I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Albert-Eden Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 17 August 2021

2.00pm

Albert Eden Local Board Office
135 Dominion Road
Mt Eden

 

Albert-Eden Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Lee Corrick

 

Deputy Chairperson

Margi Watson

 

Members

Graeme Easte

 

 

Rachel Langton

 

 

Julia Maskill

 

 

Will McKenzie

 

 

Christina Robertson

 

 

Kendyl Smith

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Michael Mendoza

Democracy Advisor

 

12 August 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 809 149

Email: Michael.Mendoza@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     Public Forum - Amelia Wood - Pedestrian Crossing at Mountain Road       5

9.2     Public Forum - Dominion Road Business Association                                   6

9.3     Public Forum - Alcohol off-license application at Greenwoods Corner        6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Albert-Eden Quick Response Round One 2021/2022 grant allocations                  9

12        Future Tenancy of Former Bowling Club Nicholson Park, 25 Poronui St, Mt Eden                                                                                                                                       91

13        Indicative Business Case: Aquatic Provision in Albert-Eden Local Board          99

14        Albert-Eden Joint Council-Controlled Organisations (CCO) Engagement Plan 2021-2022                                                                                                                             167

15        Albert-Eden Local Board feedback on the resource management system reform: Natural and Built Environment Bill exposure draft                                                187

16        Proposal to make a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw                           193

17        Albert-Eden Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021                                              303

18        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Albert-Eden Local Board for March to June 2021                                                                                                                    307

19        Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors' Updates                                           355

20        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                357

21        Board Members' Reports                                                                                          361

22        Albert-Eden Local Board 2021 Governance Forward Work Calendar                 363

23        Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Records                                                        367

24        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

25        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               381

17        Albert-Eden Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021

a.      Draft Albert-Eden Local Board Annual Report (2020/2021)                        381

18        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Albert-Eden Local Board for March to June 2021

b.      Financial performance                                                                                     381


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)         confirm the minutes of its ordinary meeting, held on Tuesday, 20 July 2021, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Albert-Eden Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Amelia Wood - Pedestrian Crossing at Mountain Road

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for Amelia Wood – student, Epsom Girls Grammar, to deliver a presentation during the Public Forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Amelia Wood – student, Epsom Girls Grammar, will be in attendance to deliver a presentation to the local board outlining her advocacy for a second pedestrian crossing at Mountain Road, Epsom, to better enable pedestrians, in particular school-aged students, to safely cross Mountain Road.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      thank Amelia Wood – student, Epsom Girls Grammar, for her attendance and Public Forum presentation.

 

 

9.2       Public Forum - Dominion Road Business Association

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for Gary Holmes and Chris Hammonds of the Dominion Road Business Association, to deliver a presentation during the Public Forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Gary Holmes and Chris Hammonds - Dominion Road Business Association, will be in attendance to deliver a presentation to the local board to outline the group’s views on the proposed Light Rail.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      thank Gary Holmes and Chris Hammonds - Dominion Road Business Association, for their attendance and Public Forum presentation.

 

 

9.3       Public Forum - Alcohol off-license application at Greenwoods Corner

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for Justine Waters, to deliver a presentation during the Public Forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Justine Waters – local community member, will be in attendance to deliver a presentation to the local board to outline her objections regarding an alcohol off-license application pertaining to Greenwoods Corner, Epsom.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      thank Justine Waters – local community member, for her attendance and Public Forum presentation.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Albert-Eden Quick Response Round One 2021/2022 grant allocations

File No.: CP2021/11427

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Albert-Eden Quick Response Round One 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Albert-Eden Local Board adopted the Albert-Eden Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 18 May 2021 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

3.       This report presents applications received for the for Albert-Eden Quick Response Round One 2021/2022 (Attachment B).

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $140,500 for the 2021/2022 financial year.

5.       Nineteen applications were received for Quick Response Round One 2021/2022, requesting a total of $39,898.60.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Albert-Eden Quick Response Round One 2021/2022 listed in the following table:   

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR2201-117

Circability Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the costs of delivering two "Circability Family Circus Sundays" events to be held at Mt Albert War Memorial Hall, including the cost of advertising, three circus tutors, and one creative director to oversee the health and safety and event management.

$2,200.00

Eligible

QR2201-121

Holding Space Aotearoa Charitable Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of delivering three youth-friendly “Open Mic” events, including the cost of venue hire, sound technician fee, back-line music gear hire, and bean bag hire.

$2,707.50

Eligible

QR2201-132

Point Chevalier Social Enterprise

Arts and culture

Towards venue and public address system hire, sound, stage, design and printing of posters for the “Pt Chev Festival” on 4 September 2021.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2201-101

Bellyful New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards the purchase of plastic and foil containers and delivery bags.

$600.00

Eligible

QR2201-103

The Brain Injury Association (Auckland) Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of electrician’s fee to install the new road sign.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2201-106

Almanar Trust

Community

Towards the costs of security, bouncy castle, and games hire to host the “Almanar Trust Eid event” in May 2022.

$2,822.40

Eligible

QR2201-110

[redacted] Siu

Community

Towards the purchase of a new computer for personal use.

$1,000.00

Ineligible

QR2201-112

Auckland Marathi Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of hosting a Diwali celebration at the Fickling Centre in November 2021, including the venue hire, sound and lighting, decoration and set up, recyclable cutlery, and design and printing of community magazine costs.

$2,718.90

Eligible

QR2201-125

Mat Connolly

Community

Towards the purchase of teardrop flags, projector and fitness packs.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR2201-128

Mt Albert Presbyterian Church

Community

Towards the purchase of new tables and chairs for the Mt Albert Presbyterian Church Hall.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2201-129

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the cost of clinical supervision and programme resources used by the youth worker team and counsellors from 1 September 2021 to 30 June 2022.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2201-133

Multiple Sclerosis Auckland Incorporated

Community

Towards a portion of the annual pool hire at both Epsom Girls and Diocesan Girls for hydrotherapy for people with Multiple Sclerosis living in the Albert-Eden area.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2201-127

N R Smith on behalf of Predator Free Waterview

Environment

Towards traps and chew cards.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR2201-126

Sandringham Business Association Incorporated

Events

Towards the "Sandringham Spring Street Festival" traffic management cost.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2201-104

Te Roopu O Wai Ora Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards health and fitness (Kenpo) classes and boxing training and fitness classes, for the 24-week community club programme for at-risk youths.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2201-111

Balmoral Seventh Day Adventist School

Sport and recreation

Towards the transport costs for a six day “Water Skills for Life Swimming Programme” at the Mt Albert Aquatic Centre for year three to six students in November 2021.

$1,759.50

Eligible

QR2201-114

Point Chevalier Croquet Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of four sets of croquet balls.

$2,800.00

Eligible

QR2201-115

Campbell Park Tennis Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost to host "Love Tennis Open Day", specifically the cost of the “Love Tennis” registration kit and on-court coaching fees.

$1,110.00

Eligible

QR2201-124

Auckland United Football Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of two junior football goals for Nicholson Park training grounds.

$1,899.20

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$39,898.60

 

 

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       Auckland Council’s Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Albert-Eden Local Board adopted the Albert-Eden Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 18 May 2021 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

10.     The community grants programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

11.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $140,500 for the 2021/2022 financial year.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The aim of the local board grants programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include:

·        local food production and food waste reduction

·        decreasing use of single-occupancy transport options

·        home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation

·        local tree planting and streamside revegetation

·        education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

15.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Albert-Eden Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

17.     Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they can increase their chances of success in the future.

18.     A summary of each application received through Albert-Eden Quick Response Round One 2021/2022 (Attachment B) is provided.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grants processes.

20.     Seven applicants applying to Albert-Eden Quick Response Round One indicate projects that target Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements. To update the LTP with 10-year Budget 2021-2031 to reflect the recent change.

22.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $140,500 for the 2021/2022 financial year.

23.     Nineteen applications were received for Quick Response Round One 2021/2022, requesting a total of $39,898.60.

24.     Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Following the Albert-Eden Local Board allocating funding for round one of the quick response grants, grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Board Grants Programme 2021/2022

15

b

Albert Eden Quick Response Round One 2021/2022 applications

21

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moumita Dutta - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Future Tenancy of Former Bowling Club Nicholson Park, 25 Poronui St, Mt Eden

File No.: CP2021/11515

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek direction from the Albert-Eden Local Board on future options for occupation of the former bowling club building and associated land at Nicholson Park, Mt Eden.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The current lease for the former bowling club building at Nicholson Park, 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden expired on 30 June 2020.

3.       The Handweavers and Spinners Guild Auckland Incorporated (HWG) are the current tenants of the building. Their occupation commenced 1 July 2005 for an initial term of five years with one right of renewal of five years expiring on 30 June 2010. A subsequent lease was formalised commencing 1 July 2010 with final expiry on 30 June 2020. This lease remains operative on a month-by-month basis, until a decision is made on future occupancy.

4.       When the lease of a council owned building expires, an expression of interest (EOI) process is recommended to canvas the community for proposals to ensure the best community outcomes are delivered.

5.       The current tenancy was for the building only and the option to include the green space in a new lease could be more attractive to a broader range of community groups and increase utilisation of the park.

6.       Community leasing seeks direction from the local board to progress with the expression of interest process to identify suitable community occupants for either just the building, or the building and the associated land.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      approve advertising calling for expressions of interest to lease the council-owned building (approximately 200m²) and greens area (approximately 1200m²) located on Nicholson Park Reserve, 25 Poronui Road, Mt Eden (Attachment A).

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       This report seeks direction from the local board to initiate the expression of interest process to identify suitable uses and occupants for either the building, or the building and the associated land of the former bowling club at Nicholson Park.

8.       The Albert-Eden Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport, and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

 

 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Land and Building

 

9.       The former bowling club building is situated at the south side of Nicholson Park, Mt Eden. The building is owned by council and is approximately 200sqm in area. The former bowling green land at Nicholson Park is approximately 1200sqm and is held by the Crown through the Department of Conservation as a classified recreation reserve and vested in Auckland Council, in trust, for recreation purposes.

10.     There is an approved Park Management Plan for Nicholson Park from 1993 which contemplates leasing to a bowling club only.   Public notification and iwi consultation on the intent to lease to any alternative group is therefore required.

11.     When council owned land and/or buildings become available for occupation, it is recommended to call for expressions of interest from interested parties. This ensures that the greatest need and best community outcomes can be assessed and provided for. It also ensures the process is transparent so that all requests can be assessed equally.

12.     Currently Nicholson Park is used for both active recreational and community service-based groups.

Current tenants – The Handweavers and Spinners Guild Auckland Incorporated

13.     The HWG has leased the building since 1 July 2005 and shares these premises with the Auckland Embroiderers Guild (AEG). The current lease expired on the 30 June 2020 and continues on a month-by-month tenancy.

14.     The HWG is a non-profit organisation, and their main aim is to advance and encourage the crafts of hand weaving, spinning, dyeing and related fibre crafts.

Options are as follows:

Option 1:  EOI Building Only

Option 2: EOI Building and Green

Option 3: New Lease to current tenants

·      Limits the applicants to indoor type activities only

·      Greens area remains available as passive or active recreation open space.

·        Attract groups that may also require outdoor space

·        Opens up EOI process to both recreation and community service-based groups

·        May attract applications from active recreational groups

·        Greens area space is not suitable for all sports because of size and configuration

·        Currently no floodlighting, only suitable for daytime use.

·        Gives security to the current tenants HWG for the next six years

·        HWG and AEG members will be able to continue to their activities and events at the site

·        If option three is not supported HWG can apply through the EOI process.

·        The Greens area remains available as passive or active recreation open space.

 

15.     Community leasing staff have liaised with Parks Sport and Recreation staff and the Albert-Eden Strategic Broker, who support option two.

16.     Staff recommend progressing option two as this will align with the community occupancy guidelines and invites a wider range of groups to apply, is a transparent process giving interested groups an opportunity to put their case for accommodation and allows a more robust assessment of outcomes for the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     There is no impact on greenhouse gas emissions calling for expressions of interest. Any climate impact will be reassessed once a suitable occupant is identified and their activities are reviewed. This will be included in a report seeking approval of a new lease.

18.     It is unlikely that climate change will have an impact on the proposed leases, as the site is not within a flooding zone or near the coast.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     An EOI process has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group.

20.     Input on the proposed EOI process was sought from Area Operations, the Community Empowerment team and the Park Sports and Recreation lead. All supported the EOI process.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     During the local board workshop on 8 June 2021, staff provided information on the community lease process for the ex-bowling club and greens on Nicholson Park, 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden.

22.     The recommendations in this report fall within the local board’s allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sports, and community facilities. 

23.     The recommendations support the Albert-Eden Local Board Outcome plan “Parks and community facilities meet a wide range of needs”.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi which are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2018-2028, the Unitary Plan, and local board plans.  

25.     The aim of community leasing is to increase targeted support for Māori community development. This proposal seeks to improve access to facilities for all Aucklanders, including Māori living in the Albert-Eden Local Board area.

26.     As the nature of this lease is not contemplated in the operative reserve management plan, iwi engagement is required. A presentation will be made to the Mana Whenua forum and written communication with iwi groups as part of the EOI process with an interest in the area will be undertaken depending on the board’s decision in this regard.

27.     In addition, as the underlying land is Crown-owned it could potentially be subject to Treaty Settlement. As such, any proposed new lease will include a Tiriti o Waitangi clause.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     The costs for advertising for expressions of interest and any subsequent public notification relating to a grant to lease are borne by the Community Facilities Department.

29.     Rent for the current lease to HWG is $500 plus GST per annum. The recommended rental in the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 for a new lease is one dollar ($1) plus GST per annum.

30.     The Community Occupancy Guidelines also recommend that groups contribute to the maintenance cost of the facility. In this case the cost will be $500 per annum. That means the change in rental to one dollar ($1) together with the $500 is cost neutral to the board’s budget.  

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     If the board resolves to approve the EOI process this may create uncertainty for the HWG, which may affect the group’s ability to undertake its core activities. 

32.     Should the Albert-Eden Local Board resolve not to approve the EOI process this may limit other community groups the opportunity to provide services to the community.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     If the board wishes to proceed with the EOI, staff will prepare an advertisement to call for expressions of interest.

34.     An EOI is open for a one-month period that allows time for advertising, a site visit for prospective tenants and submission of applications.

35.     The applications are then assessed using information requested in the application, and local board and council plan criteria.

36.     The applications and analysis will be workshopped with the local board with advice from staff, prior to preparation of a business meeting report for formal approval.

37.     Before reporting for approval of the new lease staff will consult with iwi and publicly notify the intent to consider the new lease. Any comments or submissions can then be included into the report for the board’s information.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Site Plan and Photos

95

b

Attachment B HWG Summary

97

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jo Heaven - Senior Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - Acting General Manager Community Facilities

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Indicative Business Case: Aquatic Provision in Albert-Eden Local Board

File No.: CP2021/11061

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To consider an indicative business case for the continued provision of aquatic services in the Albert-Eden Local Board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Funding is included in the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 for a new aquatic facility in the Whau Local Board area, to address a gap in services identified in the community needs investigation for Central West Auckland (comprising of the Whau area, the eastern fringe of the Waitākere area and the western suburbs of the AlbertEden area).

3.       The 2015 Framework Agreement which sets the governance model for Mt Albert Aquatic Centre, requires Auckland Council to investigate how to maintain aquatic services provision in Albert-Eden in the future. The need for on-going aquatic provision in Albert-Eden was established in 2017 by the community needs investigation for Central West Auckland.

4.       Staff have developed an indicative business case to inform decision-making on future provision of aquatic services in Albert-Eden.

5.       Five solutions to maintain aquatic services in Albert-Eden were considered:

·    Option 0: Status quo (provision at Mt Albert Aquatic Centre)

·    Option 1: Expansion of Mt Albert Aquatic Centre to improve pool capacity, access and parking

·    Option 2: New aquatic facility integrated with Mt Albert Community and Leisure Centre

·    Option 3: Smaller new aquatic facility on council-owned land, retaining access to Mt Albert Aquatic Centre

·    Option 3.1: Larger new aquatic facility on council-owned land, no community access to Mt Albert Aquatic Centre.

6.       Staff recommend continuing delivering aquatic services using Mt Albert Aquatic Centre (Option 0). The facility can operate long-term: it is in satisfactory condition and has a 50-year Licence to Occupy to 2048, plus two rights of renewal.

7.       No investment in expanding Mt Albert Aquatic Centre or in building a new aquatic facility is required to maintain aquatic services in Albert-Eden in the short-to-medium term.

8.       This recommendation is based on an investigation of community needs, an assessment of strategic alignment and an economic analysis.

·    The investigation of community needs confirms the need to maintain aquatic provision in Albert-Eden as demand is expected to increase with population growth and changing preferences.

·    There is a strong strategic case to maintain aquatic services provision in Albert-Eden. It aligns with national and local strategic objectives and contributes to Auckland Plan 2050 outcomes. It responds to a clear investment logic.

·    There is a weak economic case to invest in expanding the existing facility or building a new one. Solutions other than the status quo require large capital investments and only provide net benefits 30 years after investment at the earliest. This is because all investment options deliver capacity that exceeds anticipated demand over the next 30 years.

9.       As required in the 2015 Framework Agreement, staff are working with partners to identify and implement a solution to address operational issues associated with shared parking and access at Mt Albert Aquatic Centre.

10.     Mt Albert Aquatic Centre is near, or at capacity with near 370,000 annual visitors. The facility’s ability to meet demand in the medium-term is highly dependent on a new aquatic centre in Whau, anticipated to open around 2028. Demand for aquatic services is likely to outstrip Mt Albert Aquatic Centre capacity again from 2033.

11.     Staff recommend that community needs for aquatic services in Albert-Eden be investigated in 2029/30 or earlier if the planned aquatic facility in Whau is delayed.

12.     The next step is for staff to report to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in September 2021. The report will include feedback from Albert-Eden Local Board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the indicative business case for aquatic provision in Albert-Eden, which found that:

i)        there is a need for on-going aquatic services provision in the Albert-Eden Local Board area

ii)       Mt Albert Aquatic Centre can operate long-term as it is in satisfactory condition and operates under a 50-year license to occupy to 2048, plus one right of renewal for 25 years to 2073, and then a further final option to renew for a term to be agreed by the parties

iii)      there is a weak economic case for investment to expand Mt Albert Aquatic Centre or to build a new facility in the Albert-Eden Local Board area

iv)      Mt Albert Aquatic Centre is near, or at capacity

v)      the facility’s ability to meet future demand for aquatic services in the medium-term is highly dependent on the planned aquatic facility in the Whau Local Board area

vi)      capacity is anticipated to become an issue again at Mt Albert Aquatic Centre from 2033 as population growth drives demand.

b)      support that no further investigation of investment options to maintain aquatic services in the Albert-Eden Local Board area as part of a detailed business case be undertaken

c)      support maintaining the delivery of aquatic services in the Albert-Eden Local Board area at Mt Albert Aquatic Centre (Option 0: Status quo)

d)      support that no investment in expanding Mt Albert Aquatic Centre or in building a new aquatic facility is required to maintain aquatic services in the Albert-Eden Local Board area until further work as per resolution e) below

e)      support adding the following action to the Community Facilities Network Plan (CFNP) Action Plan: “Investigate community needs for aquatic services in the Albert-Eden Local Board area” for delivery in 2029/30 or earlier if the planned aquatic centre in the Whau Local Board area is delayed.

 

Horopaki

Context

A long-term solution for aquatic facilities in Mt Albert is a priority for Albert-Eden Local Board

13.     Mt Albert Aquatic Centre was developed in partnership between Auckland Council, Mt Albert Grammar School, Ministry of Education, and the Mt Albert Grammar School Community Swimming Pool Trust.

14.     A Framework Agreement developed in 2015 sets a new governance model for the facility. It establishes a requirement for Auckland Council to investigate how to maintain aquatic services provision in the Albert-Eden area in the future.

15.     Albert-Eden Local Board has been advocating for the continuing provision of aquatic facilities. One of the key initiatives in the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020, under “Outcome 5: Parks and community facilities meet a wide range of needs” is to:

   “Continue to advocate to the Governing Body through the council’s 10-year Budget process for a replacement pool in Mt Albert or another appropriate Albert-Eden site”.

The need for continued aquatic services provision in Albert-Eden was previously established

16.     A community needs investigation for Central West Auckland carried out in 2017 examined aquatic and leisure service provision in an area comprising the Whau Local Board area, the eastern fringe of the Waitākere Local Board area and the western suburbs of the AlbertEden Local Board area.

17.     The investigation established the need for:

·     a new aquatic and leisure facility in the Whau area to address gaps in services and support growth

·     on-going aquatic provision in the Albert-Eden area to maintain service levels now and into the future.

18.     Funding is included in the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 for a new aquatic facility in Whau. The facility is anticipated to open by 2028.

19.     An indicative business case has been developed to consider the case for investment to maintain aquatic services provision in Albert-Eden. The indicative business case is provided in Attachment A.

Indicative business cases provide evidence to support decision-making

20.     Auckland Council uses a three-step process to investigate large-scale capital projects and new investment in community facilities or services. This approach is based on the business cases model developed by New Zealand Treasury.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 1: Council’s methodology for investment

We are here 

 


We are recommending not progressing to the detailed business case phase

21.     The first step begins with a needs assessment and aims to ascertain whether there is or will be a gap in provision. This entails:

·      research into the profile of the community

·      a summary of recent social research

·      a community facility stocktake (both council and non-council facilities)

·      a gap analysis which assesses current provision against Auckland Council policy.

22.     The second step is an indicative business case. It considers the merits of any proposed investment and provides decision makers with an early indication of a preferred way forward. The indicative business case:

·      confirms the need for provision or investment and need for change

·      outlines how the proposal aligns with the organisation’s strategic intent

·      considers the feasibility of a range of options, which includes comparing their costs and benefits in the view to ensure value for money.

23.     The third step is a detailed business case. It recommends a preferred option that optimises value for money and seeks approval from decision makers to finalise the arrangements for successful implementation.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

24.     Staff have prepared an indicative business case for the continued provision of aquatic services in Albert-Eden. It comprises a needs assessment, a strategic case and an economic case. The key findings are outlined below.

The need to maintain aquatic services provision in the Albert-Eden Local Board area is confirmed

25.     There is an existing and growing need for aquatic services in Albert-Eden.

26.     Demand is driven by a growing and changing population:

·      The Albert-Eden Local Board area was home to 98,622 residents in 2018.

·      The majority of residents in 2018 were of European descent (59.7 per cent) and 32.0 per cent identified as Asian ethnicity (compared to 28.2 per cent in Auckland).

·      The population is becoming increasingly ethnically diverse. Albert-Eden’s Asian population has increased by 6,249 people, or 24.7 per cent, between the 2013 and the 2018 census.

·      The resident population is expected to increase from near 100,000 to over 150,000 people over the next 30 years.

·      Population will grow by an average of 1.8 per cent per year between 2021 and 2028 and by an average of 1.2 per cent per year between 2028 and 2057.

·      This growth rate is not as fast as the Auckland average of 2.6 per cent over the next 30 years.

Mt Albert Aquatic Centre provides aquatic services to Albert-Eden residents 

27.     Current aquatic services in Central West Auckland (study area shaded purple in the map below) are largely provided by Mt Albert Aquatic Centre. Other facilities servicing the Albert-Eden population include Olympic Aquatic Centre, Tepid Baths, Cameron pool, the privately-owned Mt Eden pool as well as learn-to-swim providers.

28.     The planned facility in Whau (illustrated by a black dot in the map below) will also be within a short distance to Mt Albert residents.

Figure 2: Current and planned aquatic provision


Note: The black circle shows the potential catchment for the planned facility in Whau for which the exact location is not known yet. The location shown in the figure above is illustrative only.

Mt Albert Aquatic Centre can operate long-term 

29.     Mt Albert Aquatic Centre is in satisfactory condition. A $3.2m upgrade in 2015 plus regular maintenance and renewal mean that it can operate long-term.

30.     The facility received numerous awards post-improvements, winning the New Zealand Recreation Association Outstanding Pool of the Year 2017 and the Innovation Award Winner 2017 and 2018.

31.     It is owned by the Mt Albert Grammar School Community Swimming Pool Trust (or the Pool Trust, an Auckland Council-controlled organisation) under a 50-year Licence to Occupy to 2048, plus one right of renewal for 25 years to 2073, and then a further final option to renew for a term to be agreed by the parties.

32.     The facility is near, or at capacity, with near 370,000 annual visits. Demand projections suggest that the facility:

·      is unlikely to meet increased short-term demand for aquatic services between 2021 and 2028

·      will be able to meet medium-term demand from 2028 as a new aquatic facility in the Whau area opens and displaces around 70,600 visits a year from Mt Albert Aquatic Centre

·      is likely to reach capacity again from around 2033 and therefore unable to meet long-term demand.

There is a strong strategic case to maintain aquatic services provision in Albert-Eden

33.     The investment proposal is: “to maintain aquatic services provision in the Albert-Eden Local Board area”.

34.     The investment proposal aligns with national and local strategic objectives and contributes to Auckland Plan 2050 outcomes.

35.     It responds to a clear investment logic as shown below:

Figure 3: Investment Logic Map

Note: Percentages refer to weight given to each problem or investment objectives

The findings of the indicative business case are presented graphically below


 

Five options were short-listed

36.     Five options were short-listed from a long list to maintain aquatic provision in Albert-Eden:

·        Option 0: Status quo

·        Option 1: Expansion of Mt Albert Aquatic Centre to improve pool capacity, access and parking

·        Option 2: New aquatic facility integrated with Mt Albert Community and Leisure Centre

·        Option 3: Smaller new aquatic facility on council-owned land, retaining access to Mt Albert Aquatic Centre

·        Option 3.1: Larger new aquatic facility on council-owned land, no community access to Mt Albert Aquatic Centre.

37.     Option 1 is contingent on all Pool Trust partners agreeing to further developing the facility.

There is a weak economic case for investment  

38.     All investment options were assessed against the status quo option as part of a cost benefit analysis, concluding to a weak economic case to expand the current facility or to invest in a new facility.

39.     The cost benefit analysis reached several conclusions:

·        Option 1: Expansion of Mt Albert Aquatic Centre has the highest benefit cost ratio: for every dollar spent, $1.15 in measured benefits is expected to be realised. Benefits are expected to outweigh costs from 2055, or 30 years after investment. This is because expanding Mt Albert Aquatic Centre creates an over-supply of aquatic services as illustrated by the red line in Figure 4. 

·        Option 2: New aquatic facility integrated with Mt Albert Community and Leisure Centre is not expected to deliver benefits substantially higher than costs, with a benefit cost ratio of 1.02. Again, benefits outweigh costs more than 30 years after investment.

·        The remaining options deliver no value for money. Costs of provision for Option 3 and Option 3.1, proposing a new aquatic and leisure facility on council-owned land, outweigh benefits.

·        Overall results vary only marginally when assumptions such as visitor numbers displaced by the new facility in the Whau area and construction costs are adjusted in a sensitivity analysis.

Table 1: Net present value and benefit cost ratio for each option

 

Capital costs

Net present value

Benefit cost ratio

Option 1

Expansion of Mt Albert Aquatic Centre

$21.9 m

$2.9 m

1.15

Option 2

New aquatic facility integrated with Mt Albert Community and Leisure Centre

$27.7 m

$0.4 m

1.02

Option 3

Smaller new aquatic facility on council-owned land, retaining access to Mt Albert Aquatic Centre

$40.0 m

-$8.0 m

0.78

Option 3.1

Larger new aquatic facility on council-owned land, no community access to Mt Albert Aquatic Centre

$42.9 m

-$9.0 m

0.77

*Highest values in green, lowest values in red
Source: MartinJenkins, 2021.

 

 


 

Figure 4: Comparison of demand for aquatic services in Albert-Eden to capacity options

 

Source: MartinJenkins, 2021.

The investment options compare unfavourably to other local projects   

40.     Benefit-cost ratios for the four investment options compare unfavourably to those for recent investment proposals using the same methodology.

41.     Table 2 provides a comparison of the Mt Albert Aquatic provision cost-benefit analysis results with four Auckland Council Local Board projects assessed in 2019 and 2020.

Table 2: Comparison of the Mt Albert Aquatic investment options with other projects

Project

Net present value

Benefit cost ratio

Capital cost

Mt Albert aquatic centre investment options

Option 1

$2.9 m

1.15

$21.9 m

Option 2

$0.4 m

1.02

$27.7 m

Option 3

-$8.0 m

0.78

$40.0 m

Option 3.1

-$9.0 m

0.77

$42.9 m

“One Local Initiative” projects

Henderson-Massey – Destination aquatic centre

Option 2

Option 3

Option 4

Option 5

$108.5 m

$72.9 m

$67.8 m

$67.9 m

3.71

2.92

2.61

2.71

$53.5 m

$53.3 m

$65.7 m

$57.4 m

Rodney indoor sport facility (Kumeu/Huapai)

$14.6 m

1.8

$10.5 m

Upper Harbour indoor sport facility (Whenuapai)

$50.0 m

2.7

$18.5 m

Manurewa Community facility and sports field upgrade

Partial option

$1.7 m

1.3

$5.5 m

Full option

-$3.5 m

0.7

$11.9 m

Franklin – Karaka sports park upgrade

Partial option

$2.1 m

1.1

$18.4 m

Full option

-$14.4 m

0.6

$40.4 m

Source: MartinJenkins, 2021.

All options but the status quo provide benefits to the school

42.     Mt Albert Grammar School has reported several issues related to the aquatic facility. These are included in the Investment Logic Map.

43.     Addressing those issues would provide benefits to the school. Those benefits cannot be quantified but are assessed below.

Table 3: Benefits assessment

Option 0

Option 1

Option 2

Option 3

Option 3.1

Safety benefits associated with no longer sharing a driveway

None

High

High

High

High

Benefits from increased parking

None

High

High

High

High

Better utilisation of school property

None

No

Medium

Medium

Medium

Greater access to pool lanes for training and games

None

Low

High

Medium

High

Address school’s concerns

None

Low

High

Medium

High

Source: Adapted from MartinJenkins, 2021.

44.     All investment options provide benefits to the school. The status quo option does not.

45.     With a fast-growing roll, space on school ground is in short supply. Options for which there is no community access to the current facility (options 2 and 3.1) deliver the highest level of benefits to the school. Option 1 does not address the school’s concern regarding better utilisation of school property and the school might not be amenable to an expansion of the existing pool.

Staff have developed criteria to assess the five options

46.     Staff developed assessment criteria to enable the comparison of the options in line with New Zealand Treasury’s Better Business Case framework.

Table 4: Success Factors

Success factor

Description

Strategic fit

Meets Auckland Council strategic intent and contributes to Auckland Plan outcomes by ensuring continued aquatic services provision in Albert-Eden in the future

Business needs

Fulfil the current and future needs for aquatic and leisure services in the local catchment

Value for money

Provides the highest cost-benefit ratio, benefit levels being dependent on the size of the catchment served by the facility

Address school’s concerns

Addresses Mt Albert Grammar School’s concerns regarding accessway, car parking, access to lanes and better use of the site

The status quo fares the best against the success factors

47.     A summary of the options assessed against the success factors is provided in the table below.

48.     Option 1 Expansion of Mt Albert Aquatic Centre is the best of the four investment options. However, it delivers low value for money, with a benefit cost ratio of 1.15 and net benefits 30 years after investment. Furthermore, Option 1 does not address school issues and is therefore unlikely to gain the necessary traction amongst the Pool Trust’s partners. It is therefore not a preferred option.

49.     The other investment options are discarded as they provide no to very low value for money.

50.     The assessment concludes to Option 0 being the preferred option, noting short-term capacity constraints.

Table 5: Assessment against success factors

Option 0

Option 1

Option 2

Option 3

Option 3.1

Strategic fit

High

High

High

High

High

Business needs

Met, but some short-term capacity constraints

Met

Met

Met

Met

Value for money

No investment

Low

Very low

No

No

Address school’s concerns

No*

Low

High

Medium

High

Overall assessment

Preferred option

Not a preferred option

Not a preferred option

Not a preferred option

Not a preferred option

* Staff and partners are currently investigating alternative solutions to address school’s operational concerns.

Staff recommend maintaining the status quo and further investigating service gap in 2029/30

51.     Staff recommend Option 0: Status quo as the preferred option to continue using Mt Albert Aquatic Centre to deliver aquatic services in the Albert-Eden area.

52.     Mt Albert Aquatic Centre can continue to operate long-term. The facility is in satisfactory condition and has a 50-year Licence to Occupy, plus two rights of renewal.

53.     This indicative business case has highlighted likely capacity issues at Mt Albert Aquatic Centre in the long-term. Staff recommend that a community needs investigation for aquatic services in the Albert-Eden Local Board area be carried out in 2029/30 or earlier if the planned facility in the Whau area is delayed. This will provide an evidence base to address potential gap in aquatic services and plan for future investment.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

54.     There is no climate impact associated with the recommendations in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

55.     Staff from Parks Sport and Recreation, Service Strategy and Integration, and Service and Asset Planning were involved in the development of this report.

56.     The indicative business case in Attachment A was reviewed by the Chief Economist Unit and the General Manager: Value for Money.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

57.     Albert-Eden Local Board advocates for the continuing provision of aquatic facilities in Mt Albert based on the outcome of the Framework Agreement Mt Albert Aquatic Centre 2015. This agreement set a 10-year expectation to find a way of providing aquatic provision in the Central West area into the future.

58.     In 2016 the Albert-Eden Local Board requested officers to progress investigation for a continued long-term need for aquatic provision in the Mt Albert area, including options analysis, site assessment, and estimating cost implications.

59.     One of the key initiatives in the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020, under “Outcome 5: Parks and community facilities meet a wide range of needs” is to “continue to advocate to the Governing Body through the council’s 10-year Budget process for a replacement pool in Mt Albert or another appropriate Albert-Eden site.”

60.     Continued aquatic provision in the Albert-Eden area would deliver a range of benefits to users as well as to the wider community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

61.     Central West Auckland has a slightly lower percentage of Māori (7 per cent) compared to the Auckland average (11 per cent). Māori, in general, are more active, younger and are over-represented on the deprivation index compared to the general population. The provision of affordable sport opportunities is important to this group.

62.     In 2018, just over 50 per cent of Māori in Auckland were physically active. Of those who are physically active, 14.3 per cent participate in swimming.

63.     The lack of aquatic provision in the local area is a barrier to participation in aquatic services. The transport cost to neighbouring facilities is an issue for lower socio-economic groups. Maintaining provision in the Albert-Eden area means they can continue to participate.

64.     Provision of aquatic services in Central West Auckland will contribute to Māori outcome ‘Priority 2: Whānau and Tamariki Wellbeing’ in the Auckland Plan 2050.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

65.     There is no financial implication from this report.  

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

66.     A comprehensive risk assessment has been undertaken. There are multiple risks associated with the options to deliver against the investment proposal, outlined in the table below.

67.     One of the main identified risks is a delay in delivery of the planned aquatic centre in the Whau Local Board area. As discussed as part of the needs assessment Mt Albert Aquatic Centre is unlikely to meet increased demand for aquatic services forecast between 2021 and 2028. Its ability to meet demand from 2028 is entirely dependent on the new Whau facility increasing capacity across the network.

68.     A further risk is that there is no planning to meet long-term demand, as capacity constraint is likely again from 2033. A community needs investigation for aquatic services would ensure gap in provision and solutions to meet demand can be fully considered.

Table 6: Initial risk analysis

Main Risks

Consequence (H/M/L)

Likelihood (H/M/L)

Comments and Risk Management Strategies

Optimism bias

M

H

Conduct sensitivity analysis of cost-benefit results.

Delay in delivery of the Whau aquatic centre

H

M

The Whau aquatic facility is planned for construction in 2025 and expected to open in 2028. This will enable Mt Albert Aquatic Centre to meet demand for the following five years.  Financial constraints or unforeseen circumstances may delay construction. Any delay would have a significant impact on Mt Albert Aquatic Centre’s ability to meet medium-term demand.

No further planning to meet long-term demand

H

M

Analysis shows likely capacity constraints at Mt Albert Aquatic Centre  from 2033, five years after the Whau facility opens. A community needs investigation for aquatic services would ensure gap in provision and solutions to meet demand can be fully considered.

Non-mitigation of facility issues with option

H

H

The Framework Agreement that sets the governance structure for Mt Albert Aquatic centre, puts an obligation on Auckland Council to work with the school and Trust to find a solution that establishes a new access point to the pool and additional parking.

Potential for conflicting use with Central Interceptor

M

L

Option 2 (new aquatic facility integrated with Mt Albert Community and Leisure Centre) would require coordination with Watercare if progressed. This is due to the Central Interceptor project occupying the Mt Albert War Memorial carpark from late 2020 to mid-2022, making the site extremely constrained. If the Central Interceptor project is delayed this may have flow-on effects to the Mt Albert Community Centre expansion.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

69.     The next steps are for staff to report to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in August 2021. The report will include resolutions from Albert-Eden Local Board.

70.     The Status quo option does not address Mt Albert Grammar School’s issues related to shared parking and access. Under the Framework Agreement for Mt Albert Aquatic Centre, Auckland Council has an obligation to work with the Pool Trust and Mt Albert Grammar School to address current operational issues. Staff are currently investigating alternative solutions.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Aquatic Provision in Albert-Eden Local Board Area- Indicative Business Case

113

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kelsey Hanrahan - Graduate Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Albert-Eden Joint Council-Controlled Organisations (CCO) Engagement Plan 2021-2022

File No.: CP2021/11221

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       For the local board to adopt its Joint Council-Controlled Organisations (CCO) Engagement Plan 2021-2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The review panel for the independent review of Auckland Council’s substantive council-controlled organisations presented its findings to the Governing Body and local board chairs in August 2020. All 64 recommendations were adopted.

3.       Recommendations 6, 34, and 53 were designated as those that CCOs would work with local boards to implement. Recommendation 34 (b) of the 2020 CCO Review advised the preparation of joint CCO engagement plans for each local board. 

4.       A template for the joint engagement plan has been developed in conjunction with local board members and CCO staff over the last six months. While it will be signed, it will be a live document that will be updated as required.

5.       Workshops have been held at all 21 local boards with CCO staff.  Local boards have provided their views on CCO delivery and engagement in their area, and the degree of engagement they expect for each project or programme, both for the local board and for the community.

6.       These discussions have formed the basis of the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 that is provided as Attachment A.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      adopt the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 as agreed between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations: Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Panuku Development Auckland, and Watercare

b)      note that the Joint Engagement Plan is a live document that will be updated as needed, with changes reported to the local board each quarter.

c)      authorise the chair of the local board to sign this agreement on behalf of the local board, in conjunction with representatives from the four CCOs.

Horopaki

Context

7.       In November 2019, the Governing Body approved the draft terms of reference for an independent review of Auckland Council’s substantive council-controlled organisations (CCOs) (GB/2019/127).

8.       These terms of reference required the independent review panel to consider whether CCOs were an efficient and effective model for delivering services, and whether the CCO decision-making model had enough political oversight, public transparency and accountability.

CCO Review Findings

9.       The independent panel presented the findings of the CCO Review to the Governing Body and local board chairs on 11 August 2020. 

10.     The review made 64 recommendations noting that the recommendations should be considered as a package. On 27 August 2020, the Governing Body resolved to agree in principle all of the review’s recommendations (GB/2020/89). 

11.     Local boards provided input to the CCO Review by:

·   participating in the CCO Review process

·   providing feedback on the final report to the Governing Body in August 2020.

12.     The 64 recommendations were divided up into categories of work:

·   those to be implemented by the council’s chief executive

·   those the council’s chief executive would work with CCO chief executive(s) to implement

·   those that the Panuku Development Auckland board would consider and report back on

·   those that CCOs would work with local boards to implement; this last group includes recommendations 6, 34, and 53. 

13.     Recommendation 34 was that CCOs and local boards reset how they engage with one another, by means of: 

a)    a workshop to develop a more meaningful way for CCOs and local boards to work together 

b)    the preparation of joint CCO engagement plans for each local board

c)    more initiative by local boards in integrating their own planning with CCO planning

d)    liaison between CCOs and local boards at a more senior level so CCOs can quickly remedy local board concerns

e)    the preparation of joint CCO six-monthly reports for each local board

f)     the communication of clear, up-to-date information from CCOs to local boards on projects in their area.

14.     This report focusses on activities undertaken to deliver part (b) of recommendation 34, the preparation of a joint CCO engagement plan for each local board.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Developing a joint CCO engagement plan template

15.     Prior to the 2020 CCO Review, the Governance Manual for substantive council-controlled organisations set the expectation that each CCO would prepare a local board engagement plan every three years, by 31 July following local board elections, and report to local boards accordingly. These engagement plans were created separately by the five CCOs, and were generic across all 21 local boards.

16.     Recommendation 34 (b) of the 2020 CCO Review advised the preparation of joint CCO engagement plans for each local board. 

17.     A template for the joint engagement plan has been developed iteratively over the last six months, with input from Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Panuku Development Auckland, and Watercare staff.

18.     The template includes:

·   CCO responsibilities

·   local board commitments

·   local board plan outcomes and objectives

·   names of local board members and staff from the CCOs and local board services

·   leads and/or delegations in place

·   an overview of the IAP2 Public Participation Spectrum that is used to indicate the degree of engagement in each project

·   work programme tables for each CCO.

19.     The sections on CCO responsibilities and local board commitments have largely been imported from previous engagement plans, or directly from the Governance Manual.

20.     Local board plan outcomes and objectives have been included to ensure these are front and centre when CCOs are working with local boards.

21.     While directly addressing recommendation 34(a), the joint engagement plan also addresses other elements of recommendation 34 as follows:

·   documents key contacts, including senior CCO representatives of the organisation well placed to quickly respond to and resolve local concerns (34d)

·   gives local boards the opportunity to highlight projects likely to be most significant to them as governors, and contributes to a “no surprises” environment

·   the process of developing, agreeing and documenting levels of engagement for each project or programme is the first step towards ensuring the communication of clear, up-to-date information from CCOs to local boards on projects in their area (34f).

22.     This template was shared with local boards for feedback via the Chairs’ Forum (December 2020 and May 2021) and via a memo in May 2021.

23.     It will be used for the 2021 financial year, with feedback from this 2021 process taken into account and any necessary changes incorporated for future years.

A workshop to develop a more meaningful way for CCOs and local boards to work together 

24.     In delivering parts (a) and (b) of recommendation 34, staff have linked the two outcomes together and supported local boards and CCOs to customise the content of each local board’s engagement plan via a joint workshop.

25.     Staff from the four CCOs have attended joint workshops facilitated by Local Board Services at each of the 21 local boards between May and July 2021.

26.     These workshops have provided local boards with the opportunity to share their views on CCO delivery and engagement in their area. They included an outline of each CCO’s work programme relating to the local area, and local boards have provided their views on the degree of engagement they expect for each project or programme.

27.     The local board also indicated their preference for whether and how community engagement is undertaken for each project.

Customised engagement plans

28.     The discussions that took place at the joint workshops are reflected in the customised version of the engagement plan provided for this local board as Attachment A.

29.     This plan represents a point in time and will be subject to change over the course of the year. It is a “live document” that will be updated when needed. Major changes to the CCO work programme, or to the agreed level of local board and public engagement, will be workshopped with the local board ahead of any change. Minor changes will be summarised and reported on each quarter.

30.     Work programme items that will be confirmed with the formal adoption of the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 (LTP) will be included as they become available. This includes items from the Economic Development Action Plan, and the Regional Land Transport Plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     The adoption of the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have a direct impact on climate.

32.     Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     Adopting the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 is likely to have a positive impact on other parts of the council as well as between the respective CCOs within each local board area.

34.     These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes, and will give council staff greater visibility of CCO work programmes.

35.     To avoid or reduce disruption, staff will align the processes for the local board work programme and the updating of the CCO engagement plans over time.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     Local board engagement plans will enable local boards to customise engagement between CCOs and communities in their areas, by signalling those issues and projects which are of most significance within their communtiies.

37.     Local boards provided input to the CCO Review by:

·   participating in the CCO Review process

·   providing feedback on the final report to the Governing Body in August 2020.

38.     Local boards have been kept up to date on the development of the engagement plan template via:

·   input and feedback at December 2020 Chairs’ Forum

·   update at May 2021 Chairs’ Forum

·   a memo to all local board members in May 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     Adopting the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 is likely to have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

40.     While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     The adoption of the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.     It is likely that there will be changes made to work programme items in the engagement plan during the year, or to the level of engagement that the board or the community will have. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, contains a table recording changes made since it was signed, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.     With the engagement plans completed for all 21 local boards, staff will develop a reporting framework that best responds to the type of projects and the level of engagement to which local boards and CCOs have agreed.

44.     CCOs will work with local boards to ensure that any major changes to the work programme or to engagement levels are workshopped with the board, and well documented.

45.     Minor changes will be noted within the live document and shared with the local board each quarter.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Board Joint Council-Controlled Organisations (CCO) Engagement Plan 2021-2022

173

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Planning, Local Board Services

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Albert-Eden Local Board feedback on the resource management system reform: Natural and Built Environment Bill exposure draft

File No.: CP2021/11274

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Albert-Eden Local Board’s formal feedback on the Ministry for the Environment’s Natural and Built Environment Bill exposure draft.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       As part of the government’s comprehensive reform of the Resource Management Act 1991, the Ministry for the Environment released key aspects of the proposed Natural and Built Environments Bill in an exposure draft which will form the basis of a select committee inquiry.

3.       Submissions on the inquiry close on 4 August 2021. A copy of the paper can be found here: environment.govt.nz/publications/natural-and-built-environments-bill-parliamentary-paper-on-the-exposure-draft/

4.       Local boards were invited to provide feedback to be incorporated and appended to the Auckland Council submission by 26 July 2021. At its business meeting on 20 July 2021, the local board delegated the authority to provide feedback on the exposure draft by 26 July 2021 to Members Easte and McKenzie (AE/2021/115).

5.       The local board’s feedback was provided to Auckland Council subject matter experts prior to the deadline to be incorporated and appended to the final Auckland Council submission. A copy of the local board’s feedback is included as an attachment to this report (Attachment A).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      note the formal feedback on the Ministry for the Environment’s Natural and Built Environment Bill exposure draft (Attachment A) as authorised by delegation to Members Easte and McKenzie on 20 July 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Board feedback on the Natural and Built Environment Bill exposure draft

189

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Emma Reed - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Proposal to make a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw

File No.: CP2021/11536

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board support for the draft proposal to make a new Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Auckland Council Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022, before it is finalised for public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Staff have prepared a draft proposal for a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw to enable local boards to provide their views before it is finalised for public consultation.

3.       The draft proposal is to make a new bylaw under the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This bylaw would replace the current legacy bylaw, which expires in 2022 and contains provisions developed before the Freedom Camping Act 2011 was passed.

4.       The Freedom Camping Act 2011 allows freedom camping on all public land unless it is already prohibited under another enactment. The Act enables councils to make a bylaw to prohibit or restrict freedom camping in areas that meet statutory criteria for protection.

5.       This draft proposal replaces an earlier proposal developed in 2018 which was set aside by the Governing Body in 2019. Following decisions by the Governing Body in March and May 2021, the key changes compared with the 2018 proposal are that the new draft proposal:

·      excludes land held under the Reserves Act 1977 from scope (council would maintain the current default prohibition on camping on reserves under the Reserves Act 1977)

·      manages freedom camping only on land held under the Local Government Act 2002

·      seeks to prevent freedom camping impacts in sensitive areas, and to protect public health and safety and manage access in all areas, by:

scheduling 44 prohibited areas, where no freedom camping is allowed

scheduling 19 restricted areas, where freedom camping is allowed subject to site-specific restrictions

including general rules to manage freedom camping impacts in all other areas (campers must use certified self-contained vehicles, stay a maximum of two nights, depart by 9am and not return to the same area within two weeks).

6.       The proposed prohibited and restricted areas are those areas which the Bylaw Panel recommended should be prohibited and restricted in 2019, and which are held under the Local Government Act 2002. Areas held under the Reserves Act 1977 have been removed.

7.       The Panel’s recommendations draw on previous area assessments and take into account feedback from local board engagement and public consultation conducted in 2018 and 2019.

8.       The draft proposal includes one designated prohibited area and no designated restricted areas located in the Albert-Eden Local Board area. All designated areas are listed in the draft Bylaw schedules within Attachment A. All other council-managed land held under the Local Government Act 2002, including roads, is proposed to be covered by general rules.

9.       Staff recommend that the local board provide its view on the draft proposal, including the inclusion of general rules in the bylaw and the recommended settings for those rules.

10.     The key risks of the proposal are that:

·      it creates too few areas where freedom camping is allowed; this is partially mitigated by allowing freedom camping on most roads (subject to general rules), and council could decide to designate more restricted areas following consultation

·      the cumulative impact of all prohibitions under the Bylaw and other enactments is viewed as an effective ban; however staff looked closely at the requirements of the Freedom Camping Act 2011 in developing the proposal and will continue to monitor cumulative impact as bylaw development progresses.

11.     The local board’s views will be provided to the Governing Body in September with the recommendation that the finalised proposal is adopted for public consultation. Public consultation is scheduled for November, and Bylaw Panel deliberations for early 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      support the draft Statement of Proposal in Attachment A of this agenda report to make a new Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Auckland Council Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022 for public consultation.

Horopaki

Context

Freedom camping can have both positive and negative impacts

12.     For the purposes of this Bylaw, freedom camping is when someone stays overnight on council-managed land, including roadsides, in a vehicle or caravan.

13.     Freedom camping specifically refers to people staying in vehicles overnight as part of leisure travel, or because they are choosing to live in a vehicle for lifestyle reasons.

14.     Freedom camping provides a flexible and affordable way for Aucklanders and for domestic and international visitors to experience and enjoy the region. Many freedom campers will visit friends and family, attend events, and support local businesses during their stay.

15.     Freedom camping can however have negative impacts on the local environment and host communities if it is not well-managed. These impacts can be caused by:

16.     Freedom camping has become popularly associated with harmful and antisocial behaviours, but our research shows that most freedom campers visiting Auckland do camp responsibly.

17.     However, the presence of large numbers of campers – even responsible campers – is more likely to cause community concern in Auckland due to pressure on limited public space.

18.     Freedom camper numbers have been growing in Auckland and throughout the country over the last two decades. Once the current border restrictions are lifted overseas visitors are likely to return, and domestic freedom camping may continue to increase in the meantime.

19.     Auckland does not currently have enough places for freedom campers to go. This means there is often overcrowding in the places where it is allowed, or illegal camping in unsuitable areas once legal sites are full. Having more areas would reduce these supply-related issues.

20.     The council can regulate freedom camping to help prevent irresponsible camping and manage responsible freedom camping in a way that minimises its negative impacts.

Council must align its freedom camping regulation with the Freedom Camping Act 2011

21.     The Freedom Camping Act 2011 allows freedom camping on all public land unless it is prohibited under a bylaw or another enactment, such as the Reserves Act 1977.

22.     Auckland’s current Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2015 is a consolidation of pre-2010 legacy bylaw provisions developed before the Freedom Camping Act 2011 was passed. A new bylaw must be made that aligns with the national legislation before the current bylaw expires in 2022.

23.     The Freedom Camping Act 2011 is permissive by default but does allow council to make a bylaw to prohibit or restrict freedom camping in areas where certain statutory criteria are met. In particular, council must be satisfied that:

·      each area’s location can be clearly shown on a map and/or described

·      the prohibitions and restrictions in each area are necessary to:

-     protect the area (for example because it is environmentally or culturally sensitive)

-     protect the health and safety of the people who may visit the area

-     protect access to the area (for other users)

·      the cumulative impact of all prohibitions and restrictions (under the bylaw and other enactments) do not constitute an effective ban on freedom camping on council land.

A 2018 proposal to regulate freedom camping was set aside in August 2019

24.     Work to develop a freedom camping bylaw began in 2016. Staff assessed more than 1,000 areas for their suitability for freedom camping and need for protection under the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This process included extensive engagement with local boards.

25.     In late 2018 and early 2019 public feedback and formal local board views were sought on a proposal for a draft Freedom Camping in Vehicles bylaw. A Bylaw Panel deliberated on all feedback and made recommendations to the Governing Body. The Panel recommended scheduling 322 prohibited areas and 103 restricted areas, including a number of reserves.

26.     In August 2019 the Governing Body set aside the recommendations of the Bylaw Panel and instead requested advice on a new direction for bylaw development.

The Governing Body decided to exclude reserves from scope and include general rules

27.     The Governing Body considered staff advice in March 2021[1] and May 2021[2] and directed that a new proposal for a Freedom Camping Act 2011 bylaw be developed that:

·      only manages freedom camping on land held under the Local Government Act 2002, with camping on reserves continuing to be managed by the Reserves Act 1977

·      includes general rules to manage the generalised impacts of freedom camping, and ensure problems are not displaced from regulated to unregulated areas

·      relies on previous assessments (undertaken to develop the 2018 proposal) to identify land held under the Local Government Act 2002 that should be prohibited or further restricted through the bylaw.

28.     Staff have prepared a draft proposal to implement the Governing Body’s decisions (Attachment A). This proposal outlines the reasons and decisions that have led to the content of the proposed new Bylaw.

Potential changes to the Freedom Camping Act 2011 not yet confirmed

29.     In April and May 2021, the Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) publicly consulted on four proposals for change to the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This included making the use of self-contained vehicles mandatory for all freedom camping.

30.     The Governing Body approved Auckland Council’s submission, which incorporated local board views, in May 2021[3]. MBIE has not yet released any further information, and timeframes for any changes to the Act have not been confirmed.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

A new bylaw is proposed to manage freedom camping in vehicles on some council land

31.     The draft proposal would make a new Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022 that:

·      aligns with the Freedom Camping Act 2011

·      helps council to prevent freedom camping impacts in sensitive areas, and to protect public health and safety and manage access in all areas of land held under the Local Government Act 2002 (including roads controlled by Auckland Transport)

·      forms part of a wider regulatory framework of Acts, regulations and other bylaws[4].

32.     The Bylaw will be enforced by the Licensing and Regulatory Compliance unit using a graduated compliance model (information, education, enforcement).

33.     The table below summarises the main proposals:

Draft proposals

Reasons for draft proposal

To schedule 63 specific areas as follows:

Restrict freedom camping in 19 specific areas (where freedom camping is allowed subject to site-specific restrictions)

Listed in Schedule 1 of the draft Bylaw

 

To better manage areas that have been identified as needing additional regulation due to factors such as popularity, current use by others, demand for parking and the size of the parking areas.

These are the restricted areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel in 2019, with all reserves removed.

Prohibit freedom camping in 44 specific areas (where freedom camping is not allowed)

Listed in Schedule 2 of the draft Bylaw

 

To protect areas that have been identified as being environmentally or culturally sensitive, or where freedom camping would impact public health and safety and access in ways that cannot be adequately managed through restrictions.

These are the prohibited areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel in 2019, with all reserves removed.

To include general rules for all other areas as follows:

Require freedom campers to use certified self-contained vehicles

To prevent impacts from the depositing of toilet waste and wastewater into the environment, and the use of unsuitable areas for cooking

Allow freedom campers to stay a maximum of two nights in the same road or off-road parking area

To prevent impacts from the depositing of toilet waste and wastewater into the environment and ensure fair access to limited shared parking and amenities

Require freedom campers to vacate their parking space by 9am on the day of departure

To ensure fair access for shared parking and amenities for other campers and users of public space

Require freedom campers not return to stay in the same road or off-road parking area within a two-week period

To ensure fair access to limited shared parking and amenities for other campers and users of public space

34.     The draft proposal notes that the council does not intend to use the bylaw to manage:

·      issues associated with homelessness (people living in a vehicle involuntarily)

·      areas where access is already controlled or parking is reserved or charged for, for example gated carparks, land leased to other organisations and regional parks.

The draft proposal complies with statutory requirements

35.     The draft proposal has been prepared in accordance with statutory requirements. Staff consider the proposed draft Bylaw:

·      only prohibits or restricts freedom camping where it is necessary to protect sensitive areas, and/or to manage impacts on public health and safety and access to an area

·      uses a format and wording that are easy to read, understand and comply with

·      is authorised by statute, is not repugnant to other legislation, and is not unreasonable

·      does not give rise to any implications or inconsistencies with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990.

Staff recommend the local board consider and provide its views on the draft proposal

36.     Staff recommend that the local board consider the draft proposal in Attachment A and provide any views by resolution to the Governing Body before it is finalised for public consultation on 23 September 2021.

37.     For example, the board could support the draft proposal for public consultation, recommend changes or defer comment until after it has considered public feedback on the proposal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     Staff note that this is a regulatory process to manage existing activities enabled by central government policy. It is not causing these activities to occur or affecting the likelihood that they will occur. The decision sought in this report therefore has no specific climate impact.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.     The draft proposal impacts the operations of several council departments and council-controlled organisations, including Licensing and Regulatory Compliance, Parks, Sport and Recreation and Auckland Transport.

40.     The Licensing and Regulatory Compliance unit are aware of the impacts of the draft proposal and their primary role in implementing and managing compliance with the Bylaw.

41.     Council’s 86 park rangers help to manage compliance with council Bylaws, the Reserves Act 1977 and the Litter Act 1974 by carrying out education and monitoring on parks and reserves. However, rangers are not currently being warranted or renewing warrants, and Licensing and Regulatory Compliance will continue to carry out any enforcement required.

Enhanced service levels for Bylaw compliance activities are not currently budgeted

42.     Concern about the council’s ability to effectively implement the Bylaw and manage compliance within existing resources was a key theme of public and local board feedback received in 2019.

43.     In March 2021 the Governing Body requested advice about costed options for increasing the service levels for compliance associated with this Bylaw. Costings are being finalised and this advice will be provided alongside the proposal in September, for consideration during future Annual Plan cycles.

44.     There are multiple options for increasing investment in Bylaw implementation and both proactive and reactive Bylaw compliance activities. These include:

·      enhancement of council’s information technology systems, to enable the implementation of the new infringement notice regime

·      use of contracted security services, to increase responsiveness to complaints (similar to the current arrangements for Noise Control), or for additional proactive monitoring at seasonal ‘hotspots’

·      purchase of mobile printers, to enable infringement notices to be affixed to vehicles in breach of the Bylaw at the time of the offence

·      signage at all prohibited and restricted areas and at other areas as needed

·      camera surveillance technology to enable remote monitoring of known or emerging hotspots, for evidence-gathering purposes and/or to support real-time enforcement.

45.     Local boards can request further advice from Licensing and Regulatory Compliance if they wish to consider allocating local budget for enhanced local compliance activities.

46.     For example, Rodney Local Board recently allocated funds from its Locally Driven Initiatives budget to employ two Compliance Wardens for a six-month trial during the 2021-2022 financial year. The wardens will address low level compliance issues, including illegal freedom camping, with follow-up support from warranted compliance staff when required.

Ongoing land classification work won’t be completed with bylaw development timeframes

47.     Following the Governing Body’s decision in March 2021 to exclude reserves from scope, land status has become more relevant for identifying areas requiring protection in the bylaw.

48.     The council does not currently hold complete land classification data to establish definitive numbers of reserves. Parks and reserves can comprise multiple land parcels which may be held under different Acts.

49.     Since reporting to the Governing Body in March, staff have completed further investigation of the land status of the prohibited and restricted areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel. This has identified additional reserves, which has reduced the proposed prohibited areas (from 55 in the March report to 44 in the draft proposal) and restricted areas (from 21 to 19).

50.     Classifications are still being confirmed as part of the development of omnibus Local Park Management Plans. Five local board areas have completed this work, and an average of 94 percent of their parks were found to be held under the Reserves Act 1977.

51.     Ongoing land classification work will support bylaw implementation. It will not finish within the timeframe for bylaw development, so the status quo issues will remain.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

52.     The proposed draft Bylaw impacts on local boards’ governance role as it affects decision making over local assets, particularly parks and other council-controlled public places. There is also high community interest in freedom camping regulation in many local board areas.

53.     The local board has an opportunity to provide its views on this draft proposal by resolution to the Governing Body. The local board will also have further opportunity to provide its views to a Bylaw Panel on any public feedback to the proposal from people in their local board area.

All proposed prohibited and restricted areas previously discussed with local boards

54.     The draft proposal includes one designated prohibited area and no designated restricted areas located in the Albert-Eden Local Board area. All designated areas are listed in the draft Bylaw schedules within Attachment A. All other council-managed land held under the Local Government Act 2002, including roads, is proposed to be covered by general rules.

55.     The proposed prohibited and restricted areas are those areas which the Bylaw Panel recommended should be prohibited and restricted in 2019, and which are held under the Local Government Act 2002. Areas held under the Reserves Act 1977 have been removed.

56.     All areas proposed to be scheduled as prohibited or restricted were previously discussed with the relevant local boards in 2018.

Joint political working group provided views on general rules in May 2021

57.     Three local board representatives participated in a joint political working group on 21 May 2021 to provide views on options for including general rules in the Bylaw.

58.     The working group unanimously supported the inclusion of general rules in the Bylaw, and five out of six working group members supported the recommended settings included in the draft proposal. A summary of the working group’s views was reported to the Governing Body on 27 May 2021[5].

The new draft proposal responds to feedback provided on the 2018 proposal

59.     Local boards provided formal feedback on the 2018 draft proposal to the Bylaw Panel in 2019, following on from their early feedback given during engagement in 2017, and site-specific feedback provided in 2018.

60.     The table below details typical concerns expressed by local boards in their formal feedback and how the new draft proposal responds to these concerns:

Key local board concern (from 2019)

Draft proposal’s response to concern

The loss of protection in the legacy bylaws for most reserves and roadsides

·   Excludes reserves from the bylaw and continues to use the Reserves Act 1977 to manage all camping at reserves

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw, including roadsides

·   Notes individual roads can be scheduled as prohibited or restricted areas if problems arise in future

The provision for unrestricted freedom camping in the local board area

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw

Freedom camping at reserves and enforcement tools under the Reserves Act

·   The Reserves Act 1977 will be used to manage all camping at reserves, which means the status quo (prohibition) will continue

·   Notes that following changes in September 2019 to the Reserves Act 1977, $800 infringement notices can now be issued for breaches of this Act

Freedom camping in inner-city areas, unsafe areas and areas near sports fields, residential homes and campgrounds

·   Bylaw schedules designate individual sites that have been identified and assessed as unsuitable for freedom camping (prohibited areas), or where additional restrictions are needed to manage impacts (restricted areas)

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw

The potential effect on people experiencing homelessness

·   Clarifies that the bylaw will not be used to manage issues associated with homelessness and confirms the council’s commitment to a compassionate enforcement approach to protect vulnerable Aucklanders

Council’s ability to enforce bylaws and the cost of enforcement and monitoring

·   Although not contained in the proposal itself, advice will be provided to the Governing Body on options for increasing investment in bylaw implementation

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

61.     The Bylaw has relevance to Māori as kaitiaki of Papatūānuku. The proposal supports two key directions in the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau:

·      wairuatanga (promoting distinctive identity), in relation to valuing and protecting Māori heritage and Taonga Māori

·      kaitiakitanga (ensuring sustainable futures), in relation to environmental protection.

62.     The proposal also supports the Board’s Schedule of Issues of Significance by ensuring that sites of significance to Māori are identified and protected from freedom camping harms.

63.     Mana whenua and mataawaka were invited to provide feedback during the development of the 2018 proposal via dedicated hui and again through the public consultation process.

64.     Feedback received on specific prohibited and restricted areas identified in the 2018 proposal was incorporated into the deliberations. This included the identification of sites of significance to Māori, such as wahi tapu areas.

65.     General matters raised by Māori during engagement included the need to ensure:

·      the ability to add further sites of significance to the bylaw as these are designated

·      provision for temporary bans on freedom camping, e.g. in areas under a rahui

·      a compassionate approach to people experiencing homelessness

·      provision of sufficient dump stations to avoid environmental pollution

·      clear communication of the rules in the bylaw and at freedom camping sites.

66.     The draft proposal addresses these matters by proposing to prohibit freedom camping at sites of significance to Māori (such as Maraetai Foreshore and Onetangi Cemetery), provision in the Bylaw for temporary bans, and confirming council’s commitment to a compassionate enforcement approach to people experiencing homelessness.

67.     Mana whenua and mataawaka will have an opportunity to provide further feedback during public consultation on the proposal.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

68.     There are no financial implications to the local board for any decisions to support the draft proposal for public consultation. The Governing Body will consider any financial implications associated with public notification in September 2021.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

69.     Legal risks were discussed as part of the provision of legally privileged advice to interested local board members at a confidential workshop held in June 2021.

70.     The other key risks and possible mitigations are summarised in the table below.

If...

Then...

Mitigation (partial)

The bylaw proposal does not create enough areas where freedom camping is allowed

 

Council may need to manage an increase in overcrowding, non-compliance, and harms over time.

The proposed bylaw would enable freedom campers to stay for up to two nights on most roads, subject to general rules.

Council could consider increasing the number of designated restricted areas following consultation, or if problems arise in future.

The cumulative impact of prohibitions and restrictions in the Bylaw and other enactments is viewed as an ‘effective ban’ on freedom camping in Auckland

The risk of legal challenge could increase.

Staff looked closely at the requirements of the Freedom Camping Act 2011 in developing the proposal, and cumulative impact will continue to be monitored.

Council can’t meet public expectation of increased enforcement

There may be a loss of social license for freedom camping and reputational risk for council.

Responsible Camping Ambassadors will assist compliance staff during the peak season, although future funding is not guaranteed.

The Governing Body or local boards could allocate additional funding to increase service levels for compliance activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

71.     Staff will present local board views and a finalised proposal to the Governing Body on 23 September 2021. The next steps for bylaw development are shown in the diagram below.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Freedom Camping in Vehicles SOP & Draft Bylaw (combined) August 2021

203

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rebekah Forman - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Albert-Eden Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021

File No.: CP2021/11219

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2020/2021 Annual Report for the Albert-Eden Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 27 September 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2020/2021 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 27 September 2021. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market maintained by NZX Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA), local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      adopt the draft 2020/2021 Albert-Eden Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A to the agenda report.

b)      note that any proposed changes after the adoption will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body on 27 September 2021.

c)      note that the draft 2020/2021 Albert-Eden Local Board Annual Report, as set out in Attachment A to the agenda report, will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2020/2021 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which are expected to be made public by 28 September 2021.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities and the overall funding impact statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       The annual report contains the following sections:

 

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi is an introduction specific to each local board area and is presented in Te Reo Māori and English.

About this report

An overview of what is covered in this document.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved. Includes the activity highlights and challenges.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Funding impact statement

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

7.       The council’s climate change disclosures are covered in volume four of the annual report and sections within the summary annual report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

10.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

11.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2020/2021 Annual Report for the local board are:

·       Audit NZ review during July and August 2021

·       report to the Governing Body for adoption on 27 September 2021

·       release to stock exchanges and publication online on 28 September 2021

·       physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Albert-Eden Local Board Annual Report (2020/2021) (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Audrey Gan – Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Mark Purdie - Manager Local Board Financial Advisors

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Albert-Eden Local Board for March to June 2021

File No.: CP2021/10443

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Albert-Eden Local Board with an integrated performance report for March to June 2021 and the overall performance for the financial year against the approved 2020/2021 local board work programmes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an integrated view of performance for the Albert-Eden Local Board and includes financial performance and delivery against work programmes for the 2020/2021 financial year.

3.       Eighty-five activities within the agreed work programmes were delivered including multi-year projects that have progressed as expected. Eleven activities were undelivered, cancelled, put on hold or deferred and 16 projects are on hold due to funding decisions made as part of the Emergency Budget 2020/2021.

4.       Key activity achievements from the 2020/2021 work programme include:

·    Nine local board events delivered throughout 2020/2021.

·    Over $300,000 in grants allocated to community groups through the accommodation support fund and community grants programme.

·    The Shade and Shelter Assessment, Play Network Gap Analysis and Urban Ngahere Action Plan 2021 were adopted.

·    Fowlds Park new hybrid turf and lighting and Mt Albert War Memorial Hall floor renewal have been completed.

·    Twenty-two EcoNeighbourhoods are established and undertaking sustainable low carbon activities within their groups.

·    Three community leases have been processed and completed.

5.       Key activities not delivered / not progressed as expected include:

·    Parks services planning programme (ID 133). The Outdoor / Covered Courts assessment has been delayed due to challenges in getting stakeholder data. $20,000 of this budget is signaled as a carry forward to complete delivery of the project in 2021/2022.

·    CARRY FORWARD AE: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) FY20 Tranche one (ID 2224). As yet, no agreement has been reached amongst iwi on naming in this board area. Adoption of a new council naming policy should help resolve this. There is a budget underspend which is signalled as a carry forward to complete tranche one in 2021/2022.

·    Drains for Rain (ID 2319). This project was unable to be delivered this financial year due to staff capacity issues and suitable contractor availability. A carry-forward for the budget has been applied for. A decision on the carry forward is expected in late July 2021.

6.       Qualifying budgets of unfinished activities will be carried forward into 2021/2022 work programmes.

7.       The financial performance report is attached but is excluded from the public. This is due to restrictions on releasing annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – on or about 30 September.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for March to June 2021.

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group results for 2020/2021 are released to the New Zealand’s Exchange (NZX) which are expected to be made public on or about 30 September 2021.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Emergency Budget was adopted on 30 July 2020. The Albert-Eden Local Board approved 2020/2021 work programmes for the following operating departments at their August 2020 business meeting:

·     Arts, Community and Events;

·     Parks, Sport and Recreation;

·     Libraries and Information;

·     Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew;

·     Community Leases;

·     Infrastructure and Environmental Services;

·     Plans and Places.

9.       As the work programmes were adopted two months later than normal due to the effects of COVID-19, there has been a reduced timeframe to deliver these work programmes (10 months).

10.     Since the work programmes were approved the Customer and Communities Services directorate has been restructured. Two new departments were created - Connected Communities and Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships. The Southern Initiative and Western Initiative moved into the directorate as a new department - Community and Social Innovation. Arts, Community and Events; Libraries and Information; and Service, Strategy and Integration were incorporated into the three new departments. The table below shows the distribution.

Table 1: Changes to Departments in Customer and Communities Services directorate

Previous Department - Unit

Current Department - Unit

Arts, Community and Events - Community Places

Connected Communities – Community Places

Arts, Community and Events - Community Empowerment

Connected Communities – Community Empowerment

Arts, Community and Events - Community Empowerment (Youth)

Community and Social Innovation – Youth Empowerment

Arts, Community and Events - Arts & Culture

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Arts & Culture

Arts, Community and Events - Events

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Events

Service, Strategy and Integration

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Service and Asset Planning

Libraries

Connected Communities – Libraries

The Southern Initiative

Community and Social Innovation – The Southern Initiative

The Western Initiative

Community and Social Innovation – The Western Initiative

 

11.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board or projects funded through the Transport Capital Fund, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

12.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that have been delivered as expected or multi-year activities which have progressed as planned (green), activities that are in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that are undelivered or have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work Programme by RAG status

13.     The graph below shows the stage of the activity (activity status) in each departments’ work programme. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: work programme activity by activity status and department

Key activity achievements from the 2020/2021 work programme

14.     The key achievements in the delivery of the local board work programmes for 2020/2021 include:

Arts, Community and Events

15.     Citizenship ceremonies (ID 525); Albert-Eden Schools Cultural Festival (ID 530); Carols at Potters Park (ID 531); Movies in Parks (ID 532), Albert-Eden Business Excellence Awards (ID 2177), Anzac Day services (ID 526), Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020 launch event (ID 527), Junior Sports Awards and Local Heroes Awards (ID 528) were all successfully delivered.

16.     $129,220 of community grant funding (ID 533) and $172,300 of accommodation support funding was granted to community groups (ID 534).

17.     The arts and event broker programme (ID 506) delivered 22 projects by 203 creative leaders and event organisers, with over 10,000 participants.

Parks, Sport and Recreation

18.     The Shade and Shelter Assessment and the Play Network Gap Analysis were approved on 16 March 2021 (ID 2222).

19.     Volunteers invested over 3,000 hours and plants with community plantings and weed control delivered at Eric Armishaw Reserve, Te Auaunga/Oakley Creek, Roy Clements Treeway, Howlett Reserve, Watea Reserve and Balmoral Heights Reserve (ID 131).

20.     Eighteen activations were delivered across eleven locations with a total of 1,223 attendees as part of the Active Play programme. Ninety-six per cent of surveyed participants were either satisfied or very satisfied with the activations and seventy-two per cent were first time attendees (ID 130).

21.     The Albert-Eden Urban Ngahere Action Plan 2021 was adopted on 15 June 2021 (ID 2209) and planting plans for 2022 planting season have been confirmed (ID 129).

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

22.     The following projects are complete:

·     Fowlds Park - develop fields 2 and 3 - install hybrid turf surfaces and lighting (ID 2392)

·     Heritage stone walls restoration (ID 2645)

·     Coyle Park – renew flying fox and safety matting (ID 2667)

·     Mt Albert War Memorial Hall - renew floor (ID 2960)

·     Howlett-Waterview Esplanade Reserve restoration plan implementation (3140).

Community Leases work programme

23.     The following community leases have been completed:

·     869 New North Road back building - Expressions of Interest (ID 281)

·     956 Great North Road, Western Springs - Auckland Horticultural Council Incorporated (ID 2142)

·     249-259 Gillies Avenue - Epsom/Remuera Croquet Club Incorporated (ID 2144).

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

24.     Forty on-site visits were completed as part of the Industrial Pollution Prevention Programme Dominion Road (ID 1706).  Eleven reports have been issued to businesses with recommendations for onsite improvements.

25.     There are now 22 established EcoNeighbourhood groups, including five in Mount Eden and Epsom. An evaluation report will be presented to the board at a workshop in quarter one 2021/2022 (ID 1582).

Plans and Places

26.     Integrated Area Plan for parts of Albert-Eden and Puketāpapa (ID 2011): Working group meetings have been held monthly with Puketāpapa and Albert-Eden Local Boards members, mana whenua representatives, and council staff. The first phase of engagement occurred during September and November 2020 and feedback has been received from key stakeholders and government agencies.

Overview of work programme performance

Arts, Community and Events work programme

27.     In the Arts, Community and Events work programme all 28 activities were completed by the end of the year (green). There are no activities that are delayed, significantly delayed, on hold, not delivered, cancelled or deferred.

Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

28.     In the Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme there are:

·     seven activities that were completed by the end of the year (green)

·     two activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber)

·     two activities that are significantly delayed (red)

·     one activity that was cancelled and deferred (grey).

29.     Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 2: Parks, Sport and Recreation activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

AE: Parks services planning programme (ID 133)

Red

In progress

The Outdoor / Covered Courts assessment has been delayed due to challenges in getting stakeholder data. $20,000 of this budget is signalled as a carry forward to complete delivery of the project in 2021/2022.

CARRY FORWARD AE: Urban Forest (Ngahere) Knowing FY20 (ID 2209)

Amber

In progress

The draft Urban Ngahere Action Plan 2021 was approved on 15 June 2021 - AE/2021/84. An information memo with the 'Albert-Eden Local Board canopy cover analysis update 2021' will be provided during Q1, 2021. This will complete the 'Knowing' phase to support the next 'Growing' phase of implementation.

CARRY FORWARD AE: Sport and Recreation Facility Plan (ID 2223)

Amber

In progress

The final plan is under review by other teams within council. An additional workshop is planned for September prior to formal adoption in October 2021.

CARRY FORWARD AE: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) FY20 Tranche one (ID 2224)

Red

In progress

As yet, no agreement has been reached amongst iwi on naming in this board area. Adoption of a new council naming policy should help to resolve this. There is a budget underspend which is signalled as a carry forward to complete tranche one in 2021/2022.

 

Libraries work programme

30.     In the Libraries work programme, all eight activities were completed by the end of the year (green). There are no activities that are delayed, significantly delayed, on hold, not delivered cancelled or deferred.

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

31.     In the Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme there are:

·     Eight activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green)

·     Twenty-one activities that are progressing as expected as part of a multi-year project (green)

·     Nine activities that are approved or approved in principle for future years (green)

·     Sixteen activities that are on hold due to budget restrictions as set out in the Emergency Budget 2020/2021 (green)

·     One activity that is in progress but is delayed (amber)

·     One activity that is on hold (grey). 

32.     Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 5: Community Facilities activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Windmill Park - renew and rebuild buildings (ID 3558)

Amber

In progress

Developed design is underway following a workshop with the local board on the concept design. Next steps are the share the developed design with the local board and confirm material for community engagement.

 

Community Leases work programme

33.     In the Community Leases work programme, there are four activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green) and eight activities that have been deferred in the period March to June 2021 (grey). 

34.     There are no activities that are delayed, significantly delayed, on hold or cancelled.

Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme

35.     In the Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme, there are eight activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green).

36.     One activity was not delivered (red). There are no activities that are delayed, significantly delayed, on hold, cancelled or deferred.

Table 7: Infrastructure and Environment Services activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Drains for Rain (ID 2319)

Red

Not delivered

This project was unable to be delivered this financial year due to staff capacity issues and suitable contractor availability. A carry-forward for the budget has been applied for. A decision on the carry forward is expected in late July 2021.

 

Plans and Places work programme

37.     In the Plans and Places work programme, one activity is progressing as planned as part of a multi-year programme (green) and one activity is delayed (amber).

38.     There are no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold, not delivered cancelled or deferred.

Table 7: Infrastructure and Environment Services activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Heritage workshops and events (ID 2019)

Amber

In progress

Two workshops were run in May – ‘Decoding your home: Researching your property’s history and style’ and ‘Stop the rot: Repairs and maintenance of historic homes’. The workshops were well attended and have received very good feedback. The talks were recorded and will be available on the Auckland Council YouTube channel in the coming months.

Deferred activities

39.     The Lead Financial Advisors are identifying projects from the local board’s 2020/2021 Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operational budget which meet the criteria to be carried forward. These will be added to the work programme to be delivered in 2021/2022.

 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

40.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

41.     The local board invested in a number of sustainability projects in 2020/2021, which aim to build awareness around individual carbon emissions, and changing behaviour at a local level. These include:

·    EcoNeighbourhoods (1582). An EcoNeighbourhood comprises groups of six or more neighbours from different households within the local board area, with the objective of adopting sustainable, low carbon practices and increasing resilience within their homes, lifestyles and neighbourhoods.

·    Bike Hub Implementation (1579). This project will continue to develop and refine the operations of the Tumeke Cycle Space Bike Hub established at Gribblehirst Park in 2018/2019.

·    Placemaking: Community-led placemaking in community gardens (515). A community organisation co-ordinates a network of community gardens, connects with eco-neighbourhoods, low carbon initiatives and ecological restoration projects, responds to new garden initiatives and provides seed funding to the network to share materials and expertise.

·    Taonga tuku iho - Legacy - we preserve our past, ensure our future. (Environment) (1272). Libraries showcase sustainable workplace practices and run programmes to care for the environment for present and future generations.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

42.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

43.     This report informs the Albert-Eden Local Board of the performance for the period March to June 2021 and the performance for the 2020/2021 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     The local board’s work programme contains a number of projects which provide direct outcomes for Māori, such as:

·     Local Māori Aspirations (520). Funding was provided to Whenua Warrior to undertake a new garden project focusing on cultivation of kai based on hua parakore principles and Mātauranga Māori at the Kura Kaupapa Māori o Ngā Maungarongo. Funding was provided to Te Mahurehure Marae to support the pre-launch of the Te Taumata ō Kupenuku education centre, currently under construction at the Marae. Funding was provided to Spin-Poi to conduct poi-making and poi exercise classes (focusing on children, older people and diverse communities), as well as train future coordinators of the programme and link in with key events and networks in Albert-Eden.

·     Whakatipu i te reo Māori - we grow the Māori language. Celebrating te ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori (1266). Epsom and Mount Albert libraries had Matariki displays. Epsom library staff are preparing for a special storytime in early July, with a performance from the Kowhia Terrace School Kapa Haka group. Mount Albert Library is also preparing for special Wriggle and Rhyme, Tamarki Time and after school activities focused on Matariki.

45.     The local board, through its work programme, responds and delivers upon council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework with the following actions:

·     Fostering and building strong relationships with mana whenua and mataawaka by ensuing their views are considered prior to making decisions on local projects.

·     Embedding mana whenua customary practices within the development of local projects (for example, blessings at sod-turnings).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

46.     This report is provided to enable the Albert-Eden Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2020/2021 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial performance

47.     Auckland Council (Council) currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – on or about 30 September. Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to this report is excluded from the public. 

48.     Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is under confidential cover.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Overview of work programme performance by department’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

50.     Work programmes for 2021/2022 were approved at the board’s business meeting in June 2021.

51.     Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2021/2022 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Work programme update

317

b

Financial performance - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Emma Reed - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors' Updates

File No.: CP2020/17583

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors to update the local board on Governing Body issues they have been involved with since the previous local board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Standing Orders 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provides provision in the local board meeting for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors Christine Fletcher and Cathy Casey’s verbal updates.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2021/11849

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To facilitate an opportunity for the local board chairperson to provide a written update on projects, meetings and other initiatives relevant to the local board’s interests.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 2.4.7, the chairperson will update board members by way of a written report.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive Chairperson Corrick’s August 2021 report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairperson Corrick - August 2021 Report

359

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Board Members' Reports

File No.: CP2021/12025

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To facilitate an opportunity for local board members to provide a written update on projects and events-attended since the previous month’s meeting and to discuss other matters of interest to the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This is an information item and it is optional for board members to provide a written board member report for inclusion in the agenda.

3.       Local board members are recommended to use a Notice of Motion, rather than a Board Member Report, should a member wish to propose a recommendation or request action to be undertaken by staff.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal Board Member Reports for August 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Albert-Eden Local Board 2021 Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2021/12026

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Albert-Eden Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar, which is a schedule of items that are expected to be reported to the local board during business meetings and/or workshops for 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Albert-Eden Local Board during business meetings and/or workshops for 2021. The local board’s governance forward work calendar is appended to this report under Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·     ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·     clarifying what advice is required and when

·     clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported to the local board’s monthly business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff.  At times there may be items that will arise that are not programmed or noted in the governance calendar.  Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      note the August 2021 edition of the Albert-Eden Local Board 2021 Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Board 2021 Governance Forward Work Calendar - August edition

365

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2021/12027

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the local board to receive the records of its recent workshops held following the previous month’s local board business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 12.1.4, the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its workshops held since the previous month’s local board business meeting.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Records for the workshops held on the 27 July 2021 and the 3 and 10 August 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Record - 27 July 2021

369

b

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Record - 3 August 2021

373

c

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Record - 10 August 2021

377

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Albert-Eden Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

17        Albert-Eden Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021 - Attachment a - Draft Albert-Eden Local Board Annual Report (2020/2021)

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial adjustments, assumptions and judgements that could give an individual access to this information prior to public release, gaining an improper advantage over others.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

18        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Albert-Eden Local Board for March to June 2021 - Attachment b - Financial performance

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial information that have an impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2021 that require release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 



[1] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/03/GB_20210325_AGN_10148_AT_WEB.htm (Item 9, GB/2021/19)

[2] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_AGN_10145_AT_WEB.htm (Item 10, GB/2021/49)

[3] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_AGN_10145_AT_WEB.htm (Item 9, GB/2021/48)

[4] Freedom Camping Act; Litter Act; Resource Management Act; Fire and Emergency NZ Act; Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw; Auckland Council Traffic Bylaw; Auckland Transport Traffic Bylaw; Alcohol Control Bylaw; Dog Management Bylaw

[5] https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_MAT_10145_WEB.htm