I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 17 August 2021

2.00pm

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Office
1 The Strand
Takapuna

 

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Ruth Jackson

 

Deputy Chairperson

Jan O'Connor, QSM

 

Members

Aidan Bennett, QSM

 

 

Trish Deans

 

 

Toni van Tonder

 

 

George Wood, CNZM

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Michelle Riley

Democracy Advisor

 

11 August 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 0272298404

Email: michelle.riley@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          6

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       6

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          6

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

9.1     Friends of Takapuna Library - Takapuna community and library service provision                                                                                                               6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Allocation of sales proceeds for 2 The Strand, Takapuna                                        9

12        Takapuna community and library service provision                                               15

13        Proposal to make a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw                             31

14        Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021                                                                    141

15        Local board input into Auckland Council’s submission on the Department of Internal Affair’s changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes     145

16        Allocation of Local Board Transport Capital Fund budgets to local transport projects                                                                                                                       165

17        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Devonport-Takapuna Local Board for 1 March to 30 June 2021                                                                                              177

18        Chairpersons' Report                                                                                                211

19        Elected Members' Reports                                                                                        213

20        Devonport-Takapuna Local Board - Record of Workshops July 2021                215

21        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      225

22        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

23        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               229

17        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Devonport-Takapuna Local Board for 1 March to 30 June 2021

b.      Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Financial Report at 30 June 2021       229


1          Welcome

 

The meeting will open with a karakia.

 

Whakataka te hau ki te uru                 Cease o winds from the west

Whakataka te hau ki te tonga             Cease o winds from the south

Kia mākinakina ki uta                          Bring calm breezes over the land

Kia mātaratara ki tai                            Bring calm breezes over the sea

E hī ake ana te atakura                       And let the red-tipped dawn come

He tio                                                   With a touch of frost

He huka                                               A sharpened air

He hau hū                                           And promise of a glorious day.

Tīhei mauri ora

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making

When a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external

interest they might have.

 

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the Code) requires elected

members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of

Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy. The policy covers two classes of conflict of

interest:

 

                 i.             A financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member.

                ii.             A non-financial conflict interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component. It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

 

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members

understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968. The

guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail and provide elected members with

practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of

interest.

 

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office

of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request.

Any questions relating to the Code or the guidelines may be directed to the Local Area

Manager in the first instance.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 20 July 2021, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Friends of Takapuna Library - Takapuna community and library service provision

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Ruth Ell of Friends of Takapuna Library will be in attendance to address the board about the Takapuna and library service provision

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation from Friends of Takapuna Library and Thank Ruth Ell for their attendance.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Allocation of sales proceeds for 2 The Strand, Takapuna

File No.: CP2021/07432

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report seeks the views of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board regarding the allocation of the sales proceeds from 2 The Strand, Takapuna, which is an endowment property approved for disposal by the Finance and Performance Committee as part of the Emergency budget asset recycling programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       2 The Strand, Takapuna was donated to the former Borough of Takapuna in 1940 for the purpose of a public library. It is a Category B Heritage scheduled building under the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP). The building has known seismic issues.

3.       In July 2020, council’s Finance and Performance Committee and Governing Body approved, subject to the satisfactory conclusion of any required statutory processes, the disposal of 2 The Strand with the final terms and conditions to be approved under the appropriate delegations.

4.       Council has undertaken public consultation regarding the sale of this property as part of the Recovery Budget (10-year Budget 2021-2031). In June 2021, council’s Finance and Performance Committee and Governing Body confirmed the sale of 2 The Strand.

5.       This property is subject to an endowment, and sales proceeds from the disposal must be used in accordance with the requirements of sections 140 and 141 of the Local Government Act 2002.

6.       A sale of 2 The Strand is not expressly prohibited, and this property can be sold under section 140(4)(b) of the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA 2002), subject to conditions set out in section 141 of the LGA 2002:

·    The proceeds of sale must be used for a purpose consistent with the endowment (in this case, for municipal purposes within the former Borough of Takapuna boundaries); and

·    The council must notify the Minister for Land Information and the Minister in Charge of Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations of the proposal to sell the land.

7.       In order for the disposal of 2 The Strand to proceed in accordance with the July 2020 and June 2021 council resolutions, a specific use or uses of the proceeds of sale consistent with the endowment purpose must be identified before the property is sold. 

8.       This report seeks the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board’s endorsement to recommend the allocation of the proceeds of sale from 2 The Strand to the following projects (ranked in order of priority); Francis Street to Esmonde Road pathway; Wairau Estuary Boardwalk; Takapuna Beach Reserve concept plan – implementation. In the event the funding is not required for the board’s top ranked priority project, the funding can be allocated to next highest ranked listed project. 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      endorse the recommendation of Eke Panuku Development Auckland to the Finance and Performance Committee to approve the allocation of the proceeds of sale from 2 The Strand, Takapuna to the following projects, ranked in order of priority:

i)        Francis Street to Esmonde Road pathway;

ii)       Wairau Estuary Boardwalk; and

iii)      Takapuna Beach Reserve concept plan – implementation.

b)      note the above projects have been identified as consistent with the purpose of the endowment pursuant to which this property was vested and is in accordance with the conditions set out in sections 140 and 141 of the Local Government Act 2002.

Horopaki

Context

9.       2 The Strand was identified as no longer required for a public work and approved for sale by council’s Finance and Performance Committee in July 2020.

10.     The disposal of 2 The Strand is deemed significant under Auckland Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. Accordingly, council undertook public consultation as part of the Recovery Budget. In June 2021, the Finance and Performance Committee and Governing Body confirmed the sale of 2 The Strand.

11.     Eke Panuku is seeking the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board’s formal views and endorsement for the proceeds of sale. The views of the board will be included in the report to the Finance and Performance Committee, which holds decision-making delegation regarding non-service council owned property.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Property information

12.     2 The Strand is a former community use building on a 486m2 site. It was donated to the former Borough of Takapuna in 1940 for the purpose of a public library. The property was used as a library from 1955 until 1989 and subsequently as staff offices.

13.     This property is a Category B Heritage scheduled building under the AUP. It is deemed an Earthquake-Prone Building with a New Building Standard rating of below 34 % and is currently vacant.

14.     The property is subject to an endowment. However, the sale of the property is not expressly prohibited, and the property can be sold under section 140(4)(b) of the LGA 2002, subject to conditions set out in section 141 of the LGA 2002:

·    The proceeds of sale must be used for a purpose consistent with the endowment; and

·    The council must notify the Minister for Land Information and the Minister in Charge of Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations of the proposal to sell the land.

15.     The AUP zoning is Business - Metropolitan Centre. 2 The Strand has a 2020/2021 council rating valuation of $2,850,000. The property is not likely to be subject to offer back obligations to the former owners in accordance with section 40 of the Public Works Act 1981.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     It is not known at this point what the potential future use of this property will be and therefore what the potential impacts could be on carbon emissions. A sale of the property could lead to land use changes. It is acknowledged that any form of construction and development can increase carbon emissions.

17.     The subject property is not located in flood prone area and is not a coastal property likely to be impacted in the future by rising sea levels.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     Council’s Heritage team has confirmed that 2 The Strand is a category B scheduled building in the AUP with historical, social, physical attributes and aesthetic heritage values. The team noted that council ownership is not required to protect its heritage values, as the property’s scheduled status should be adequate. The Heritage team also recommend that council advise any potential new owner of accepted conservation practices as part of due diligence undertaken.

19.     Council’s Legal Services team has confirmed that the proceeds of sale from 2 The Strand, can be allocated to the following projects, which are consistent with the purpose of the endowment (being for municipal purposes within the boundaries of the former Borough of Takapuna):

·    Francis Street to Esmonde Road pathway;

·    Wairau Estuary Boardwalk; and

·    Takapuna Beach Reserve concept plan implementation;

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     Eke Panuku has provided the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board with information memorandums regarding a proposed disposal of 2 The Strand and attended a local board workshop in June 2020.

21.     The board provided feedback through council’s adoption of the Recovery Budget (10-year Budget 2021-2031) that it did not support the proposal to sell 2 The Strand.

22.     Following council’s approval to dispose of this property, Eke Panuku has worked with council’s Local Board Services department and Legal Services team to identify options for the allocation of the sales proceeds. The projects presented in table 1 (below) are either funded projects in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan, the board’s current local board work programme, the local board transport’s capital fund schedule or listed in previous local board work programmes. The projects have been ranked in order of priority following advice from Local Board Services.

23.     Specific feedback was received through the Recovery Budget public consultation, with 12 submissions supporting a disposal, and four not in support. Comments in support included “I agree we need to get rid of assets that are not performing, are empty or have no use”. Finance and Performance Committee and Governing Body resolved that the Recovery Budget, 10-year Budget 2021-2031confirmed the sale of 2 The Strand.

 

 

 

 

 

Table 1. Proposed projects

Project

Description

Status

Francis Street to Esmonde Road pathway

Construct a pathway between Francis Street and Esmonde Road, which will link to and from the following pathways:

·    Patuone Reserve walkway;

·    Northern Pathway (under development); and

·    the existing cycling route along the western side of the Devonport Peninsular.

Project is in accordance with the 2020-2023 Local Board Plan, Local Board Greenways Plan, and AT’s Lake Road Improvements project.

Cost: Est $5.1 million to deliver. 

On hold.

Previously allocated budgets were absorbed into savings as part of the 2020/2021 Emergency Budget.

Wairau Estuary Boardwalk

Construct a pathway which starts at Omana Road, runs through the Wairau Estuary.

Project is in accordance with the 2017-2020 Local Board Plan.

Cost: Est $2 million to deliver.

On hold. 

Previously allocated budgets were absorbed into savings as part of the 2020/2021 Emergency Budget.

Takapuna Beach Reserve concept plan – implementation

 

To transform and develop the beach reserve. The following areas are proposed for development:

·    Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove site

·    proposed plaza

·    coastal boardwalk

Project is in accordance with the Takapuna Beach Reserve Concept Plan.

Cost: To be determined.

 

Has not started

 

24.     This report provides the local board with an opportunity to formalise its views regarding the allocations of sales proceeds from 2 The Strand, Takapuna.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     2 The Strand is within the boundaries of land acquired by the Crown from Maori from 1841 to 1844 through a series of land purchases.

26.     Because 2 The Strand is an endowment property, any sale must be in accordance with sections 140 and 141 of the LGA 2002, including a requirement that the council notify the Minister in Charge of Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations of council’s intended sale of the property.

27.     19 mana whenua iwi authorities were consulted regarding this property through the Eke Panuku led mana whenua engagement process and through council’s Emergency Budget in 2020 and Recovery Budget (10-year Budget 2021-2031) in 2021. Through the previous engagement undertaken, one iwi entity has expressed interest in purchasing the property.

28.     Eke Panuku will undertake its standard process of informing all iwi entities of upcoming commercial opportunities to acquire 2 The Strand six weeks before the property is brought to the open market.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     As 2 The Strand is subject to an endowment, the proceeds of sale must be used for municipal purposes (as it was defined in 1940) in accordance with the purpose of the endowment.  The proposed use of the sale proceeds towards the projects listed in Table 1 have been assessed in detail by council’s Legal Services team and the proposed uses meet the requirements for the sale of endowment property as set out in section 141 of the Local Government Act 2002.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     In the event that any of the proposed projects listed in Table 1 cannot progress, the Finance and Performance Committee may need to consider additional projects for the allocation of the sales proceeds from the sale of 2 The Strand.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Following receipt of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board’s resolution, Eke Panuku will report to the Finance and Performance Committee regarding the allocation of sales proceeds from the sale of 2 The Strand, in accordance with section 140 and section 141 of the LGA 2002.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Anthony Lewis - Senior Advisor, Portfolio Review, Eke Panuku Development Auckland

Authorisers

Letitia Edwards - Head of Strategic Asset Optimisation, Eke Panuku Development Auckland

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Takapuna community and library service provision

File No.: CP2021/11865

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for the development of an indicative business case to analyse options to use service property optimisation to fund improved community and library service provision in Takapuna (being the Mary Thomas Centre, Takapuna Community Services Building and Takapuna Library), within fit-for-purpose facilities.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Investigating opportunities to improve the delivery of community and library services in Takapuna from the Mary Thomas Centre, Takapuna Community Services Building and Takapuna Library (all located at 3 Gibbons Road, Takapuna) is a priority action in the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan (2019).

3.       A community needs assessment received by the local board in July 2020 (resolution DT/2020/97) found there is a reasonable range of council and non-council facilities and services available for the Takapuna community. It also identified that the Takapuna Library is well used and has high levels of satisfaction. There is capacity for additional activities and use in both the lease and venue for hire spaces within the Mary Thomas Centre and Takapuna Community Services Building.

4.       Key issues included a mixed level of awareness of the activities provided from the Mary Thomas Centre and Takapuna Community Services Building, and mixed feedback on the condition of these facilities.

5.       High level options for community and library service delivery in Takapuna were identified and analysed based on the findings of the community needs assessment and other relevant information. These were workshopped with the local board in November 2020 and August 2021.

6.       Four options were shortlisted:

1)   status quo;

2)   renovate and integrate the Takapuna Library and Takapuna Community Services Building using the proceeds from the divestment of the Mary Thomas Centre site;

3)   a new integrated community facility within a mixed-use development located on the land currently occupied by the existing Takapuna Library and Takapuna Community Services Building, using the proceeds from the divestment of the Mary Thomas Centre and air space development rights above the new facility; and

4)   a new integrated community facility within a mixed-use development adjoining the Takapuna town square using the proceeds from the divestment of 3 Gibbons Road and air space development rights above the new facility.

7.       Service property optimisation is proposed to fund options that include capital improvements (options 2-4). Service property optimisation offers an alternative funding source to deliver fit-for-purpose community facilities and improved community outcomes on a cost neutral basis (i.e nil impact on rates) by using proceeds from the sale or redevelopment of assets, land or both. It is market driven – any service property optimisation proposal must be commercially viable to proceed.

 

8.       The status quo option has poor alignment with council’s strategic direction of providing quality, integrated fit-for-purpose facilities and the aging facilities require increasing investment to address ongoing issues. The remaining three options meet the assessment criteria and based on initial assessments, are able to be funded through service property optimisation.

9.       It is recommended that an indicative business case is developed to further investigate options 2, 3 and 4, to enable the results and recommendations being presented to the local board in the first half of 2022.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      supports using service property optimisation as the funding mechanism to deliver cost neutral community and library services in Takapuna.

b)      approves the development of an indicative business case to investigate the following options to deliver integrated community and library services in Takapuna, within fit-for-purpose facilities:

i.     Option 2 - renovating the Takapuna Library and Takapuna Community Services Building to support consolidated and integrated service delivery, using the proceeds from divestment of the Mary Thomas Centre;

ii.     Option 3 - developing a new fit-for-purpose, integrated community facility within a mixed-use development on the land currently occupied by the Takapuna Library and Takapuna Community Services Building, using the proceeds from divestment of the Mary Thomas Centre and air space development rights above the new facility; and

          iii.        Option 4 - developing a new fit-for-purpose, integrated community facility within a mixed-use development adjoining the Takapuna town square, using the proceeds from divestment of the Takapuna Library, the Takapuna Community Services Building and the Mary Thomas Centre (all located at 3 Gibbons Road) and air space development rights above the new facility.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     Investigating options for the improved provision of community services and facilities in Takapuna is a priority action in the Community Facilities Network Plan (CFNP) action plan (2019).

11.   The CFNP and action plan provide strategic direction for the community facility portfolio. This investigation aligns with the CFNP’s key drivers to:

•     ensure existing facilities are fit-for-purpose;

•     address gaps or duplication in provision and needs for community facilities; and 

•     meet future demand arising from population growth and changing user expectations.

 

 

 

 

Key drivers

12.    The key drivers for this investigation are:

·    the priority action in the CFNP action plan “To investigate opportunities to improve the delivery of community services in Takapuna from the Mary Thomas Centre, Takapuna Community Services Building and Takapuna Library”

·    the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020 which has a key initiative to ‘Progress improvements to service delivery following the completion of the Takapuna Needs Assessment’

·    the opportunity to investigate the application of service property optimisation

·    questions regarding the performance of the facilities, how fit-for-purpose they are and the increasing costs to maintain them into the future

·    the opportunity to respond to identified community service needs within the urban redevelopment proposed through the Unlock Takapuna programme.

Property information

13.       The three facilities in scope are located at 3 Gibbons Road, Takapuna, and include:

·     Mary Thomas Centre (MTC);

·     Takapuna Community Services Building (TCSB); and

·     Takapuna Library (Library).

14.       Within MTC and TCSB there are five venues for hire and 11 community leases. The Library includes Research North, the Angela Morton Room, as well as customer services which has recently been integrated into the library. The total combined floor area across all buildings is approximately 5,825sqm.

15.       The basement areas of the Library and TCSB provide approximately 78 car parks, approximately 26 of which are allocated for tenant use.

16.       The total land area is 4,955sqm, which is held in two titles. A caveat related to a dispute between previous occupants of the property was registered in 1995 on the title containing the MTC and currently prevents sale of this property. It is anticipated that an application to remove the caveat would likely succeed.

17.       The property is zoned Business Metropolitan Centre in the Auckland Unitary Plan and is  within the Takapuna 1 Sub-precinct A, which has a maximum height limit of 24.5 metres.  There is a notable tree on the MTC site which is subject to rules within the Auckland Unitary Plan.

Takapuna community needs assessment 

18.       A community needs assessment was undertaken by Mobius Research & Strategy Ltd to understand:

·          the current and future community service provision needs of the Takapuna community;

·          how these needs are being met by council and other providers in the Takapuna area; and

·          the function and use of the MTC, TCSB and Library.

19.       The Takapuna Community Needs Assessment Report was received by the local board at the July 2020 business meeting (resolution number DT/2020/97). The needs assessment found there is a reasonable range of council and non-council facilities and services available for the Takapuna community. It also identified that the Library is well used and has high levels of satisfaction. There is capacity for additional activities and use in both the lease and venue for hire spaces within the MTC and TCSB.

20.       Key issues included a mixed level of awareness of the MTC and TCSB and the services provided in these facilities. There was also mixed feedback on the condition of these facilities. A summary of the key findings is contained in Attachment A.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

21. A long list of seventeen options to improve the provision and delivery of community and library services were identified and assessed by staff against criteria (refer to Attachment B). The criteria were workshopped with the local board in September 2020 and are grouped into the following themes:

·    community service provision;

·    community facility provision;

·    site considerations;

·    community use;

·    financial considerations; and

·    deliverability.

22.   Based on the assessment of the long list, staff proposed a short list of four options, which were workshopped with the local board in November 2020 and August 2021. They are outlined in the table below:

Table 1: Short listed options

Options

Description

1. Status quo

Retain all three facilities and address maintenance/renewal works as recommended in the asset assessment reports, as budget allows.

2. Renovate and integrate the Library and TCSB

Renovate the Library and TCSB to support consolidated and integrated service delivery, using the proceeds from divestment of the MTC site. It is anticipated this option would include creating an opening to connect the two buildings.

3. A new facility on the Library and TCSB sites 

Develop a new fit-for-purpose, integrated community facility across two levels within a mixed-use development including residential levels above, on the land currently occupied by the Library and TCSB.

This would be funded by the divestment of the MTC site and air space development rights for the residential component of the new development.

4. A new facility adjoining the Takapuna town square 

Develop a new fit-for-purpose, integrated community facility across three levels within a mixed-use development including residential levels above, adjoining the Takapuna town square.

This would be funded by the divestment of the three facilities (MTC, TCSB and Library) at 3 Gibbons Road and air space development rights for the residential component of the new development adjoining the town square.

NOTE: Options 3 and 4 would result in the completed community facility and associated land being retained in council ownership, while the airspace development rights will transfer to the selected development partner to enable completion of the residential component.

23.     The assessment process was informed by the following inputs:

·    Takapuna Community Needs Assessment

·    demographic and growth information

·    strategic alignment

·    building and site related information

·    asset and financial information

·    staff technical advice

·    community and library service trends.

24.     The key assumptions that informed the identification and assessment of the options are:

·    capacity to support key service providers is required (this is based on the needs assessment indicating that community service needs are effectively being met)

·    spaces or venues for hire are required, but an opportunity exists to reduce provision levels and still meet current and future demand (this is based on current under-utilisation, the opportunity to create more flexible and efficient spaces and supply by other providers in the Takapuna area)

·    an opportunity exists to improve the configuration and use of space to reduce overall spatial requirements to deliver services

·    capacity for some onsite parking is required to support the diversity of those who use the services.

25.  A summary of the pros and cons for the four short listed options is provided in the table below. These have been considered under four categories based on the assessment criteria.

26. Options 2, 3 and 4 are assessed on a reduced floor area than currently provided, as facility integration will enable improved use and configuration of space while still supporting service delivery requirements.

Table 2: Short listed option assessment

Option 1:  Status quo

Pros

Cons

Strategic alignment

·   Existing facilities are co-located 

Strategic alignment

·   Limited opportunity to provide integrated, flexible, quality facilities to support current and future community needs

Service outcomes

·   No change to service provision

·   Opportunity to review how spaces are used 

·   Opportunity to improve awareness of services 

Service outcomes

·   The condition of assets may continue to impact on tenant and user satisfaction in some cases

·   Service levels could decrease as parts of the facility reach life end and cannot be renewed 

Facility outcomes

·   The services, nature and location of the existing library is valued by customers and stakeholders

Facility outcomes

·   Fit-for-purpose issues remain 

·   Aging facilities

·   Limited opportunity to accommodate changing community needs and growth 

Value for investment

·   No initial capital outlay 

Value for investment

·   Uncertainty of funding for ongoing maintenance, renewals and any seismic remediation

·   As the facilities age, increasing investment for renewals will deliver decreasing value

 

Option 2:  Renovate and integrate the Library and TCSB

Pros

Cons

Strategic alignment

· Opportunity to improve provision of integrated, flexible, quality facilities to support current and future community need

Strategic alignment

·  Opportunities are limited by existing building design and potentially funding

Service outcome

·   Opportunity to improve the integration of services and review service provision to meet current and future community need

·   Higher profile of services  

Service outcome

·   Disruption to services during refurbishment

·   Perception that reduced floor area may impact levels of service

Facility outcome

·   Opportunity to reconfigure internal spaces and create more efficient and effective use of space to support service delivery

·   Provision of onsite parking

Facility outcome

·   Community may consider benefits of a renovated facility not worth divestment of the MTC site

·   Aging facilities

Value for investment

·   Opportunity to improve facility condition and make it more fit-for-purpose for service delivery

·   Long term cost reduction in managing one less facility (MTC) whilst meeting service requirements

Value for investment

·   Managing ongoing costs of maintaining aging assets and addressing any seismic remediation  

·   As the facilities age, increasing investment for renewals will deliver decreasing value

·   Potential value release of MTC site may not achieve optimal outcomes

 

Option 3:  A new facility on the Library and TSCB sites

Pros

Cons

Strategic alignment

·      Opportunity to provide a fully integrated, flexible, quality facility supporting current and future community need

Strategic alignment

·   None identified

Service outcome

·  Provision for integrated service delivery

·  Higher profile of services

 

Service outcome

·   Disruption to current services during construction

·   Perception that reduced floor area may impact levels of service

Facility outcome

·  Provision of a new, fit-for-purpose facility that can accommodate changing community need and growth

·  Provision of onsite parking

Facility outcome

·   Possible limitations in design outcomes from air space development

·   Perception of loss for community of MTC

Value for investment

·   A new smaller facility is more financially sustainable

·   High level assessment indicates this can be funded through service property optimisation

Value for investment

·   Perception that a stand-alone facility is preferable

·   Optimisation is market dependent

 

Option 4:  A new facility adjoining the Takapuna town square

Pros

Cons

Strategic alignment

·  Opportunity to provide a fully integrated, flexible, quality facility supporting current and future community need

Strategic alignment

·  None identified

Service outcome

·   Provision for integrated service delivery

·   No disruption to service delivery during construction

Service outcome

·   Perception that reduced floor area may impact levels of service

Facility outcome

·  Provision of a new, fit-for-purpose facility that can accommodate changing community need and growth

·  Central location close to public transport and adjoining the town square

Facility outcome

·  Community may be reluctant to sell the existing community facilities

·  Will require a different parking model that may be perceived negatively

Value for investment

·  A new smaller facility is more financially sustainable

·  High level assessment indicates this can be funded through service property optimisation

Value for investment

·  Perception that a stand-alone facility is preferable

·  Optimisation is market dependent

Indicative Business Case to consider options 2, 3 and 4 is recommended

27.     Based on the assessment of pros and cons it is recommended that an indicative business case (IBC) is developed for options 2, 3 and 4 to understand the merits of the proposed investment, strategic alignment and costs and benefits to ensure there is a robust case for change. This process will involve working with and receiving input from key stakeholders. The IBC will recommend a preferred option.

28.     The key findings and preferred option will be workshopped with the local board followed by a business report. Further analysis of the local board’s preferred option will then be undertaken through a Detailed Business Case.

29.     It is intended that a renovated or new fit-for-purpose community facility will provide improved service outcomes for future communities. It is noted that option 2 outcomes could be limited by the existing building design, structures and available funding.

30.     Recent community developments are providing evidence of the benefits of integrating services and designing facilities to meet the needs of the community (examples include Te Manawa and Te Paataka Koorero O Takaanini).

31.     Option 1: status quo requires increasing maintenance and renewals of aging facilities and seismic remediation works in a constrained financial environment. It has high long-term cost with little impact on service improvements. It also has poor alignment with council’s strategic direction outlined in the CFNP, including failure to resolve fit-for-purpose issues.

32.     Initial investigations indicate that options 2, 3 and 4 are financially feasible through service property optimisation, based on assumptions that require further testing through an IBC.

33.     Service property optimisation offers the opportunity to fund these options but is market dependent. More detailed analysis is required to understand the costs of renovating the existing buildings or building new, and the potential sale proceeds. It is anticipated this will involve quantity surveying, engineering, architectural and valuation input. 

34.     A Detailed Seismic Assessment (DSA) is underway which further investigates the Library and TCSB seismic strength and performance. This includes quantity surveying services to estimate the cost of seismic remediation works and will feed into the overall costings and works required, particularly of relevance for options 1 and 2.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

35.     The recommendations in this report have no direct climate impact. The climate impacts of each option will be assessed as a result of further investigations through the IBC process and in alignment with council’s Climate Action Plan.

36.     Any potential for an increase in emissions from facility redevelopment will be addressed by ensuring selected development partners undertake any demolition with appropriate methods for treating the resulting waste. It is Eke Panuku policy that all residential developments are constructed to a minimum of Homestar 6.

37.     Option 2 would provide an upgraded community facility that is anticipated to reduce energy costs by approximately 20%. Options 3 and 4 would provide a new community facility that is anticipated to decease energy costs by 50% compared to existing energy consumption.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

38.     The review of community and library services and supporting facilities in Takapuna involved input and specialist advice from across the council family, including Eke Panuku Development Auckland, Connected Communities, Community Facilities, Local Board Services and Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships.

39.     If approval is received from the local board, representatives from the same departments will contribute to the next phase of the project. 

40.     Essential renewals work will be prioritised and planned through the Community Facilities renewals work programme process to ensure levels of service are maintained during development of the IBC.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     Takapuna is experiencing population growth and changing demographics. Two catchment areas were reviewed for this piece of work – Takapuna Central (incudes neighbourhoods within a 15 minute walk from the facilities) and North Shore East (includes a significant proportion of neighbourhoods within the local board area). The key statistics for these catchment areas are as follows:

·        over the next thirty years the population increase for Takapuna Central is predicted to be higher than the overall Auckland region growth rate and North Shore East is predicted to be lower.

·        the two highest representation of ethnicities in both catchments is European and Asian. Whilst both catchment areas have higher proportions of Europeans in comparison to the Auckland region, it is anticipated that there will be a decline in this ethnicity and an increase in people of Asian ethnicity.

·        it is anticipated that both catchment areas will experience a decrease in the proportion of young people and young families, and an increase in the proportion of older adults and retirees (this is similar to the trend for the Auckland region).

42.     It is important to ensure community services and facilities meet the changing service needs of changing communities.

43.     The community needs assessment was informed by community views obtained through a survey and intercept interviews, and through in-depth interviews with key stakeholders (including non-council service providers) and user groups.

44.    Four local board workshops were held in 2019 and early 2020 in relation to the community needs assessment which was received by the local board at the July 2020 business meeting (resolution number DT/2020/97).

45.    Subsequent workshops were held in August, September and November 2020 and August 2021 to discuss the identification and assessment of emerging options.

46.    The purpose of this report is to confirm local board support to progress the investigation of options to improve service provision and delivery supported by fit-for-purpose facilities.

47.     The site currently occupied by the local board service centre is leased. Future provision within a renovated or new community facility could be considered through the IBC.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

48.     In the 2018 census, 5.5 percent of people living in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area identified as Māori compared to 12 percent in the Auckland region.

49.     •	Direction – Whanaungatanga: social outcome, Māori communities are connected and safe; action, wellbeing of tamariki through provision of facilities and services such as libraries, community centres, swimming pools
•	Direction – Manaakitanga: social outcome, Māori enjoy a high quality of life 
•	Direction – Wairuatanga: social outcome, Māori social institutions and networks thrive
Community and library services contribute to outcomes under three directions in the Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau (2017). The plan, published by the Independent Māori Statutory Board, provides a framework to Auckland Council for implementing desired cultural, economic, environmental and social outcomes for Māori:

50.     Mana whenua were invited to participate in the engagement process for the community needs assessment. No responses were received.

51.     Engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka will commence as part of the IBC.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

52.     Service property optimisation is proposed to fund options that include capital improvements. Service property optimisation offers an alternative funding source to deliver fit-for-purpose community facilities and improved community outcomes on a cost neutral basis by using proceeds from the sale or redevelopment of assets, land or both. Service property optimisation aims to deliver improved community outcomes with no impact on rates. It is market driven – any Service property optimisation proposal must be commercially viable to proceed.

53.     Service property optimisation is a tripartite agreement that requires the relevant council business units, the local board and Eke Panuku to work together. The local board has decision making delegation regarding service property optimisation and will receive joint advice and recommendations on the commercial viability of the options within the IBC, as well as optimal community service provision, from council staff and Eke Panuku.

54.     The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent financial impacts for Auckland Council has resulted in reduced financial capacity and the adoption of the Recovery Budget 2021-2031. Service property optimisation is considered the most likely way improved service provision delivered from fit-for-purpose assets can be realised in Takapuna in current conditions.

55.     An initial high-level financial feasibility assessment of each option has been undertaken with significant assumptions made that materially impact on value and costs, as outlined below.

Option 1 – Status quo

56.     A summary of projected capex costs based on the council derived Capex Asset Lifecycle Renewals Model for the three facilities over the next 30 years, is provided in the table below.

57. Table 3: Projected Capex costs ($000s)

Facility

2021

2025

2030

2035

2040

2045

2051

TOTAL

MTC

80

1,010

260

420

530

520

500

3,320

TCSB

10

310

500

160

420

850

2,250

Library

0

2,420

4,700

4,340

2,350

2,710

1,730

18,250

 

57.     Costs include project management, building consent, design, inflation and contingency. Costs recorded in 2021 are funded in the 2021/2022 capex work programme. The rest are currently unbudgeted expenses.

58.     Any seismic remediation costs relating to the Library and TCSB are currently an unbudgeted expense. It is likely these costs will need to be funded through local board budgets.

59.     Current funding constraints restrict the ability to cover total renewal requirements of the community asset portfolio meaning prioritisation is required to determine where investment is best allocated to meet long term outcomes.

Options 2, 3 and 4

60.     These options offer the opportunity to consider community service provision through reinvestment, rather than rates funded budget increases.

61.     A key assumption for these options is a reduction in the current overall floor area from the existing 5,825m2 to 4,600m2 for option 2 and 3,400m2 for options 3 and 4. In all cases this reduced floor area allows for integrated service requirements based on the needs assessment. Larger floor areas are not considered necessary to deliver the required current and future service needs and are unlikely to be financially viable using service property optimisation.

62.     High-level assessment indicates these options are financially feasible (i.e. can be wholly funded through service property optimisation), with the costs of the renovated/new community facility funded by the sale of assets, and for options 3 and 4 development rights for the residential component in a new mixed-use development.

63.     Renovation of the Library and TCSB (option 2) will need to consider any seismic remediation works required. New facilities (options 3 and 4) will be compliant so there will be no seismic related issues.

64.     An upgraded facility is expected to deliver approximately a 20 percent decrease in energy costs and a new facility is expected to deliver up to a 50 percent decrease compared to existing energy consumption. For both upgraded and new facilities there is an expected 10 percent decrease in maintenance costs. A new facility is expected to have minimal renewal requirements for the first 5 years.

65.     There will also be long term cost reductions by divesting the MTC and managing one less facility.

66.     Further investigation is required through an IBC to understand the options in more detail and identify a recommended option.

67.     Development of the IBC will be led by Eke Panuku and Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships and funded through operational budgets, subject to internal approvals required for resource allocation, consideration of capacity and work programming. Should the local board request additional investigations outside the IBC it is expected that the local board would meet or make a financial contribution to these costs. Once an IBC and preferred option is approved, all further costs will be capitalised against the project and deducted from the proceeds of sale. 

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

68.     Risks and mitigations have been identified in Table 4 below.

Table 4   Risks and Mitigations

Risks

Mitigations

Community concern and/or opposition to alternate provision affecting the future of the MTC, TCSB and Library

Development of a communications and engagement plan with the local board to support stakeholder, mana whenua and community understanding and engagement

Service property optimisation relies on viable market conditions and the ability to deliver an economical project to achieve cost-neutral delivery, and may not be a viable funding mechanism

Service property optimisation scenarios will be fully tested and include market awareness and sensitivity testing

If facilities do not receive investment for renewals, existing assets will continue to deteriorate and reduce service levels

Staff will work through the local board to agree a renewals programme based around service and asset priorities

The ability to progress Option 4, a new facility adjoining the Takapuna town square, is dependent on the timing of development. The development block of interest, will be progressed according to the Unlock Takapuna programme and there is a risk it will no longer be available for community use by the time a preferred option is agreed for community service delivery in Takapuna.

Ensure project planning and timeframes are reviewed and updates sought from Eke Panuku on the Unlock Takapuna programme and development timeframes

If population growth rates exceed projections demand for additional or larger facilities may result

Design adaptable and flexible spaces aimed at serving a changing population

Community concern about any change in service delivery and/or perception of loss of service (understanding what an ‘integrated facility’ is)

Development of a communications and engagement plan with the local board to support stakeholder, mana whenua and community understanding and engagement

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

69.     Subject to local board approval of the recommendations of this report, an IBC will be jointly developed by Eke Panuku and Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships with support from other council departments.

70.     The resource and operational budget to initiate and develop the IBC are to be confirmed by Eke Panuku and Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships. It is anticipated the IBC will take approximately 8-10 months to complete.

71.     The results of the DSA for the Library and TCSB will be considered through the IBC.

72.     The IBC key findings and preferred option will be workshopped with the local board in early/mid 2022 followed by a business report. Should the local board approve the preferred option the next step is to undertake a detailed business case.

73.     Staff propose essential renewals are completed while an IBC is developed.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Takapuna Community Needs Assesement - key findings

27

b

Option Assessment

29

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sophie Bell – Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Letitia Edwards – Head of strategic Asset Optimisation, Eke Panuku

Authorisers

Marian Webb – GM Assets & Delivery, Eke Panuku

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator



Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator



Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Proposal to make a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw

File No.: CP2021/11537

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek support for the draft proposal to make a new Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Auckland Council Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022, before it is finalised for public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Staff have prepared a draft proposal for a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw to enable local boards to provide their views before it is finalised for public consultation.

3.       The draft proposal is to make a new bylaw under the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This bylaw would replace the current legacy bylaw, which expires in 2022 and contains provisions developed before the Freedom Camping Act 2011 was passed.

4.       The Freedom Camping Act 2011 allows freedom camping on all public land unless it is already prohibited under another enactment. The Act enables councils to make a bylaw to prohibit or restrict freedom camping in areas that meet statutory criteria for protection.

5.       This draft proposal replaces an earlier proposal developed in 2018 which was set aside by the Governing Body in 2019. Following decisions by the Governing Body in March and May 2021, the key changes compared with the 2018 proposal are that the new draft proposal:

·     excludes land held under the Reserves Act 1977 from scope (council would maintain the current default prohibition on camping on reserves under the Reserves Act 1977)

·     manages freedom camping only on land held under the Local Government Act 2002

·     seeks to prevent freedom camping impacts in sensitive areas, and to protect public health and safety and manage access in all areas, by:

scheduling 44 prohibited areas, where no freedom camping is allowed

scheduling 19 restricted areas, where freedom camping is allowed subject to site-specific restrictions

including general rules to manage freedom camping impacts in all other areas (campers must use certified self-contained vehicles, stay a maximum of two nights, depart by 9am and not return to the same area within two weeks).

6.       The proposed prohibited and restricted areas are those areas which the Bylaw Panel recommended should be prohibited and restricted in 2019, and which are held under the Local Government Act 2002. Areas held under the Reserves Act 1977 have been removed.

7.       The Panel’s recommendations draw on previous area assessments and take into account feedback from local board engagement and public consultation conducted in 2018 and 2019.

8.       The draft proposal includes one designated prohibited area and no designated restricted areas located in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area. All designated areas are listed in the draft Bylaw schedules within Attachment A. All other council-managed land held under the Local Government Act 2002, including roads, is proposed to be covered by general rules.

9.       Staff recommend that the local board provide its view on the draft proposal, including the inclusion of general rules in the bylaw and the recommended settings for those rules.

10.     The key risks of the proposal are that:

·     it creates too few areas where freedom camping is allowed; this is partially mitigated by allowing freedom camping on most roads (subject to general rules), and council could decide to designate more restricted areas following consultation

·     the cumulative impact of all prohibitions under the Bylaw and other enactments is viewed as an effective ban; however staff looked closely at the requirements of the Freedom Camping Act 2011 in developing the proposal and will continue to monitor cumulative impact as bylaw development progresses.

11.     The local board’s views will be provided to the Governing Body in September with the recommendation that the finalised proposal is adopted for public consultation. Public consultation is scheduled for November, and Bylaw Panel deliberations for early 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      support the draft Statement of Proposal in Attachment A of this agenda report to make a new Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Auckland Council Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022 for public consultation.

Horopaki

Context

Freedom camping can have both positive and negative impacts

12.     For the purposes of this Bylaw, freedom camping is when someone stays overnight on council-managed land, including roadsides, in a vehicle or caravan.

13.     Freedom camping specifically refers to people staying in vehicles overnight as part of leisure travel, or because they are choosing to live in a vehicle for lifestyle reasons.

14.     Freedom camping provides a flexible and affordable way for Aucklanders and for domestic and international visitors to experience and enjoy the region. Many freedom campers will visit friends and family, attend events, and support local businesses during their stay.

15.     Freedom camping can however have negative impacts on the local environment and host communities if it is not well-managed. These impacts can be caused by:

16.     Freedom camping has become popularly associated with harmful and antisocial behaviours, but our research shows that most freedom campers visiting Auckland do camp responsibly.

17.     However, the presence of large numbers of campers – even responsible campers – is more likely to cause community concern in Auckland due to pressure on limited public space.

18.     Freedom camper numbers have been growing in Auckland and throughout the country over the last two decades. Once the current border restrictions are lifted overseas visitors are likely to return, and domestic freedom camping may continue to increase in the meantime.

19.     Auckland does not currently have enough places for freedom campers to go. This means there is often overcrowding in the places where it is allowed, or illegal camping in unsuitable areas once legal sites are full. Having more areas would reduce these supply-related issues.

20.     The council can regulate freedom camping to help prevent irresponsible camping and manage responsible freedom camping in a way that minimises its negative impacts.

Council must align its freedom camping regulation with the Freedom Camping Act 2011

21.     The Freedom Camping Act 2011 allows freedom camping on all public land unless it is prohibited under a bylaw or another enactment, such as the Reserves Act 1977.

22.     Auckland’s current Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2015 is a consolidation of pre-2010 legacy bylaw provisions developed before the Freedom Camping Act 2011 was passed. A new bylaw must be made that aligns with the national legislation before the current bylaw expires in 2022.

23.     The Freedom Camping Act 2011 is permissive by default but does allow council to make a bylaw to prohibit or restrict freedom camping in areas where certain statutory criteria are met. In particular, council must be satisfied that:

·     each area’s location can be clearly shown on a map and/or described

·     the prohibitions and restrictions in each area are necessary to:

-     protect the area (for example because it is environmentally or culturally sensitive)

-     protect the health and safety of the people who may visit the area

-     protect access to the area (for other users)

·     the cumulative impact of all prohibitions and restrictions (under the bylaw and other enactments) do not constitute an effective ban on freedom camping on council land.

A 2018 proposal to regulate freedom camping was set aside in August 2019

24.     Work to develop a freedom camping bylaw began in 2016. Staff assessed more than 1,000 areas for their suitability for freedom camping and need for protection under the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This process included extensive engagement with local boards.

25.     In late 2018 and early 2019 public feedback and formal local board views were sought on a proposal for a draft Freedom Camping in Vehicles bylaw. A Bylaw Panel deliberated on all feedback and made recommendations to the Governing Body. The Panel recommended scheduling 322 prohibited areas and 103 restricted areas, including a number of reserves.

26.     In August 2019 the Governing Body set aside the recommendations of the Bylaw Panel and instead requested advice on a new direction for bylaw development.

The Governing Body decided to exclude reserves from scope and include general rules

27.     The Governing Body considered staff advice in March 2021[1] and May 2021[2] and directed that a new proposal for a Freedom Camping Act 2011 bylaw be developed that:

·     only manages freedom camping on land held under the Local Government Act 2002, with camping on reserves continuing to be managed by the Reserves Act 1977

·     includes general rules to manage the generalised impacts of freedom camping, and ensure problems are not displaced from regulated to unregulated areas

·     relies on previous assessments (undertaken to develop the 2018 proposal) to identify land held under the Local Government Act 2002 that should be prohibited or further restricted through the bylaw.

28.     Staff have prepared a draft proposal to implement the Governing Body’s decisions (Attachment A). This proposal outlines the reasons and decisions that have led to the content of the proposed new Bylaw.

Potential changes to the Freedom Camping Act 2011 not yet confirmed

29.     In April and May 2021, the Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) publicly consulted on four proposals for change to the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This included making the use of self-contained vehicles mandatory for all freedom camping.

30.     The Governing Body approved Auckland Council’s submission, which incorporated local board views, in May 2021[3]. MBIE has not yet released any further information, and timeframes for any changes to the Act have not been confirmed.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

A new bylaw is proposed to manage freedom camping in vehicles on some council land

31.     The draft proposal would make a new Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022 that:

·     aligns with the Freedom Camping Act 2011

·     helps council to prevent freedom camping impacts in sensitive areas, and to protect public health and safety and manage access in all areas of land held under the Local Government Act 2002 (including roads controlled by Auckland Transport)

·     forms part of a wider regulatory framework of Acts, regulations and other bylaws[4].

32.     The Bylaw will be enforced by the Licensing and Regulatory Compliance unit using a graduated compliance model (information, education, enforcement).

33.     The table below summarises the main proposals:

Draft proposals

Reasons for draft proposal

To schedule 63 specific areas as follows:

Restrict freedom camping in 19 specific areas (where freedom camping is allowed subject to site-specific restrictions)

Listed in Schedule 1 of the draft Bylaw

 

To better manage areas that have been identified as needing additional regulation due to factors such as popularity, current use by others, demand for parking and the size of the parking areas.

These are the restricted areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel in 2019, with all reserves removed.

Prohibit freedom camping in 44 specific areas (where freedom camping is not allowed)

Listed in Schedule 2 of the draft Bylaw

 

To protect areas that have been identified as being environmentally or culturally sensitive, or where freedom camping would impact public health and safety and access in ways that cannot be adequately managed through restrictions.

These are the prohibited areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel in 2019, with all reserves removed.

To include general rules for all other areas as follows:

Require freedom campers to use certified self-contained vehicles

To prevent impacts from the depositing of toilet waste and wastewater into the environment, and the use of unsuitable areas for cooking

Allow freedom campers to stay a maximum of two nights in the same road or off-road parking area

To prevent impacts from the depositing of toilet waste and wastewater into the environment and ensure fair access to limited shared parking and amenities

Require freedom campers to vacate their parking space by 9am on the day of departure

To ensure fair access for shared parking and amenities for other campers and users of public space

Require freedom campers not return to stay in the same road or off-road parking area within a two-week period

To ensure fair access to limited shared parking and amenities for other campers and users of public space

34.     The draft proposal notes that the council does not intend to use the bylaw to manage:

·     issues associated with homelessness (people living in a vehicle involuntarily)

·     areas where access is already controlled or parking is reserved or charged for, for example gated carparks, land leased to other organisations and regional parks.

The draft proposal complies with statutory requirements

35.     The draft proposal has been prepared in accordance with statutory requirements. Staff consider the proposed draft Bylaw:

·     only prohibits or restricts freedom camping where it is necessary to protect sensitive areas, and/or to manage impacts on public health and safety and access to an area

·     uses a format and wording that are easy to read, understand and comply with

·     is authorised by statute, is not repugnant to other legislation, and is not unreasonable

·     does not give rise to any implications or inconsistencies with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990.

Staff recommend the local board consider and provide its views on the draft proposal

36.     Staff recommend that the local board consider the draft proposal in Attachment A and provide any views by resolution to the Governing Body before it is finalised for public consultation on 23 September 2021.

37.     For example, the board could support the draft proposal for public consultation, recommend changes or defer comment until after it has considered public feedback on the proposal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     Staff note that this is a regulatory process to manage existing activities enabled by central government policy. It is not causing these activities to occur or affecting the likelihood that they will occur. The decision sought in this report therefore has no specific climate impact.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.     The draft proposal impacts the operations of several council departments and council-controlled organisations, including Licensing and Regulatory Compliance, Parks, Sport and Recreation and Auckland Transport.

40.     The Licensing and Regulatory Compliance unit are aware of the impacts of the draft proposal and their primary role in implementing and managing compliance with the Bylaw.

41.     Council’s 86 park rangers help to manage compliance with council Bylaws, the Reserves Act 1977 and the Litter Act 1974 by carrying out education and monitoring on parks and reserves. However, rangers are not currently being warranted or renewing warrants, and Licensing and Regulatory Compliance will continue to carry out any enforcement required.

Enhanced service levels for Bylaw compliance activities are not currently budgeted

42.     Concern about the council’s ability to effectively implement the Bylaw and manage compliance within existing resources was a key theme of public and local board feedback received in 2019.

43.     In March 2021 the Governing Body requested advice about costed options for increasing the service levels for compliance associated with this Bylaw. Costings are being finalised and this advice will be provided alongside the proposal in September, for consideration during future Annual Plan cycles.

44.     There are multiple options for increasing investment in Bylaw implementation and both proactive and reactive Bylaw compliance activities. These include:

·     enhancement of council’s information technology systems, to enable the implementation of the new infringement notice regime

·     use of contracted security services, to increase responsiveness to complaints (similar to the current arrangements for Noise Control), or for additional proactive monitoring at seasonal ‘hotspots’

·     purchase of mobile printers, to enable infringement notices to be affixed to vehicles in breach of the Bylaw at the time of the offence

·     signage at all prohibited and restricted areas and at other areas as needed

·     camera surveillance technology to enable remote monitoring of known or emerging hotspots, for evidence-gathering purposes and/or to support real-time enforcement.

45.     Local boards can request further advice from Licensing and Regulatory Compliance if they wish to consider allocating local budget for enhanced local compliance activities.

46.     For example, Rodney Local Board recently allocated funds from its Locally Driven Initiatives budget to employ two Compliance Wardens for a six-month trial during the 2021-2022 financial year. The wardens will address low level compliance issues, including illegal freedom camping, with follow-up support from warranted compliance staff when required.

Ongoing land classification work won’t be completed with bylaw development timeframes

47.     Following the Governing Body’s decision in March 2021 to exclude reserves from scope, land status has become more relevant for identifying areas requiring protection in the bylaw.

48.     The council does not currently hold complete land classification data to establish definitive numbers of reserves. Parks and reserves can comprise multiple land parcels which may be held under different Acts.

49.     Since reporting to the Governing Body in March, staff have completed further investigation of the land status of the prohibited and restricted areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel. This has identified additional reserves, which has reduced the proposed prohibited areas (from 55 in the March report to 44 in the draft proposal) and restricted areas (from 21 to 19).

50.     Classifications are still being confirmed as part of the development of omnibus Open Space Management Plans. Five local board areas have completed this work, and an average of 94 percent of their parks were found to be held under the Reserves Act 1977.

51.     Ongoing land classification work will support bylaw implementation. It will not finish within the timeframe for bylaw development, so the status quo issues will remain.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

52.     The proposed draft Bylaw impacts on local boards’ governance role as it affects decision making over local assets, particularly parks and other council-controlled public places. There is also high community interest in freedom camping regulation in many local board areas.

53.     The local board has an opportunity to provide its views on this draft proposal by resolution to the Governing Body. The local board will also have further opportunity to provide its views to a Bylaw Panel on any public feedback to the proposal from people in their local board area.

All proposed prohibited and restricted areas previously discussed with local boards

54.     The draft proposal includes one designated prohibited area and no designated restricted areas located in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area. All designated areas are listed in the draft Bylaw schedules within Attachment A. All other council-managed land held under the Local Government Act 2002, including roads, is proposed to be covered by general rules.

55.     The proposed prohibited and restricted areas are those areas which the Bylaw Panel recommended should be prohibited and restricted in 2019, and which are held under the Local Government Act 2002. Areas held under the Reserves Act 1977 have been removed.

56.     All areas proposed to be scheduled as prohibited or restricted were previously discussed with the relevant local boards in 2018.

Joint political working group provided views on general rules in May 2021

57.     Three local board representatives participated in a joint political working group on 21 May 2021 to provide views on options for including general rules in the Bylaw.

58.     The working group unanimously supported the inclusion of general rules in the Bylaw, and five out of six working group members supported the recommended settings included in the draft proposal. A summary of the working group’s views was reported to the Governing Body on 27 May 2021[5].

The new draft proposal responds to feedback provided on the 2018 proposal

59.     Local boards provided formal feedback on the 2018 draft proposal to the Bylaw Panel in 2019, following on from their early feedback given during engagement in 2017, and site-specific feedback provided in 2018.

60.     The table below details typical concerns expressed by local boards in their formal feedback and how the new draft proposal responds to these concerns:

Key local board concern (from 2019)

Draft proposal’s response to concern

The loss of protection in the legacy bylaws for most reserves and roadsides

·   Excludes reserves from the bylaw and continues to use the Reserves Act 1977 to manage all camping at reserves

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw, including roadsides

·   Notes individual roads can be scheduled as prohibited or restricted areas if problems arise in future

The provision for unrestricted freedom camping in the local board area

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw

Freedom camping at reserves and enforcement tools under the Reserves Act

·   The Reserves Act 1977 will be used to manage all camping at reserves, which means the status quo (prohibition) will continue

·   Notes that following changes in September 2019 to the Reserves Act 1977, $800 infringement notices can now be issued for breaches of this Act

Freedom camping in inner-city areas, unsafe areas and areas near sports fields, residential homes and campgrounds

·   Bylaw schedules designate individual sites that have been identified and assessed as unsuitable for freedom camping (prohibited areas), or where additional restrictions are needed to manage impacts (restricted areas)

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw

The potential effect on people experiencing homelessness

·   Clarifies that the bylaw will not be used to manage issues associated with homelessness and confirms the council’s commitment to a compassionate enforcement approach to protect vulnerable Aucklanders

Council’s ability to enforce bylaws and the cost of enforcement and monitoring

·   Although not contained in the proposal itself, advice will be provided to the Governing Body on options for increasing investment in bylaw implementation

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

61.     The Bylaw has relevance to Māori as kaitiaki of Papatūānuku. The proposal supports two key directions in the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau:

·     wairuatanga (promoting distinctive identity), in relation to valuing and protecting Māori heritage and Taonga Māori

·     kaitiakitanga (ensuring sustainable futures), in relation to environmental protection.

62.     The proposal also supports the Board’s Schedule of Issues of Significance by ensuring that sites of significance to Māori are identified and protected from freedom camping harms.

63.     Mana whenua and mataawaka were invited to provide feedback during the development of the 2018 proposal via dedicated hui and again through the public consultation process.

64.     Feedback received on specific prohibited and restricted areas identified in the 2018 proposal was incorporated into the deliberations. This included the identification of sites of significance to Māori, such as wahi tapu areas.

65.     General matters raised by Māori during engagement included the need to ensure:

·     the ability to add further sites of significance to the bylaw as these are designated

·     provision for temporary bans on freedom camping, e.g. in areas under a rahui

·     a compassionate approach to people experiencing homelessness

·     provision of sufficient dump stations to avoid environmental pollution

·     clear communication of the rules in the bylaw and at freedom camping sites.

66.     The draft proposal addresses these matters by proposing to prohibit freedom camping at sites of significance to Māori (such as Maraetai Foreshore and Onetangi Cemetery), provision in the Bylaw for temporary bans, and confirming council’s commitment to a compassionate enforcement approach to people experiencing homelessness.

67.     Mana whenua and mataawaka will have an opportunity to provide further feedback during public consultation on the proposal.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

68.     There are no financial implications to the local board for any decisions to support the draft proposal for public consultation. The Governing Body will consider any financial implications associated with public notification in September 2021.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

69.     Legal risks were discussed as part of the provision of legally privileged advice to interested local board members at a confidential workshop held in June 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

70.     The other key risks and possible mitigations are summarised in the table below.

If...

Then...

Mitigation (partial)

The bylaw proposal does not create enough areas where freedom camping is allowed

 

Council may need to manage an increase in overcrowding, non-compliance, and harms over time.

The proposed bylaw would enable freedom campers to stay for up to two nights on most roads, subject to general rules.

Council could consider increasing the number of designated restricted areas following consultation, or if problems arise in future.

The cumulative impact of prohibitions and restrictions in the Bylaw and other enactments is viewed as an ‘effective ban’ on freedom camping in Auckland

The risk of legal challenge could increase.

Staff looked closely at the requirements of the Freedom Camping Act 2011 in developing the proposal, and cumulative impact will continue to be monitored.

Council can’t meet public expectation of increased enforcement

There may be a loss of social license for freedom camping and reputational risk for council.

Responsible Camping Ambassadors will assist compliance staff during the peak season, although future funding is not guaranteed.

The Governing Body or local boards could allocate additional funding to increase service levels for compliance activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

71.     Staff will present local board views and a finalised proposal to the Governing Body on 23 September 2021. The next steps for bylaw development are shown in the diagram below.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Freedom Camping in Vehicles SOP & Draft Bylaw (combined) August 2021

41

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rebekah Forman - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021

File No.: CP2021/11193

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2020/2021 Annual Report for the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 27 September 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2020/2021 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 27 September 2021. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market maintained by NZX Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA), local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      adopt the draft 2020/2021 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A to the agenda report.

b)      note that any proposed changes after the adoption will be clearly communicated and agreed with the Chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body on 27 September 2021.

c)      note that the draft 2020/2021 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Annual Report, as set out in Attachment A to the agenda report, will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2020/2021 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which are expected to be made public by 28 September 2021.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities and the overall funding impact statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       The annual report contains the following sections:

 

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi is an introduction specific to each local board area and is presented in Te Reo Māori and English.

About this report

An overview of what is covered in this document.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved. Includes the activity highlights and challenges.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Funding impact statement

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

7.       The council’s climate change disclosures are covered in volume four of the annual report and sections within the summary annual report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

10.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

11.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2020/2021 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during July and August 2021

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 27 September 2021

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 28 September 2021

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2021.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jestine Joseph – Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Mark Purdie – Manager of Local Board Financial Advisors

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Local board input into Auckland Council’s submission on the Department of Internal Affair’s changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes

File No.: CP2021/11752

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide input into the Auckland Council’s submission on the Department of Internal Affair’s changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes.

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Context

1.       The Department of Internal Affairs’ (DIA) consultation on changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes is open for public submission until 27 August 2021.

2.       In 2020, Central Government began a two-stage process to align Māori ward and Māori general ward processes more closely together.

3.       The first stage of the changes was completed on 1 March 2021 with the enactment of the Local Electoral (Māori Wards and Māori Constituencies) Amendment Act 2021.  These changes were to:

·        remove all mechanisms from the Local Electoral Act 2001 for binding polls to be held on the establishment of Māori wards; and

·        provide councils with a new opportunity to make decisions on Māori wards in time for the 2022 local elections.

4.       The second stage of changes is intended by the Minister to provide an enduring process for councils to consider setting up Māori wards, by bringing even closer together the Māori wards process and general wards process.

5.       The consultation is not about whether councils should have Māori wards, whether there should be binding polls on Māori wards, or whether there are other ways to improve Māori participation in local government.  Central Government has already agreed that establishing a Māori ward is a decision for councils to make.

6.       Central Government now wants to improve how these decisions are made.

7.       This is a consultation with the public by the Minister and it precedes the drafting of the bill.

8.       There is also an opportunity to have a full submission on the draft bill when it is at the select committee stage.

 

Summary of the changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes

9.       Central government has identified six key differences between the Māori wards and general wards process that are the focus of their consultation.  These include:

·        the requirements for councils to consider ward systems;

·        the timing of decisions;

·        opportunities for public input;

·        decision-making rights and the role of the Local Government Commission;

·        how and when wards can be discontinued; and

·        the types of polls that councils can hold.

 

Process and providing feedback

10.     The following table outlines the timeframe for local board input into council’s submission:

Date

Action

14 August

Draft council submission circulated to all local board

25 August

Final deadline for local board views to be appended to submission

26 August

Governing Body approve council’s final submission

27 August

Closing date for council’s submission

 

11.     It is important to note that the local board must finalise their input and feedback into the council’s submission at the August 2021 business meeting.  Due to the 25 August 2021 deadline, the local board cannot delegate the matter for further discussion and approve feedback at the September 2021 business meeting.

12.     Further information and summary documents on the consultation on changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes can be found here: https://www.dia.govt.nz/maori-wards.

13.     Please refer to Attachment A for the DIA’s consultation summary document.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      provide input into the Auckland Council’s submission on the Department of Internal Affair’s changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes.

b)      note that feedback is required by 25 August 2021 to ensure the local board’s feedback is appended to Auckland Council’s submission.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Department of Internal Affair’s changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes - consultation document

147

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tristan Coulson - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 


















Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Allocation of Local Board Transport Capital Fund budgets to local transport projects

File No.: CP2021/11815

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board (the local board) consider allocating its Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) budgets towards transport projects in the local board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council (council) and delivered by Auckland Transport (AT). 

3.       Through the 10-Year Budget, council’s Governing Body allocated $20,000,000 a year to local boards for transport projects. 

4.       The local board’s 2021-2023 allocation is $1,345,300.  The local board also has an additional $16,411 available, which has been carried-forward from the 2020/2021 financial year.  $1,361,711 in total is available for allocation.

5.       Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they consider important but are not part of the AT work programme.

6.       Potential LBTCF projects have been identified from the current and previous local board plans, other planning documents (i.e. Greenways Plan), unsuccessful local board advocacy and identified community issues.

7.       Assessment and advice to the local board has been based upon the following principles:

·    whether the project is eligible to be funded from the sale proceeds of the 2 The Strand building;

·    the maximised development opportunity that combining the LBTCF capital budget proceeds from 2 The Strand offer to the local board; and

·    the likelihood of delivering an outcome with the available capital budgets.

8.       The following projects have been identified to be funded from the LBTCF:

·    Francis Street to Esmonde Road connection (the recommended project);

·    Wairau Estuary boardwalk;

·    Bayswater Ferry Terminal – renewal and / or upgrade

·    safety improvements on Vauxhall Road, Devonport; and

·    raised pedestrian crossing at Castor Bay.

9.       Staff recommend the local board allocate $1,361,710 from both available budgets to the Francis Street to Esmonde Road connection.

10.     Please refer to the following attachments which support this report:

·    Attachment A: full assessment and advice on each potential project to be funded from the LBTCF; and

·    Attachment B: an update on projects being delivered from the 2020/2021 LBTCF budget.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      allocate $1,361,711 from the following budget sources to the Francis Street to Esmonde Road connection project:

i)        $16,411 which was carried forward from the 2020/2021 Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

ii)       $1,345,300 from the 2021-2023 Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

b)      note that staff will present a final concept design for the Francis Street to Esmonde Road connection, which will include a preferred route and timelines for delivery at a future business meeting.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     The Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council (council) and delivered by Auckland Transport (AT). 

12.     Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they consider important but are not part of the AT work programme.

13.     Any LBTCF project recommended by the local board must meet the following criteria:

·    build a transport asset;

·    be within the road corridor;

·    if outside the road corridor, the project must support active transport modes (i.e. walking and cycling);

·    be technically deliverable;

·    meet transport safety criteria;

·    not impact negatively on transport network efficiency;

·    is not part of an asset renewal programme, and

·    be aligned to local board plans.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Potential LBTCF projects have been identified from the current and previous local board plans, other planning documents (i.e. Greenways Plan), unsuccessful local board advocacy and identified community issues.

15.     Assessment and advice to the local board has been based upon the following principles:

·    whether the project is eligible to the funded from the proceeds from the 2 The Strand building;

·    the maximised development opportunity that combining the LBTCF capital budget proceeds from 2 The Strand offer to the local board; and

·    the likelihood to delivering an outcome with the available capital budgets.

16.     The following projects have been identified to be funded from the LBTCF:

·    Francis Street to Esmonde Road connection (the recommended project);

·    Wairau Estuary boardwalk;

·    Bayswater Ferry Terminal – renewal and /or upgrade

·    safety improvements on Vauxhall Road, Devonport; and

·    raised pedestrian crossing at Castor Bay.

17.     An overview of each project is presented in the table below.  Please refer to Attachment A for a full assessment and advice on each project.

Project

Description

Assessment

Francis St to Esmonde Rd connection

Recommended project

Develop a cycling and walking connection between Francis Street and Esmonde Road.

Cost: $5.1m (2020 preferred route estimate).

·      Key project identified in the local board plan, Greenways Plan and supports AT’s Lake Road Improvements project.

·      Project is eligible to receive proceeds from the sale of 2 The Strand.

·      The Kingstone Group (who are developing the 48 Esmonde Road site) remained interested in partnering with the local board on the project.

·      The project could be staged, and any shortfalls can be met from future capital budget allocations.

·      Staff recommend this project because it will complete the existing cycle route along the Devonport peninsular, connect to other projects (i.e. Patuone Reserve walkway and Northern Pathway), and provides a high-quality and safe alternative to using private motor vehicles.

·      Planning work is completed (however local board approval is still required).

·      The budget will be used towards project delivery.

·      Staff assessment: highest priority for funding.

Wairau Estuary boardwalk

Develop a recreational boardwalk along the Wairau Estuary.

Cost: $2m (2020 estimate).

·      Was initially a community-led project, however was ‘transferred’ to council for capital funding and delivery.

·      The boardwalk promotes passive and recreational movement through the estuary, rather than an active transport modes.

·      Project is eligible to receive proceeds from the sale of 2 The Strand.

·      Staff assessment: high priority for funding.

Safety improvements on Vauxhall Road

Implement a range of safety improvements on Vauxhall Road, Devonport.

Cost: To be determined.

·      Preliminary assessment and investigations need to be undertaken by AT to determine what changes are required.

·      Implementing an approach like Innovating Streets is likely to be more cost effective and could be delivered within the available LBTCF budget.

·      Project is ineligible to receive proceeds from the sale of 2 The Strand.

·      Staff assessment: medium priority for funding.

Bayswater Ferry Terminal – renewal or upgrade

Renew and / or upgrade the existing ferry terminal at Bayswater.

Cost: $12.5m (2017 estimate).

·      It is extremely likely that there will still be a significant funding shortfall despite allocating LBTCF and 2 The Strand proceeds. 

·      It is unlikely that allocating funds will lead to an outcome in the short-term. 

·      Project still requires assessment from council’s Legal Services department, should the proceeds from the sale of 2 The Strand be allocated to this project.  

·      Staff assessment: low priority for funding.

Raised pedestrian crossing at Castor Bay

Implement a raised crossing on Beach Road, Castor Bay.

Cost: To be determined.

·      AT has advised the local board and community that the existing asset (which was recently upgraded) is meeting existing service provision.  Traffic flow data also has highlighted a raised crossing and further interventions to reduce speed are not required. 

·      AT has also advised that further changes will impact on underground assets, which will increase the project costs.

·      The overall project costs (including investigations and project delivery) will exceed the available LBTCF budget.  It is unlikely that allocating funds will lead to an outcome.

·      Project is ineligible to receive proceeds from the sale of 2 The Strand.

·      Staff assessment: low priority for funding.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     AT is committed to minimising the negative effects that transport operations have on climate change.  This includes encouraging emission neutral modes, such as walking and cycling and low emission modes (i.e. public transport and ride sharing).

19.     The Francis Street to Esmonde connection and Wairau Estuary boardwalk both support AT’s commitment as they promote cycling and walking as active transport options.  While the upgrade of the Bayswater Ferry Terminal will provide enhanced public transport options, work is still required to decarbonise the existing ferry fleet which is critical to reducing emissions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The following table outlines the respective comments and considerations of the various council units on the proposed LBTCF projects:

 

21.     Project

Council unit

Parks and Places

Community Facilities

Francis Street to Esmonde Road connection

Considers that the LBTCF budget be prioritised to this project because it:

·      provides the final missing link to the existing cycle route

·      provides a commuting and rapid cycling and walking transport option.

·      it is the critical link to future developments (i.e. Northern Pathway).

Overall position: strongly support.

Considers that the LBTCF budget be prioritised to this project because it:

·      supports active modes of transport

·      provides the final missing link to the existing cycle route.

·      provides a link to the Patuone Reserve walkway upgrade.

Overall position: strongly support.

Wairau Estuary boardwalk

Parks and Places note that funding the boardwalk will provide passive recreational experiences for users and improve the overall amenity of the estuary.

Overall position: support.

Community Facilities have highlighted that funding this project will improve the natural environment and ecological features at the estuary, and improve the overall amenity of the estuary. 

Overall position: support.

 

22.     Parks and Places or Community Facilities have not commented on Bayswater Ferry Terminal – renewal and /or upgrade, safety improvements on Vauxhall Road or the raised pedestrian crossing at Castor Bay as these projects lie outside their areas of responsibility.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     The information and advice detailed throughout this report reflect the local board’s direction and input on potential LBTCF projects to date.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     Mana whenua views and preferences are not required for the purposes of allocating the LBTCF. 

25.     Engagement with mana whenua will however be undertaken during the development of the preferred LBTCF project.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     Through the 10-Year Budget, council’s Governing Body allocated $20,000,000 per year to local boards for transport projects.  The local board’s amount is based on the Local Boards Funding Policy formula, which is allocated based on the following variables:

·    90 percent population;

·    five percent deprivation; and

·    five percent land mass.

27.     The local board’s allocation is $1,345,300.  The local board also has an additional $16,411 available, which has been carried-forward from the 2020/2021 financial year. 

28.     This means $1,361,711 in total is available for allocation.

29.     It is important to note that should the local board approve the recommendations outlined in this report, the budget will be fully allocated for the next two financial years.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     The following table outlines which projects carry risks should the local board allocate LBTCF budget to them:

Project

Risks

Bayswater Ferry Terminal – renewal or upgrade

It is likely that there will still be a significant funding shortfall despite allocating LBTCF (and / or 2 The Strand proceeds).  It therefore seems unlikely that allocating funds will lead to an outcome in the short-term. 

This risk can be mitigated through ongoing discussions between the local board and AT on the next steps for the ferry terminal. 

Raised pedestrian crossing at Castor Bay

AT staff have previously advised that the cost of investigations and project deliver will exceed the available LBTCF budget. 

Staff cannot assure the local board that allocating LBTCF funding will lead to an outcome.

This risk can be mitigated by AT continuing to monitor and evaluate speeds on Beach Road.  This is undertaken on an annual basis through AT’s safe speeds programme.

Francis St to Esmonde Rd connection

None

Wairau Estuary boardwalk

None

Safety improvements on Vauxhall Road

None

31.     Allocating proceeds from the sale of 2 The Strand is a Governing Body, not local board decision.  There is a risk that any unclear and inconsistent feedback to the Governing Body may result in them allocating the funding to another project.  This could create a greater funding shortfall for projects which can benefit from the sale proceeds from 2 The Strand.

32.     All matters pertaining to the 2 The Strand building is detailed in a separate report which is being presented at the August 2021 business meeting.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Next steps are contingent on which project the local board allocates LBTCF funding towards.  If the local board supports the recommendations in this report, the next steps for the Francis Street to Esmonde Road connection include:

·    recommence discussions with the Kingstone group, with the objective of forming a partnership with them to deliver the connection;

·    the local board confirming their preferred route at a future business meeting;

·    local board feedback on the proceeds from the sale of 2 The Strand;

·    Governing Body allocates proceeds from the sale of 2 The Strand to an eligible project;

·    mana whenua and iwi engagement;

·    identification of any funding shortfalls and contingencies;

·    detailed design and consents; and

·    project delivery.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Assessment of eligable projects to be funded from the 2021-2023 Local Board Transport Capital Fund

173

b

Projects funded from the 2020/2021 Local Board Transport Capital Fund

175

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tristan Coulson - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 



Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator



Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Devonport-Takapuna Local Board for 1 March to 30 June 2021

File No.: CP2021/10873

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board (the local board) with an integrated performance report for 1 March to 30 June 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report and its attachments include financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the local board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2020/2021 work programme.

3.       The key activity updates from the 1 March to 30 June 2021 period are:

·    six digital inclusion courses were held at four locations in the local board area.  The pilot was delivered with the Digital Inclusion Alliance Aotearoa (DIAA), Tech Tutors and external stakeholders.  The initiative used resources from the DIAA’s Stepping up ‘Better Digital Futures for Seniors’ programme.  63 Seniors aged 65+ registered on to the classes, of which 43 participants completed a least three out of four sessions;

·    North Shore Birdsong continue to increase their volunteer base and are now undertaking pest plant and pest mammal control in 25 parks across the broader Takapuna area.  Over 3,630 native plants have been planted in parks and private backyards over the last year. 

Restoring Takarunga Hauraki also continues to grow its volunteer base, who hold weeding sessions each week.  The Ngātaringa Eco-corridor project has been enhancing connectivity, food and habitat.  Over 20 planting events were held over the last year, with around 3,000 trees planted in reserves across the Devonport peninsula; and

·    the Ngataringa Park Service Assessment was adopted by the local board in June 2021.

4.       The completion of the 2020/2021 work programme saw a number of notable highlights, particularly the delivery of the capital programme (i.e. renewals and local board capital projects).  The following renewal and local board capital projects were delivered by council’s Community Facilities department this year:

·    renewal of the King Edward Parade seawall;

·    wharf remediation at the Devonport Yacht Club;

·    renewed sports fields two and three at Becroft Park;

·    renewal park path and safety barrier at Killarney Park.  This included the installation of a viewing glass panel to showcase the historical iron pipes that used to provide water supply to the North Shore;

·    renewed the air conditioning system and café roof at the Takapuna Pumphouse;

·    renewed the Melrose Reserve playspace;

·    renewed the Lansdowne Reserve playspace;

·    completed the Sunnynook People Space project, which included a renewed playground and plaza space;

·    delivery of a new toilet at Lake Town Green;

·    renewing the skatepark at Greville Reserve; and

·    renewing the stairs at Kennedy Park / Rahopara Pa.

5.       All activity updates from the local board work programme can be viewed in Attachment A.

6.       The local board financial report is included as Attachment B.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for 1 March to 31 June 2021.

Horopaki

Context

7.       The local board has an approved 2020/2021 work programme with the following operating departments:

Date approved

Council department and / or unit

Resolution number

18 August 2020

·    Community Facilities (including leases) (CF).

·    Infrastructure and Environmental Services (I&ES).

·    Community Services, which includes:

o Arts, Community and Events (ACE)

o Libraries and Information (L&I)

o Parks, Sport and Recreation (PSR)

o Service Strategy and Integration (SS&I)

·    External Partnerships.

DT/2020/116

DT/2020/118

DT/2020/120

 

 

 

 

DT/2020/115

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Key activity updates for the March to June 2021 reporting period

8.       During the March to June 2021 reporting period, the local board work programme was tracking against its key objectives, milestones and timelines for delivery.  Some notable project updates from the reporting period include:

·    to celebrate the installation of Greer Twiss’ Flight Support for Albatross on Victoria Wharf.  Council and The Depot delivered an exhibition and a floor talk which the artist demonstrated his thinking and processes for the completed and reworked sculpture;

·    six digital inclusion courses were held at four locations in the local board area.  The pilot was delivered with the Digital Inclusion Alliance Aotearoa (DIAA), Tech Tutors and external stakeholders.  The initiative used resources from the DIAA’s Stepping up ‘Better Digital Futures for Seniors’ programme.  63 Seniors aged 65+ registered on to the classes, of which 43 participants completed a least three out of four sessions;

·    venue for hire facilities have experienced increased participation (four percent increase) and bookings (14 percent increase) when compared to 2020;

·    draft community resilience plans for the Devonport, Milford, Castor Bay and Sunnynook-Forrest Hill areas have commenced;

·    We Read Auckland was held in June to promote reading for pleasure.  The Takapuna Library celebrated Samoan Language with a children's story time session to celebrate diversity with literacy. This pacific themed hour proved to be very popular. 

Devonport Library celebrated We Read Auckland by supporting an overnight Readathon after being approached by Takapuna Grammar students.  22 teens read through the night raising money for The World Literacy Foundation.

·    North Shore Birdsong continue to increase their volunteer base and are now undertaking pest plant and pest mammal control in 25 parks across the broader Takapuna area.  Over 3,630 native plants have been planted in parks and private backyards over the last year. 

Restoring Takarunga Hauraki also continues to grow its volunteer base, who hold weeding sessions each week.  The Ngātaringa Eco-corridor project has been enhancing connectivity, food and habitat.  Over 20 planting events were held over the last year, with around 3,000 trees planted in reserves across the Devonport peninsula; and

·    the Ngataringa Park Service Assessment was adopted by the local board in June 2021.

Overall delivery of the 2020/2021 work programme

9.       The completion of the 2020/2021 work programme saw a number of notable highlights, particularly the delivery of the capital programme (i.e. renewals and local board capital projects).  The following renewal and local board capital projects were delivered by council’s Community Facilities department this year:

·    renewal of the King Edward Parade seawall;

·    wharf remediation at the Devonport Yacht Club;

·    renewed sports fields two and three at Becroft Park;

·    renewed park path and safety barrier at Killarney Park.  This included the installation of a viewing glass panel to showcase the discovery of iron pipes that helped supply the North Shore with water more than 100 years ago;

·    renewed the air conditioning system and café roof at the Takapuna Pumphouse;

·    renewed the Melrose Reserve playspace;

·    renewed the Lansdowne Reserve playspace;

·    completed the Sunnynook People Space project, which included a renewed playground and plaza space;

·    delivery of a new toilet at Lake Town Green;

·    renewing the skatepark at Greville Reserve; and

·    renewing the stairs at Kennedy Park / Rahopara Pa.

10.     The projects noted above equate to $2,384,244 of renewals funding being invested into the local community.

11.     Other highlights from the 2020/2021 work programme include:

·    the renewal of the Milford Reserve toilet block, Windsor Reserve band rotunda and upgrade of the Patuone Reserve walkway have all commenced.

·    the renewal of the Claystore Heritage building, Gould Reserve toilets and Narrowneck Beach seawalls are in the tendering process and due to commence in the prior to the end of the 2021 calendar year;

·    all funding agreements to external providers and partners (e.g. Devonport Peninsular Trust and Milford Business Association) were administered in the first quarter of the 2020/2021 financial year;

·    continued strong participation and programme delivery at arts and culture facilities (i.e. Lake House Arts Centre, The Depot and The Pumphouse Theatre), despite the year being disrupted by COVID-19 lockdowns;

·    the Local parks ecological volunteers and environmental programme provided 4,291 plants and 1,348 volunteer hours across seven local parks.  As part of the Adopt-a-Park programme, two schools helped with 1,750 plants.  At Kitchener Park there is new volunteer group, and the park received six large nikau trees which were required to move as part of the Milford Reserve toilet renewal project: and

·    attendance at the Activation of parks, places and open spaces programme increased, and was successfully delivered with no COVID-19-related disruptions.

12.     The following table outlines the overall delivery of the 2020/2021 work programme:

13.     Department

Project delivery status

Green

Amber

Red

Grey

Total

Arts, Community and Events

Completed: 23

In progress: 1

-

-

-

24

Community Facilities

Completed: 18

In progress: 32

On hold: 3

In progress: 4

On hold: 1

1

-

59

Community Facilities: leases

8

 

-

8

16

Service Strategy and Integration

1

1

-

-

2

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

3

-

-

-

3

Libraries and Information

10

-

-

-

10

Parks, Sport and Recreation

6

2

1

-

9

External partnerships

4

-

-

-

4

Total

109 (86%)

8 (6%)

2 (2%)

8 (6%)

127

 

14.     All activity updates from the local board work programme can be viewed in Attachment A.

 

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial Performance

15.     The local board financial report is included as Attachment B.

16.     It should be noted that Attachment B is confidential as it contains detailed financial information that may have an impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 31 July 2021 that require release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board work programme update - March to June 2021

183

b

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Financial Report at 30 June 2021 - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tristan Coulson - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 

 



Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Chairpersons' Report

File No.: CP2021/00588

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the Chairperson of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board to provide updates on the projects and issues relevant to the board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive and thank Chairperson R. Jackson for her verbal report

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Elected Members' Reports

File No.: CP2021/00598

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the members of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board to provide updates on the projects and issues they have been involved in since the August 2021 Meeting

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive and thank members for their reports.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board - Record of Workshops July 2021

File No.: CP2021/00608

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a record of Devonport-Takapuna Local Board workshops held during July 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the workshop held on 6 July 2021, the board was briefed on:

·    Waka Kotahi

-     Northern Pathway update

·    Local Board Services

-     Equity of service levels and funding

3.       At the workshop held on 27 July 2021, the board was briefed on:

·    Community Leasing

-     Takapuna Bowling EOI

·    Local Board Services

-     Bayswater Ferry Terminal next steps

·    Local Board Services

-     Capital Budget Allocations Options

4.       Records of these workshops are attached to this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the records of the workshops held in July 2021

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport - Takapuna Local Board Workshop Record Tuesday 06 07 2021

217

b

Devonport - Takapuna Local Board Workshop Record Tuesday 27 07 2021

221

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2021/00621

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on reports to be presented to the board for 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme. The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by the local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance to staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to local board business meetings, and distributed to council staff.

4.       The August 2021 governance forward work calendar for the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board is provided as Attachment A. The information contained within this attachment is as accurate as possible under covid-19 circumstances.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      note the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board governance forward work calendar for August 2021 as set out in Attachment A of this agenda report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar August 2021

227

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

17        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Devonport-Takapuna Local Board for 1 March to 30 June 2021 - Attachment b - Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Financial Report at 30 June 2021

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains the report contains detailed financial information that have an impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 31 July 2021 that require release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 



[1] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/03/GB_20210325_AGN_10148_AT_WEB.htm (Item 9, GB/2021/19)

[2] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_AGN_10145_AT_WEB.htm (Item 10, GB/2021/49)

[3] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_AGN_10145_AT_WEB.htm (Item 9, GB/2021/48)

[4] Freedom Camping Act; Litter Act; Resource Management Act; Fire and Emergency NZ Act; Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw; Auckland Council Traffic Bylaw; Auckland Transport Traffic Bylaw; Alcohol Control Bylaw; Dog Management Bylaw

[5] https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_MAT_10145_WEB.htm