024

Regional parks – developments

$900,000

$900,000

$1,900,000

Regional parks – renewals

$9,015,268

$9,054,317

$9,396,950

Auckland Cemeteries – developments

$850,000

$2,500,000

$4,000,000

Auckland Cemeteries – renewals

       $1,678,504

       $1,586,971

      $1,607,519

Coastal asset renewals

$7,000,000

$11,500,000

$11,500,000

Slips remediation and prevention

$1,000,000

$1,000,000

$1,000,000

Local parks and sports fields development

$17,913,965

$14,333,320

$10,310,321

 

87.     Any 2020/2021 capex budget unspent on 30 June 2021 will be assessed for carry-forward to the 2021/2022 work programme. Carry forwards will be added to the work programme as separate activity lines.

88.     Where an activity is cancelled or no longer required, this budget can be reallocated to an existing work programme activity or to a new activity within that financial year.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

89.     If approval of the Community Facilities work programme is not obtained, there is significant risk that the activities within it will be delayed or not delivered.

90.     There have been some delivery delays in the FY2021 capital work programme due to the impact of COVID-19. An internal review has been conducted and a plan has been developed to mitigate the risk of further delays as much as possible. These plans include assessing and planning for sufficient resourcing and a coordinated procurement process across suppliers. Market delays continue to be monitored and local sourcing progressed where possible.

91.     Staff believe that the proposed work programme is deliverable within existing resources. Delivery progress will be monitored through the year. Any resourcing challenges arising will be brought to the Committee’s attention alongside consideration of implications and options to address challenges.

92.     The COVID-19 pandemic could have a further negative impact on the delivery of work programmes if the COVID-19 Alert Level changes (New Zealand’s 4-level Alert System specifies measures to be taken against COVID-19 at each level). The deliverability of some activities will decrease if there is an increase to the COVID-19 Alert Level.

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Next steps

93.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence once approved and continue until 30 June 2022.

94.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, or should there be any changes to regional programmes that affect local board work programmes, these will be reported to the relevant local board when appropriate.

 

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Attachments

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