I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 24 August 2021

2.00pm

This meeting will be held remotely and a recording of the meeting will be available on:
https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/meetings-council-bodies/Pages/webcasts-council-meetings.aspx

 

Kōmiti Aromātai Whakahaere Kaupapa Kei Raro

I Te Maru O te Kaunihera / Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

Chairperson

Deputy Mayor Cr Bill Cashmore

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Angela Dalton

Cr Shane Henderson

Members

Cr Josephine Bartley

Cr Richard Hills

 

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

Cr Tracy Mulholland

 

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Cr Pippa Coom

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Chris Darby

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Alf Filipaina

IMSB Chair David Taipari

 

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

Cr John Watson

 

IMSB Member Hon Tau Henare

Cr Paul Young

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

Duncan Glasgow

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere /
Governance Advisor

19 August 2021

Contact Telephone: (09) 890 2656

Email: duncan.glasgow@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 



 

Terms of Reference

 

Responsibilities

 

The purpose of the committee is to:

 

·         have a general overview and insight into the strategy, direction and priorities of all Council Controlled Organisations (CCO)

·         set policy relating to CCO governance

·         approve CCO Statements of Intent

·         monitor performance of CCOs and other entities in which the council has an equity interest (such as CRLL, Tāmaki Regeneration Company and Haumaru Housing).

 

Key responsibilities include:

 

·         monitoring the financial and non-financial performance targets, key performance indicators, and other measures of each CCO and the performance of each organisation

·         advising the mayor on the content of the annual Letters of Expectations (LoE) to CCOs and Ports of Auckland Limited

·         exercising relevant powers under Schedule 8 of the Local Government Act 2002, which relate to the Statements of Intent of CCOs

·         exercising relevant powers under Part 1 of the Port Companies Act 1988, which relate to the Statements of Corporate Intent for port companies

·         exercising Auckland Council’s powers as a shareholder or given under a trust deed, including but not limited to modification of constitutions and/or trust deeds, granting shareholder approval of major transactions where required, exempting CCOs, and approving policies relating to CCO and CO governance

·         approval of a work programme which includes a schedule of quarterly reporting of each CCO to balance reporting across the meetings.

 

Powers

 

(i)         All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities.

Except:

(a)          powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2)

(b)          where the committee’s responsibility is limited to making a recommendation only

(ii)        Power to establish subcommittees.

 

 

Code of conduct

 

For information relating to Auckland Council’s elected members code of conduct, please refer to this link on the Auckland Council website - https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/elected-members-remuneration-declarations-interest/Pages/elected-members-code-conduct.aspx

 

 


 

Auckland Plan Values

 

The Auckland Plan 2050 outlines a future that all Aucklanders can aspire to. The values of the Auckland Plan 2050 help us to understand what is important in that future:

 

 


 

 

Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·           Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·           Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·           Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·           In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·           The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·           However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·           All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·           Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·           Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·           All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·           Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·           Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·           Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 


Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

24 August 2021

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        9

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   9

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               9

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          9  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    9

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          9

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                              10

8          CCO Review: Implementation Programme Update                                                 11

9          Auckland Council Group updated brand guidelines                                               33

10        Proposed shareholder feedback on Draft Ports of Auckland Limited - Statement of Corporate Intent (2021 - 2024)                                                                                    89

11        Council Controlled Organisations - approval of statements of intent for 2021-2024                                                                                                                                     113

12        Liaison councillors' updates                                                                                    349

13        Review of the Forward Work Programme - Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee                                                                                                351

14        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 22 June 2021, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public input had been received.

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 


 

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

24 August 2021

 

CCO Review: Implementation Programme Update

File No.: CP2021/11570

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on the implementation programme for the Council-controlled Organisations (CCO) Review (The Review).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Review investigated the effectiveness of the council’s CCO model; whether the council has adequate accountability measures and is using them effectively, and accountability to Māori and the public; and CCO culture.

3.       There has been good progress implementing the Review recommendations in the 12 months since Auckland Council received the report from the independent panel. Fourteen of the 64 recommendations have been fully completed and implementation is underway for 37 recommendations.

4.       The intent is to make meaningful change through the implementation of the review recommendations. While some of the recommendations are more straightforward to implement, others are programmes of work requiring more detailed scoping, options analysis and time to operationalise.

5.       Six recommendations have not progressed to or beyond scoping at this stage, but all of these will be initiated by December 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee:

a)      receive the update on the implementation programme for the Council-controlled Organisations Review.

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Review’s recommendations should be considered as a package. Many of the recommendations are interrelated. The intent is to improve accountability to the community and the council. Implementation is focused on developing more collaboration, trust and genuine change in behaviour across the council and CCOs to deliver the improvements.

7.       Updates on the implementation programme are being provided to each meeting of the committee.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       Ten recommendations have been completed since the latest update to the committee in June 2021. Fourteen of the 64 recommendations of the Review are now fully complete.


 

Table 1: Completed Review recommendations

#

Completed recommendations

1

The council approves the merger of the two CCOs and appoints a steering group to implement the change. 

4

Auckland Transport and the council jointly prepare the regional land transport plan, the draft of which the council endorses before going to the CCO’s board for approval.

22

The council prepares a statement of expectation setting out its expectations of each CCO and of CCOs generally.

23

The council develops a template CCOs must use when drafting their statements of intent, as well as a set of common key performance measures they must include, to ensure consistency in length, detail, presentation and benchmarks.

24

CCOs’ first and third quarterly reports concentrate more on any emerging risks or any developments that may require CCOs to adjust their priorities.

25

The council creates a senior position responsible for day-to-day management of council-CCO relationships to take some of the load off its chief executive.

29

The council rewrites its governance manual so the focus is squarely on its expectations of CCOs, removing policies to a separate document and requiring incoming directors and senior managers to read the manual.

30

The council gives its CCO governance and external partnership unit more resources to strengthen monitoring of CCOs.

43

CCO boards have a more ethnically diverse membership and include more individuals with relevant subject matter expertise and public sector experience.

46

The council, Auckland Transport and Panuku jointly communicate to the public about urban development and transport infrastructure matters.

47

CCO chief executives establish a group, led by the council’s chief executive, that meets monthly to deal with any common or significant problems, risks or developments.

48

CCO chairs meet four times a year to strengthen relationships, build trust and generally provide a forum to share information and views.

55

CCOs’ statements of intent contain a key performance indicator on complaint-handling.

64

The council makes compliance with the procurement policy mandatory on all CCOs to reduce costs and minimise duplication.

 

9.       Implementation is underway for 37 of the review 64 recommendations and many are well advanced. Work on an additional three recommendations is underway since the previous update to the committee in June 2021: 

·    Auckland Unlimited is progressing work on the joint management and operation of the city’s four stadiums with the Eden Park Trust.

·    A project has been initiated to delineate bylaw-making powers between Auckland Transport and the council.

·    Work has been underway across the group to share collective bargaining information and strategy.

10.     Twelve have a RAG of Amber and one recommendation has a RAG of Red, due to delays against timeframes.


 

Chart 1: Status of review recommendations

 

Recent progress

11.     Recent progress since the June update to the committee is summarised below. Commentary on each recommendation is provided in Attachment A.

Auckland Unlimited

12.     Auckland Unlimited is progressing work on better coordinating stadium operations and is developing the relationship with the Eden Park Trust Board.  At a confidential workshop with the CCO Oversight Committee on 7 July 2021 Auckland Unlimited presented progress on exploration of joint operating models. A further update for the committee is scheduled in September 2021.

Auckland Transport

13.     Following endorsement by the Planning Committee the Regional Land Transport Plan 2021-2031 was approved by the Auckland Transport board in June 2021. 

14.     Auckland Transport and the council have agreed the scope of work to delineate bylaw-making powers between the two organisations. Initial discovery has been completed and the next step is to develop the current state. 

15.     Auckland Transport undertook a design sprint to review its project development processes for small projects. Work is progressing to implement the improvements. A design sprint with the Puketāpapa and Rodney Local Boards on how Auckland Transport engages and reports to Local Boards is also complete.

16.     Good progress has been made to streamline funding processes. Waka Kotahi has approved an increase in the funding threshold for Auckland Transport to approve National Land Transport Fund funding for its own projects from the current $5 million threshold to $15 million.  Waka Kotahi is also considering how it could support programme-based funding approvals, such as safety programmes.

Eke Panuku

17.     Eke Panuku has provided more detail on its activities, and links between investments, deliverables and performance targets in its final Statement of Intent 2021-2024.

18.     A Property Functions Framework is being developed by the council. The framework will include the roles, responsibilities and property management approaches in the council. The role of Eke Panuku with regard to non-service properties will also be considered.

 


 

Watercare

19.     Watercare is supporting the overall development of the water strategy. It will report estimated permanent water consumption savings as a result of lower demand currently experienced. The smart meter rollout programme is underway.

20.     The Economic Level of Leakage calculation is progressing.

21.     Council has updated the CCO Accountability Policy through the Long-term plan 2021-2031 requiring Watercare and Auckland Transport to share asset management plans with council annually.

22.     As part of work to improve consent timelines, the council, Watercare and Auckland Transport have agreed to appoint a project manager to drive the Better Faster Consents project. This role will be funded equally by the three family members. Areas for improvement centre around three themes - raise quality, clear roles and processes, and be accountable.

Accountability

23.     The group Economic Development Action Plan, jointly led by Auckland Unlimited and the council was approved by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in July 2021. The Plan defines the council group’s economic objectives and priorities and a coordinated course of action for 2021-2024. 

24.     The water strategy and strategic stadium work are underway, which were the other strategies highlighted by the Review. Work is proceeding to identify other prioritised topics where more strategic direction is needed by CCOs.

25.     Improvements to the group strategic planning function will be designed to align long-term plan and group planning processes and strategic direction. 

26.     The new statement of expectations (SoE) was approved by the CCO Oversight Committee in June 2021. The SoE covers how CCOs interact with council, statutory obligations and other Auckland Council specific expectations. The CCO Governance Manual was reviewed alongside the development of the SoE. This committee agreed that the governance manual is no longer required, as relevant material from the manual is now included in the SoE.  

27.     CCOs have been advised that the first and third quarterly performance reports should concentrate more on any emerging risks or any developments that may require an adjustment in priorities. These reports have been received for 2020-2021.

28.     Three focus areas for risk improvements have been identified by the group risk managers, which are to review current reporting from CCOs to the council, explore the opportunity for an online risk reporting platform, and develop a group approach to climate change risk reporting.

29.     Visits have been scheduled for the CCO Oversight Committee to meet with each CCO in 2021, to help build relationships and understanding of CCO businesses. The first visit, to Watercare’s Māngere Wastewater Treatment Plant and Puketutu Island’s Rehabilitation Project, took place on 10 August 2021.

30.     Scoping of an updated no surprises policy has commenced. This will expand on the current content in the new statement of expectations.

31.     There will be a new combined engagement plan across the four CCOs for each local board as a result of the reset of how CCOs and local boards engage with one another. Engagement planning workshops between local boards and CCOs commenced in May 2021, to gain agreement on the level of engagement expected for each project, and to ensure the right range of projects are included in the plan. These workshops were attended by senior CCO staff, including executives. Engagement plans are being adopted by local boards during July and August 2021.

32.     Engagement plans will identify CCO and local board expectations for public consultation. This practice will contribute to better alignment of CCO consultation activities.

33.     The council has completed the Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau - Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework. This was approved by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in July 2021.  CCO Māori responsiveness plans are being aligned to Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau.

Culture

34.     The three communications and engagement leads at Eke Panuku, Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have worked to embed processes and relationships across their teams to support joint communication about urban development and transport infrastructure.

35.     A CCO/ council working group led by Eke Panuku is identifying areas where a ‘lead agency’ role would be of benefit when council and CCOs are working on projects or programmes in a specific geographic area. The group is developing options to share a forward work programme and provide further scoping on the lead agency role following consultation with CCO teams.

36.     CCO chairs are meeting on a quarterly basis, with the most recent meeting in July 2021.

37.     Development of learning modules for council and CCO staff induction on the CCO model is underway with input from across the council group. Introductory online modules will be complete in August 2021. Work across the council family on a more advanced module for staff working with elected members will start late September which should be complete and integrated into the full governance fundamentals programme from November 2021. 

38.     Each CCO statement of intent for 2021-2024 includes a key performance indicator on the resolution of formal complaints.

39.     The proposed brand guidelines, subject to a separate report, have been developed collaboratively across the council group. The guidelines set out how to use the pōhutukawa logo across council’s range of brands, services and facilities.

40.     All three CCOs that write reports to council have confirmed participation in the NZIER review in 2021. The headline elected members survey was sent to all elected members to complete in July 2021. Arrangements are underway for more detailed focus groups and interviews.

41.     An update of the group remuneration policy was approved by the governing body in June 2021. Feedback on the policy was provided by the CCOs.

42.     The group procurement policy was approved by the Finance and Performance Committee in June 2021. The group’s chief financial officer forum will be accountable for implementation and monitoring of the policy.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

43.     Climate impacts are considered through the implementation of individual recommendations.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

44.     The council group is working collectively to implement the recommendations of the Review.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

45.     Local impacts and local board views are considered when implementing individual recommendations.

46.     CCOs are working with local boards to implement recommendations to improve local board engagement, implementation of local projects and community consultation (see recommendations 34, 6, 53).


 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

47.     The Review made seven recommendations to improve the use of mechanisms to ensure CCOs meet their obligation to Māori at governance, senior management and staff levels. Ngā Mātārae have been convening staff from council, CCOs and the Independent Māori Statutory Board secretariat to progress the recommendations.

48.     The Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau Māori Outcomes Performance Management framework was approved in July 2021. Ngā Mātārae is providing guidance to CCOs as they update their Māori responsiveness plans.

49.     Watercare has completed a Māori outcomes plan aligned to the new outcomes framework and Eke Panuku has also commenced work on alignment to the new outcomes framework. Auckland Unlimited is also preparing a new Māori responsiveness plan for the merged entity.

50.     The council/CCO chief executives group has initiated a quarterly meeting with the Independent Māori Statutory Board chief executive focused on Māori outcomes. The first of these hui was on 27 May 2021. Staff supporting the Independent Māori Statutory Board and the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum are scoping areas in their respective work programmes where they can work together and with CCOs.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

51.     There are no additional costs from the committee receiving this report on the implementation programme for the Review.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

52.     Risks are reported to the steering group of the council/ CCO chief executives. The most significant risks identified are lack of budget, resources and organisational buy-in. Strong executive commitment and effective collaboration between the council and CCOs will mitigate these main risks associated with the implementation programme. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

53.     CCOs report on their contribution to implementing the Review in their quarterly reporting to the CCO Oversight Committee.

54.     Updates on the Review programme will be provided to the CCO Oversight Committee at each meeting.

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

CCO Review Implementation – progress by recommendation

19

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Trudi Fava - CCO Programme Lead

Authoriser

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

 


Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

24 August 2021

 

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Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

24 August 2021

 

Auckland Council Group updated brand guidelines

File No.: CP2021/12095

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the updated Auckland Council group brand guidelines.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The July 2020 Review of Auckland Council’s council-controlled organisations – Report of the Independent Panel (CCO Review), recommended that:

·    the council updates its brand guidelines to ensure the pōhutukawa logo is used in a clear, consistent, and flexible way on all council-funded services, activities and facilities, including when used alongside CCO operational brands (recommendation 57); and

·    the Council monitors CCOs’ compliance with its brand guidelines (recommendation 58).

3.       These recommendations were agreed in principle by the Governing Body on 27 August 2020 (GB/2020/89).

4.       The updated group brand guidelines have been developed jointly by representatives from Auckland Council and the Council-controlled organisations (CCOs). The purpose of the guidelines is to ensure the pōhutukawa logo is used in a clear, consistent and flexible way by CCOs in order to increase awareness among Aucklanders of the full range of services and facilities provided or funded by council.

5.       Compliance with these guidelines will be monitored on an ongoing basis and reported to this committee annually.

6.       Council and CCO implementation of the guidelines will be cost neutral, with physical signs only updated as part of planned renewals.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee:

a)      approve the updated Auckland Council group brand guidelines

b)      require CCOs to comply with the updated Auckland Council group brand guidelines

c)      note that updates on compliance with these guidelines will be reporting to this committee annually.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       On 26 July 2011, the CCO Strategy Review Subcommittee agreed that CCOs should incorporate the Auckland Council pōhutukawa logo in all communication, marketing, and advertising, and use the logo when promoting any activity, service or facility receiving council funding (CCOS/2011/26 b) ii).

8.       Council provided brand guidelines to CCOs in 2013. While there are good examples of the guidelines being followed, in many cases they have proven difficult and impractical to implement and have not worked well overall for CCOs or council.

9.       Visibility and prominence of the pōhutukawa logo has continued to be low overall, contributing to low attribution to council for many of the services and facilities provided by CCOs.

10.     Problems with the current brand guidelines were noted by the July 2020 report of the CCO Review, which recommended that the council updates its brand guidelines to ensure the pōhutukawa logo is used in a clear, consistent and flexible way on all council-funded services, activities and facilities, including when used alongside CCO operational brands; and the Council monitors CCO’s compliance with its brand guidelines (recommendations 57 and 58).

11.     The updated group brand guidelines have been developed jointly by representatives from Auckland Council and the CCOs.

12.     The purpose of the updated guidelines is to ensure the pōhutukawa logo is used in a clear, consistent and flexible way by CCOs in order to increase awareness among Aucklanders of the full range of services and facilities provided or funded by council.

13.     Compliance with these guidelines will be monitored on an ongoing basis and reported to this committee annually.

14.     A workshop was held with the CCO Oversight Committee on 24 February 2021 to introduce the proposed changes.  Feedback from councillors at that workshop was incorporated into the guidelines as appropriate. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     Increased visibility of the pōhutukawa logo is an important tool for improving Aucklanders’ understanding of the value and benefits council provides Aucklanders, and ultimately for growing trust in council.

16.     Research carried out in 2018 by council’s Communications Department found that Aucklanders have low attribution to council for many of the services and facilities provided through the CCOs, particularly those they value most highly (such as the Zoo, Gallery, venues and high-profile events).

17.     Further research in 2020 found that most Aucklanders recognised the pōhutukawa brand, identified it with the council and approved of it being used more widely to make it clear what services the council provided or funded overall.

18.     The research also showed that use of the pōhutukawa had no detrimental effect on the brands of the CCOs or other council-funded entities (such as the Zoo, Gallery and Auckland Live).

19.     The CCOs have acknowledged that council branding should reinforce Aucklanders’ understanding of the full range of council-funded services. They have worked with council’s communications team to develop, test and agree these updated guidelines.

20.     It should be noted that the Auckland ‘A’ logo (used to represent the Auckland place brand) is separate and distinct from the operational (endorsed) brands of the CCOs. It has its own specific guidelines within the current Auckland Council Brand Policy and Guidelines. It is used on Auckland Unlimited communications when the intended audience is out of, or not solely Auckland, e.g. broadcast, rest of New Zealand and international.

Approach to development of guidelines

21.     The updated brand guidelines were developed jointly by council and CCOs.  In the case of Auckland Unlimited, special consultation with its business units Auckland Zoo, Auckland Live, Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki and the Maritime Museum Hui Te Ananui a Tangaroa was undertaken.

 

22.     Testing through focus groups was carried out to ensure the approach taken in the guidelines would increase attribution to council, make sense to Aucklanders and support existing CCO brands. Testing suggested that use of the pōhutukawa on its own does not draw sufficient connection with Auckland Council and CCO brands. To address this, a tagline ‘Part of the Auckland Council whānau’ will be used in situations where the pōhutukawa is not alongside a CCO name. The guidelines recommend application of the pōhutukawa and associated Council logos with the following criteria:

·    Not confusing to Aucklanders

·    Supports commercial considerations of the CCO brands

·    No detrimental impact on existing brands.

23.     The updated brand guidelines also include the Auckland place brand, the evidence-based articulation of what makes Auckland distinct from the rest of New Zealand and unique in the world. The Auckland Council Group has a collective responsibility to build the reputation of Auckland by supporting the Auckland place brand objectives.

Council whanau brand team/shared brand plan

24.     Council and CCOs have used this opportunity to develop a shared brand plan for the group, that will sit alongside the guidelines. Our objectives are to build value in the council group brand and deliver greater value from our combined investment in marketing and advertising, as well as to collectively build the Auckland Place Brand.

25.     The plan includes shared campaigns, cross-promotion, media coordination and measurement. This will be led by a new Council Whanau Brand Team, comprised of senior representatives from council and CCOs. A final brand plan, endorsed by the group chief executives, will be published on council’s website by December 2021.

26.     Annual reports and updates on the plan will be published on an ongoing basis (which, in addition to annual reporting to this committee, will include compliance with the updated brand guidelines).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.     The recommendations in this report do not have demonstrable impact on greenhouse gas emissions and the approach to reduce emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     Auckland Council has sought input from the CCOs on how to implement CCO Review recommendations 57 and 58. The guidelines and brand strategy reflect this consultation and supporting research and have been endorsed by the CCO chief executives. The proposed brand strategy, guidelines and general approach have been ratified by the CCO boards.

29.     The Auckland Council Group will develop a measurement framework to monitor impact and effectiveness of the brand guidelines in raising awareness of council investment in the community, including through the services provided by CCOs.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     Where branding on communication activities and facilities falls under the decision-making jurisdiction of local boards the Auckland Council brand guidelines provide technical details on how local boards are acknowledged alongside the use of the pōhutukawa logo and the relevant CCO branding.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     Tāmaki Makaurau's Māori identity is our unique point of difference in the world and is one of the four brand themes of the Auckland place brand, 'Region of Wairuatanga’. It is the council and CCO’s collective remit to build the reputation of Tāmaki Makaurau by aligning to the Auckland place brand themes as captured in the new brand guidelines.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     Implementing guidelines will be cost neutral or minimal. Brand changes on marketing materials will be adopted as future campaigns are launched, digital assets will be updated within existing development cycles, new products and services will incorporate the guidelines as they are developed, and fixed assets will be updated within existing cycles of renewal and replacement.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     There is a risk that increased use of the council brand dilutes or degrades the positive view of some of the existing CCO brands.  This risk is mitigated by the work that has been done as part of developing the guidelines, to test public reaction to increased use of the pōhutukawa. Also, the process builds in ongoing evaluation of the effectiveness and impacts of the changes. Any changes required can be considered as appropriate.  This is not considered to be a major risk at this time. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     If the updated guidelines are approved, the next steps will be:

·        Inclusion of the updated Auckland Council Group Brand Guidelines in individual brand guidelines for each CCO and their operational (endorsed) brands (noting the Auckland Place Brand is not an operational (endorsed) brand).

·        Updating the Council Whanau Brand team terms of reference.

·        Mandatory attendance at the bi-monthly Auckland Council Whanau Brand team by the CCO brand leads to oversee implementation of the guidelines and annual brand plan.

·        Continuing to collectively build the reputation of Auckland by aligning to the Auckland Place Brand, noting the Auckland Place Brand is not an operational (endorsed) brand.

·        Development of a measurement framework as described in paragraph 29.

·        Annual reporting to this committee with compliance progress updates.

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Council Group Brand Guidelines 2021

39

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dan Lambert – General Manager Communications

Authorisers

Patricia Reade - Deputy Chief Executive

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

 



Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

24 August 2021

 

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Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

24 August 2021

 

Proposed shareholder feedback on Draft Ports of Auckland Limited - Statement of Corporate Intent (2021 - 2024)

File No.: CP2021/11878

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To agree shareholder comments on Ports of Auckland Limited’s (POAL) 2021-2024 draft Statement of Corporate Intent (SCI).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Ports of Auckland Limited has provided the council with a draft SCI for the period 2021–2024 (Attachment A).

3.       As the sole shareholder, the council has the opportunity to provide comments on POAL’s draft SCI by the end of August each year.

4.       The SCI includes several changes from last year including a decrease in some key performance indicators and targets. POAL reason that these changes are due to the impact of COVID-19 and the ongoing disruption caused by implementing automation at its container terminal.  

5.       Staff have reviewed the SCI and advise that shareholder comments be provided to POAL as set out in this report. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee:

a)      approve the shareholder comments on the draft Statement of Corporate Intent 2021–2024 for Ports of Auckland Limited as set out in this report

b)      delegate authority to the Mayor to:

i)        finalise a letter to Ports of Auckland Limited setting out the shareholder comments on the draft Statement of Corporate Intent 2021–2024 in line with the direction set by today’s committee

ii)       approve any minor amendments to the shareholder comments, if required.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Under the Port Companies Act 1988 (the Act), POAL is required to provide the council (as shareholder) a draft SCI one month after the commencement of each financial year of POAL.

7.       The SCI instrument is comparable to a Statement of Intent for a council-controlled organisation (CCO) in that the SCI is the principal mechanism for establishing the strategic objectives of POAL, which is not a CCO.


 

8.       The purpose of the SCI is to:

a)      publicly state the activities and intentions of POAL and the objectives to which those activities will contribute; and

b)      provide a basis for the accountability of the Board of Directors of POAL to the council as shareholder for the performance of the Company and its subsidiaries.

9.       Under the Act, the council may provide comments on the draft SCI, and must do so by the end of August. POAL must then provide a revised final SCI by the end of September. The council can modify POAL’s SCI at any time.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     In July the Mayor sent POAL a letter of expectation (LOE) setting out the council’s priorities and expectations (as shareholder) to inform POAL’s drafting of their SCI (Attachment B). Staff have assessed the draft SCI against the expectations outlined in the LOE and against targets set in last year’s SCI.

11.     Below are the key elements of the SCI and suggested comments to be provided to POAL before they finalise the SCI in September.

Objectives of POAL

12.     Under section 5 of the Act, POAL is required to “operate as a successful business”. What is meant by “successful” is left to the council and POAL to define. In the SCI POAL has defined “success” for the next 12-month period as achieving:

a)      improvement in safety and wellbeing

b)      recover container terminal productivity

c)      deliver automation

d)      rest of business achieves delivery and maintains stability

e)      recover commercial position.

13.     Staff suggest that these high-level objectives are appropriate priorities for POAL and reflect the expectations of the council as shareholder.

Improvement in Health and Safety

14.     At the 29 July 2021 meeting of the Governing Body POAL provided a progress update on the implementation of the CHASNZ independent health and safety review recommendations. At the meeting, POAL confirmed that the implementation of all the review’s recommendations would be incorporated in the SCI as a key performance target.

15.     In the SCI POAL has committed to delivering 91 per cent of the 45 recommendations in the CHASNZ report by 30 December 2021 and will deliver all the recommendations by 30 June 2022. In addition, POAL will implement its own safety and wellbeing strategy over the period covered by this SCI.

16.     POAL and CHASNZ will provide a further update on progress of the implementation of the recommendations to the Governing Body in October.

17.     The key performance target for number of lost time injuries (LTI) has increased from last year and the indicator has changed from ‘number of LTIs’ to ‘percentage decrease in LTIs’. POAL note that it will take time for new safety initiatives to significantly lower the LTIs and this is why a new indicator and target is proposed.

18.     Staff recommend reiterating the overall importance of health and safety and request that POAL keep the previous ‘number of LTIs’ indicator and zero lost time injury target given the importance of health and safety.

Delivery of Automation

19.     The implementation of container terminal automation has been delayed by a combination of a fatality, COVID-19 related events and system underperformance. POAL has reassessed the plan for fully rolling out automation across the terminal and now have a revised plan to deliver automation successfully and safely. The SCI includes a new objective of successfully implementing automation by a target date of 30 June 2022.

20.     POAL will undertake a review of the automation project once complete to ascertain the success or otherwise of the project. A summary of the results will be shared with the council.

21.     Staff recommend asking POAL to include a specific performance indicator and target in the SCI to track the improvements to productivity made by automation once implemented.

Emissions/Climate Change

22.     POAL have changed their emissions performance indicators in the SCI from intensity indicators to absolute indicators. The updated target now represents POAL Group Emissions. The annual absolute emissions reduction targets are two per cent, three per cent and three per cent reductions for 2022 – 2024. The actual emission reductions for FY2021 are yet to be calculated as the audit is in September 2021.

23.     Relevant to POAL’s climate change strategy is a progress report on the Hydrogen production and refuelling facility and an update on the electric powered tugboat ‘Sparky’. The interim Hydrogen fueling system has enabled POAL to trial a range of hydrogen powered plant and vehicles as part of their decarbonization pathway. Sparky is expected to be delivered late 2021 or early 2022 and will contribute to POAL’s goal to become zero emission by 2040.

24.     Staff advise that the change in POAL’s key performance measure from intensity to absolute emissions is reasonable. The absolute measure is a “science-based” target. Targets are considered “science-based” if they are in line with what the latest climate science deems necessary to meet the goals of the Paris Agreement – limiting global warming to well-below 2°C above pre-industrial levels and pursuing efforts to limit warming to 1.5°C.

25.     This performance measure and the targets will allow the council to measure the incremental progress against POAL’s long term environmental sustainability goals of being carbon neutral by 2025, emission free by 2040 and zero waste to landfill by 2040.

Maori Responsiveness

26.     POAL has committed to develop a Māori Outcomes Framework that recognises their unique relationship with Iwi of Tāmaki Makaurau. The SCI targets development and implementation of a Māori Outcomes Framework by 2023. There is no indication of how much progress will be made by 2022.

27.     The IMSB have provided POAL a skeleton Māori Outcomes Framework and staff are of the view that the framework should be able to be completed before well 2023. We recommend asking POAL to engage with council staff and the IMSB to set a far more ambitious deadline for completion of the framework and confirm that it will include its own Maori staff and engage with mana whenua in the development of the framework.

Improved Relationship with the Council

28.     POAL have committed to growing and enhancing the working relationship with all levels of the council and the wider council group. POAL have identified the two-way principle of early engagement on key issues and a ‘no surprises’ approach as key to the relationship. A key performance indicator is to attend all relevant local board meetings when invited and to strengthen relationships with the Ōrākei, Waitematā and Devonport-Takapuna local boards.

29.     The commitment to improve the relationship is important and welcome. An improved relationship should increase the flow of information between the council and POAL and enable council to better monitor performance.

Use of Group Capital

30.     POAL acknowledge that their debt is consolidated into the council’s accounts and as such will work with the council on a strategic approach to its capital expenditure, to help ensure the optimum use of debt across the council group. POAL will confer with the council’s financial planning team on any material acquisitions, capital expenditure, disposals or other changes that affect the council’s accounting or financial reporting treatment or obligations before entering contractual commitments.

31.     The commitment to an improved relationship between POAL and the council mentioned above is important to facilitate this flow of information.

Reduction in Key Productivity Performance Targets

32.     POAL have reduced the key performance targets relating to productivity in this SCI. Crane rate targets have been reduced from 35 to 25 for 2022 and 36 to 26 for 2023. Ship rate targets have been reduced from 82 to 62.5 for 2022 and 84 to 65 for 2023.

33.     Crane rate is the average number of containers handled by a single crane for every hour that it is used to load or discharge a vessel. Ship rate is the average number of containers handled per hour, across all cranes employed, for every hour that cranes are used to load or discharge a vessel. The Ministry of Transport note that “crane rate is a measure of the average productivity of container cranes at port after allowing for operational and non-operational delays in using cranes. However, the crane rate does not reflect the productivity of a port’s container terminal operation which may use two or more cranes to load and unload containers from a ship. The ship and vessel rates help to give a better overall perspective of container productivity at a port”.

34.     According to POAL, the rationale for the reduction in crane rate and ship rate indicator targets is to make them more realistic. POAL attribute the need to reduce these targets to structural changes in the business and the industry, which have reduced achievable rates and the ongoing impact of implementing automation. POAL indicate that more ambitious targets can be set in the third year once automation is implemented and stable.

35.     Customer service indicators have been removed for the next two years. This target has been removed because the industry is highly disrupted due to the global pandemic and POAL believe this has reduced the value of this measure as a means of tracking customer satisfaction. At present a survey will not identify the true level of satisfaction because there continues to exist a high level of external disruption that the port cannot control. POAL have committed to working closely with their customers and they already know the impact that they have on them.

36.     The Truck turnaround time target has been increased as the metric has been amended to start measuring the time at the first point of registration at the kiosks or road offices, rather than on entry to the terminal. This is a longer time period better represents the time a truck spends at the terminal, so the target is higher.

37.     Staff suggest providing clear feedback that the council expects to see more ambitious productivity targets for the years after implementation of automation is complete. These targets should reflect not only the removal of the disruption caused by the implementation of automation but should also reflect the improved productivity that automation is intended to provide. The council also expects customer service indicators to be reinstated in next year’s SCI.

Recovering Commercial Position / Financial Impact

38.     POAL claim that the recovery of their commercial position and profitability dependents on the success of the identified key objectives (see above paragraph 11). It appears the commercial success of the port largely turns on the successful implementation of automation.


 

 

39.     POAL’s profitability over the next two years has deteriorated by around $10 million each year compared to the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 position (which was based on financials submitted by POAL in March 2021). This reflects recent announcements on further delays to automation. POAL’s profitability largely returns to the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 position after this period.   

40.     POAL also propose to amend their dividend policy to have dividends based on a rising percentage of free cash flow (i.e., net profit less capital expenditure) rather than a simple percentage of profit to allow them to sustain an optimal capital structure.

41.     Staff recommend that the proposed amendment to the dividend policy be adopted because it:

·    reflects current practice of adjusting the percentage of profit to be used for dividends to reflect POAL’s capital requirement;

·    represents best practice of listed NZX companies; and

·    does not impact the Auckland Council group accounts, as dividends are eliminated as an inter-entity transaction.

42.     POAL’s updated budget projections including the dividend payments will be incorporated into the group budgets as part of the Annual Budget 2022/2023 process.

43.     Staff suggest providing clear feedback that the council expects to see a return to profitability and the corresponding targets once automation is complete.

Summary of Proposed Comments

Key aspect of draft SCI

Suggested comments

Objectives of POAL

Objectives are appropriate priorities for POAL and reflect the expectations of the council as shareholder

Improvements in Health and Safety

Reiterate the overall importance of health and safety and request that POAL keep the previous ‘number of LTIs’ indicator and zero lost time injury targets given the importance of health and safety.

Delivery of Automation

Ask POAL to include a specific performance indicator and target in the SCI to track the improvements to productivity made by automation once implemented.

Emissions/Climate Change

The change in POAL’s key performance measure from intensity to absolute emissions is reasonable and science based.

Maori Responsiveness

Ask POAL to engage with council staff and the IMSB to set a far more ambitious deadline for completion of the framework and confirm that it will include its own Maori staff and engage with mana whenua in the development of the framework.

Improved Relationship with the Council

The council welcomes an improved relationship.

Use of Group Capital

The commitment to an improved relationship between POAL and the council is important to facilitate this flow of information.

 

Reduction in Key Productivity Performance Targets

The council expects to see more ambitious productivity targets for the years after implementation of automation is complete. These targets should reflect not only the removal of the disruption caused by the implementation of automation but should also reflect the improved productivity that automation is intended to provide. The council also expects customer service indicators to be reinstated in next year’s SCI.

Recover commercial position

The council expects to see a return to profitability and the corresponding targets once automation is complete. The proposed amendment to the dividend policy should be adopted.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

44.     As noted above, the draft SCI includes an absolute annual emissions reduction indicator and targets. These targets will allow the council to measure the incremental progress against POAL’s long term environmental sustainability goals of being carbon neutral by 2025, emission free by 2040 and zero waste to landfill by 2040.

45.     This SCI also provides an update and progress report on the Hydrogen production and refuelling facility and electric powered tugboat ‘Sparky’ which contribute to POAL’s overall climate impact strategy.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

46.     POAL debt is consolidated into the council’s accounts and as such will work with the council on a strategic approach to its capital expenditure, to help ensure the optimum use of debt across the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

47.     POAL has committed to continued growth and enhancement of the working relationship at all levels of the council.

48.     The SCI includes a performance target of attending all relevant local board meetings when invited and to strengthen relationships with the Ōrākei, Waitematā and Devonport-Takapuna local boards.

49.     The governance of POAL is a Governing Body responsibility, and therefore we have not consulted with local boards.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

50.     As noted above, POAL has committed to develop a Māori Outcomes Framework that recognises the unique relationship between Iwi of Tāmaki Makaurau to be developed and implemented by 2023. Staff recommend asking POAL to set a more ambitious deadline for completion of the framework and confirm that it will include its own Maori staff and engage with mana whenua in the development of the framework. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

51.     POAL’s updated budget projections including the dividend payments will be incorporated into the group budgets as part of the Annual Budget 2022/2023 process.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

52.     The SCI is the principal mechanism for establishing the strategic objectives of POAL. Under the Act the council (as shareholder) has the opportunity to provide comments on the draft SCI. If the council does not engage with the SCI process and provide comments, there is a risk that the strategic objectives of POAL will not be in line with the strategic direction and expectations of the council. To mitigate this risk, staff will work with elected members to fully engage with the process and provide comments as an engaged shareholder.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

53.     If the CCO Oversight Committee agrees to the recommendations, staff will prepare a letter to the chair of the POAL board summarising the contents. Staff recommend that the Committee delegates approving the letter to the Mayor.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ports of Auckland - Draft SCI (2021 - 2024)

97

b

Letter from Mayor to Ports of Auckland

107

c

Letter from Ports of Auckland to Mayor

111

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Chris Levet - Principal Advisor - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Authoriser

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

 


Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

24 August 2021

 

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Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

24 August 2021

 

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Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

24 August 2021

 

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Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

24 August 2021

 

Council Controlled Organisations - approval of statements of intent for 2021-2024

File No.: CP2021/09762

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2021 – 2024 statements of intent (SOIs) for Auckland Council’s four substantive council-controlled organisations, and three legacy council-controlled organisations (CCOs).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       SOIs set out the objectives and activities of each CCO for the next three years. They serve as a basis for accountability to the council, as the shareholder, and provide an opportunity for the council to influence each organisation’s direction. SOIs should reflect agreed council plans and strategies, 10-year budget (long-term plan) decisions and a CCO view of the strategic outlook and organisational priorities. 

3.       Developing a SOI is always more challenging in the year that council adopts a 10-year budget and for Auckland Transport, the development and adoption of a Regional Land Transport Plan. The final SOIs have now been checked to ensure that they align with the agreed budgets, programmes and performance expectations in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.  

4.       Staff consider that no major modifications are required and that the CCO Oversight Committee should approve the 2021 – 2024 SOIs for council’s substantive CCOs – Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku and Watercare Services Limited.

5.       The council has also received final statements of intent from three legacy CCOs. Staff recommend that the 2021-2024 SOIs for Community Education Trust Auckland, Manukau Beautification Charitable Trust and Contemporary Art Foundation are approved.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee:

a)      approve the 2021-2024 statements of intent for Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku and Watercare

b)      approve the 2021-2024 statements of intent for Community Education Trust Auckland, Manukau Beautification Charitable Trust and Contemporary Art Foundation.

Horopaki

Context

6.       The requirements for statements of intent are set out in Schedule 8 of the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA). SOIs set out the objectives and activities of each CCO for the next three years. They serve as a basis for accountability to the council, as the shareholder, and provides an opportunity for the council to influence each organisation’s direction.

7.       Under the LGA the council has the ability to modify a statement of intent to ensure it adequately reflects the council’s strategic priorities if it considers that is necessary.

8.       Due to COVID-19 and the 10-year budget process, council decided not to issue a letter of expectation to substantive CCOs in late 2020. Guidance was instead provided to CCOs via 10-year budget workshops and the Mayoral Proposal.

9.       The CCO review recommended that the council develop a template CCOs must use when drafting their statements of intent to ensure consistency in length, detail, presentation and benchmarks. The template was jointly developed between council and CCOs and staff have worked with CCOs in its application. Each SOI is broken into sections:

·    Part 1: Strategic Overview – which focuses on the three-year horizon and sets out strategic objectives, nature and scope, how it will deliver on council’s outcomes and the 10-year budget (LTP) performance measures. It is intended that this will be produced triennially, aligning with the adoption of the 10-year budget.

·    Part 2: Statement of performance expectations. It provides an annual work programme, financial information and responses to specific requests by the shareholder. It is updated and submitted annually.

10.     Given the need to align budgets, programmes and performance expectations with the 10-year budget, the CCO Oversight Committee agreed to approve a one-month extension of statutory deadlines for the 2021-2024 statements of intent (CCO/2020/27). Key steps in the process were:

·    CCOs provided their draft SOI to council by the deadline of 1 April 2021

·    the CCO Oversight Committee approved shareholder comments on 18 May 2021

·    CCOs considered the shareholder comments at a public board meeting (as required)

·    Final SOIs were received by 1 August 2021.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     Staff have reconciled shareholder comments against the final statements of intent.  This reconciliation is provided in Attachment A of the report.

12.     Staff consider that no major modifications are required for the statements of intent.

13.     The SOIs are provided in attachments B-H as follows:

·    Auckland Transport (Attachment B)

·    Auckland Unlimited (Attachment C)

·    Eke Panuku Development Auckland Limited (Attachment D)

·    Watercare Services Limited (Attachment E)

·    COMET Auckland (Attachment F)

·    Contemporary Art Foundation (Attachment G)

·    Manukau Beautification Charitable Trust (Attachment H).

Auckland Transport (AT)

14.     The Auckland Transport final statement of intent addresses all the matters raised in the shareholder feedback and there are no issues for modification.

15.     A number of matters have undergone revision since shareholder comments were provided. The most important of these are outlined below. How the remainder of the shareholder comments have been addressed is noted in the attached reconciliation table.

·    Measures and targets are aligned with the 10-year budget. Many of these were subject to discussions during budget-setting in the 10-year budget process, and the statement of intent reflects the outcomes of governing body decision-making. 

·    A significantly revised section on Māori outcomes.

·    Responding to shareholder feedback, Auckland Transport has developed a new measure for delivery of safe cycling facilities (p57 of SOI).  This is discussed in more detail below.

·    A revised discussion – with supporting actions – of AT’s response to the climate emergency.  This mentions in several parts council’s goal of a 64 per cent reduction in transport emissions by 2030 (eg. p12 of SOI), and the upcoming development of a Transport Emissions Reduction Plan. This process will be worked on by both AT and council, and options for different packages to reach this challenging emissions goal will be brought to governing body for consideration (including the trade-offs which may be required).

16.     In respect of the new cycling measure, safe facilities are defined as those which meet AT’s Transport Design Manual standards (to deliver Vision Zero). It is important to understand that the physical context within which a cycle facility is located is critical.  A low-speed, low-traffic environment will likely not require protected cycle facilities to be described as safe, whereas facilities on busy arterials will require a high degree of protection to be deemed safe. Interactions with pedestrians and narrow sections are also a consideration. Finally, it is important to note that a facility that currently exists, but is upgraded to a safe standard may be counted.  This might include a current painted lane that has protection added to it.

17.     Additionally, to be counted for the SOI, new facilities will have to be on the strategic cycle network.  This is defined as being located on the cycle network described as part of Future Connect, which is AT’s long-term vision for the strategic transport network of Auckland. 

18.     The third aspect of the new measure is the targets, which have been increased significantly from the original draft of the SOI.  The three-year target is 44km, compared to fewer than 20km of new cycle facilities in the previous draft.  This will be reported on against indicative annual targets. 

19.     Council staff have worked closely with AT on this and consider that the new measure will more accurately capture delivery of the facilities that councillors would understand as safe, and which contribute to the achievement of a strategic network.  We anticipate that as other plans are developed (such as the Transport Emissions Reduction Plan), the targets may possibly be increased further, depending on decisions which are taken. 

Auckland Unlimited

20.     The Auckland Unlimited final statement of intent addresses or responds to all the matters raised in the shareholder feedback and there are no major issues for modification.  The final SOI reflects further development and refinement as a result of:

·     A dedicated Auckland Unlimited workshop with the CCO Oversight Committee on 27 April 2021.

·     Formal shareholder feedback received on 31 May 2021.

·     Finalisation of the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, including budgets and performance measures.

·     Finalisation of the Auckland Council Economic Development Action Plan 2021-24.

·     Further refinement and feedback from the new Auckland Unlimited executive team.

21.     Changes to the final statement of intent of note include:

·    Changes to some LTP measures and targets, as detailed in the attached reconciliation table. These were subject to discussions during budget-setting in the 10-year budget process, and the statement of intent aligns to the final 10-year budget 2021-2031.  In summary the key changes are:

Re-instatement of the “number of people who experience Auckland Unlimited arts, environment and sports venues and events” measure, with some rewording and revision to targets

Re-instatement of the “contribution to regional GDP” measure, with some revision to targets

Removal of the “number of visitor nights” measure.

·    Updates to the financial tables to reflect the final capital funding decisions made through the 2021-31 LTP process and the commentary relating to capital funding has been updated and/or removed.

·    Refresh and strengthening of some of the Māori outcomes content, including the addition of a table showing Auckland Unlimited’s high level investment in Māori outcomes.

·    Updates to activities in the one-year work programme section to reflect work on consolidated operation of Auckland’s stadiums, and the actions from the Auckland Council Economic Development Action Plan for which Auckland Unlimited is the lead or co-lead.

22.     The final SOI refers to the Auckland Unlimited Trust.  This reflects a name change that has now been executed (formerly the Regional Facilities Auckland Trust).

Eke Panuku

23.     The Eke Panuku final statement of intent responds to the matters raised in the shareholder feedback and there are no major issues for modification this year.

24.     Changes to the final statement of intent of note include:

·    More information and detailed explanation of projects to be delivered in 2021/2022.

·    The context and drivers for Eke Panuku work have been expanded in more detail.

·    Annual targets have been provided for four measures and greater detail supplied on the capital project milestones. 

25.     Further detail does need to be provided on the 50 ongoing or new initiatives that support Māori outcomes (performance measure 10). Further guidance and monitoring will be provided by Nga Mātārae outside the SOI process. 

26.     In the final SOI Eke Panuku have made a significant effort to respond to shareholder comments and staff recommend that the final SOI be approved. However it would be useful to consider if further improvements could be made for the next SOI (2022-2025). This may include: 

·    Providing an overview of progress and projects by priority area (in addition to projects by core function). Often people want to get a high-level understanding of delivery and projects planned across the Auckland region. Some of this information is in the SOI already but is split across different sections of the work programme.

·    Reviewing the core functions diagram or providing an explanation of ‘what we do’ in a different way. Significant explanation in a footnote is currently required to link the core functions diagram to the annual work programme (and performance measures).

·    Linking the performance measures more clearly to the three yearly or annual work programmes (they currently link to the core functions diagram). 

Watercare Services Limited

27.     The Watercare Services Limited final statement of intent addresses all the matters raised in the shareholder feedback and there are no major issues for modification.


 

28.     Changes to the final statement of intent of note include:

·    Additional commentary on managing the ongoing drought, which is now in its third year.

·    Watercare are adopting council’s 50 per cent target for greenhouse gas emissions reduction.

·    Updates to reflect new regulatory compliance requirements (Water Services Regulator Act 2020 and the proposed Water Services Bill) and including training of staff in the work programme to comply with these legislative requirements.

·    The annual work programme has been updated for construction projects and the finalisation of the Māori Outcomes Plan (page 25).

29.     Previous shareholder comments have asked Watercare to work with Auckland Council (CPO) to review the Drought Management Plan and the drought standard. Watercare have had their response independently audited and state in their statement of intent that they will as part of the Auckland Water’s Strategy work undertaken with council, review the drought standard (page 16 and 23). We encourage Watercare to continue to ensure that there is joint work on both the response plan and the drought standard.

30.     Shareholder comments on Watercare’s draft Statement of Intent asked them to work with council to amend the measure in the Watercare’s Auckland Water Efficiency Plan 2021-2025 (published in April 2021) to reflect those agreed by the Council as part of the Water Strategy (ECC/2021/19) and reflected in their draft Statement of Intent. This was to avoid confusion and create alignment between strategic documents. As communication and education of customers about water use and efficiency is an important element of Watercare’s work programme over the coming year, we encourage Watercare to be consistent in their communication around measures and targets in all public facing documentation.

31.     Watercare may also like to add the 2030 and 2050 targets into their water efficiency plan with the note that Auckland Council have requested more ambitious targets be developed over time.

Legacy council-controlled organisations

32.     Through the shareholder comment report in May 2021, the Manager, CCO Governance and External Partnerships was delegated the authority to finalise shareholder feedback for the Contemporary Art Foundation, COMET Auckland and Manukau Beautification Charitable Trust. All the matters in the shareholder feedback have been addressed.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

33.     The general shareholder feedback to all substantive CCOs asked that the final SOIs identify planned activities are intended to address climate change and other environmental outcomes.  All CCOs have addressed this in their final documents.

34.     Auckland Transport’s SOI includes responses to the climate challenge and Auckland’s Climate Plan Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri in a number of areas. This reflects the awareness of the transport sector making up around 40 per cent of emissions in Auckland.  As noted earlier, inviting Auckland Transport to work closely with council on how together we address these issues will be critical in the period of this SOI. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

35.     Council staff have advised CCOs of the content of this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     The reconciliation exercise between the final statements of intent and the shareholder comments ensured that issues relating to local boards were addressed as required in the shareholder comments.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     The statements of intent contain each CCO’s contribution to Māori outcomes. The performance of each substantive CCO on these issues is reported on each quarter. The final SOIs address issues raised by the Independent Māori Statutory Board and Ngā Mātārae in shareholder feedback.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     Financial information in each CCO’s final statement of intent has been agreed with Financial Strategy and Planning and reflects the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     There are no major risks associated with approving the CCOs’ statements of intent.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     If the committee approves the statements of intent, each substantive CCO will report on their performance every quarter. The first quarterly reports will be presented to the CCO Oversight Committee in December 2021.  Legacy CCOs will report on their performance half-yearly.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Reconciliation tables: shareholder feedback with final CCO Statements of intent

121

b

Auckland Transport Statement of Intent 2021-2024

131

c

Auckland Unlimited Statement of Intent 2021-2024

197

d

Eke Panuku Statement of Intent 2021-2024

227

e

Watercare Statement of Intent 2021-2024

261

f

COMET Statement of Intent 2021-2024

295

g

Contemporary Art Foundation Statement of Intent 2021-2024

313

h

Manukau Beautification Charitable Trust Statement of Intent 2021-2024

331

     


 

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Rachel Wilson - Principal Advisor

Sarah Johnstone-Smith - Principal Advisor

Claire Gomas - Principal Advisor

Edward Siddle - Principal Advisor

Authoriser

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

 


Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

24 August 2021

 

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24 August 2021

 

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24 August 2021

 

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Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

24 August 2021

 

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Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

24 August 2021

 

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24 August 2021

 

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24 August 2021

 

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24 August 2021

 

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Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

24 August 2021

 

Liaison councillors' updates

File No.: CP2021/11970

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To receive an update from liaison councillors to the boards of Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In February 2020, the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee resolved to establish the role of a CCO liaison councillor (Resolution number CCO/2020/3).

3.       The key purpose of the liaison councillor role is to develop trusting relationships with the CCOs, to allow a better exchange of information. Liaison councillors can act as a key point of contact when specific issues arise, and provide advice when issues are likely to be of high public interest. They can provide the CCO with Governing Body perspectives which may help board decision-making, while at the same time being able to provide Governing Body colleagues with information about the rationale and detail of board decisions.

4.       Liaison councillors are required to regularly report verbally to the CCO Oversight Committee, or in writing if unavailable to attend in person, about activities undertaken in the role and issues arising.

5.       Liaison councillors are allocated to each CCO as follows:

·        Auckland Transport: Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore and Cr Chris Darby

·        Auckland Unlimited: Cr Richard Hills and Cr John Watson

·        Eke Panuku Development Auckland: Cr Efeso Collins

·        Watercare: Cr Linda Cooper.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee:

a)      receive the updates from liaison councillors to the Council Controlled Organisations.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Duncan Glasgow - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

 


Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

24 August 2021

 

Review of the Forward Work Programme - Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

File No.: CP2021/10309

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To review and note progress on the 2021Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee forward work programme appended as Attachment A.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The forward work programme for the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee was adopted at its meeting held on 12 December 2019.  It was agreed that the forward work programme would be reported monthly for information and reviewed on a six-monthly basis.

3.       Due to the uncertainty of the meeting schedule during 2020, and the adoption of an Emergency Budget, the committee forward work programmes have not had a full review since originally being approved.

4.       The Governing Body has now adopted the Recovery Budget (10-year Budget 2021-2031) and committee forward work programmes should reflect those decisions.

5.       All committees need to review their forward work programme, by the end of September, following the adoption to the budget each year. A further review needs to be carried out by the end of March each year.

6.       Following approval, all committee forward work programmes will be reported to the Governing Body in October and April each year, for oversight as per the Terms of Reference.

7.       To expedite the above process, it has been agreed to report the committee forward work programmes to the Governing Body at its meeting on 26 August 2021.

8.       The current forward work programme for the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee is appended as Attachment A.

9.       Specific amendments have been made as follows:

i)        any new additions will be highlighted in red text

ii)       any deletions will be shown in strikethrough.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee:

a)      receive and review the progress on the 2021 forward work programme - Attachment A of the agenda report

b)      approve the reviewed forward work programme

c)      review the forward work programme prior to the end of March 2022.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Forward Work Programme

353

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Duncan Glasgow - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

 


Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

24 August 2021

 

 

Kōmiti Aromātai Whakahaere Kaupapa Kei Raro I Te Maru O te Kaunihera / CCO Oversight Committee
Forward Work Programme 2021

This committee deals with the performance monitoring of CCOs and other entities in which the council has an equity interest. The committee are to have a general overview and insight into the strategy, direction and priorities of all CCOs, set policy relating to CCO governance and approve the CCO statements of intent.

The full terms of reference can be found here: Terms of Reference - Agreed 12 November 2019

 

Area of work and Lead Department

Reason for work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Expected timeframes

Highlight the month(s) this is expected to come to committee in 2021

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

CCO Review Updates

CCO Governance and External Partnerships

As per the CCO Review: Terms of Reference, agreed by the Governing Body in November 2019 (Resolution number: GB/2019/127), an independent review panel conducted a review of Auckland Council’s Substantive Council-Controlled Organisations.

The recommendations from the CCO Review report were received by the Governing Body on 27 August 2020 (Resolution number: GB/2020/89).

It was agreed that that the implementation team report on the programme and proposed approach timing to the CCO Oversight Committee within three months, and that progress reports on the programme implementation were to be provided to the CCO Oversight Committee every six months.

To receive updates on the implementation and progression of the 64 summary recommendations of the CCO Review

Progress to date:

A programme update was received in February 2020

The CCO Review was received by the Governing Body on 27 August 2020.

An update by way of memorandum was provided in November 2020.

An update was received in February 2021.

An update by way of memorandum was provided in March 2021.

An update was received in May 2021.

An update was received in June 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Auckland Council Branding Guidelines

CCO Governance and External Partnerships

The recommendations from the CCO Review report were received by the Governing Body on 27 August 2020 (Resolution number: GB/2020/89).

Two of the recommendations in the CCO Review report were:

- (Rec 57) The council updates its brand guidelines to ensure the pōhutakawa logo is used in a clear, consistent and flexible way on all council-funded services, activities and facilities, including when used alongside CCO operational brands.


- (Rec 58) The council monitors CCOs’ compliance with its brand guidelines.

Decision: to approve new Auckland Council branding guidelines.

 

Progress to date:

A workshop was held in February 2021.

 

 

A report will be provided in August 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quarterly, Half-Year and Annual Reports

CCO Governance and External Partnerships

Under the LGA and LGACA the council must regularly undertake performance monitoring of the CCO to evaluate its contribution to meeting its objectives, and the desired results identified in the SOI.

Receive quarterly reports, receive and adopt half yearly and annual reports.  The CCOs will present to the CCO Oversight committee twice a year on their performance.

Progress to date:

First quarter reports were received for substantive council-controlled organisations in December 2019, and December 2020.

Second quarter reports received for substantive council-controlled organisations in March 2020.

Third quarter reports were scheduled for June 2020; however this meeting was cancelled due to COVID-19.

Fourth quarter reports were received for substantive council-controlled organisations September 2020.

Second quarter reports for substantive council-controlled organisations were received in March 2021.

The Ports of Auckland Limited Interim Report for the six months ending 31 December 2020 were received in March 2021.

Third quarter reports for substantive council-controlled organisations and POAL was received in May 2021.

Fourth quarter reports for substantive council-controlled organisations and POAL will be received in September 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liaison Councillor Updates

CCO Governance and External Partnerships

Mayor Phil Goff has appointed a list of six CCO liaison councillors to attend the board meetings of the CCOs allocated to them, and report back to this committee. 

To receive updates from the CCO Liaison Councillors.

Progress to date:

Principals and draft protocols for the liaison councillor role were agreed in February 2020

Updates were provided in September, October and November 2020.

Updates were provided in September, October and November 2020.

Updates were provided in May 2021.

An update was provided in  June 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ports of Auckland - Statement of Corporate Intent

CCO Governance and External Partnerships

Under legislation Ports of Auckland Limited must deliver annually a statement of intent not later than 1 month after the commencement of each financial year.

Seeking committee feedback of draft 2021/24 Ports of Auckland Limited Statement of Corporate intent in August.

 

Seeking committee approval of final 2021/24 Ports of Auckland Limited Statement of Corporate intent in September.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Final SOIs

CCO Governance and External Partnerships

Under legislation CCOs must deliver annually a final statement of intent to its shareholders by 30 June 2021.

Seeking committee approval of final 2020/24 Statements of Intent from its substantive and non-substantive CCOs.

Progress to date:

On 24 November 2020, the committee agreed to extend the SOI timeline by one month (resolution number: CCO/2020/27).

 

A report will be provided in August 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stadiums Strategy

CCO Governance and External Partnerships

A workshop was requested following Auckland Unlimited’s presentation of its strategic work programme on 27 April 2021.

To receive information on Auckland Unlimited’s ‘what’s best for Auckland’ position on stadium investment and business case for a single stadium operator as well as advice on options to move forward. 

 

Confidential Workshop held 7 July 2021.

Confidential Workshop scheduled for September 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

City Rail Link Limited (CRLL) – end of year results

CCO Governance and External Partnerships

CRLL has been established to govern and manage the delivery of the City Rail Link CRL), as part of an agreement between the Crown and Auckland Council to jointly fund the project.

The company has the full governance, operational and financial responsibility for the CRL, with clear delivery targets and performance expectations.

CRLL reports quarterly as part of the group report to the Finance and Performance Committee. CRLL will present to the CCO Oversight Committee to discuss performance and end of year results.

Results will be presented in workshops in October 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Haumaru Housing – End of year results

CCO Governance and External Partnerships

Haumaru Housing is a new joint venture established by Auckland Council and The Selwyn Foundation.

This will ensure the long-term provision of affordable housing services for older people in Auckland.

Haumaru Housing will report to CCO Oversight Committee once a year to discuss performance and end of year results.

Results will be presented in a workshop in October 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tamaki Regeneration Company (TRC) - End of year results

CCO Governance and External Partnerships

TRC is a Crown entity that is jointly owned by the government and Auckland Council.

TRC is leading urban regeneration activity in Tāmaki to achieve four strategic objectives; social transformation, economic development, placemaking and housing resource.

TRC will report to CCO Oversight Committee once a year to discuss performance and end of year results.

Results will be presented in a workshop in October 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Letters of Expectation

CCO Governance and External Partnerships

Council issues an annual letter of expectations to each of its substantive CCOs to inform the development of the CCOs’ Statements of Intent.

Seeking committee approval of the content of draft 2021/2022 letters of expectation.

A report will be provided in December 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                            

 

Completed

Area of Work

Committee Role

(decision and/or direction)

Decision

Letters of Expectation

Seeking committee approval of the content of draft 2020/21 letters of expectation.

Decision to approve content of 2020/2021 letters of expectation, authority delegated to mayor to finalise and issue the letters, 12 December 2019.

(Link to decision CCO/2019/2)

CCO AGM Resolutions

To delegate the authority to Auckland Council’s chief executive to act as Auckland Council’s shareholder representative to execute a written resolution in lieu of an annual meeting. 

Decision to delegate authority to council’s chief executive to act as council’s shareholder representation to the substantive council-controlled organisations and also Tāmaki Regeneration Company and City Rail Link Limited and sign written resolutions

(Link to decision CCO/2019/3)

Final SOIs

Seeking committee approval of final 2020/21 Statements of Intent from its substantive and non-substantive CCOs.

Decision to approve the 2020-2023 statements of intent, 22 September 2020.

(Link to decision CCO/2020/10)

Haumaru Housing – End of year results

Haumaru Housing will report to CCO Oversight Committee once a year to discuss performance and end of year results.

Results presented in a workshop, 21 October 2020.

City Rail Link Limited (CRLL) – end of year results

CRLL reports quarterly as part of the group report to the Finance and Performance Committee. CRLL will present to the CCO Oversight Committee twice a year to discuss performance and end of year results.

Results presented in a workshop, 21 October 2020.

Tamaki Regeneration Company (TRC) - End of year results

TRC will report to CCO Oversight Committee once a year to discuss performance and end of year results.

Results presented in a workshop, 21 October 2020.

Merged Entity – new name

To approve the new name for the merged entity resulting from the amalgamation of RFAL and ATEED.

Decision to approve name of merged entity, 27 October 2020.

(Link to decision CCO/2020/17)

Legacy CCO Review

To agree a set of criteria that will guide a review of Auckland Council’s legacy CCOs and the sequence of their review.

Decision to approve a review of the status of non-substantive CCOs and framework, 27 October 2020.

(Link to decision CCO/2020/21)

Auckland Unlimited Final SOI

To approve a statement of intent for the new merged entity, Auckland Unlimited, resulting from the amalgamation covering the period 1 December 2020 to 30 June 2021.

Decision to approve a statement of intent for the new merged entity, Auckland Unlimited, 24 November 2020.

(Link to decision CCO/2020/27)

Ports of Auckland statement of corporate intent

To consider POAL’s final statement of corporate intent.

Draft statement of corporate intent received by the Governing Body, 27 August 2020.

Decision to approve POAL’s final statement of corporate intent, 8 December 2020.

(Link to decision CCO/2020/33)

Te Puru Community Charitable Trust Organisation – extension of exemption

To approve Te Puru’s extension to the exemption from council-controlled organisation requirements under the Local Government Act 2002.

Decision to extend the Trust’s exemption, 23 February 2021.

(Link to decision CCO/2021/5)

Draft SOIs

To approve proposed shareholder comments on substantive and non-substantive CCO draft 2021/2024 Statements of Intent.

Decision to note recommended comments, focus of the feedback and feedback received at committee, and agree the process of providing feedback to substantive and non-substantive CCOs, 21 May 2021.

(Link to decision CCO/2021/18)

Highbrook Park Trust - Review of Trust Deed and Management Contract

To disestablish the trust

Decision to disestablish the trust, 18 May 2021. 

(Link to decision CCO/2021/19)

Statement of Expectation

Approve the statement of expectations content and process.

Decision to approve the Statement of Expectations for substantive Council-controlled Organisations, agreed that the CCO Governance Manual is no longer required, 22 June 2021.

(Link to decision CCO/2021/26)

CCO ‘Scan the Horizon’ Workshops

The topics and sequencing of these workshops is being developed and will be agreed early in 2020.

Future of these workshops being considered as part of CCO Review.

Workshops were held as follows:

ATEED - February 2020

Auckland Transport - March 2020

Watercare - July 2020 (Governing Body workshop)

Watercare site visit – 10 August 2021