I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Environment and Climate Change Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 12 August 2021

10.00am

Reception Lounge
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Kōmiti Mō Te Hurihanga Āhuarangi me Te Taiao / Environment and Climate Change Committee

 

OPEN ADDENDUM AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Richard Hills

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Pippa Coom

 

Members

Cr Josephine Bartley

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Deputy Mayor Cr Bill Cashmore

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Angela Dalton

Cr John Watson

 

Cr Chris Darby

IMSB Member Glenn Wilcox

 

Cr Alf Filipaina

IMSB Member Karen Wilson

 

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

Cr Paul Young

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

 

 

Cr Shane Henderson

 

 

Cr Tracy Mulholland

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

Suad Allie

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua /

Senior Governance Advisor

 

11 August 2021

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 977 6953

Email: suad.allie@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

12 August 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

 

9          Proposed approach and governance structure for the Transport Emissions Reduction Plan                                                                                                               5

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

12 August 2021

 

 

Proposed approach and governance structure for the Transport Emissions Reduction Plan

File No.: CP2021/10243

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for the proposed approach and governance structure for the Transport Emissions Reduction Plan for Auckland.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council endorsed Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan (Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri) in 2020. The plan includes targets to halve regional emissions by 2030 (against a 2016 baseline) and models an indicative pathway of a 64 per cent reduction in transport sector emissions by 2030.  This reflects the relative difficulties in reducing emissions at-scale in other sectors.

3.       The modelled decarbonisation pathway depicts how climate action in each sector that contributes to Auckland’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions profile could reduce emissions from a business-as-usual projection.  This is based on several assumptions, with the level of certainty decreasing over time. 

4.       Current settings will not achieve emissions reductions of this scale.  Similarly, the Climate Change Commission’s proposed policies to meet the government’s 2050 net zero goal will not meet Auckland’s interim target. 

5.       By achieving its 2030 goal Auckland will make a critical contribution to national emissions reduction targets.  This will require wide-ranging transformation of Auckland’s transport and land use systems, however in achieving this goal we must seek to minimise any negative social and economic impacts.

6.       The journey to decarbonise Auckland’s transport system will require difficult choices by local and central government, and will undoubtedly require substantial investment. There is however also a very real opportunity for it to bring about significant improvement in outcomes valued by Aucklanders.  The co-benefits of a decarbonised transport system include cleaner air, fewer traffic-related deaths and serious injuries, improved public health, lower road infrastructure costs, and more equitable access to jobs, schools, health, services, recreation, and other opportunities.

7.       Achieving these co-benefits necessitates an understanding of the wider social, economic, financial and environmental impacts of the specific interventions designed to reduce emissions.  It also requires a strong focus on achieving a just transition to a lower emissions transport system. 

8.       Conversely, climate inaction will exacerbate current inequities as the consequences of climate change on health, housing and livelihood will be disproportionately borne by the most disadvantaged populations.  

9.       Rapid electrification of the vehicle fleet can only get Auckland part way to achieving its climate goals.  Reducing the amount people drive is critical to reducing transport emissions.  Focusing on reducing Vehicle Kilometres Travelled (VKT) aligns well with other policy goals, such as safety, health and air quality.

10.     Auckland Council and Auckland Transport are jointly developing a Transport Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) that will identify a strategic and phased set of potential pathways to reduce transport sector emissions and implement the priority action areas of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri.

 

 

11.     The TERP will be complex and will require robust evidence and sophisticated analysis to identify pathways and their impacts.  It will be a peer-reviewed document that outlines:

·        a range of pathways (a combination of actions) to achieve the target, and a comparison with business-as-usual,

·        actions from local and central government, Aucklanders and businesses within each pathway,

·        the social, economic, cultural and financial impacts of each pathway, and

·        a recommended pathway for endorsement by the Environment and Climate Change Committee and the Auckland Transport Board in the second quarter of 2022.

12.     The government will release an Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP) that sets out policies and strategies to meet its emissions budgets by the end of 2021, which will directly impact on the TERP.  Government’s ERP and council’s TERP will be developed with overlapping timelines. The transport-related actions in the ERP will therefore provide a baseline for the TERP pathways to achieve the modelled 64 per cent reduction in transport emissions by 2030 in the Auckland region.

13.     This report seeks delegated authority for the establishment of a Transport Emissions Reference Group to provide direction to the work.  It is proposed that the group include: 

·    the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Environment and Climate Change Committee,

·    the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Planning Committee,

·    the Chair or Deputy Chair of the CCO Oversight Committee,

·    the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Independent Māori Statutory Board,

·    up to three Auckland Transport Board members (delegated authority will be sought in the August 2021 Auckland Transport Board meeting).

14.     The types and scale of interventions identified in the pathway endorsed by the committee and board in the second quarter of 2022 will subsequently be incorporated into formal planning documents where actions relate to the council group.  The TERP will also provide an avenue to advocate for more central government emissions reduction actions.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)         note the decarbonisation pathway in Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan includes a modelled 64 per cent reduction in transport emissions by 2030

b)         endorse the proposed approach for the Transport Emissions Reduction Plan to identify pathways to meet the 2030 emissions reduction targets of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, key elements of which include:

i)          identifying key interventions to reduce transport emissions and sizing the scale of their potential impact

ii)         combining programmes of interventions to identify pathways that meet the 2030 target

iii)        assessing the impacts of these pathways on other priorities, such as safety and equity

c)         note the proposed approach will be considered by the Auckland Transport Board at its August meeting

 

 

 

d)         delegate authority to the Transport Emissions Reference Group to provide direction to staff in the development of the Transport Emissions Reduction Plan, adapt the proposed approach as required, and approve the pathway recommended for endorsement by the Environment and Climate Change Committee and the Auckland Transport Board in the second quarter of 2022, with the group consisting of:

i)          the chair and deputy chair of the Environment and Climate Change committee

ii)         the chair and deputy chair of the Planning Committee

iii)        the chair or deputy chair of the CCO Oversight Committee

iv)        the chair and deputy chair of the Independent Māori Statutory Board

v)         up to three members of the Auckland Transport Board

e)         note the Transport Emissions Reference Group will endorse a Terms of Reference for the Transport Emissions Reduction Plan that reflects the shared outcomes and joint approach between Auckland Council and Auckland Transport.

Horopaki

Context

15.     Auckland Council endorsed Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan (Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri) in 2020, committing to halve Auckland’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 2030 and transition to net zero emissions by 2050, while ensuring the region is resilient to the impacts of climate change.  The decarbonisation pathway and targets detailed in the plan have been endorsed by C40 as compliant with the 1.5°C ambition of the Paris Agreement.

16.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri received significant public support, with 91 per cent of respondents agreeing that Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri either fully or partially takes Auckland in the right direction to act on climate change. 

17.     The modelled decarbonisation pathway in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri includes a modelled 64 per cent reduction in transport sector emissions by 2030 against a 2016 base year.  This depicts one pathway as to how modelled climate actions for each sector that contributes to Auckland’s GHG emissions profile could reduce emissions from a business-as-usual projection.  This is based on several assumptions, with the level of certainty decreasing over time. 

18.     The 64 per cent figure for transport reflects the increased difficulty in reducing emissions at-scale in other sectors (e.g. from industrial processes), however the reduction must be achieved while minimising any negative social and economic impacts.

19.     As per the Planning Committee resolutions of 11 March 2021 (PLA/2021/15) and 24 June 2021 (PLA/2021/61), Auckland Council and Auckland Transport are jointly developing a Transport Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) that will set out a strategic and phased set of potential pathways (a combination of actions) to meet the 2030 transport emissions reduction target

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Scale of the challenge

20.     Auckland’s GHG emissions profile is very different from the rest of the country.  The nation’s most significant source of GHG emissions is agriculture, while road transport is the largest contributor to Auckland’s emission profile accounting for 38.5 per cent of its GHG emissions in 2018.  

 

 

 

21.     Under the Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Act 2019, the government is required to reduce net emissions of all greenhouse gases (except biogenic methane) to zero by 2050.  The government is obligated to release an Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP), that sets out policies and strategies to meet its emissions budgets, by the end of 2021. 

22.     The transport chapter in the ERP will be based on the content from Hīkina te Kohupara, a Ministry of Transport discussion document released in May 2021 that sets out potential pathways and policies to phase out emissions across the transport system.  Auckland Council group supported Pathway Four in its submission, the steepest of the document’s transport decarbonisation pathways (ECC/2021/26).  Pathway Four focuses on aggressive and early implementation of interventions to reduce private VKT while increasing accessibility and travel choice for all, as well as strong electric vehicle uptake.   

23.     Auckland, as Aotearoa’s largest city with a relatively mature public transport network and more alternatives to private vehicle travel, can reduce transport emissions more than other parts of the country.  Auckland will therefore be expected to make a disproportionate contribution to national emissions reduction targets and achieving its 2030 goal will be important for the efforts of Aotearoa as a whole. 

24.     The government will confirm its response to the Climate Change Commission’s recommendations and the GHG emissions reduction it is planning for by 2030, when the ERP is released before the end of 2021.

25.     Reducing transport emissions to meet the target in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri will require policy and investment interventions and other tools to help Aucklanders make the transition to using public and active transport more, improving the efficiency of their vehicles, and reducing the distance they travel.  Many factors and parties influence people’s travel decisions; these influences need to be aligned to achieving the emissions reduction required to meet Auckland’s target.

26.     Improvements to the public transport network have led to significant growth in patronage over the last decade (more than 100 million boardings in 2019 compared to 59 million in 2009).  However, this success has been dwarfed by substantial increases in private and commercial vehicle travel over the past decade.  Similarly, where safe cycling connections have been provided, take-up of active modes has increased. 

27.     Despite these recent improvements, private vehicle remains the dominant mode and mode share for public and active transport has remained relatively static.

28.     Research into ‘Understanding Driving Choices in Auckland’ is underway and will explore what influences people’s decision to drive (by choice or necessity) and the service, infrastructure and behavioural levers that enable travel behaviour change. 

Co-benefits of a low carbon transport system

29.     The current transport system is not equitable.  Māori, Pasifika, lower income households and rural communities are often underserved by the transport system, as well as overburdened by transport externalities such as road harm and transport pollution. 

30.     Transport decarbonisation policies can address current inequities by focusing on improving accessibility. This can be done by providing more frequent public transport, safe and connected walking and micromobility networks, and more affordable shared and pooled mobility options. 

31.     Many low carbon transport interventions could lead to improvements in other transport outcomes.  For example, increasing safe active travel reduces air and noise pollution and improves public health.  Some interventions, such as road pricing, however require careful design and targeted mitigations to ensure a just transition.

Proposed approach

32.     The TERP will be jointly developed by Auckland Council and Auckland Transport to deliver a recommended pathway to meet the modelled 64 per cent transport emissions reduction goal by 2030.  This requires a clear understanding of the:

·        key interventions required to reduce transport emissions in Auckland and the scale of their potential emissions reduction impacts,

·        most appropriate combination of actions to create pathways (or combinations of actions) to meet the target,

·        impacts (including social, economic, cultural and financial) of pathways and trade-offs that may be required.

33.     This will require engagement with a wide range of stakeholders to ensure their views and expertise help inform the actions, impacts and pathways.

34.     The TERP will be complex and requires a robust evidence base and sophisticated analysis to identify pathways and assess their impacts.  It will be a peer-reviewed document that presents:

·        a range of pathways (or combination of actions) that will achieve the target, and a comparison with business-as-usual,

·        actions from local and central government, Aucklanders and businesses within each pathway,

·        the social, economic, cultural, environmental and financial impacts of each pathway, and

·        a recommended pathway.

35.     The TERP will be consistent with the principles of Hīkina te Kohupara, which are:

i.     The transport sector will play a lead role in meeting our 2050 net zero carbon target

ii.     Focusing on moving to a zero carbon transport system, rather than offsetting emissions

iii.    Taking a strategic approach to reducing transport emissions

iv.   Co-ordinating action across the transport system to avoid and reduce emissions

v.    Managing the impacts and maximising the opportunities brought about by changes to the transport system to ensure a Just Transition

vi.   Forging a path to zero transport emissions by 2050, while recognising that there is not one way to get there

vii.   Innovation and technologies will play an important role in reducing emissions, but people are the key to our future.

36.     The TERP will enable the Environment and Climate Change Committee to endorse the recommended pathway, or select an alternative pathway, for Auckland to achieve its 2030 transport emissions reduction target.

Identifying key interventions to reduce transport emissions

37.     An ambitious emissions reduction task requires a systems approach to identify all available levers and interactions to change travel behaviour. The work will not just focus on the transport system but the broader systems that impact transport, for example land use planning and funding and financing mechanisms. 

38.     Similar to Hīkina te Kohupara, Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri and other international transport decarbonisation plans, it will use the ‘Avoid, Shift and Improve’ framework:

·        Avoid: Reducing motorised travel through avoiding and shortening trips, for example through compact growth policies and demand management interventions such as road pricing, parking management and flexible working arrangements

·        Shift: Redistributing trips from private vehicles to lower emissions travel options, including public transport, walking and cycling, and replacing road freight with rail and coastal shipping

·        Improve: Increasing the energy efficiency of motorised vehicles, for example by introducing fuel efficiency standards and low emissions vehicle purchase incentives.

39.     In-depth work is required to understand the emissions reduction potential of these interventions. 

40.     Building on existing work by central government, a combination of literature review, case studies from comparator cities, business cases and previous transport modelling will be used to identify the actions that have the greatest emissions reduction potential.  Further work will identify any interactions among the interventions and the overall impact of scaled delivery.

41.     In some cases, there may not be a sufficient body of evidence to underpin robust assumptions to develop the pathways.  In these circumstances, best practice will be followed.  The chosen pathway will be updated as new evidence comes to light during the course of its implementation in the years to come.

42.     The analysis is potentially constrained by the ability of existing transport models to respond to certain types and scales of interventions that are likely to be proposed.  For example, the Macroscopic Strategic Travel Demand Model (MSM) responds to car and public transport mode choices but has limited ability to forecast the new/ future mode effects, active travel and travel substitution or demand responses of many of the required interventions. On the other hand, models that focus on aggregate outputs are unable to measure the dynamic nature of transportation.

43.     A range of models and analysis tools will need to be utilised to appropriately assess travel demand responses.  This customised approach to assess the potential scale of intervention impacts will be based on available evidence and international best practice.

Developing pathways to meet Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri’s target

44.     There are different pathways Auckland could take to meet its 2030 target, although none will be easy.  The intention of the pathways is to provide different mixes of the type and scale of interventions required to reach the 2030 target.

45.     It is too early to identify the composition of the pathways that will be developed. However, it is envisaged that the pathways will cover:

·    current investment plans and policy settings (a base-case for comparison purposes),

·    the impact of the government’s ERP,

·    trends influencing travel choices (e.g. changes in fuel prices, remote working), and

·    additional interventions required to achieve the target (which will likely go beyond traditional approaches). 

46.     Given TERP’s timeframes and the constraints of existing transport modelling tools, the level of analysis will be at the aggregate or Auckland-wide level rather than at local level.  This is appropriate for a strategic plan and follows the precedence set by the Ministry of Transport through Hīkina te Kohupara. 

47.     A current state accessibility analysis based on existing transport investment plans to 2030 will be undertaken as part of this work.  This will highlight existing inequalities. Ensuring a just transition both at a sub-regional level and across demographic groups will be a core focus of the implementation of the pathway.

Assessing the impacts of pathways

48.     Following the creation of pathways, the impacts (social, cultural, economic, financial etc.) will be assessed and compared against business-as-usual. This assessment is critical to selecting the best pathway for Auckland.

49.     The benefits and costs of each pathway will be based on existing frameworks such as Waka Kotahi’s Benefits Framework, Ministry of Transport’s Transport Outcomes Framework, the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport, and the Auckland Plan 2050. It will also use Communities of Greatest Need data available. Benefits and costs are expected to include, but are not limited to, environment, road safety, public health, access, transport affordability, equity, financial (costs to government and council) and economic impacts.

Developing an engagement approach

50.     The TERP requires well-considered engagement to support the development and implementation of pathways that meet the transport emission reduction target of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri.  Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri was adopted following an extensive public consultation process in 2019, which saw overwhelming support for the plan. 

51.     It is proposed that development of the TERP includes targeted engagement with a diverse group of stakeholders to identify transport emissions reduction solutions and the impacts of transport decarbonisation, including impacts on disadvantaged communities. 

52.     Staff will engage with elected members and central government officials to seek their input on the plan. 

53.     There will also be a Māori engagement approach that will include seeking input from the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum, iwi chairs and matāwaka organisations, and the Auckland Transport mana whenua operational tables.

54.     In addition, the intention is to engage with representative groups or organisations such as Auckland Council’s Advisory Panels, the freight industry, cycling groups, automobile association, climate and poverty action groups etc.

55.     As part of the implementation of the TERP there will also be extensive public consultation.

Delivering a recommended pathway

56.     The TERP will recommend a pathway for endorsement by the Environment and Climate Change Committee and the Auckland Transport Board in the second quarter of 2022.  This timeframe closely follows the release of the government’s ERP by the end of December 2021, as rapid implementation is required to achieve progress in regional transport emission reductions before 2030. 

57.     Implementation of the TERP will follow the committee and board decisions in 2022. 

Communicating to Aucklanders

58.     Staff propose that a public communications campaign is delivered to support the TERP as part of broader climate change communications to proactively socialise the scale of changes that will be required to implement the recommended pathway. 

59.     Council allocated funding for climate action communications campaigns in the 2020/21 Annual Plan. Due to Covid impacts, some of this funding was carried forward to the 2021/22 financial year. Incorporating communication to support the implementation of the TERP may require adjustments to the planned campaign, which may in turn require additional funding. Should this be the case the appropriate channels will be followed to address this.

60.     This communications campaign could also build on the consultation processes that will be required as part of the implementation of the chosen pathway.

Further work subsequent to endorsement of pathway in 2022

61.     Once endorsed, implementing the TERP will require change across a broad range of central and local government planning and investment processes.  Other additional tools may also be needed to assist Aucklanders and Auckland businesses to change their travel behaviour.

62.     Other strategies and policies will need to be developed or refreshed to guide implementation of the actions.  For example, a transport equity strategy may be an effective way to ensure that transport decarbonisation interventions are delivered in a just manner, or the Development Strategy may need to be adjusted to give effect to the pathway.

63.     The recommended pathway will also provide a platform for Auckland Council and Auckland Transport to advocate to central government on the types and scale of government interventions that are required to support Auckland meeting its transport reduction target.

64.     A monitoring framework will be established to track implementation and outcomes, and determine review cycles.

Proposed governance structure

65.     Staff propose that a Transport Emissions Reference Group is set up to provide direction to this work and to make adjustments to the proposed approach as required.  The group would also approve the pathway that is recommended to the Environment and Climate Change Committee and the Auckland Transport Board for endorsement in March 2022. 

66.     To reflect the joint approach for the plan, staff recommend that the following members receive delegated authority to provide direction to staff throughout the development of the project:

·    Chair and Deputy Chair of the Environment and Climate Change Committee,

·    Chair and Deputy Chair of the Planning Committee,

·    Chair or Deputy Chair of the CCO Oversight Committee,

·    Chair and Deputy Chair of the Independent Māori Statutory Board,

·    Up to three Auckland Transport Board members (delegated authority will be sought in the August 2021 Auckland Transport Board meeting).

67.     Staff also propose that a Terms of Reference (TOR) that reflects the shared outcomes and joint approach between Auckland Council and Auckland Transport be developed and signed off by the reference group. The TOR offers an efficient and timely framework for the proposed reference group to provide direction for the process. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

68.     The journey to decarbonise Auckland’s transport system will require difficult choices, and the development of the TERP will identify the potential pathways necessary to stay within Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri’s carbon budget. 

69.     Comprehensive implementation of ‘avoid’ and ‘shift’ interventions is especially important for a large, urbanised region such as Auckland.  Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have control of, or at least some influence over, several of these interventions, including accelerating mode shift, reallocating road space, reprioritising investment, and shaping urban form.

70.     Auckland Council and Auckland Transport’s ability to implement these interventions may be constrained by factors including

·        availability of funding,

·        slow decision-making processes, e.g. business case and consultation processes

·        committed investments that increase emissions,

·        mixed signals from central government, particularly in respect of the approach to urban growth,

·        the lack of priority given to climate outcomes in planning and investment decision-making,

·        insufficient legislative and regulatory support, e.g. weak parking enforcement frameworks,

·        lack of community mandate for certain solutions.

 

71.     Work will be done with other agencies on a parallel piece of work to identify and suggest ways to unlock some of these barriers.

72.     Policies that promote electric vehicles are integral to reducing transport emissions, given the low carbon intensity of New Zealand’s electricity.  The cost of owning and operating an electric vehicle must reach parity with conventional internal combustion engine vehicles to achieve rapid market penetration.  These benefits are reliant on government action such as the Clean Car Standard and Clean Car Discount. 

73.     On their own, however, policies to promote electric vehicles will not be enough to achieve climate targets, nor will they support broader transport and liveability outcomes. A strong focus on mode shift is also required.  Mode shift incentives and investments will be more successful when coupled with constraints on private vehicle use, such as parking management and congestion pricing.   Additionally, street level changes to prioritise public transport and active travel could be undertaken swiftly and cost effectively, given the potential to reallocate existing space devoted to low value uses such as free parking.  The emissions reduction impacts of these interventions will be explored as part of this work.

74.     There are opportunities to leverage investment in other areas, such as safety and renewals, to contribute to transport emissions reduction.

75.     Levers outside of the transport system have a significant impact on transport emissions. For example, decisions on land use and urban development can support transport emissions reduction over the longer term, by enabling households and businesses to travel shorter distances - for example to access employment, education and other opportunities. 

76.     Changes to urban form take time. The planning changes implemented over the next few years will only have a limited impact by 2030 on the city as a whole, but will have large impacts over the decades ahead.  Land use planning decisions, such as those relating to the implementation of the provisions of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development relating to urban intensification, should reflect the council’s stated goal of a zero carbon transport system by 2050.

77.     Conversely, some aspects of the current land use planning system hinder the task of reducing transport emissions.  Requirements for councils to provide for expansion into greenfield areas on the urban periphery and in rural areas, the challenges councils face in resisting private plan changes in greenfield areas, and the consequential requirements to plan for and fund greenfield expansion enabling infrastructure, all increase the scale of the challenge to reduce transport emissions.  

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

78.     Auckland Council and Auckland Transport are jointly developing the TERP.  The proposed Transport Emissions Reference Group that will provide oversight will include both Auckland Council and Auckland Transport governors, reflecting the joint nature of the work programme.

79.     The Auckland Transport Board has provided informal feedback on the proposed approach, and will consider it at its Board meeting on 26 August 2021.  Any subsequent changes to the approach will be jointly agreed through the reference group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

80.     Staff will engage with local boards and seek their input on the TERP.  Local boards will also have an opportunity to provide input on the interventions in the endorsed pathway as part of implementation processes.

 

 

 

81.     Transport decarbonisation is a topic that many local boards are passionate about, and the implementation of a transport decarbonisation pathway will have significant impacts at the local board level. Past local board feedback, including input into the submission on the Climate Change Commission’s draft advice, show overwhelming support for strong action on climate change, particularly for transport.

82.     Some of the low carbon transport interventions that local boards have advocated for include greater investment in public transport and active modes, and changes to government policy and financial settings to enable Auckland to equitably transition to a low carbon future.  Many local boards also expressed in-principle support for congestion pricing, subject to a range of caveats, as part of Auckland Council’s submission to the select committee inquiry into congestion pricing in Auckland.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

83.     Reducing transport emissions to mitigate against the worst impacts of climate change has significant implications for Māori. Co-benefits of a decarbonised transport system include cleaner air, reduced noise pollution, fewer traffic-related deaths and serious injuries, improved public health, lower road infrastructure costs, and more equitable access to jobs, schools, health, services, recreation, and other opportunities for whānau.

84.     Improving transport access and decreasing the number of mana whenua and matāwaka killed or injured on Auckland’s roads are strategic objectives of the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum Strategic Plan 2030. 

85.     Recent submissions on planning and investment processes show strong support from mana whenua and matāwaka for Auckland Council and Auckland Transport to deliver climate action, in partnership with iwi and hapū.  Some submissions highlight the need for a more equitable transport system that aims to increase access, choice and affordability, particularly for lower income groups and those living outside of the urban core who are travelling to destinations outside of the city centre.

86.     Auckland Council and Auckland Transport will take a joint approach to engaging with Māori.  Over the coming months, staff will reach out to iwi chairs and matāwaka organisations for their input on the proposed pathways.  In addition, staff will engage with the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum and seek its advice on how it would like to be involved in the project, including the opportunity for Forum representation on the Transport Emissions Reference Group.  Staff will also engage with Auckland Transport’s mana whenua operational tables for input.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

87.     Cost estimates to deliver this project by the second quarter in 2022 are being developed. To date, Auckland Transport has committed $155,000.  Staff will report back to the proposed reference group once there is a better understanding of budget requirements.  Funding will be sourced from within Auckland Council and Auckland Transport. 

88.     There will likely be significant financial implications for the council group once the project moves into implementation phase from 2022.  The project will recommend substantial investment in a range of interventions to influence travel behaviour.  Further work will need to be undertaken to determine the specific projects and programmes required, and their funding arrangements.  Delivery of the chosen pathway will be implemented through various funding processes for actions that relate to the council group.

 

89.     The need for additional investment is consistent with advice from the Climate Change Commission which recommended that the government provide councils with substantially increased and targeted funding for public transport, walking and cycling.  If the government acts on this advice it is likely that a large proportion of any additional funding would be allocated to Auckland, given the contribution it will be required to make to emissions reduction nationally.  Any requirements for local share funding, and the ability of Auckland Council to meet those requirements, would need to be worked through with central government over time.          

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

Risks

Mitigation

The project is constrained by the ability of existing transport models to reliably capture and portray the impacts of the interventions that are likely to be proposed.

A customised approach to assessing the potential scale of intervention impacts will be required.  This will be based on available evidence, international best practice, existing work by central government, and specific outputs derived from previous transport modelling runs.

 

There may not be sufficient evidence to credibly support the assumptions that will go into the model, especially if there is a delay to the technical work required, and some interventions will be difficult to model.

Best practice will be followed in terms of assessing the likely emissions reduction potential of interventions.  The pathways should be updated subsequent to the endorsement of the chosen pathway as new information comes to light.

Given the complexity of the work and the tight timeframes involved, any slippage may endanger the ability to deliver a recommended pathway in 2022.

The Transport Emissions Reference Group will be briefed on how the project is tracking.   The Environment and Climate Change Committee will be informed of any potential issues with project delivery as part of the progress update in December 2021.

 

Uncertainty with the government’s Emissions Reduction Plan and its implications for Auckland’s decarbonisation.

Staff will work with central government agencies as they develop the Emissions Reduction Plan to ensure alignment in approach.   The draft plan is expected to be released around September / October 2021.

Risk that available resources will not be sufficient to deliver a recommended pathway in 2022.

Staff will brief and keep the Transport Emissions Reference Group updated on resource requirements and take direction on how potential resource shortfalls are to be approached.

Current central and local government funding, planning and regulatory frameworks are not reformed quickly enough to enable the transformation required to meet the transport emissions reduction goals in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri. 

Parallel work on identifying barriers and suggesting potential ways of unlocking them will be undertaken with support from other agencies.

Disruption from the scale of change required could disproportionately impact disadvantaged communities.

Many of the interventions proposed will help address current transport inequities, e.g. lower levels of access and travel choice for certain parts of Auckland.  Other interventions such as road pricing will require specific mitigation measures.

Equity impacts will be assessed as part of the identification of pathways.

 

Strong support for climate action does not always translate into support for specific action at the local level.

A public communications campaign is needed to identify the wider benefits of decarbonisation, the risks of inaction and the ways to ensure a Just Transition.

The implementation of specific actions within the chosen pathway will be subject to public consultation processes.

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Next steps

90.     The Auckland Transport Board will formally consider the proposed approach in its August 2021 board meeting.

91.     The first Transport Emissions Reference Group meeting will convene in September 2021.

92.     The government’s draft Emissions Reduction Plan is expected to be released in September / October 2021. It is expected that the council group will make a submission on the draft plan.

93.     Staff will provide a progress update to the Environment and Climate Change Committee on 2 December 2021.  The progress update will also include feedback received from the Māori engagement and targeted stakeholder engagement processes undertaken as part of the development of the pathways.

94.     The Transport Emissions Reference Group will approve the pathway that is recommended to the Environment and Climate Change Committee and the Auckland Transport Board for endorsement in the second quarter of 2022. 

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Attachments

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Signatories

Authors

Szening Ooi - Principal Transport Advisor

Robert Simpson - Manager Transport Strategy

Greg Nelson – Head of Transport Sustainability, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jacques Victor – General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Jenny Chetwynd – Exec General Manager Planning and Investment, Auckland Transport

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy