I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 18 August 2021

5.00pm

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Office
Shop 17B
93 Bader Drive
Māngere

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

 

Deputy Chairperson

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

 

Members

Makalita Kolo

 

 

Christine O'Brien

 

 

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

 

 

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

 

 

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Janette McKain

Democracy Advisor

 

12 August 2021

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 262 5283

Email: janette.mckain@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Monte Cecilia Housing Trust                                                        5

8.2     Deputation - Blue Light                                                                                        6

8.3     Deputation - Māngere Ōtāhuhu Netball Centre                                                 6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Governing Body Member Update                                                                                9

12        Local Board Leads and Appointments Report                                                         11

13        Chairpersons Report and Announcements                                                              17

14        Māngere Mountain Education Trust funding for 2021/2022                                    27

15        Land classification, landowner approval and new community lease for Time to Thrive to Stay Alive at 66R Mascot Avenue, Māngere                                            45

16        To classify unclassified parcels of land – Tararata Creek Reserve                      61

17        Approval for four new public road names at Aorere Precinct, Māngere East      75

18        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Play Network Assessment                                   83

19        Adoption of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Urban Ngahere 10-Year Action Plan           129

20        Auckland Transport - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board: Māngere East & Manukau Cycling Single Stage Business Case (SSBC) – Community Partner Working Group Engagement Approach                                                                                             135

21        Proposal to make a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw                           141

22        Local board resolution responses, feedback and information report                151

23        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Workshop Notes                                                  203

24        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      213

25        Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022                                                                 219

26        Seeking local board views on changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes                                                                                                                   237

27        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Māngere Ōtāhuhu Local Board for March to June 2021                                                                                                               277

28        Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021                                                                    331

29        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

30        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               335

27        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Māngere Ōtāhuhu Local Board for March to June 2021

b.      Work Programme T3 financial report                                                             335

28        Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021

a.      Draft 2020/2021 Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Annual Report (to be tabled at the meeting)                                                                                                      335


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 16 June 2021,  as  true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Monte Cecilia Housing Trust

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

 

1.       Dean Duckmanton from Monte Cecilia Housing Trust would like to discuss a transport project on Windrush Close with the board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      thank Dean Duckmanton for his attendance and update.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Blue Light

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

 

1.       Brendon Crompton from Blue Light would like to discuss their plans for future work with youth in the local board area.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      thank Brendon Crompton for his attendance and update.

 

 

 

8.3       Deputation - Māngere Ōtāhuhu Netball Centre

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

 

1.       Members from the Māngere Ōtāhuhu Netball Centre would like to give an update to the board on the netball centre. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      thank members from the Māngere Ōtāhuhu Netball Centre for their attendance and update.

 

Attachments

a          Māngere Ōtāhuhu Netball Centre presentation........................................... 339

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Governing Body Member Update

File No.: CP2021/08406

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 Minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal reports from Cr Alf Filipaina and Cr Efeso Collins.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Local Board Leads and Appointments Report

File No.: CP2021/08408

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To allow the local board members an opportunity to present verbal and written updates on their lead roles, such as relevant actions, appointments and meetings.

2.       To make any appointments to vacant positions.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Members have an opportunity to update the board on their activities as topic area leads.

4.       The table below outlines the current leads and alternates for topic areas of local board business meetings and organisations on which the board is represented through a formal appointment.

Topic Area

Lead

Alternate

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Arts, Community and Events (including libraries)

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Parks, Sport and Recreation and Community Facilities

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Christine O’Brien

Local planning, housing, and heritage – includes responding to resource consent applications on behalf of board

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

1st Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

2nd Harry Fatu Toleafoa

Transport

Makalita Kolo

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Economic development

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

1st Christine O’Brien

2nd Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Youth, Children, Seniors and Uniquely Abled    

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

1st Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

2nd Christine O’Brien

Landowner Consents (excluding filming)

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Landowner Consents Filming

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Events (receive staff notifications of areas that may involve reputational, financial, performance or political risk)

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Liquor Licences Hearings

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Resource Consent (proceed as a non-notified, limited notified or fully notified application)

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Resource Consents (notified hearings)

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Area Plan Working Group

MOLB

All board members

OPLB

Apulu Reece Autagavaia,

Dawn Trenberth

 

LGNZ (Local Government New Zealand

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

 

 

 

 


Organisation / Initiative

Lead

Alternate

Community Impact Forum for Kohuora Corrections Facility

Makalita Kolo

 

Mangere Bridge BID

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

 

Mangere Town Centre BID

Makalita Kolo

 

Mangere East Village BID

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

 

Otahuhu Business Association

Christine O’Brien

 

South Harbour Business Association BID

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

 

Auckland Airport Community Trust for

Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

 

Te Pukaki Tapu O Poutukeka Historic Reserve & Associated Lands Co-Management Committee

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

 

Ambury Park Centre

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Christine O’Brien

Mangere Mountain Education Trust               

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Maori input into local board decision-making political steering group

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Ōtāhuhu Portage Project Steering Group

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

The Southern Initiative (TSI) Steering Group

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Otahuhu Town Hall Community Centre Incorporated Society

Makalita Kolo

 

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal and written reports from local board members.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Member Harry Fatu Toleafoa conference report

15

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Chairpersons Report and Announcements

File No.: CP2021/08410

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To give the Chairperson an opportunity to update the local board on any announcements and for the local board to receive the Chairperson’s written report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal update and written reports of the local board Chair.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairpersons report July August

19

b

LGNZ Conference report

25

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Māngere Mountain Education Trust funding for 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/11124

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the funding for Mangere Mountain Education Trust for 2021/2022 of $300,000 and associated performance measures.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Māngere Mountain Education Trust has provided a report on its performance for the 2020/2021 financial year. Generally performance has met the measures set in the funding agreement.

3.       Funding of $300,000 is allocated for the 2021/2022 year in the Long-term plan and will be subject to a funding agreement.

4.       The Trust has proposed updated performance measures to be included in the funding agreement for 2021/2022. These measures are proposed to better align with the Trust’s strategic planning work and note the need for the Trust to keep its educational programmes refreshed and relevant.

5.       Progress against these measures will be reported to the local board in February and August 2022.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      approve the release of the funding of $300,000 for 2021/2022 to the Māngere Mountain Education Trust in two tranches (August 2021 and January 2022) based on the proposed performance measures and reporting schedule

b)      note the performance report from of the Māngere Mountain Education Trust about the Trust’s activities in 2020/2021.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Māngere Mountain Education Trust was formed in 2007 and is a council-controlled organisation (CCO) under the Local Government Act.

7.       The deed of trust lists the purposes of the Trust which are summarised as follows:

·   study Māngere Mountain and its related cultural and physical environs

·   manage and promote the education centre to provide educational programmes for young people and the wider community about the cultural values and natural history of the maunga.

·   assist in the formulation of management plans and conservation of Māngere Mountain in support of the reserve administering authority.

8.       In August 2020, the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board approved the release of $300,000 funding for the Māngere Mountain Education Trust (the Trust) for the 2020/2021 financial year.

9.       Funding at a level of up to $300,000 per annum for the financial years from 2021/2022 to 2023/2024 is provided by the Long-term plan. After that, funding will return to the previous amount of $94,000 unless further funding is allocated in the Long-term Plan.

10.     The Mayor’s final proposal for the Long-term plan noted that while this funding is allocated for the next three years, a governance review of the Trust should be completed within that time and that should include further exploration of integrating the Trust with the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.

11.     Delivery by the Trust has been impacted by COVID-19 and changing alert levels causing cancellations of school visits and reduced visitor numbers through the second half of the 2019/2020 and first half of the 2020/2021 financial years. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Performance results for 2020/2021

12.     The Trust has met or made good progress towards the performance measures agreed for 2020/2021.

13.     Participation has improved from 4,017 visits in 2019/2020 to 5,600 in 2020/2021. This is still lower than the 7,461 visitors achieved before COVID in 2018/2019. Approximately 4100 students visited in the second half of the year which reflects strong demand.

14.     Good governance and financial management measures have been met and work is almost complete on the strategic plan for the centre.

15.     The Trust has maintained and built on connections to its strategic partners including the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board, mana whenua and the Tupuna Maunga Authority. It has continued to make progress on refurbishing Kingi Tāwhiao’s cottage, including engaging with Kingitanga kaumatua to decide on the stories to be told and the fitout.

Performance measures for 2021/2022

16.     The Trust has proposed updates to their performance measures for 2021/2022 to align better with the strategic plan that is being developed by the Trust. These changes are detailed in Table 1 and the complete proposed performance measures proposed for the 2021/2022 financial year are contained in Attachment B.

Table 1: New performance measures for 2021/2022

1.  

Outcome

Summary of measure

1.   Good governance

 

Completion of governance review with Auckland Council

Completion of 10 year strategic plan (rather than 5 year)

2.   Delivering high-quality education outside the classroom

Updated KPI on programme participation levels to note a maximum level of participation at 8000 rather than 11,000 which is seen as unsustainable.  

Refresh educational programmes to reflect the new  Aotearoa Histories curriculum

Complete the internal fitout and signage for Kiingi Taawhiao’s cottage and integration of the cottage into educational programmes

Publish the 1868 Orakei Judgment Minute Books volume 1 and 2

3.   Connected to its strategic partners

Build relationships with Tainui Waikato and Kingitanga

 

Collaborate with TMA regarding interpretation (signage or art) on the Historic Reserve.

 

17.     The description of Outcome 2: Delivering high-quality education outside the classroom has been updated to note the need for the Trust to engage in activities that ensure that its programmes remain up to date with current knowledge and curriculum. This includes supporting research and serving a wider audience through publications.

Funding agreement

18.     Staff recommend that based on the performance of the Trust in the 2020/2021 financial year, funding of $300,000 is provided to the Trust. Funding would be provided in two tranches with one released immediately after the board’s decision and the other in January 2022.

19.     Staff recommend approval of the updated performance measures for the 2021/2022 financial year to be included in the funding agreement.

20.     The Trust will provide performance reports in February 2022 and August 2022 at local board business meetings.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     There are no direct climate impacts from these decisions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     There are no council group impacts.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     Staff attended a workshop session with the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on 28 July to discuss the proposed performance measures.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     The funding agreement reflects the Trust’s important relationships with Māori. The performance measures include that the Trust must invest in and build relationships with its strategic partners. The strategic partners listed include Pukaki, Makaurau and Te Puea marae along with Tainui Waikato, Kingitanga and the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.

25.     Makaurau and Pukaki Marae have been invited to nominate representatives to serve on the board of the Trust. Makaurau Marae has appointed one member of the board. The review of governance arrangements will include consideration of further representation of Māori stakeholders on the board.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     The funding for the 2021/2022 financial year is provided for in the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board’s annual budget.

Funding in the 2021 – 2031 Long-term Plan

27.     In the 2021 – 2031 Long-term Plan the governing body agreed to an increase in the funding for the Trust from the base amount of $94,000 per annum to $300,000 per annum for the first three years from 2021/2022 to 2023/2024. After that time, funding will revert to $94,000 per annum.

28.     The local board has requested that the Trust consider what non-rates funding might be sought to ensure the sustainability of the Trust.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     COVID-19 caused a reduction in school visits in the 2019/2020 and 2020/2021 years. Any raised alert levels are likely to impact the ability of the Trust to deliver this measure.

30.     Not approving funding will mean that the Trust is not able to deliver on the outcomes and would be extremely constrained in its ability to deliver on the purpose of the Trust.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     If the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board approves the recommendations, staff will prepare the funding agreement.

32.     The Trust will continue its governance review with Auckland Council and the local board will be consulted on any decision making.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2020/2021 - Performance Report for Māngere Mountain Education Trust

31

b

2021/2022 - Proposed performance measures for Māngere Mountain Education Trust

43

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

James Stephens - Senior Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

 

Māngere Mountain Education Trust

 

A group of people posing for a picture

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

 

Six-monthly report to the Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Board

(July 2021)


A message from the Māngere Mountain Education Trust

 

 

 

Tēnā koutou katoa,

 

As we reflect back on the previous six months, we do so with a more positive outlook to our future, for two main reasons.

 

Firstly, the people are back!  After multiple interruptions to normal service through 2020, our visitor numbers since the start of 2021 have returned to a healthier level.

 

Secondly, we gratefully acknowledge the continued support of Auckland Council and the Māngere-Otahuhu Local Board, following the agreement to a further three years of funding.  It goes without saying, we would be unable to do what we do without your on-going commitment and support, so for that we are eternally appreciative.

 

Both of the above reasons underscore the value of what’s on offer at the Māngere Mountain Education Centre, and the appetite for it within our local and broader communities.  With the government’s mandate for schools to look locally for their history curriculum content, we again feel confident that we will continue be a desirable destination to experience the past, to understand the present, and become protectors of the future.

 

 

On behalf of the Mangere Mountain Education Trust, I thank the Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Board for recognizing the value of our centre, and continuing to support us in our endeavours.

 

Ngā mihi ki a koutou

 

Fraser Alaalatoa-Dale

 

General Manager

Mangere Mountain Education Centre

Funding Agreement – Mangere Mountain Education Trust

 

SCHEDULE 1

 

Māngere Mountain Education Centre – Performance Measures for 2019/2020

 

MMET’s performance should be reported to the Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Board in the following way:

·      The MMET board chair should make a formal presentation to a public meeting of the Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Board at least twice annually.  This should include a summary of MMET’s operations, achievements and strategic issues and risks.

·      Any performance reporting data should be provided to the CCO Governance and External Partnerships Department in the frequency listed in the column ‘Frequency and date of reporting’ below, which will then be summarized and reported to the Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Board.

 

1.  

d)  

        f)      Programmes are designed in collaboration with mana whenua to authentically represent the culture and history of mana whenua and their special relationship with Te Pane o Mataoho.

d)  

OUTCOME

Outcome Description

KPIs or delivery requirements

Frequency and date of reporting

Progress

1.   Good governance

The Trust is governed according to best practice.

 

 

 

a)   The Trust continues to comply with the financial management internal controls specified in Schedule 2.

MMET will verify its own compliance on a six-monthly basis.

a)   See schedule 2

There is a clear vision for Mangere Mountain Education Centre which drives operational planning, investment and the design and delivery of programmes.

b)   Prepare a strategic and business plan which details:

·      What the vision is for the centre over the next five years.

·      The capital and operational investment needed to give effect to the plan is set out in a business plan with a funding impact statement.

Completed by end of 2021/22 year.

b) A new strategic plan constructed by the MMET board is nearing completion.

2.   Delivering high-quality education outside the classroom

Auckland students participate and learn through educational programmes on Te Pane o Mataoho covering:

·      History

·      Environment

·      Pre-European life

·      Gardening, fishing & food

·      Archaeology & history

·      Kiingi Tawhiao’s cottage

c)   The Trust should aim to increase programme participation levels above previous levels within the upper allowable limit of approximately 11,000* visitors in 2019/20.

Six-monthly (reported in January & July)

 

d)   Visitor totals to MMEC for FY 2020/21 amount to roughly 5,600 people.  This is a strong overall result, considering the COVID-related effects impacting on the latter half of 2020, allowing only 1,500 visitors through.   This demonstrates the strong demand, particularly from schools, for quality EOTC programmes, with a focus on local stories.

 

A further note on visitors, of the 35 schools (both primary and secondary) within the local board region, we have hosted 8 schools - within term 2 only.  These are:

Southern Cross (Junior School)

Southern Cross (Senior School)

Favona School (Staff)

Jean Batten Primary School

Mangere Bridge School

Otahuhu Primary

Waterlea Primary

St Mary Mackillop Catholic School

Mangere Central School

 

A targeted discount policy adopted by the board has aided our efforts to attract our local schools.  With more local schools coming in term 3 and 4, this is a great result.

 

e)   Positive feedback from at least 80% of schools about the quality and relevance of the programme.

d)   Feedback from school groups is sought post-visit and collated to provide reflection on MMEC performance.  The quality and relevance of MMEC programme is overwhelmingly positive (above 80%), with sample feedback provided below.  The feedback collection system has been adapted with the aim of garnering both more quantitative and qualitative feedback, and in turn helping to improve our programmes where necessary.  For example, we are currently adapting our programmes for ECE groups, in response to feedback that aspects of workshops were slightly difficult for our littlest visitors.

 

        e)    The internal fit-out and signage for Kiingi Tawhiao’s cottage to be completed, and the cottage further integrated into MMET’s education programmes and made available to the public.

e)   & f)  The internal fit-out of Kiingi Taawhiao’s cottage is in progress, with an indicative layout of period imagery, furniture  and informational signage underway.  We are liasing with Kiingitanga representatives to help select appropriate material for this action.

We are continuing to work with our Kaumatua Advisory group – from the original working party – who are representatives of Pukaki, Te Puea and Makaurau Marae.  Meetings are on a quarterly basis, whereby they give advice and feedback around Kiingi Taawhiao Cottage developments.  The filming project to capture stories of kaumatua and kuia relating to the cottage continue, with the last filming session held July 21st.

 

        g)       Ensure trained guides are in place for all programmes.

g)  A stable work-force in place, with one full-time and two part-time guides, all are mana whenua.

3.   Connected to its strategic partners

Invest in and build key relationships with partners, in particular:

·      Auckland Council: the Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Board and the Governing Body.

·      Pukaki Marae and Makaurau Marae

·      Te Tupuna Maunga o Tamaki Makaurau Authority.

h)   Maintain a governance partnership with the Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Board based on regular reporting and governance.

i)    Work with Pukaki Marae, Makaurau Marae and Te Puea Marae to reflect Māori history in programmes , including Kingi Tawhiao’s cottage.

j)    Work with the Tupuna Maunga Authority to exercise kaitiakitanga for Te Pane o Mataoho.

k)   Involve key partners in the development of the strategic and business plan.

Six-monthly (reported in January & July)

h)  MMET board relationship with the Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Board continues to grow in strength.  We are grateful to have hosted Local Board Chair Lemauga Lydia Sosene on more than one occasion, and look forward to more opportunities to meet and share feedback.

 i)  As mentioned above, the MMET board actively engages with marae to help guide future endeavors, ensuring an authentic message permeates our programmes. The board has a new Makaurau Marae trustee (Sophia Olo-Whaanga), and Whaea Julie Wade has been our contact with Pukaki Marae.

 

j). The MMET board seeks to grow its relationship with the Tupuna Maunga Authority, through consultation and collaboration across a range of events, such as the annual Love Your Maunga day, community planting days, providing feedback for the planned māra hupara, and consultation with MMET’s governance review.

 

k)  A new strategic plan is currently in development by the board - as the plan takes shape, the board will seek buy-in from its key partners.

 

 

*The upper limit is based on a maximum of 60 students per day and 380 half days per year.

 

COVID-19

 

·     We are thankful that COVID-19 has been a lesser feature over the period of this report.

·     As noted above, while there were negative impacts through the second half of 2020, our resurgent visitor numbers indicate that we are ‘back on track’.

 

Funding Agreement – Mangere Mountain Education Trust

 

SCHEDULE 2

 

Financial Management Governance Checklist for Māngere Mountain Education Trust

 

Checklist: Each “no” answer identifies a potential problem area.

 

Control Expectations

In place

Evidence of Control

Comment/Action Required

Yes

No

Budgeting and Reporting – ensuring that:

 

 

 

 

All expected income and expenditure items are included.  Key budget assumptions are documented and reviewed.

Yes

 

Annual review of budget

 

The annual budget, including key assumptions are reviewed and approved by the Trust Board

Yes

 

See board meeting minutes (July)

 

There is a monthly formal review of the approved budget to actual results, balance sheet, cashflow – at the monthly trust board meeting.

Yes

 

Monthly report from accountants reviewed at each board meeting (see MMET board meeting minutes)

 

The impact of any variances from budget to actual are identified, explained, documented and reported monthly – at the monthly trust board meeting.

Yes

 

Monthly report from accountants reviewed at each board meeting (see MMET board meeting minutes)

 

The budget is formally amended where changes have occurred that impact original budgeted income and expenditure – any budget amendments are formally approved by the Trust Board.

Yes

 

Annual review of budget

 

Financial statements – ensuring that:

 

 

 

 

Appropriate record-keeping is maintained.

Yes

 

As below

 

Key financial accounts are regularly reconciled (IA to sit with MMET and set out expectations re reconciliations).

Yes

 

Monthly report compiled by MMET admin, sent to accountants for review

 

The financial information is able to be understood by the Trust Board.

Yes

 

Monthly report from accountants reviewed at each board meeting (see MMET board meeting minutes)

 

The Trust’s Financial statements are audited annually.

Yes

 

Annual Performance Report prepared by Charities Services

 

The balance sheet is reviewed monthly with respect to the financial health of the entity (matters to consider under solvency below).

Yes

 

Monthly report from accountants reviewed at each board meeting (see MMET board meeting minutes)

 

Expected Internal Controls:

 

 

 

 

·      All payments reviewed and approved monthly by the Trust Board

·      All credit card expenditure reconciled monthly – approved monthly by the Trust Board

·      Cash receipting/Koha – basis segregation of duties implemented (cash counting, recording which is then checked daily. Checked for reasonableness given visitor numbers

·      Asset security – asset register maintained, premises locked, smoke alarms in place and tested

·      Asset maintenance plan in place that sets out required maintenance for buildings. Asset maintenance and replacement needs incorporated into annual budgets

·      Visitor numbers – attendance records kept – for each visit by a group co-signed by MMET staff and visiting teacher.

Yes

 

No

 

Yes

 

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

 

Yes

 

 

Payments require two sets of board authorisers.

Credit card yet to be re-instated

 

Segregation of duties in place, though acceptance of cash/koha is discouraged.

Asset register maintained

 

Asset maintenance plan largely focused on annual deep-clean tasks.

 

Visitor Numbers form collected and filed by staff.

 

Solvency – ensuring that the entity:

 

 

 

 

Can pay all bills when due

Yes

 

 

 

Has adequate funds in the accounts for scheduled bills and expenses

Yes

 

 

 

Can fund all its programs, grant agreement obligations and all other contractual obligations

Yes

 

 

 

Regularly reviews its cash flow forecast, identifies any variances and potential impact on solvency

Yes

 

 

 

Legal Compliance

 

 

 

 

There is an understanding of the Trust’s obligations with respect to the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015, Vulnerable Children’s Act 2014, and IRD requirements as to GST compliance and payroll tax compliance.

Yes

 

·      MMET Finance & Accounting Policy and Guidelines

·      MMET Management & Human Resource Administration Manual

 

 


 

On the Horizon

 

Proposed capital expenditure projects

 

Priority

Description

Target

1.

Washing station(s) – installation of external ‘trough’, to supplement the bathroom facilities within the education centre.  Hygiene is obviously a greater focus than ever in the wake of the pandemic, but having more facilities available makes it a more transparent and efficient process.  Have in mind a similar facility to that at Ambury Farm.  Auckland Council permit has been granted, and plumber engaged, awaiting parts to start.

August 2021

2.

Additional external toilet block – (feasibility) again, to supplement existing facilities, and ease the post-visit clean-up, and pressure on the centre.  Positioning could either be at rear of centre or in corner of carpark.  AC may look at this as a renewal project (TBC)

Late October 2021

4.

Constructing a hot-house/integrated water tank – to accommodate the preservation of tipu and other seedlings, and make it more accessible to staff and the public.  Would add to the prestige of the centre and capacity to engage with other community gardens.  Would look at sponsorship for this project. Periods of extreme dry weather, and resulting water restrictions, may be mitigated by having tank water available.

August 2021

5.

Building out shelter – (feasibility) increasing rain cover to better accommodate visitors during the wet weather period.  Gives MMEC more flexibility and may mitigate postponements or cancellations of visits due to the weather.

August 2021

6.

Constructing proper seating in the children’s garden area – to increase usage of children’s garden area for workshops

Late September 2021

 

Other major projects:

 

 

Tāwhiao’s Cottage – the creation of content for, and integration of the cottage into educational programmes to offer to the community and visitor groups. 

In progress

 

Orakei Minute Books Publication – the project to publish in hard-copy and digital format Judge Fenton’s notebooks, which have immense historical value as they contain first-hand testimonials from the late-1800s, identifying land ownershio and occupation within the Mangere region and beyond.

In progress, confirming contribution to forward.

 


 

A sample of feedback from visitor groups (Feb-July 2021)

 

Finally please leave any comments you would like to make about your visit.  Please let us know if there are any ways we can improve visitor experience at Mangere Mountain Education Centre.

Visitor

We would like to extend our sincere thank you to the Mangere Mountain Education Centre for this wonderful opportunity that we got to experience and learn about Mangere Mountain. We are grateful for allowing us to tour the premises while learning about some important facts and history of our local area. Thnak you so much we would definitely visit again. Best regards, Gina

Onehunga Primary

$15 per student made it an expensive trip. Great experience however!! Appreciated the communication beforehand and the guides were wonderful. Thanks so much!!

Anon

Thank you. I loved the connection te ao maori.

Anon

Great teamwork and always an effective way to learn about early Maori life.
Thank you once again for an interesting day out.  

Waterlea School

The small number of bathrooms for the number of students was the only issue. Other than that the trip was fantatic. In particular, your facilitators were absolutely excellent.

Anon

I attended a Very informative session thank you for your guidance. The kids were buzzing

Mary Mackillop School

Just wanted to say a massive thank you to our guides! We had a wonderful time there and learnt a lot about the area.

Marcellin College

The guided walk was excellent, almost a bit rushed with so much information, and it would have been nice to spend even more time exploring the mountain

Pukekohe High School

It was very informative and well organised. Thank you very much.

Anon

Our students really enjoyed the three workshops....short, simple and easy activities for them to do.  Activities appropriate to student's learning in the classroom.  Really grateful for taking home kumara.

Southern Cross Campus

The visit was very educational and the students found the presentation enjoyable and inquisitive. The guide also had to deal with one of our students that was quite negative and did that in a professional manner.

Anon

We would love to thank Marcia and Ayla for spending their time with our children, and being patient. Both were very knowledgeable and tried very hard to meet the needs of our rather energetic children. We just needed to see more of the medicinal plants.

Papatoetoe North

 

 

Activity at the centre and beyond:

 

 A group of people looking at a city

Description automatically generated with low confidence A picture containing person, several

Description automatically generated A person standing on a hill

Description automatically generated with medium confidence A picture containing tree, person, outdoor, people

Description automatically generated A group of people sitting on the ground outside

Description automatically generated with medium confidence A picture containing person, outdoor, people, group

Description automatically generated A group of people in a circle

Description automatically generated with low confidence

 

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Proposed Performance Measures for Mangere Mountain Education Trust 2021/2022

 

MMETs performance should be reported to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board in the following way:

·      The MMET board chair should make a formal presentation to a public meeting of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board at least twice annually. This should include a summary of MMET’s operations, achievements and strategic issues and risks.

·      Any performance reporting data should be provided to the CCO Governance and External Partnerships Department in the frequency listed in the column ‘Frequency and date of reporting’ below, which will then be summarised and reported to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board.

 

Outcome

Outcome description

Key performance indicators or delivery requirements

Frequency and date of reporting

1.  Good governance

The Trust is governed according to best practice

a) The Trust continues to comply with the financial management internal controls specified in Schedule 2

b) Complete governance review with Auckland Council and key stakeholders, formalised through updated and executed Trust Deed.

MMET will verify its own compliance on a six-monthly basis

 

There is a clear vision for Mangere Mountain Education Centre which drives operational planning, investment and the design and delivery of programmes

c) Prepare a strategic and business plan which details:

·      What the vision is for the centre over the next ten years

·      The capital and operational investment needed to give effect to the plan is set out in a business plan with a funding impact statement

Completed by end of 2021/22 year

2.  Delivering high-quality education outside the classroom

 

Auckland students participate and learn through educational programmes on Te Pane o Mataoho covering:

·     History

·     Environment

·     Pre-European life

·     Gardening, fishing and food

·     Archaeology and history

·     Kiingi Taawhiao’s cottage

MMET values and supports research to learn more about Māngere Mountain and its environs to strengthen and test the veracity of its programmes.

 

MMET undertakes publications that ensure that learning about Māngere Mountain and its environs endure intergenerationally and serve both its owns programmes and a wider audience.

 

Research and publications may include printed works, artwork, film, interpretive signs, science, tradition and pedagogy.

d) The Trust should aim to increase programme participation levels above previous levels within the upper allowable limit of approximately 8,000 visitors in 2021-22

Six-monthly (reported in January and July) 

e) Positive feedback from at least 80 percent of schools about the quality and relevance of the programme

f)  Educational programmes to be refreshed in line with the new Aotearoa Histories curriculum, and related professional development for MMEC staff (bicultural and bilingual, for a wider range of schooling audiences)

 

g) The internal fitout and signage for Kiingi Taawhiao’s cottage to be completed, and the cottage further integrated into MMET’s education programmes and made available to the public

h) Publish online and in book form the MMET commissioned transcript of Judge F.D Fenton’s 1868 Orakei Judgment Minute Books 1 & 2.  Transcribed by Ian Lawlor

i)  Programmes are designed in collaboration with mana whenua, including Pukaki Marae, Makaurau Marae, and Te Puea Marae, to authentically represent the culture and history of mana whenua and their special relationship with Te Pane o Mataoho

j)  Ensure trained guides are in place for all programmes

3.  Connected to its strategic partners  

Invest in and build key relationships with partners, in particular:

·     Auckland Council: the Māngere Ōtāhuhu Local Board and the Governing Body

·     Pukaki Marae, Makaurau Marae, and Te Puea Marae  

·     Te Tupuna Maunga o Tamaki Makaurau Authority.

k) Maintain a governance partnership with the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board based on regular reporting and governance.

l)  Engage with Tainui Waikato and the Kingitanga to strengthen and build strong relationships.

m)            Work with Pukaki Marae, Makaurau Marae and Te Puea Marae to reflect Māori history in programmes, including Kingi Taawhiao’s cottage.

n) Work with the Tupuna Maunga Authority to exercise kaitiakitanga for Te Pane o Mataoho.  Collaborate with TMA regarding interpretation (signage or art) on the Historic Reserve.

o) Involve key partners in the development of the strategic and business plan

 

Six-monthly (reported in January and July)

 

* The upper limit is based on a maximum of 60 students per day and 380 half days per year


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Land classification, landowner approval and new community lease for Time to Thrive to Stay Alive at 66R Mascot Avenue, Māngere

File No.: CP2021/10961

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To classify the land at 66R Mascot Avenue, Māngere legally described as Lot 2 Deposited Plan 64741 contained in Record of Title NA29A/1400 from unclassified recreation reserve to classified recreation reserve, pursuant to section 16(1) of the Reserves Act 1977.

2.       To grant landowner approval and a new community lease for Time to Thrive to Stay Alive for the establishment of the proposed Māngere Community Bike Hub on part of 66R Mascot Avenue, Māngere.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Time to Thrive to Stay Alive have formally applied for landowner approval and a new community lease for the group-owned assets to be located on part of 66R Mascot Avenue, Māngere; to accommodate the establishment and operation of a community bike hub. The initiative will enable and provide support for people to cycle in the local community. It also complements the investment of new cycling infrastructure in Māngere and surrounding communities.

4.       Land classification of 66R Mascot Avenue from unclassified recreation reserve to recreation reserve is required in accordance with section 16(1) of the Reserves Act 1977. Following classification, the group’s occupation can be validated by issuing landowner approval for the site, and a new community lease.

5.       The group’s objective is to encourage and educate residents in the local community on the fundamentals of owning and riding a bicycle. Moreover, the group, in collaboration with its key partners, aspires to make Māngere the bike capital of the Pacific.

6.       After assessing the group’s landowner approval and new lease applications, staff are satisfied that the requirements under Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 have been met.

7.       Mana whenua engagement has been undertaken and public notification will follow, subject to Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board’s approval of the recommendations below.

8.       This report recommends that the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board approve the land classification of 66R Mascot Avenue, Māngere as a recreation reserve and grant landowner approval and a new community lease for Time to Thrive to Stay Alive, in accordance with the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 and Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      approve, under section 16(1) of the Reserves Act 1977, the classification of 66R Mascot Avenue, Māngere legally described as Lot 2 Deposited Plan 64741 comprising 3.2071 hectares, contained in Record of Title NA29A/1400 as a recreation reserve as shown in Attachment A

b)      note, public notification of Auckland Council’s intention to grant landowner approval and a new community lease for Time to Thrive to Stay Alive on part of 66R Mascot Avenue, Māngere

c)      delegate, to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Chairperson the authority to appoint a hearings panel to consider any objections received, following the public notification, and for the panel to reach a decision

d)      grant, subject to any objections being resolved, landowner approval for Time to Thrive to Stay Alive to establish and operate a community bike hub on part of 66R Mascot Avenue, Māngere

e)      grant, subject to any objections being resolved, under section 54(1)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977, a new community lease for Time to Thrive to Stay Alive for the group-owned assets comprising 40 square metres (more or less) located on part of 66R Mascot Avenue, Māngere (outlined in red on Attachment B) on the land described as Lot 2 Deposited Plan 64741, contained in Record of Title NA29A/1400 subject to the following terms:

i)        term - two years commencing on completion of public notification and subject to the resolution of any objections, with one (1) two-year right of renewal; four-year total term

ii)       rent - $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded

iii)      all other terms and conditions to be in accordance with Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977

f)       approve, the Time to Thrive to Stay Alive’s Community Outcomes Plan in Attachment C for inclusion as the third schedule of the lease agreement.

Horopaki

Context

9.       This report considers the:

·        land classification of 66R Mascot Avenue, Māngere as a recreation reserve, and

·        landowner approval and new community lease for Time to Thrive to Stay Alive for the establishment of a community bike hub and group-owned assets located on part of 66R Mascot Avenue, Māngere.

 

10.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including land advisory services and community leasing matters.

The land

11.     Time to Thrive to Stay Alive proposes to establish a community bike hub on part of 66R Mascot Avenue, Māngere. The underlying land is legally described Lot 2 Deposited Plan 64741 contained in Record of Title NA29A/1400, held in fee simple by Auckland Council as an unclassified recreation reserve (Attachment A), subject to the Reserves Act 1977 (the Act).

 

 

12.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is advised to classify the parcel of land Lot 2 Deposited Plan 64741 prior to consideration of the proposed landowner approval and lease. Local boards hold delegated authority under section 16(1) of the Act to classify reserves for its primary purpose.

Landowner approval proposal

13.     The group is proposing to establish and operate a community bike hub operating out of two shipping containers on part of 66R Mascot Avenue, in the location shown below:

14.     The proposed area has been identified as an ideal location for the bike hub for the following reasons:

·        close proximity to Māngere Town Centre

·        location along the existing cycle path from Ashgrove Reserve in Māngere

·        open park space and existing cycle path on the reserve is suitable for safe riding and learning to ride

·        existing gravel surface means no earthworks will be required to place the containers on-site.

15.     The bike hub will offer the following services to the neighbourhood:

·        free bike maintenance and safety advice

·        used, low-cost bikes for sale and for loan

·        novelty ‘fun’ bikes for hire

·        bike parts and accessories

·        information on safe cycling routes and other bike support services

·        organised bike rides.

16.     The proposed bike hub will be open to the public from Thursday to Sunday every week with hours of operation envisaged from 10:00am to 2:00pm, or similar.

17.     Two trained staff members and volunteers will be on-site during the public days.

18.     The visual impact of the shipping containers will be mitigated by painting the containers in a visually recessive colour; or, engaging local artists to paint a suitable mural on them so that they become an attraction on-site. Anti-vandalism topcoat will also be applied to the containers.

19.     The group will be fully responsible for all on-going maintenance of the bike hub containers, including removal of any vandalism that may occur.

Group and additional information

20.     Time to Thrive to Stay Alive was established in 2013 and registered as a charitable trust on 10 October 2014. The group provides programmes and services on the fundamentals of owning and riding bicycles for all ages and aspire to make Māngere the bike capital of the pacific.

21.     Some of the programmes and services on offer include:

·        community education, events and workshops around learn to ride, bike safety, maintenance and repairs

·        fix and restore bikes for children in the local community

·        health promotion through cycling and staying active

·        the group collaborates with social services and is an agency for Department of Corrections.

22.     The group supports initiatives that benefit the local community. One such initiative is Māngere Bike FIT Club. The club has been in operation for six years and created by local resident Teau Aiturau (Mr Tee) who has been a driving force of the establishment of the club and has received numerous awards in recognition of the impact the programmes have had on supporting more individuals in the community to ride bikes.

23.     Time to Thrive to Stay Alive is determined to see the establishment of a more accessible bike hub type operation in Māngere and will partner with EcoMatters Environment Trust to deliver and manage the bike hub. EcoMatters currently operates three community bike hubs across Auckland and have recently been acknowledged for their success, winning the category Superior Grassroots Action award from the Travelwise Choices Awards 2020.

24.     The aim of the service is to support more people in the local community to lead healthy and active lifestyles, support better health, wellbeing and reduce carbon emissions.

25.     The containers are owned by the group, which is also responsible for all maintenance of the proposed leased area.

26.     The area proposed to be leased to the group consists of approximately 40 square metres (more or less) and is outlined in red on Attachment B.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Land classification of 66R Mascot Avenue, Māngere

27.     The parcel of land at 66R Mascot Avenue, Māngere is currently held in fee simple by Auckland Council as an unclassified recreation reserve, subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 (the Act). The land is legally described as Lot 2 Deposited Plan 64741 comprising 3.2071 hectares, contained in Record of Title NA29A/1400.

28.     The mentioned land was part of a larger land (Record of Title NA552/121) originally owned by the Crown for the purposes of the Housing Act 1955. In 1971, the Crown subdivided its land where Lot 2 Deposited Plan 64741 was shown to be proclaimed recreation reserve.

29.     Following the subdivision from the Crown, a gazette notice was published declaring that Lot 2 Deposited Plan 64741, being part Allotment 70 Manurewa Parish, comprising 3.2071 hectares of land as a recreation reserve, subject to the Reserves and Domains Act 1953 and the said reserve vests in former Manukau City Council in trust, for that purpose. Following the gazette notice publication, a new fee simple title was issued in the name of former Manukau City Council and recorded under Record of Title NA29A/1400 as a recreation reserve, pursuant to the Reserves and Domains Act 1953.

30.     Auckland Council, as a reserve administering body, is required to formally classify all unclassified reserves. To align the activities on the land to the provisions of the Act, staff propose Lot 2 Deposited Plan 64741 be classified as recreation reserve pursuant to section 16(1) of the Act. This classification is appropriate given the recreation activities taking place on the reserve.

31.     The purpose of recreation reserves, as set out in section 17 of the Act, is to provide for:

·        ‘recreation and sporting activities and the physical welfare and enjoyment of the public and for the protection of the natural environment and beauty of the countryside, with emphasis on the retention of open spaces and on outdoor recreational activities, including recreation tracks in the countryside’.

 

32.     The land is held for recreation purposes and currently zoned as ‘Open Space - Sport and Active Recreation Zone’ under the Auckland Unitary Plan. In addition, public notification concerning the land classification is not required.

33.     Staff from Legal Services (General Counsel) and Land Advisory Services have provided feedback that the proposed classification is appropriate.

Landowner approval for Time to Thrive to Stay Alive

34.     The landowner approval letter will be subject to conditions the group will need to adhere to and briefly outlined beneath:

·        pre-start meeting will be held with the Facilities Manager for Community Facilities prior to placing the bike hub containers on-site

·        the containers are to be finished in a visually recessive colour, sympathetic to the surrounding environment; or with a suitable mural by a local artist. The finish of the containers is to be approved by Community Facilities prior to start of works

·        the group is responsible for all maintenance of the bike hub facility

·        the containers must be maintained and kept clean, with any graffiti removed immediately at the group’s cost.

35.     In addition, the following specialists were contacted to provide input into the landowner approval application:

·        Area Manager and Facilities Manager (Community Facilities)

·        Parks and Places Specialist, Activation Team Manager and Sports and Recreation Lead (Parks, Sports and Recreation).

36.     All specialists view the proposal as a positive initiative that will contribute significantly to the activation of the land and provide their support for the establishment of the proposed bike hub.

New community lease for Time to Thrive to Stay Alive

37.     The group’s lease application was assessed against the criteria contained in Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the priorities set by the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2020.

38.     The lease term recommended for the newly established community group entering the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board community leasing portfolio is for a term of two years, with one (1) right of renewal for a further term of two years, four-year total term. The recommended term for a group-owned asset is to allow the new lessee time to implement initiatives and strategies to increase delivery of services while maintaining a regular review.

39.     The local board has discretion to vary the term of the lease if it wishes; however, the guidelines suggest that where the term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms within the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

40.     Staff have determined that the group meets the requirements under the guidelines to qualify for a new community lease as evidenced below.

41.     The group:

·        is registered as a legal entity with a not-for-profit status

·        caters to a well-defined group in the local community and its services are well-utilised

·        has a record of delivering quality services to the community

·        has provided a copy of its financial accounts which indicate that its funds are sufficient to meet its liabilities and that it possesses adequate financial reserves

·        is managed appropriately as evidenced by the extent of the programmes offered.

 

42.     The proposed containers are owned by the group, which are also responsible for all maintenance of the proposed leased area. A site visit undertaken indicates that the proposed site meets the needs of the group and users.

43.     The group has a scheduled maintenance plan to address general maintenance and renewals for the upkeep of the containers as the need arises and budget allows.

44.     A community outcomes plan has been negotiated with the group that identifies the benefits the group will provide to the local community. This is provided in Attachment C and will be attached as a schedule to the lease agreement.

Public notification

45.     Subject to the approval of land classification for 66R Mascot Avenue, Māngere; public notification will be undertaken prior to granting any lease and pursuant to section 54(2) and 119 of the Reserves Act 1977 (the Act). Submitters will have one month to make a submission or objection in accordance with section 120 of the Act.

46.     If any submissions or objections to the proposal are received from the public notification process, a hearings panel of the local board will be convened to consider the matter and reach a decision.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

47.     There is no impact on greenhouse gas emissions as the proposal does not introduce any new source of emissions.

48.     Climate change impacts will need to be considered in any future planning for the area. While the proposed community bike hub does not sit directly within a flood water (river or surface flooding) zone as a result of a 1‑in-100-year rainstorm event, neighbouring areas are within the zones as shown beneath:

        Proposed community bike hub site circled in red

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

49.     Staff have obtained support from colleagues in Legal Services (General Counsel), Land Advisory Services and Area Operations (Community Facilities), Active Recreation and Parks Services (Parks, Sports and Recreation), Connected Communities Lead (Connected Communities) and council-controlled organisations such as Auckland Transport and Eke Panuku Development Auckland. No concerns were raised regarding the proposed land classification of 66R Mascot Avenue, Māngere; and subsequent landowner approval and new lease for Time to Thrive to Stay Alive.

50.     In addition, Community Facilities supports the proposal for the following reasons:

·        it will provide the community access to bikes, free advice, and promote bike safety

·        it will encourage the growth of cyclists in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area and raise awareness of shared pathways in Māngere and surrounding communities

·        the proposal is in line with the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2020

·        conditions will be placed on the landowner approval letter to mitigate any potential adverse effects of the proposal.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

51.     The proposed land classification, landowner approval and new community lease applications were noted on the Community Facilities local board monthly report for February 2021 and forwarded to the local board for comment in March 2021. In addition, the assessment of the applications was workshopped with the local board on 28 July 2021. Staff received informal support regarding the land classification of 66R Mascot Avenue, Māngere; and subsequent landowner approval and the recommended term concerning the new lease for Time to Thrive to Stay Alive.

52.     The recommendations in this report fall within local board’s allocated authority to grant community leases in line with the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

53.     The recommendations within this report predominantly support the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes of:

·        We are building well connected, engaged and active communities (Outcome 2)

·        Celebrating our unique Tangata Whenua and Pasifika identities (Outcome 4)

·        Our children and young people grow and succeed (Outcome 5)

·        We thrive and belong in safe, healthy communities (Outcome 6).

54.     The proposed landowner approval and lease will benefit the local community in enabling initiatives that promote and encourage health and wellness and cycling as a mode of transport around the community, also to increase community participation and engagement in local activities.

55.     In addition, the bike hub will provide support to the existing local cyclists, give confidence to new riders, and provide an opportunity through organised bike rides for residents to meet each other.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

56.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi which are articulated in council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the 10-year budget (Long-term plan), the Auckland Unitary Plan and local board plans.

57.     An aim of community leasing is to increase targeted support for Māori community development. The proposal seeks to improve access to facilities for all Aucklanders, including Māori living in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area.

58.     Time to Thrive to Stay Alive acknowledge the place of mana whenua within Aotearoa and value initiatives that are inclusive and enhances partnership and participation of all people including Māori. Furthermore, the group encourage participation of Māori through local programmes and this forms part of their community outcomes plan commitments.

59.     The group indicated it is committed to working alongside the large Māori population that are part of the south Auckland region in conjunction with health, social development, community services and local schools in Māngere and its surrounding communities, such as:

·        Turuki Healthcare

·        Papatūānuku Kōkiri Marae, and

·        Te Kura Māori o Ngā Tapuwae; a local total immersion Māori school; to name a few.

 

60.     The group informed the purpose of working alongside the entities listed above is to strengthen funded and non-funded projects designed to raise the awareness of health and wellness in owning and riding a bicycle and focused on positive educational, social and health outcomes for whānau. Additionally, the group celebrate Māori development through annual events that includes Waitangi and Matariki rides.

61.     Mana whenua engagement was undertaken on 23 March 2021. This involved formal written correspondence detailing information concerning the proposed land classification, landowner approval and new lease forwarded to mana whenua representatives allowing 20 working days to respond.

62.     Staff received a response from Waikato Tainui on 25 March 2021 supporting the local mana whenua to take the lead on localised matters such as this and withdrew its interest from the proposal. No other responses were received from mana whenua.

63.     In addition, the above meets the statutory requirements under section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 that council engage with mana whenua representatives. Mana whenua will also have an opportunity to provide feedback regarding the proposed landowner approval and new lease during the public notification process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

64.     All costs relating to the publication of notice in the New Zealand Gazette confirming the land classification, the advertising of the intention for landowner approval and new lease, and the preparation of the landowner and lease documentation are borne by Community Facilities.

65.     Staff have obtained support from Financial, Strategy and Planning. No concerns were raised regarding the land classification of 66R Mascot Avenue, landowner approval and new lease for Time to Thrive to Stay Alive.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

66.     It is a statutory requirement under the Reserves Act 1977 (the Act) that council as a reserve administering body; classify all unclassified reserves vest in council for its primary purpose.

67.     Should the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board resolve not to classify 66R Mascot Avenue, Māngere; this decision would contravene the statutory requirements of the Act and prevent staff from recommending the landowner approval proposal and new community lease.

68.     There are no risks to council concerning the on-going maintenance for the containers and removal at the termination of the lease is the responsibility of Time to Thrive to Stay Alive. When the lease reaches final expiry, a condition will include reinstatement of the land to its original state.

69.     Any other risks associated with the public notification, granting of landowner approval and new lease are relatively minor as the proposed community bike hub maximises the use of the parcel of land and complements the investment of new cycling infrastructure in Māngere and surrounding communities. In addition, the proposal supports the strategic and local board outcomes for the community as stated in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2020.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

70.     Subject to Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board’s approval, staff will undertake the statutory processes to complete the land classification for 66R Mascot Avenue, Māngere, as recreation reserve and publish a notice in the New Zealand Gazette to record the classification.

71.     In addition, public notification will be undertaken concerning landowner approval and new community lease for Time to Thrive to Stay Alive allowing one month for submitters to make a submission or objection. On completion of public notification, and subject to the resolution of any submissions or objections, staff will engage with Time to Thrive to Stay Alive to finalise the landowner approval letter containing conditions for the establishment of the community bike hub and lease documentation.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site plan for land classification of 66R Mascot Avenue, Māngere

55

b

Site plan of lease area for Time to Thrive to Stay Alive

57

c

Community Outcomes Plan

59

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tai Stirling - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - Acting General Manager Community Facilities

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

To classify unclassified parcels of land – Tararata Creek Reserve 

File No.: CP2021/11299

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To request approval from the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to classify three parcels of land that form part of Tararata Creek Reserve at 15R Hall Avenue, 46R Molesworth Place and 54R Molesworth Place, Māngere under Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The three parcels of land at 15R Hall Avenue, Māngere, 46R and 54R Molesworth Place, Māngere, are currently held in fee simple as unclassified reserves and subject to the Reserves Act 1977. 

3.       Land Advisory Services is requesting to classify the three parcels of land as follows: 

·          One parcel of land legally described as Lot 145 DP 65157, situated at 15R Hall Avenue, Mangere, from unclassified Recreation Reserve to classified Recreation Reserve subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

·          One parcel of land legally described as Lot 124 DP 65159, situated at 46R Molesworth Place containing 3111 square metres, more or less, being part Allotment 49 Manurewa Parish area, Part certificate of title, No. 26C/1139 from an unclassified Local Purpose (drainage) Reserve to a classified Local Purpose (drainage) Reserve, subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

·          One parcel of land legally described as Lot 147 DP 65157, situated at 54R Molesworth Place, Mangere, containing 98 square metres when combined with Lot 146 DP 65157 being part Allotment 49 Manurewa Parish, Part Gazette notice A417070, of the North Auckland Land Registry, from an unclassified Local Purpose (drainage) Reserve to classified Local Purpose (drainage) Reserve subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977. 

4.       Auckland Council is statutorily obliged to classify all unclassified reserves. This is undertaken under section 16 of the Reserves Act 1977 and if not undertaken would mean the council is not meeting its statutory obligations.

5.       Classification of the reserve enables easements to be granted for the wastewater connections to the public wastewater network within Tararata Creek Reserve to service and future proof wastewater infrastructure for the large housing development in the surrounding area by Kāinga Ora.

6.       This proposal aligns with the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2020 “Outcome 2: We are building well connected, engaged and active communities” by providing intensification and additional housing options for residents.

7.       Local boards hold the allocated authority under Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act to classify all council owned reserves. 

8.       This report recommends that Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board approve the classifications of three parcels of land at Tararata Creek Reserve as indicated in Attachment A to comply with the statutory requirement to classify reserves according to their principal or primary purpose. 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      approve pursuant Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act the classification of Lot 145 DP 65157, situated at 15R Hall Avenue, Māngere, being part Allotment 49, Manurewa Parish, held in part Gazette notice A417070 to a classified Recreation Reserve, subject to the Reserves Act 1977

b)      approve pursuant Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act the classification of Lot 124, DP 65159, situated at 46R Molesworth Place, Māngere, being part Allotment 49, Manurewa Parish. Part certificate of title 26C/1159, and part Gazette notices A126151 and A77992 to a classified Local Purpose (drainage) Reserve, subject to the Reserves Act 1977

c)      approve pursuant Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act the classification of Lot 147 DP 65157, situated at 54R Molesworth Place, Māngere, being part Allotment 49, Manurewa Parish, held in part Gazette notice A417070 to a classified Local Purpose (drainage) Reserve subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977. 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Classification is a mandatory process under section 16 of the Reserves Act 1977 which involves assigning a reserve (or parts of a reserve) to the appropriate class. The class determines the principal or primary purpose of the reserve. The present values of the reserve are considered as well as the future “potential” values and the possible future uses and activities on the reserve. 

10.     Land classification gives council the ability to grant an easement for a wastewater connection from the surrounding Kāinga Ora development at Māngere. The wastewater infrastructure connects to the nearest public wastewater network as indicated in Attachment B.

11.     Local boards hold delegated authority under Section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 to approve classifications of council owned reserves, subject to all statutory processes having been satisfied.

12.     While there is no provision under the Reserves Act requiring the council to publicly notify its intention to classify any reserve in terms of Section 16 (2A) of that Act, engagement with iwi is still necessary in terms of Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987.

13.     The request for classification was presented to the following mana whenua groups identified with having an interest in the land via email contact:  

·              Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki 

·              Ngāti Maru 

·              Ngāti Tamaoho 

·              Ngāti Tamaterā 

·              Ngāti Te Ata 

·              Ngāti Whanaunga 

·              Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei 

·              Te Ahiwaru  

·              Ngāti Poa  

·              Te Ākitai Waiohua 

·              Te Kāwerau a Maki 

·              Waikato-Tainui. 

The response is outlined in paragraph 25 within the Māori Impact Statement section.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The land

14.     The classification of Recreation Reserve is recommended for Lot 145 DP 65157, situated at 15R Hall Avenue, Māngere as the reserve was acquired for recreation purposes and the reserve is an open space area that allows for informal recreation in an almost totally urbanised area. There is no departure or future plan to change the reserves intended use as recreation reserve. 

15.     The classification to Local Purpose (drainage) Reserve is recommended for two parcels (Lot 124 DP 65159 at 46R Molesworth Place and Lot 147 DP 65157 at 54R Molesworth Place, Māngere) within Tararata Creek Reserve as the most appropriate classification as it is the purpose for which the reserve was originally vested and reflects current use of the land as a stormwater drainage channel. 

Reserves Act 1977

16.     The Reserves Act 1977 came into force on 1 April 1978 and requires all reserves to be classified for their primary purposes.

17.     The purpose of recreation reserves as set out in section 17 of the Reserves Act 1977 is to provide for “recreation and sporting activities and the physical welfare and enjoyment of the public, and for the protection of the natural environment and beauty of the countryside, with emphasis on the retention of open spaces and on outdoor recreational activities, including recreational tracks in the countryside”. 

18.     The recreation reserve classification is the most appropriate for 15R Hall Avenue as it allows formal and informal recreation in an almost totally urbanised area, enabling residents and visitors to enjoy the reserve in a manner supported by the Reserves Act 1977. This was also the intended purpose for the reserve when it was originally acquired. 

19.     The Local Purpose (drainage) Reserve classification is recommended for two parcels (Lot 124 DP 65159 at 46R Molesworth Place and Lot 147 DP 65157 at 54R Molesworth Place, Māngere) within Tararata Creek Reserve as the most appropriate classification as it is the purpose for which the reserve was originally vested and reflects current use of the land as a stormwater drainage channel. 

20.     Staff recommend the three parcels of the reserve outlined in paragraphs 18 and 19 which form part of Tararata Creek Reserve to be classified to meet the statutory requirements.

 Specialists’ comments and consultation

21.      Land advisory, the parks and places specialist and facilities manager were consulted regarding the proposed classification and support the proposal.  

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     There is a minimal impact on greenhouse gas emissions that will occur during construction with the use of trucks for delivery. The actual wastewater infrastructure connects to the existing public network and does not introduce any new source of emissions at the site. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     The proposed reserve classification has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice. Classification of reserves gives the council guidance for the development of management plans that coincide with this purpose. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     Tararata Creek Reserve was visited by members of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on 28 January 2021 and this proposal aligns with the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2020 “Outcome 2: We are building well connected, engaged and active communities” by providing intensification and additional housing options for residents. The formal classification of the parcels of land outlined will enable the easements for wastewater infrastructure. This is not possible on an unclassified reserve.  

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     Prior to proceeding with the classification, the council is required under Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 to engage with local iwi. The item was presented to the mana whenua groups identified as having an interest in the land as indicated in paragraph 13. 

26.     Land advisory received a response from Te Kawerau a Maki thanking us for this information. Te Kawerau a Maki were in support of any comments of other mana whenua who wished to engage who have ahi kaa in this area. There were no further responses received.

27.     There are no sites of value or significance to mana whenua identified in the Auckland Unitary Plan – Operative in Part in relation to the application.  

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     There are no financial operational implications for the local board over and above the existing maintenance requirements of this reserve. 

29.     Publication in the New Zealand Gazette records the local board’s resolution. A permanent public record of the classification will be obtained after registration of the published gazette notice against the titles containing the two reserves. The cost of publication is approximately $100 and will be borne by Community Facilities. 

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     If the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board does not resolve the classification of the parcels indicated in Attachment A to this report as recommended, this decision would contravene the requirements of the Reserves Act 1977.  

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Land advisory staff will complete the classification requirements. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A: Geomaps location – Tararata Creek Reserve

67

b

Attachment B - Proposed wastewater drainage plan

69

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Raewyn Sendles - Land Use Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - Acting General Manager Community Facilities

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Attachment A: Geomaps location of proposed parcels for classification

Figure 1: 15R Molesworth Place, Mangere, legally described as Lot 145 DP 65157

Figure 2: 46R Molesworth Place, Mangere Lot 124 DP 65159

 

Figure 3: 54R Molesworth Place Mangere, legally described as Lot 147 DP 65157

 

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Approval for four new public road names at Aorere Precinct, Māngere East

File No.: CP2021/09958

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to name four public roads, created by way of a subdivision development at Aorere Precinct, Māngere East.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The Guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road names for the local board’s approval.

3.       The developer, Kāinga Ora – Home and Communities has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the local board.

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines.

5.       The proposed names for the new public roads at Aorere Precinct, Māngere East are:

·    Road 1, 2 and 3: Paneke Street

·    Road 4: Reporepo Street.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      approve the name Paneke Street (Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority gifted name) for the new public road (Road 1, 2 and 3) created by way of subdivision at Aorere Precinct, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references SUB60370101)

b)      approve the name Reporepo Street (Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority gifted name) for the new public road (Road 4) at Aorere Preinct, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references SUB60370101, SUB60373270 and SUB60373271).

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent reference SUB60370101 (Phase 1.1), SUB60373270 (Phase 1.2) and SUB60373271 (Phase 1.3) were issued on 5th May 2021 for the redevelopment of 500 new homes as affordable housing and four new public roads.

7.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachments A and B.

8.       In accordance with the Standards, any road including private ways, COALs, and rights of way, that serves more than five lots generally requires a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

9.       Therefore, in this development, the new public roads require road names because they serve more than five lots. This can be seen in Attachment B, where the roads that require names are highlighted.

10.     The specialist from Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that Road 1, 2, and 3 can be named the same via email confirmation on 3 May 2021.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across Auckland. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road names for the local board’s approval

12.     The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Maori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

13.     Consultation has been undertaken by the applicant with all mana whenua groups and Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority has gifted two names and other groups have endorsed the following names:

Road Reference

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Road 1, 2 and 3

Paneke Street

(applicant preferred)

Paneke means to move forward or pass by, both in reference to the Pūkaki waka portage that is located to the east of Aorere.

Road 4

Reporepo Street

(applicant preferred)

Reporepo relates to the marsh land that Aorere was built on.

14.     The two names listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity. It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

15.     Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

16.     ‘Street’ is an acceptable road type for the new public roads.

17.     Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) and mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The local board’s decision is sought through this report and the decision is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate.  The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

22.     On 25th March 2021 mana whenua were contacted by the applicant, as set out in the Guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with an interest in the general area were contacted:

·    Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki (Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Tribal Trust)

·    Ngāti Maru (Ngāti Maru Rūnanga Trust)

·    Ngāti Pāoa (Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust)

·    Ngāti Tamaterā (Ngāti Tamaterā Settlement Trust)

·    Ngāti Te Ata (Te Ara Rangatu o Te Iwi o Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua)

·    Ngāti Whanaunga (Ngāti Whanaunga Incorporated)

·    Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua (Makaurau Marae Māori Trust)

·    Te Patukirikiri (Te Patukirikiri Incorporated)

·    Ngāti Tamaoho

·    Ngā Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara (Nga Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara Development Trust)

·    Te Ākitai Waiohua (Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority)

·    Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei (Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Trust)

·    Te Kawerau a Maki (Te Kawerau Iwi Settlement Trust & Tribal Authority)

23.     It is noted above that Te Ākitai Waiohua (Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority) has gifted two names which have been adopted by the applicant. On 22nd April, Kāinga Ora has confirmed that all mana whenua groups have endorsed both names which were gifted by Te Ākitai Waiohua. The mana whenua consultation is therefore considered to be sufficient and completed.

24.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the Council.

26.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Location map

79

b

Site Plan

81

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Elizabeth Salter - Subdivision Technical Officer

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Play Network Assessment

File No.: CP2021/11049

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Play Network Assessment.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In FY 2020/2021 the local board provided $30,000 Locally Driven Initiative Operating Expenditure (LDI Opex) to prepare phase two of the play network assessment (Sharepoint #88) to help support local board decision-making to develop a network of challenging and exciting playspaces.

3.       The phase one play network assessment produced in FY2017/2018 provided an assessment of the local board’s current play provision and helped identify David Lange Park and Cyclamen Park as priority investments.

4.       Phase two built on the phase one assessment findings by delivering insights into network provision, geographic spread and gaps in play experiences, and identifies investment opportunities to meet the recreational needs of a growing population. The assessment findings will also help identify playspace improvement opportunities through Kāinga Ora’s housing intensification programme.

5.       The assessment was prepared following an inspection of each playground to determine current play experiences and age range provision. Opportunity maps based on the analysis of current playground catchment and distribution, age and experience provision gaps and population growth forecasting were produced to articulate development priorities (high, medium, low).

6.       To further inform the mapping exercise, research which included focus group studies and interviews with over 100 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu residents were conducted on the following topics:

·   wheeled play

·   fitness

·   exercise for older people.

 

7.       Specifically, findings identified wide-ranging provision gaps in youth, wheeled, accessible and specialist play facilities across the 36 playgrounds within the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu board area. There is also a low provision of sheltered gathering spaces, accessible pathway networks and supporting amenity for caregivers and parents with mobility needs.

8.       To improve the network in the short term and to provide valuable play facilities for a wide range of age groups, it is recommended that the board prioritises investment in high population growth areas. Playgrounds at the following parks are considered high development priorities as they can fill identified age group and play provision network gaps and provide for growth:

·   Ngā Hau Māngere/Māngere Centre Park

·   Te Ara-Tāwhana/Moyle Park 

·   Vickers Park

·   Walter Massey Park (Hain Road)

·   Harania/Mary’s Foreshore

·   Kamaka Park.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      adopt the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Play Network Assessment as the guiding document to assist informed decision making on playspace development priorities included as Attachment A of the agenda report.

Horopaki

Context

9.       Play is essential for the development and well-being of individuals. Play develops creativity and imagination whilst building physical, cognitive and emotional strength.

10.     To help improve Māngere-Ōtāhuhu’s play network a phase one play network assessment was produced in FY2017/2018. This aimed to understand the local board’s current play provision and to support local board decision-making to develop a network of diverse, challenging and exciting playspaces for all ages and abilities.

11.     Assessment recommendations included service level improvements at David Lange Park to provide a destination playspace and provide play experience improvements at Cyclamen Park playground.

12.     To build on the findings of the phase one assessment the local board provided $30,000 LDI Opex in FY 2020/2021 (Sharepoint #88) to prepare the phase two play network assessment. The phase two study provides a greater level of understanding of network gaps in play experiences, provision and geographic spread, and identified investment opportunities to meet the recreational needs of a growing population.

13.     The findings of the phase two assessment will also help support local board decision-making and advocacy with Kāinga Ora to deliver playspace network improvements through its housing intensification programme.

14.     The document was prepared in consultation with relevant plans and policies which included the Auckland Plan 2050, the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2020 and the Greenways Plan (2017).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Playground Network Assessment - Methodology 

15.     The document was prepared following an assessment of each of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board’s 36 playgrounds. Consideration was given to the following factors to understand the individual playspace and its relationship to the wider network: 

·   current distribution and catchment

·   play experience and age group provision

·   current population density and forecast population growth

·   specialised play experiences (wheeled play, courts, fitness, and accessible play).

 

16.     The assessment findings enabled further analysis to inform:

·   gaps or oversupply in distribution

·   playspace provision and high-level development options

·   gaps in age group and play experience provision

·   opportunities for specialised play provision

·   development prioritisation (high, medium or low priority).

 

17.     Opportunity maps were then produced to articulate development priorities (high, medium, low) based on each playspace’s ability through improvement to fill identified network gaps and provide for population growth.

Focus group studies and research

18.     Research comprising focus groups and interviews with more than 100 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu residents aged from eight to senior adult (70+ years) was conducted to support network prioritisation and planning.

19.     Focus group research was conducted in the following areas:

·   wheeled play

·   fitness

·   exercise for older people.

 

Play network assessment key findings

20.     Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board provides access to 36 playgrounds, comprising:

·   25 neighbourhood playgrounds – modular play facilities offering standard play experiences for a narrow age range.

·   10 suburb playgrounds – that offer a broader age range with some specialist play experiences and ball court provision.

·   1 destination playground – which provides access to a unique play facility offering a range of play experiences and gathering spaces located adjacent to Tōia (pool and leisure centre).

 

Age groups

21.     The majority of playgrounds provide for the zero to eight age range with very low provision for youth (13+ years). Age ranges are identified by early childhood (0 - four years), junior (five - eight years), senior (nine - 12 years) and youth (13+ years).

22.     Age group provision across 36 playgrounds is as follows:

·   nine (25 per cent) provide exclusively for the zero – eight age range

·   24 (66 per cent) provide for senior (nine – 12 years).

·   13 (36 per cent) provide for youth with ball courts being the main provision.

 

 

 

Play experiences

23.     Most playgrounds provide standard play experiences (consisting of jumping, spinning, rocking, swinging, balancing and creative/imagination play) with low specialised play provision (consisting of water, sand, sound, nature, accessible play, fitness, wheeled play and courts).

24.     There are significant network gaps in the provision of play experiences across the network with the following notable findings:

·   Nine (25 per cent) provide four or fewer standard play experiences.

·   Seven (20 per cent) provide zero specialist play experiences.

·   26 (72 per cent) provide four or fewer specialised play experiences.

·   Nine (25 per cent) provide all abilities play.

 

25.     Generally, the network consists of standard, modular play facilities providing similar play experiences that target a narrow age range. The lack of variation results in a network with  low appeal.

Accessible play

26.     While nine (25 per cent) playspaces provide some form of all ability or accessible play facilities, the quality of the play experience is generally low with no dedicated highly accessible playspace located in the network. Many of the network’s playspaces are poorly designed with raised barriers or incomplete pathway networks and are therefore inaccessible for children and caregivers with mobility needs.

Sheltered gathering spaces

27.     There is a low provision of sheltered gathering space that support a variety of needs including large family groups, accessible seating with pram and wheelchair parking and access.

a)                

Focus group research findings

Wheeled play

28.     There is an identified network gap in the provision of quality wheeled play facilities across the local board area that enable progressive skill development from learn to ride facilities for pre-schoolers to challenging wheeled play for youth.

29.     Research indicates that provision of high-valued wheeled play facilities including skate parks should be located at sites that provide a range of other facilities including toilets, playgrounds and sheltered gathering spaces and located within walking or cycling distance or on a bus route.

30.     Short-term improvements to wheeled play provision at Māngere Centre Park will support learn-to-ride initiatives and David Lange Park skate facilities will provide for population growth at a highly accessible park.

31.     Learn to ride facilities can form part of many neighbourhood-scale playground renewals by providing circular connecting pathways around the playspace. This is a low-cost option that can also provide accessibility and connectivity to the playspace while functioning as a wheeled play asset for pre-schoolers.

 

 

 

Fitness

32.     The current network provides a range of different types of exercise and fitness facilities for various age groups. Focus group feedback from senior adults indicates that while there is interest in using fitness equipment many senior adults are unsure how to use them. There is a requirement for further fitness equipment to provide for senior adults that are co-located with other facilities including shaded seating, walking networks and libraries. Kiwi Esplanade Reserve and Walter Massey Park are identified as locations to provide senior adult fitness.

33.     Research findings also identified network gaps in the provision of challenging fitness equipment including parkour and plyometric stations. These facilities provide youth activations and should be located near other facilities including sportsfields or existing running routes and could form part of a dedicated youth play zone.

Network gaps

34.     Research findings identified wide-ranging network gaps in:

·   youth play (other than courts)

·   play for nine – 12 years

·   destination play experiences – unique playspaces that reflect the Pasifica community

·   accessible play – including accessible supporting infrastructure (pathways, seating, etc)

·   specialised play (water, sound, sand, tactile, wheeled, creative, imaginative and nature play)

·   wheeled – progressive experiences from learn to bike/trike/scooter to skate, mountain bike and skills courses

·   communal play

·   sheltered gathering spaces to provide for large groups with a range of needs.

 

Priority playspaces

35.     Improvements to playspaces at the following parks will address network gaps in play and age group provision and meet the recreational demands of population growth and can be incorporated into the local board work programme over time.

Figure 1: Priority playspaces.

 

Park name

Play improvement opportunity

I.   

Ngā Hau Māngere/Māngere Centre Park

Provide a destination play experience for all ages (zero – youth), with accessible play, fitness and wheeled play facilities.

II.  

Te Ara-Tāwhana/Moyle Park

Provide an accessible suburb level playspace for zero – 12 years with specialised play experiences, sheltered gathering space and wheeled play.

III. 

Vickers Park

Improve the provision of standard play experiences for zero – youth with sheltered gathering spaces.

IV. 

Walter Massey Park (Hain Road)

Fill an identified network gap and provide a highly accessible playground that provides for neuro-diverse children with supporting infrastructure including connecting pathways and sheltered seating areas.

V.  

Harania/Mary’s Foreshore

Provide improvements to the existing playground with play for youth and accessible sheltered seating and pathways.

VI. 

Kamaka Park

 

Provide improved standard play experiences for ages zero-12 years to address population growth and a play network provision gap. Provide accessible connecting pathways and sheltered seating.

           

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

36.     There is scope to reduce the impact of climate change through the delivery of the report findings by using sustainable construction material and practices. Selection of locally sourced, hard-wearing material will help reduce carbon production and extend the working life of the asset.

37.     Investing in playgrounds that are located in densely populated residential catchments and that have good public transport, plus active transport connections will help reduce carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

38.     The FY 2022-2024 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Community Facilities (CF) work programme identifies David Lange Park and Cyclamen Park for renewal and upgrade which reflects the phase one Play Network Assessment recommendations.

39.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Play Network Assessment will be used by CF to assist in the planning and delivery of renewed playspaces, reflecting the gaps in provision outlined in the document. The local board may, at its discretion, provide LDI capital expenditure (capex) at times to address gaps in provision through a top-up of the renewal budget.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

40.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board provided feedback on the draft Play Network Assessment at a May 2021 workshop. The board provided support to improve the network specifically for wheeled, accessible and youth play provision.

41.     The assessment will support the delivery of the following Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2020 aspiration; ‘Community facilities meet our diverse needs, enhancing our lifestyles, culture, and wellbeing’.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

42.     Parks and reserves are taonga and hold significant importance to mana whenua. Developing a network of playgrounds that provide for all ages and abilities will positively benefit the health and wellbeing of mana whenua and the wider community through increased recreation provision.

43.     Partnering with mana whenua will enable delivery of the following environmental outcome identified in the Schedule of Issues of Significance 2021 – 2025 document: ‘Māori cultural values, history and heritage are reflected within the built environment through design, architecture and the inclusion of uniquely Māori design principles in public space’.

44.     Mana whenua consultation will occur as part of the investigation and design process for each individual play renewal or development project.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

45.     Capital budgets are significantly reduced due to the pandemic and in some cases development projects will be pushed out to future years. This could impact the rate at which play network improvements are delivered.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

46.     Adoption of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Play Network Assessment and priority playspace developments may raise community expectations that the local board will fund development of these priority playgrounds. Identified gaps in playspace provision may also in some instances rely on being addressed through LDI capex investment top up. This may result in gaps in provision being partially improved only.

47.     The document will ensure a considered, strategic and objective approach is taken by the board with regard to investment in play and will help support conversations with Kāinga Ora to provide play improvement outcomes through their housing intensification programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

48.     The local board can use the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Play Network Assessment as the guiding document to assist informed decision making on playspace development priorities and location provision from a network perspective.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Play Network Assessment

91

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Steve Owens - Parks and Places Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Adoption of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Urban Ngahere 10-Year Action Plan

File No.: CP2021/11631

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Urban Ngahere 10-Year Action Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The regional Te Rautaki Ngahere ā-Tāone o Tāmaki Makaurau/ Auckland’s Urban Forest Strategy  responds to changes in ngahere canopy cover and potential climate change impacts. The strategy’s target is to increase tree canopy cover across all local board areas in Tāmaki Makaurau to 30 per cent by 2050. 

3.       In 2018/19, the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board funded an implementation plan to understand the current canopy cover and plan for increasing ngahere cover in the local area. The three stages of the implementation plan are ‘knowing’, ‘growing’ and ‘protecting’.

4.       The first part of the ‘knowing’ stage involved analysis of the 2013 Light Detecting and Ranging Technology (LiDAR) data for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board tree canopy cover. A report identifying cover of 8 per cent was adopted by the local board in 2019.

5.       Comparative analysis work has been completed for the more recent LiDAR data. The findings show that net canopy coverage has remained at 8 per cent overall with a net increase of 17 hectares between 2013 and 2016-2018 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board. 

6.       The final part of the ‘knowing’ stage has been to develop a 10-year action plan that identifies target areas where trees can be planted to help increase canopy cover in the local board area.

7.       This report is seeking adoption of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Urban Ngahere 10-Year Action Plan which is provided as Attachment A.

8.       The local board’s adoption of the action plan will set the direction for tree planting over the next 10 years and enable planning and preparation for the ‘growing’ phase to commence.

9.       It is recommended the action plan is reviewed every three years to align with local board plan development. This will update the board on planting progress and enable planning for maintaining existing and highlighting next steps to further increasing canopy cover.

10.     Each year an annual planting plan, including site specific analysis, tree selection, soil and environmental condition analysis, will be prepared. The annual planting plan will require local board funding.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      adopt the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Urban Ngahere 10 Year Action Plan in Attachment A

b)      delegate authority to the General Manager - Parks, Sport and Recreation, to make minor changes and amendments to the text and design of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Urban Ngahere (Forest) 10-year Action Plan

c)      request that Parks, Sport and Recreation staff review the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Urban Ngahere 10-Year Action Plan every three years and provide a report updating the local board on progress of delivery of the action plan

d)      request that Parks, Sport and Recreation staff review the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Urban Ngahere Action Plan implementation work programme annually and provide a report to the local board on the delivery of new tree plantings.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     In 2016 staff studied the extent of urban forest canopy coverage across Tāmaki Makaurau using information captured from an aerial flight using LiDAR survey technology.

12.     A detailed tree canopy analysis report was developed by staff from the Research Investigation Monitoring Unit (RIMU) and a regional strategy was developed, which the Governing Body approved in October 2018.

13.     The regional strategy’s objective is to increase regional tree canopy cover to 30 per cent, with no local board area having less than 15 per cent canopy cover by 2050.

14.     Local boards’ role in reaching this target is to develop local implementation plans to address the canopy loss in their local board area. The local implementation plan has three stages: ‘knowing’, ‘growing’ and ‘protecting’.

15.     The ‘knowing’ stage of this planning included analysis of the cover that currently exists across the local board area, and a comparison of net change over a three to five-year period. The percentage canopy cover analysis measures all vegetation on public and private land that is over three metres in height.

16.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Urban Ngahere (Forest) Analysis Report was approved by the local board on 18 September 2019 (resolution MO/2019/162). It found that the average tree canopy cover across the local board area was 8 per cent based on the findings of the 2013 LiDAR work. 

17.     The findings from the analysis report have been used to help inform development of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Urban Ngahere 10-Year Action Plan, providing guidance on how to direct new tree planting efforts to increase overall tree canopy cover.

18.     The action plan will provide long-term direction on planting new trees across the local board area with a goal to increase overall tree canopy coverage.

19.     Adoption and implementation of the action plan will lead to:

·        planting of new specimen trees

·        undertaking enrichment planting in local parks

·        working with Auckland Transport to increase tree cover in the road corridor

·        providing guidance and direction for community groups and council departments undertaking or organising community planting events.

20.     Targets and areas to focus planting efforts are outlined in the action plan. Planting trees in these areas will increase canopy cover, establish or enhance ecological corridors for wildlife and provide shade for key areas in parks and reserves.

 

 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

21.     The action plan has been informed by findings from the canopy analysis report. Findings in the analysis report were based on a LiDAR survey that was completed in 2013.

22.     A follow up LiDAR survey was carried out in 2016-2018 and findings show a net increase in canopy cover in the local board area between 2013 and 2018. The net increase in overall tree canopy coverage equates to approximately 17 square hectares more tree canopy cover when compared to 2013. The overall net increases in canopy coverage took place across the local board area, with the largest gains being measured on publicly owned land.

23.     The comparative findings show an overall positive increase in tree cover took place between 2013 and 2018. The increases in tree canopy coverages were observed in the road corridor with net increases of 2 per cent canopy cover. The net gains on public land amount to a total increase in tree canopy cover of 17 hectares indicating a minor positive trajectory of improvement. Comparative analysis of the two data sets is now finalised and an update of the Ngahere Canopy Analysis report will be circulated with a covering memorandum to the local board later in August 2021.

24.     Site assessments have been carried out to investigate suitable locations for planting new specimen trees based on the information in the analysis report. The primary areas of assessment were parks with playgrounds and local streets that could provide green corridor connections between local parks.

25.     These investigations, along with extensive site visits and subject matter expert input, have helped to inform the proposed locations and set the target for planting that is outlined in the action plan.

26.     The target for the local board is to maintain existing and to increase tree canopy cover by 5 per cent in the road corridor and on public reserve land over a 10-year period. This will require the planting of a least two hundred fifty large growing specimen trees annually. Doing this annually will increase overall tree canopy coverages on publicly managed land by 2030. 

27.     The adoption of the action plan and its implementation will (over a 30-year period), lead to incremental changes that will help work towards achieving above the regional target of 30 per cent canopy cover.

28.     Reporting on implementation of the plan every three years aligns with local board plan development. This will enable the local board to review the target and planting strategy, plan for the next areas of planting and consider the allocation of budgets required.

29.     Staff have recommended a realistic target for the local board to work towards in the action plan. It is forecast that with small increases in new planting and decreases in tree removal year on year; the current 8 per cent cover is at least maintained with potentially an incremental increase of 5 per cent on public land as the new annual tree plantings mature over the next 10 years

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

30.     Implementation of the strategy and the action plan is an example of an integrated approach to help mitigate emissions, build resilience longer term and enable adaptation to the impacts of climate change to meet Auckland Council’s climate goals.

31.     The strategy is identified as a key action in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri - Auckland’s Climate Plan 2020.

32.     Increasing stock of trees and vegetation in Tāmaki Makaurau will increase carbon sequestration and contribute towards reducing net greenhouse gas emissions.

33.     Increasing trees and vegetation also provides various natural functions that assist with adaptation to the climate change impacts for humans and other species, such as:

·        providing a shading and cooling effect to counter rising temperatures

·        slowing and reducing stormwater runoff to assist in managing increased rainfall events

·        improve air quality by trapping particulates and filtering vehicle pollutants

·        providing additional habitat for indigenous species to occupy, enhancing their resilience to climate change impacts.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

34.     Collaboration across Parks, Sport and Recreation (PSR), Infrastructure and Environmental Services (I&ES) and Community Facilities (CF) has been key to the development of the action plan.  

35.     Community Facilities has helped inform where the current maintenance and renewal programme for trees can be strengthened to improve the overall diversity and increase the extent of the tree canopy cover.

36.     Parks, Sport and Recreation will work with Community Facilities in developing the renewals programme to ensure an ongoing programme of tree renewal occurs to replace poor and ailing stock and to replant where dead, dying or diseased trees are removed. 

37.     Staff will continue to collaborate and develop a tree planting programme and implementation plan for the delivery of new tree plantings in the 2022 planting season and beyond.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.     The early draft action plan was workshopped with the local board on 7th October 2020. At the workshop board members were presented the draft plan and were asked to provide feedback.

39.     The feedback received at the workshop has been incorporated into the final action plan.  The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Ngahere action plan 2021 is included as attachment A to this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

40.     The strategy was workshopped with mana whenua during its development in three workshops during 2017 and 2018. Feedback and views discussed at the hui helped to shape the final version of the strategy.

41.     The use of native trees for all new tree planting is a strong view of mana whenua, and as such natives are the first choice for planting as outlined in the strategy. Native trees are also identified as the preference for planting in the action plan.

42.     New tree plantings will benefit local Māori and the wider community by providing increased opportunities for access to nature and providing shade in the local park network.

43.     Mana whenua will be updated in the coming months on the local implementation programme and will be engaged to support tree planting advice and to provide a cultural narrative in the choice of species for local areas.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

44.     The adoption of the action plan will conclude the ‘knowing’ stage of the local board’s implementation of the strategy, which is funded by the Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) OPEX budget.

45.     Delivery of the ‘growing’ stage will be funded by CAPEX from various budgets. These include Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI), Asset Based Services (ABS), the Natural Environment Targeted Rate (NETR) and Mayor’s Million Trees budgets that are allocated by the Governing Body.

46.     In 2021/2022 the local board has not proposed to allocate any LDI CAPEX for new tree planting in the Ngahere programme. The adoption of the action plan will help to direct priorities for any future funding and ensure the right trees are planted in the right place.

47.     To ensure the target outlined in the action plan is met, it is recommended that a scaled approach to increasing the amount of LDI CAPEX through the local board’s Community Facilities annual work programme to increase the numbers of new trees being planted. The amount of funding required will be quantified annually based on priorities to advance new tree plantings in areas of need.

48.     LDI OPEX will be required each year for development of site-specific plans, for board approval to enable delivery of the local board’s annual tree planting programme. This is currently included in the draft 2021/2022 – 2023/2024 work programme.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     The trajectory of loss of tree canopy cover across the local board area is expected to continue on private land as the area develops. New tree planting on public land is necessary to help offset these changes over the longer term.

50.     Sufficient time is required to plan and prepare for planting. Should the local board not adopt the plan there is a risk that the ‘growing’ stage of the strategy will not be able to start in June 2021.

51.     The 10 year action plan outlines a detailed ‘Planting Opportunities List’ to ensure the right tree is planted in the right place. Should the local board not adopt the action plan there is a risk that trees planted in 2021 will not be appropriate for their location.

52.     There is a risk of poor maintenance of plants once they are in the ground. Adoption of the action plan will help mitigate this risk and enable staff to employ best practice tree planting and ongoing maintenance methods.  

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

53.     Following adoption of the action plan, annual planting plans will be completed that identify areas for new planting in 2021, 2022 and 2023. These assessments will advise CF, Auckland Transport and other delivery partners on priorities for the ‘growing’ stage.

54.     If funding becomes available to fund new tree planting through CAPEX projects, sponsorship, renewals and upgrades an annual update on the ‘growing’ stage will be developed for the local board. These reports will be provided by departments that are leading the tree planting and collated by Parks, Sport and Recreation staff to enable high level reporting on total numbers of new trees planted.

55.     In 2023, staff will review the strategy, report to the board on successes and challenges and recommend direction for planting and funding allocation for the following three years.

56.     The analysis of the 2018 data is complete which will enable the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Urban Ngahere (Forest) Analysis Report 2019 to be updated with an addendum. Staff will provide the addendum to the local board in August 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Urban Ngahere 10-Year Action Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Howell Davies - Senior Advisor - Urban Forest

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Auckland Transport - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board: Māngere East & Manukau Cycling Single Stage Business Case (SSBC) – Community Partner Working Group Engagement Approach

File No.: CP2021/11634

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report s

1.       To seek local board support for the proposed Communications and Engagement Approach and the formation of a Community Partner Working Group for the Māngere East & Manukau Cycling Single Stage Business Cases.

2.       Delegate a member(s) of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to be a representative on the proposed Community Partner Working Group.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Auckland Transport - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board: Māngere East & Manukau Cycling Single Stage Business Case (SSBC) – Community Partner Working Group Engagement Approach report is provided as Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      support the proposed Communications and Engagement approach and the formation of the Community Partner Working Group

b)      delegate a member(s) of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to be a representative on the proposed Community Partner Working Group.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board: Māngere East & Manukau Cycling Single Stage Business Case (SSBC) – Community Partner Working Group Engagement Approach

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Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Proposal to make a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw

File No.: CP2021/11605

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek support for the draft proposal to make a new Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Auckland Council Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022, before it is finalised for public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Staff have prepared a draft proposal for a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw to enable local boards to provide their views before it is finalised for public consultation.

3.       The draft proposal is to make a new bylaw under the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This bylaw would replace the current legacy bylaw, which expires in 2022 and contains provisions developed before the Freedom Camping Act 2011 was passed.

4.       The Freedom Camping Act 2011 allows freedom camping on all public land unless it is already prohibited under another enactment. The Act enables councils to make a bylaw to prohibit or restrict freedom camping in areas that meet statutory criteria for protection.

5.       This draft proposal replaces an earlier proposal developed in 2018 which was set aside by the Governing Body in 2019. Following decisions by the Governing Body in March and May 2021, the key changes compared with the 2018 proposal are that the new draft proposal:

·     excludes land held under the Reserves Act 1977 from scope (council would maintain the current default prohibition on camping on reserves under the Reserves Act 1977)

·     manages freedom camping only on land held under the Local Government Act 2002

·     seeks to prevent freedom camping impacts in sensitive areas, and to protect public health and safety and manage access in all areas, by:

scheduling 44 prohibited areas, where no freedom camping is allowed

scheduling 19 restricted areas, where freedom camping is allowed subject to site-specific restrictions

including general rules to manage freedom camping impacts in all other areas (campers must use certified self-contained vehicles, stay a maximum of two nights, depart by 9am and not return to the same area within two weeks).

6.       The proposed prohibited and restricted areas are those areas which the Bylaw Panel recommended should be prohibited and restricted in 2019, and which are held under the Local Government Act 2002. Areas held under the Reserves Act 1977 have been removed.

7.       The Panel’s recommendations draw on previous area assessments and take into account feedback from local board engagement and public consultation conducted in 2018 and 2019.

8.       The draft proposal includes one designated prohibited area and no designated restricted areas located in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area. All designated areas are listed in the draft Bylaw schedules within Attachment A. All other council-managed land held under the Local Government Act 2002, including roads, is proposed to be covered by general rules.

9.       Staff recommend that the local board provide its view on the draft proposal, including the inclusion of general rules in the bylaw and the recommended settings for those rules.

 

10.     The key risks of the proposal are that:

·     it creates too few areas where freedom camping is allowed; this is partially mitigated by allowing freedom camping on most roads (subject to general rules), and council could decide to designate more restricted areas following consultation

·     the cumulative impact of all prohibitions under the Bylaw and other enactments is viewed as an effective ban; however staff looked closely at the requirements of the Freedom Camping Act 2011 in developing the proposal and will continue to monitor cumulative impact as bylaw development progresses.

11.     The local board’s views will be provided to the Governing Body in September with the recommendation that the finalised proposal is adopted for public consultation. Public consultation is scheduled for November, and Bylaw Panel deliberations for early 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      support the draft Statement of Proposal in Attachment A of this agenda report to make a new Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 Auckland Council Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022 for public consultation.

Horopaki

Context

Freedom camping can have both positive and negative impacts

12.     For the purposes of this Bylaw, freedom camping is when someone stays overnight on council-managed land, including roadsides, in a vehicle or caravan.

13.     Freedom camping specifically refers to people staying in vehicles overnight as part of leisure travel, or because they are choosing to live in a vehicle for lifestyle reasons.

14.     Freedom camping provides a flexible and affordable way for Aucklanders and for domestic and international visitors to experience and enjoy the region. Many freedom campers will visit friends and family, attend events, and support local businesses during their stay.

15.     Freedom camping can however have negative impacts on the local environment and host communities if it is not well-managed. These impacts can be caused by:

16.     Freedom camping has become popularly associated with harmful and antisocial behaviours, but our research shows that most freedom campers visiting Auckland do camp responsibly.

17.     However, the presence of large numbers of campers – even responsible campers – is more likely to cause community concern in Auckland due to pressure on limited public space.

18.     Freedom camper numbers have been growing in Auckland and throughout the country over the last two decades. Once the current border restrictions are lifted overseas visitors are likely to return, and domestic freedom camping may continue to increase in the meantime.

19.     Auckland does not currently have enough places for freedom campers to go. This means there is often overcrowding in the places where it is allowed, or illegal camping in unsuitable areas once legal sites are full. Having more areas would reduce these supply-related issues.

20.     The council can regulate freedom camping to help prevent irresponsible camping and manage responsible freedom camping in a way that minimises its negative impacts.

Council must align its freedom camping regulation with the Freedom Camping Act 2011

21.     The Freedom Camping Act 2011 allows freedom camping on all public land unless it is prohibited under a bylaw or another enactment, such as the Reserves Act 1977.

22.     Auckland’s current Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2015 is a consolidation of pre-2010 legacy bylaw provisions developed before the Freedom Camping Act 2011 was passed. A new bylaw must be made that aligns with the national legislation before the current bylaw expires in 2022.

23.     The Freedom Camping Act 2011 is permissive by default but does allow council to make a bylaw to prohibit or restrict freedom camping in areas where certain statutory criteria are met. In particular, council must be satisfied that:

·     each area’s location can be clearly shown on a map and/or described

·     the prohibitions and restrictions in each area are necessary to:

-     protect the area (for example because it is environmentally or culturally sensitive)

-     protect the health and safety of the people who may visit the area

-     protect access to the area (for other users)

·     the cumulative impact of all prohibitions and restrictions (under the bylaw and other enactments) do not constitute an effective ban on freedom camping on council land.

A 2018 proposal to regulate freedom camping was set aside in August 2019

24.     Work to develop a freedom camping bylaw began in 2016. Staff assessed more than 1,000 areas for their suitability for freedom camping and need for protection under the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This process included extensive engagement with local boards.

25.     In late 2018 and early 2019 public feedback and formal local board views were sought on a proposal for a draft Freedom Camping in Vehicles bylaw. A Bylaw Panel deliberated on all feedback and made recommendations to the Governing Body. The Panel recommended scheduling 322 prohibited areas and 103 restricted areas, including a number of reserves.

26.     In August 2019 the Governing Body set aside the recommendations of the Bylaw Panel and instead requested advice on a new direction for bylaw development.

The Governing Body decided to exclude reserves from scope and include general rules

27.     The Governing Body considered staff advice in March 2021[1] and May 2021[2] and directed that a new proposal for a Freedom Camping Act 2011 bylaw be developed that:

·     only manages freedom camping on land held under the Local Government Act 2002, with camping on reserves continuing to be managed by the Reserves Act 1977

·     includes general rules to manage the generalised impacts of freedom camping, and ensure problems are not displaced from regulated to unregulated areas

·     relies on previous assessments (undertaken to develop the 2018 proposal) to identify land held under the Local Government Act 2002 that should be prohibited or further restricted through the bylaw.

28.     Staff have prepared a draft proposal to implement the Governing Body’s decisions (Attachment A). This proposal outlines the reasons and decisions that have led to the content of the proposed new Bylaw.

Potential changes to the Freedom Camping Act 2011 not yet confirmed

29.     In April and May 2021, the Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) publicly consulted on four proposals for change to the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This included making the use of self-contained vehicles mandatory for all freedom camping.

30.     The Governing Body approved Auckland Council’s submission, which incorporated local board views, in May 2021[3]. MBIE has not yet released any further information, and timeframes for any changes to the Act have not been confirmed.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

A new bylaw is proposed to manage freedom camping in vehicles on some council land

31.     The draft proposal would make a new Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022 that:

·     aligns with the Freedom Camping Act 2011

·     helps council to prevent freedom camping impacts in sensitive areas, and to protect public health and safety and manage access in all areas of land held under the Local Government Act 2002 (including roads controlled by Auckland Transport)

·     forms part of a wider regulatory framework of Acts, regulations and other bylaws[4].

32.     The Bylaw will be enforced by the Licensing and Regulatory Compliance unit using a graduated compliance model (information, education, enforcement).

33.     The table below summarises the main proposals:

Draft proposals

Reasons for draft proposal

To schedule 63 specific areas as follows:

Restrict freedom camping in 19 specific areas (where freedom camping is allowed subject to site-specific restrictions)

Listed in Schedule 1 of the draft Bylaw

 

To better manage areas that have been identified as needing additional regulation due to factors such as popularity, current use by others, demand for parking and the size of the parking areas.

These are the restricted areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel in 2019, with all reserves removed.

Prohibit freedom camping in 44 specific areas (where freedom camping is not allowed)

Listed in Schedule 2 of the draft Bylaw

 

To protect areas that have been identified as being environmentally or culturally sensitive, or where freedom camping would impact public health and safety and access in ways that cannot be adequately managed through restrictions.

These are the prohibited areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel in 2019, with all reserves removed.

To include general rules for all other areas as follows:

Require freedom campers to use certified self-contained vehicles

To prevent impacts from the depositing of toilet waste and wastewater into the environment, and the use of unsuitable areas for cooking

Allow freedom campers to stay a maximum of two nights in the same road or off-road parking area

To prevent impacts from the depositing of toilet waste and wastewater into the environment and ensure fair access to limited shared parking and amenities

Require freedom campers to vacate their parking space by 9am on the day of departure

To ensure fair access for shared parking and amenities for other campers and users of public space

Require freedom campers not return to stay in the same road or off-road parking area within a two-week period

To ensure fair access to limited shared parking and amenities for other campers and users of public space

34.     The draft proposal notes that the council does not intend to use the bylaw to manage:

·     issues associated with homelessness (people living in a vehicle involuntarily)

·     areas where access is already controlled or parking is reserved or charged for, for example gated carparks, land leased to other organisations and regional parks.

The draft proposal complies with statutory requirements

35.     The draft proposal has been prepared in accordance with statutory requirements. Staff consider the proposed draft Bylaw:

·     only prohibits or restricts freedom camping where it is necessary to protect sensitive areas, and/or to manage impacts on public health and safety and access to an area

·     uses a format and wording that are easy to read, understand and comply with

·     is authorised by statute, is not repugnant to other legislation, and is not unreasonable

·     does not give rise to any implications or inconsistencies with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990.

Staff recommend the local board consider and provide its views on the draft proposal

36.     Staff recommend that the local board consider the draft proposal in Attachment A and provide any views by resolution to the Governing Body before it is finalised for public consultation on 23 September 2021.

37.     For example, the board could support the draft proposal for public consultation, recommend changes or defer comment until after it has considered public feedback on the proposal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     Staff note that this is a regulatory process to manage existing activities enabled by central government policy. It is not causing these activities to occur or affecting the likelihood that they will occur. The decision sought in this report therefore has no specific climate impact.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.     The draft proposal impacts the operations of several council departments and council-controlled organisations, including Licensing and Regulatory Compliance, Parks, Sport and Recreation and Auckland Transport.

40.     The Licensing and Regulatory Compliance unit are aware of the impacts of the draft proposal and their primary role in implementing and managing compliance with the Bylaw.

41.     Council’s 86 park rangers help to manage compliance with council Bylaws, the Reserves Act 1977 and the Litter Act 1974 by carrying out education and monitoring on parks and reserves. However, rangers are not currently being warranted or renewing warrants, and Licensing and Regulatory Compliance will continue to carry out any enforcement required.

Enhanced service levels for Bylaw compliance activities are not currently budgeted

42.     Concern about the council’s ability to effectively implement the Bylaw and manage compliance within existing resources was a key theme of public and local board feedback received in 2019.

43.     In March 2021 the Governing Body requested advice about costed options for increasing the service levels for compliance associated with this Bylaw. Costings are being finalised and this advice will be provided alongside the proposal in September, for consideration during future Annual Plan cycles.

44.     There are multiple options for increasing investment in Bylaw implementation and both proactive and reactive Bylaw compliance activities. These include:

·     enhancement of council’s information technology systems, to enable the implementation of the new infringement notice regime

·     use of contracted security services, to increase responsiveness to complaints (similar to the current arrangements for Noise Control), or for additional proactive monitoring at seasonal ‘hotspots’

·     purchase of mobile printers, to enable infringement notices to be affixed to vehicles in breach of the Bylaw at the time of the offence

·     signage at all prohibited and restricted areas and at other areas as needed

·     camera surveillance technology to enable remote monitoring of known or emerging hotspots, for evidence-gathering purposes and/or to support real-time enforcement.

45.     Local boards can request further advice from Licensing and Regulatory Compliance if they wish to consider allocating local budget for enhanced local compliance activities.

46.     For example, Rodney Local Board recently allocated funds from its Locally Driven Initiatives budget to employ two Compliance Wardens for a six-month trial over the 2021-2022 summer period. The wardens will address low level compliance issues, including illegal freedom camping, with follow-up support from warranted compliance staff when required.

Ongoing land classification work won’t be completed with bylaw development timeframes

47.     Following the Governing Body’s decision in March 2021 to exclude reserves from scope, land status has become more relevant for identifying areas requiring protection in the bylaw.

48.     The council does not currently hold complete land classification data to establish definitive numbers of reserves. Parks and reserves can comprise multiple land parcels which may be held under different Acts.

49.     Since reporting to the Governing Body in March, staff have completed further investigation of the land status of the prohibited and restricted areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel. This has identified additional reserves, which has reduced the proposed prohibited areas (from 55 in the March report to 44 in the draft proposal) and restricted areas (from 21 to 19).

50.     Classifications are still being confirmed as part of the development of omnibus Local Park Management Plans. Five local board areas have completed this work, and an average of 94 percent of their parks were found to be held under the Reserves Act 1977.

51.     Ongoing land classification work will support bylaw implementation. It will not finish within the timeframe for bylaw development, so the status quo issues will remain.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

52.     The proposed draft Bylaw impacts on local boards’ governance role as it affects decision making over local assets, particularly parks and other council-controlled public places. There is also high community interest in freedom camping regulation in many local board areas.

53.     The local board has an opportunity to provide its views on this draft proposal by resolution to the Governing Body. The local board will also have further opportunity to provide its views to a Bylaw Panel on any public feedback to the proposal from people in their local board area.

 

 

All proposed prohibited and restricted areas previously discussed with local boards

54.     The draft proposal includes one designated prohibited area and no designated restricted areas located in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area. All designated areas are listed in the draft Bylaw schedules within Attachment A. All other council-managed land held under the Local Government Act 2002, including roads, is proposed to be covered by general rules.

55.     The proposed prohibited and restricted areas are those areas which the Bylaw Panel recommended should be prohibited and restricted in 2019, and which are held under the Local Government Act 2002. Areas held under the Reserves Act 1977 have been removed.

56.     All areas proposed to be scheduled as prohibited or restricted were previously discussed with the relevant local boards in 2018.

Joint political working group provided views on general rules in May 2021

57.     Three local board representatives participated in a joint political working group on 21 May 2021 to provide views on options for including general rules in the Bylaw.

58.     The working group unanimously supported the inclusion of general rules in the Bylaw, and five out of six working group members supported the recommended settings included in the draft proposal. A summary of the working group’s views was reported to the Governing Body on 27 May 2021[5].

The new draft proposal responds to feedback provided on the 2018 proposal

59.     Local boards provided formal feedback on the 2018 draft proposal to the Bylaw Panel in 2019, following on from their early feedback given during engagement in 2017, and site-specific feedback provided in 2018.

60.     The table below details typical concerns expressed by local boards in their formal feedback and how the new draft proposal responds to these concerns:

Key local board concern (from 2019)

Draft proposal’s response to concern

The loss of protection in the legacy bylaws for most reserves and roadsides

·   Excludes reserves from the bylaw and continues to use the Reserves Act 1977 to manage all camping at reserves

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw, including roadsides

·   Notes individual roads can be scheduled as prohibited or restricted areas if problems arise in future

The provision for unrestricted freedom camping in the local board area

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw

Freedom camping at reserves and enforcement tools under the Reserves Act

·   The Reserves Act 1977 will be used to manage all camping at reserves, which means the status quo (prohibition) will continue

·   Notes that following changes in September 2019 to the Reserves Act 1977, $800 infringement notices can now be issued for breaches of this Act

Freedom camping in inner-city areas, unsafe areas and areas near sports fields, residential homes and campgrounds

·   Bylaw schedules designate individual sites that have been identified and assessed as unsuitable for freedom camping (prohibited areas), or where additional restrictions are needed to manage impacts (restricted areas)

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw

The potential effect on people experiencing homelessness

·   Clarifies that the bylaw will not be used to manage issues associated with homelessness and confirms the council’s commitment to a compassionate enforcement approach to protect vulnerable Aucklanders

Council’s ability to enforce bylaws and the cost of enforcement and monitoring

·   Although not contained in the proposal itself, advice will be provided to the Governing Body on options for increasing investment in bylaw implementation

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

61.     The Bylaw has relevance to Māori as kaitiaki of Papatūānuku. The proposal supports two key directions in the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau:

·     wairuatanga (promoting distinctive identity), in relation to valuing and protecting Māori heritage and Taonga Māori

·     kaitiakitanga (ensuring sustainable futures), in relation to environmental protection.

62.     The proposal also supports the Board’s Schedule of Issues of Significance by ensuring that sites of significance to Māori are identified and protected from freedom camping harms.

63.     Mana whenua and mataawaka were invited to provide feedback during the development of the 2018 proposal via dedicated hui and again through the public consultation process.

64.     Feedback received on specific prohibited and restricted areas identified in the 2018 proposal was incorporated into the deliberations. This included the identification of sites of significance to Māori, such as wahi tapu areas.

65.     General matters raised by Māori during engagement included the need to ensure:

·     the ability to add further sites of significance to the bylaw as these are designated

·     provision for temporary bans on freedom camping, e.g. in areas under a rahui

·     a compassionate approach to people experiencing homelessness

·     provision of sufficient dump stations to avoid environmental pollution

·     clear communication of the rules in the bylaw and at freedom camping sites.

66.     The draft proposal addresses these matters by proposing to prohibit freedom camping at sites of significance to Māori (such as Maraetai Foreshore and Onetangi Cemetery), provision in the Bylaw for temporary bans, and confirming council’s commitment to a compassionate enforcement approach to people experiencing homelessness.

67.     Mana whenua and mataawaka will have an opportunity to provide further feedback during public consultation on the proposal

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

68.     There are no financial implications to the local board for any decisions to support the draft proposal for public consultation. The Governing Body will consider any financial implications associated with public notification in September 2021.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

69.     Legal risks were discussed as part of the provision of legally privileged advice to interested local board members at a confidential workshop held in June 2021.

70.     The other key risks and possible mitigations are summarised in the table below.

If...

Then...

Mitigation (partial)

The bylaw proposal does not create enough areas where freedom camping is allowed

 

Council may need to manage an increase in overcrowding, non-compliance, and harms over time.

The proposed bylaw would enable freedom campers to stay for up to two nights on most roads, subject to general rules.

Council could consider increasing the number of designated restricted areas following consultation, or if problems arise in future.

 

The cumulative impact of prohibitions and restrictions in the Bylaw and other enactments is viewed as an ‘effective ban’ on freedom camping in Auckland

The risk of legal challenge could increase.

Staff looked closely at the requirements of the Freedom Camping Act 2011 in developing the proposal, and cumulative impact will continue to be monitored.

Council can’t meet public expectation of increased enforcement

There may be a loss of social license for freedom camping and reputational risk for council.

Responsible Camping Ambassadors will assist compliance staff during the peak season, although future funding is not guaranteed.

The Governing Body or local boards could allocate additional funding to increase service levels for compliance activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

71.     Staff will present local board views and a finalised proposal to the Governing Body on 23 September 2021. The next steps for bylaw development are shown in the diagram below.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Freedom Camping in Vehicles Statement of Proposal and Draft Bylaw August 2021 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Rebekah Forman - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Local board resolution responses, feedback and information report

 

File No.: CP2021/09680

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       This report provides a summary of resolution responses, local board feedback and information reports for circulation to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board.

Information reports for the local board:

2.      Howick Local Board’s June 2021 business meeting requested a copy of the following resolutions be forwarded to all local boards for their information (Attachment A).

a)      Item 15 – Local Board Views on Plan Change 60 – Open Space (2020) and Other Rezoning Matters.

b)      Item 16 – Economic Development Action Plan: Draft for feedback.

3.      Ōrākei Local Board’s June 2021 business meeting requested a copy of the following resolution be forwarded to all local board for their information (Attachment B).

         a)           Item 21 – Feedback of Equity of Service Levels and Funding Proposals.

b)      Item 22 – Feedback on Te Waihanga New Zealand Infrastructure Commission's consultation document He Tūāpapa ki te Ora, Infrastructure for a Better Future, Aotearoa New Zealand Infrastructure Strategy.

c)      Item 23 – Feedback on Hīkina te Kohupara – Kia mauri ora ai te iwi. Transport Emissions: Pathways to Net Zero by 2050 discussion document.

4.      The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Chairperson received an email on 5 July 2021 regarding the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 -  Recovery Budget, Closing the Loop letter and the frequently asked questions document (Attachment C).

 

5.      Ōrākei Local Board’s 15 July 2021 business meeting requested a copy of the following resolution be forwarded to all local boards for their information (Attachment D).

a)      Item 17 – Resource management system reform: Natural and Build Environment Bill exposure draft submission.

b)      Item 18 – Government Policy Statement of Housing and Urban Development.

 

6.      On 22 July 2021 the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board received a memo updating the local board members on funding allocation decisions by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee regarding the Regional Sport and Recreation Facility Operating Grant (Attachment E)

 

6.      On 26 July 2021 the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board provided feedback on the Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development (Attachment F).

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/sThat the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)         note the Howick Local Board’s June 2021 business meeting resolutions (Attachment A)

b)         note the Ōrākei Local Board’s June 2021 business meeting resolutions (Attachment B)

c)         note the Long-Term Plan 2021-2031, Recovery Budget – closing the loop letter and frequently asked questions document (Attachment C)

 

d)         note the Ōrākei Local Board’s 15 July 2021 business meeting resolutions (Attachment D)

 

e)         note the memo updating the local board members on funding allocation decisions by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee regarding the Regional Sport and Recreation Facility Operating Grant (Attachment E)

 

f)          note the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board feedback on the Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development (Attachment F).

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Howick Local Board resolutions

153

b

Ōrākei Local Board resolutions

157

c

Long-Term Plan 2021-2031 - Recovery budget and closing the loop letter and frequently asked questions document

161

d

Ōrākei Local Board resolutions

173

e

Regional Sport and Recreation Facility Operating Grant

183

f

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board feedback on the Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development

199

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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18 August 2021

 

 

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18 August 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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18 August 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2021/08413

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board workshops held on 2nd, 9th and 23 June and 7th July 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 12.1.4, the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its local board workshops held over the past month.

3.       Resolutions or decisions are not made at workshops as they are solely for the provision of information and discussion. This report attaches the workshop record for the period stated below.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the workshop notes from the workshops held on 2nd, 9th and 23 June and 7th July 2021.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2nd June Workshop Notes

205

b

9th June Workshop Notes

207

c

23rd June Workshop Notes

209

d

7th July Workshop Notes

211

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2021/08412

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

3.       The governance forward work calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      note the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar August

215

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022

File No.: CP2021/09808

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       For the local board to adopt its Joint Council-Controlled Organisations (CCO) Engagement Plan 2021-2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The review panel for the independent review of Auckland Council’s substantive council-controlled organisations presented its findings to the Governing Body and local board chairs in August 2020. All 64 recommendations were adopted.

3.       Recommendations 6, 34, and 53 were designated as those that CCOs would work with local boards to implement. Recommendation 34 (b) of the 2020 CCO Review advised the preparation of joint CCO engagement plans for each local board. 

4.       A template for the joint engagement plan has been developed in conjunction with local board members and CCO staff over the last six months. While it will be signed, it will be a live document that will be updated as required.

5.       Workshops have been held at all 21 local boards with CCO staff.  Local boards have provided their views on CCO delivery and engagement in their area, and the degree of engagement they expect for each project or programme, both for the local board and for the community.

6.       These discussions have formed the basis of the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 that is provided as Attachment A.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      adopt the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 as agreed between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations: Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Ake Panuku Development Auckland, and Watercare

b)      note that the Joint Engagement Plan is a live document that will be updated as needed, with changes reported to the local board each quarter.

c)      authorise the chair of the local board to sign this agreement on behalf of the local board, in conjunction with representatives from the four CCOs.

Horopaki

Context

7.       In November 2019, the Governing Body approved the draft terms of reference for an independent review of Auckland Council’s substantive council-controlled organisations (CCOs) (GB/2019/127).

8.       These terms of reference required the independent review panel to consider whether CCOs were an efficient and effective model for delivering services, and whether the CCO decision-making model had enough political oversight, public transparency and accountability.

CCO Review Findings

9.       The independent panel presented the findings of the CCO Review to the Governing Body and local board chairs on 11 August 2020. 

10.     The review made 64 recommendations noting that the recommendations should be considered as a package. On 27 August 2020, the Governing Body resolved to agree in principle all of the review’s recommendations (GB/2020/89). 

11.     Local boards provided input to the CCO Review by:

·   participating in the CCO Review process

·   providing feedback on the final report to the Governing Body in August 2020.

12.     The 64 recommendations were divided up into categories of work:

·   those to be implemented by the council’s chief executive

·   those the council’s chief executive would work with CCO chief executive(s) to implement

·   those that the Ake Panuku Development Auckland board would consider and report back on

·   those that CCOs would work with local boards to implement; this last group includes recommendations 6, 34, and 53. 

13.     Recommendation 34 was that CCOs and local boards reset how they engage with one another, by means of: 

a)    a workshop to develop a more meaningful way for CCOs and local boards to work together 

b)    the preparation of joint CCO engagement plans for each local board

c)    more initiative by local boards in integrating their own planning with CCO planning

d)    liaison between CCOs and local boards at a more senior level so CCOs can quickly remedy local board concerns

e)    the preparation of joint CCO six-monthly reports for each local board

f)     the communication of clear, up-to-date information from CCOs to local boards on projects in their area.

14.     This report focusses on activities undertaken to deliver part (b) of recommendation 34, the preparation of a joint CCO engagement plan for each local board.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Developing a joint CCO engagement plan template

15.     Prior to the 2020 CCO Review, the Governance Manual for substantive council-controlled organisations set the expectation that each CCO would prepare a local board engagement plan every three years, by 31 July following local board elections, and report to local boards accordingly. These engagement plans were created separately by the five CCOs, and were generic across all 21 local boards.

16.     Recommendation 34 (b) of the 2020 CCO Review advised the preparation of joint CCO engagement plans for each local board. 

17.     A template for the joint engagement plan has been developed iteratively over the last six months, with input from Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Ake Panuku Development Auckland, and Watercare staff.

18.     The template includes:

·   CCO responsibilities

·   local board commitments

·   local board plan outcomes and objectives

·   names of local board members and staff from the CCOs and local board services

·   leads and/or delegations in place

·   an overview of the IAP2 Public Participation Spectrum that is used to indicate the degree of engagement in each project

·   work programme tables for each CCO.

19.     The sections on CCO responsibilities and local board commitments have largely been imported from previous engagement plans, or directly from the Governance Manual.

20.     Local board plan outcomes and objectives have been included to ensure these are front and centre when CCOs are working with local boards.

21.     While directly addressing recommendation 34(a), the joint engagement plan also addresses other elements of recommendation 34 as follows:

·   documents key contacts, including senior CCO representatives of the organisation well placed to quickly respond to and resolve local concerns (34d)

·   gives local boards the opportunity to highlight projects likely to be most significant to them as governors, and contributes to a “no surprises” environment

·   the process of developing, agreeing and documenting levels of engagement for each project or programme is the first step towards ensuring the communication of clear, up-to-date information from CCOs to local boards on projects in their area (34f).

22.     This template was shared with local boards for feedback via the Chairs’ Forum (December 2020 and May 2021) and via a memo in May 2021.

23.     It will be used for the 2021 financial year, with feedback from this 2021 process taken into account and any necessary changes incorporated for future years.

A workshop to develop a more meaningful way for CCOs and local boards to work together 

24.     In delivering parts (a) and (b) of recommendation 34, staff have linked the two outcomes together and supported local boards and CCOs to customise the content of each local board’s engagement plan via a joint workshop.

25.     Staff from the four CCOs have attended joint workshops facilitated by Local Board Services at each of the 21 local boards between May and July 2021.

26.     These workshops have provided local boards with the opportunity to share their views on CCO delivery and engagement in their area. They included an outline of each CCO’s work programme relating to the local area, and local boards have provided their views on the degree of engagement they expect for each project or programme.

27.     The local board also indicated their preference for whether and how community engagement is undertaken for each project.

Customised engagement plans

28.     The discussions that took place at the joint workshops are reflected in the customised version of the engagement plan provided for this local board as Attachment A.

29.     This plan represents a point in time, and will be subject to change over the course of the year. It is a “live document” that will be updated when needed. Major changes to the CCO work programme, or to the agreed level of local board and public engagement, will be workshopped with the local board ahead of any change. Minor changes will be summarised and reported on each quarter.

30.     Work programme items that will be confirmed with the formal adoption of the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 (LTP) will be included as they become available. This includes items from the Economic Development Action Plan, and the Regional Land Transport Plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     The adoption of the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have a direct impact on climate.

32.     Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     Adopting the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 is likely to have a positive impact on other parts of the council as well as between the respective CCOs within each local board area.

34.     These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes, and will give council staff greater visibility of CCO work programmes.

35.     To avoid or reduce disruption, staff will align the processes for the local board work programme and the updating of the CCO engagement plans over time.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     Local board engagement plans will enable local boards to customise engagement between CCOs and communities in their areas, by signalling those issues and projects which are of most significance within their communtiies.

37.     Local boards provided input to the CCO Review by:

·   participating in the CCO Review process

·   providing feedback on the final report to the Governing Body in August 2020.

38.     Local boards have been kept up to date on the development of the engagement plan template via:

·   input and feedback at December 2020 Chairs’ Forum

·   update at May 2021 Chairs’ Forum

·   a memo to all local board members in May 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     Adopting the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 is likely to have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

40.     While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     The adoption of the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.     It is likely that there will be changes made to work programme items in the engagement plan during the year, or to the level of engagement that the board or the community will have. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, contains a table recording changes made since it was signed, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.     With the engagement plans completed for all 21 local boards, staff will develop a reporting framework that best responds to the type of projects and the level of engagement to which local boards and CCOs have agreed.

44.     CCOs will work with local boards to ensure that any major changes to the work programme or to engagement levels are workshopped with the board, and well documented.

45.     Minor changes will be noted within the live document and shared with the local board each quarter.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Mangere Otahuhu Local Board Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022

225

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kat Ashmead – Senior Advissor Operations and Planning, Local Board Services

Noha Zaki - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Seeking local board views on changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes

File No.: CP2021/12038

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal input from the local board into Auckland Council’s submission on the Department of Internal Affairs’ consultation on changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Context

2.       In 2020 the Government began a two-stage process to align Māori ward and general ward processes more closely.

3.       The first stage of the changes was completed on 1 March 2021 with the enactment of the Local Electoral (Māori Wards and Māori Constituencies) Amendment Act 2021. These changes were to:

·        remove all mechanisms from the Local Electoral Act 2001 for binding polls to be held on the establishment of Māori wards

·        provide councils (other than Auckland, which has its own legislation) with a fresh opportunity to make decisions on Māori wards in time for the 2022 local elections.

4.       The second stage of changes is intended by the Minister to provide an enduring process for councils to consider setting up Māori wards, by bringing even closer together the Māori wards process and general wards process.

Consultation timeframes

5.       The Department of Internal Affairs’ consultation on changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes is open for public submission with a closing date of 27 August.

6.       Auckland Council will be submitting on the consultation and local board views provided by 25 August will be appended to the Auckland Council submission.

Summary of the consultation

7.       This consultation is not about whether councils should have Māori wards, whether there should be binding polls on Māori wards, or whether there are other ways to improve Māori participation in local government.

8.       The Government has already agreed that establishing a Māori ward is a decision for councils to make. The Government now wants to improve how these decisions are made.

9.       The Government has identified six key differences between the Māori wards and general wards process that are the focus of their consultation. Those differences are:

·        The requirements for councils to consider ward systems.

·        The timing of decisions.

·        Opportunities for public input.

·        Decision-making rights and the role of the Local Government Commission.

·        How and when wards can be discontinued.

·        The types of polls that councils can hold.

10.     This is a consultation with the public by the Minister and it precedes the drafting of the bill. There is also an opportunity to have a full submission on the draft bill when it is at the select committee stage.

11.     Further information and summary documents on the consultation on changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes can be found here: https://www.dia.govt.nz/maori-wards

12.     For the te reo Māori version of the consultation document, see attachment A.

13.     For the English version of the consultation document, see attachment B.

14.     A feedback template has been provided as attachment C to support your board with providing the most relevant information on this topic.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      provide input into Auckland Council’s submission on the Department of Internal Affairs’ consultation on changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes using attached template.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Te reo Māori version of the consultation document

239

b

English version of the consultation document

257

c

Feedback template

275

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Noha Zaki - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Māngere Ōtāhuhu Local Board for March to June 2021

File No.: CP2021/11612

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board with an integrated performance report for March to June 2021, and the overall performance for the financial year against the approved 2020/2021 local board work programmes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an integrated view of performance for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and includes financial performance and delivery against work programmes for the 2020/2021 financial year.

3.       One Hundred and nine activities within the agreed work programmes were delivered including multi-year projects that have progressed as expected. Thirteen activities were undelivered, cancelled, put on hold or deferred and seven multi-year projects/activities have not progressed as expected during 2020/2021.

4.       Key activity achievements from the 2020/2021 work programme include:

·    Funding a Community Arts Broker ($40,000) to facilitate and support a range of community art programmes and activities that support community-led arts and culture projects with an emphasis on reflecting local diversity. These are to be delivered between July 2020 - June 2021 within the scope of the remaining $60,000 project fund.

·    An additional $30,000 has been allocated to support pop-up events and activations to be delivered across the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area.

·    Activation of parks, places and open spaces: the board support a mix of both local and regional providers to deliver ‘free to attend’ 87 activations with over 3,100 participants in the 2020/2021 financial year.

5.       Covid has affected and still has a huge effect on a number of key projects and activities across the region and in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area. Some of these activities that haven’t been delivered or progressed as expected include:

·    Toia Pool and Leisure Centre in Ōtāhuhu has experienced a decrease in centre visits when measured against last financial year (2019/2020). There has been a reduction in stadium visits, adult swimming and 16-and-under swimming.

·    Renew parks roading and car parks in a number of identified community facilities are on hold during financial year 2020/2021 due to the funding restraints. However, funding is set to resume in financial year 2024/2025.

6.       Qualifying budgets of unfinished activities has been carried forward into 2021/2022 work programmes.

7.       The financial performance report is attached but is excluded from the public. This is due to restrictions on releasing annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the New Zealand Exchange (NZX – on or about 30 September 2021.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for March to June 2021

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group results for 2020/2021 are released to the New Zealand’s Exchange (NZX) which are expected to be made public on or about 30 September 2021.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Emergency Budget was adopted on 30 July 2021. The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board approved 2020/2021 work programmes for the following operating departments at its August 2020 business meeting:

·        Arts, Community and Events

·        Parks, Sport and Recreation

·        Libraries and Information

·        Community Services: Service, Strategy and Integration (now part of Connected Communities department)

·        Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

·        Community Leases

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Plans and Places

·        The Southern Initiative

·        ATEED (now Auckland Unlimited).

9.       As the work programmes were adopted two month later than normal due to effects of COVID-19, there has been a reduced timeframe to deliver these work programmes (10 months).

10.     Since the work programmes were approved the Customer and Communities Services directorate has been restructured. Two new departments were created - Connected Communities and Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships, and the Southern Initiative and Western Initiative moved into the directorate as a new department - Community and Social Innovation. Units from the previous departments Arts, Community and Events; Libraries and Information; and Service, Strategy and Integration were incorporated into the three new departments. The table below shows the distribution

Table 1: Changes to Departments in Customer and Communities Services directorate

Previous Department – Unit

Current Department - Unit

Arts, Community and Events - Community Places

Connected Communities – Community Places

Arts, Community and Events - Community Empowerment

Connected Communities – Community Empowerment

Arts, Community and Events - Community Empowerment (Youth)

Community and Social Innovation – Youth Empowerment

Arts, Community and Events - Arts & Culture

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Arts & Culture

Arts, Community and Events - Events

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Events

Service, Strategy and Integration

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Service and Asset Planning

Libraries

Connected Communities – Libraries

The Southern Initiative

Community and Social Innovation – The Southern Initiative

The Western Initiative

Community and Social Innovation – The Western Initiative

 

11.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: work programme activities by outcome

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

12.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that have been delivered as expected or multi-year activities which have progressed as planned (green), activities that are in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that are undelivered or have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work Programme by RAG status

13.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each department’s the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: work programme activity by activity status and department

Key activity achievements from the 2020/2021 work programme

14.     The key achievements in the delivery of the local board work programmes for 2020/2021 include. Please refer to Attachment A for further information.

15.     Operational expenditure for Māngere Arts Centre (ID# 757): Māngere Arts Centre delivered 23 programmes with 38 sessions, six of which had Māori outcomes, and received a combined total of 27,085 attendees and participants. Highlights included the Siva Afi fire throwing event and competition that was held over two nights and featured local secondary schools participating in the traditional Samoan art form as they showcase their talents and competed for glory with 785 people attending and participating, two productions delivered as part of the Auckland Arts Festival bringing in 2,740 people to the three events over 18 days, and a variety concert theatre production produced in-house by staff to celebrate 10 years of shows and exhibitions at MAC with 822 participants and audience members present.

16.     Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Community Arts Broker programme (ID# 758): the Arts Broker supported the delivery of 12 projects. There are four projects that are ongoing, including weekly Kurmp Klub dance activations held in collaboration with a local school; weekly meetings held by the Ethnic Women Art and Craft Group for craft making and learning together; and the Mana Māngere writers' collective project workshops celebrating the writings of locals for a fourth collection of short stories and poetry.

17.     Placemaking: Community-led activation of community spaces and nieghbourhoods Māngere-Ōtāhuhu (ID# 761): the Ōtāhuhu Business Association in collaboration with I Am Mangere delivered one community event in Seaside Park.  The event focused on fostering and building community connections with residents and key community partners.  The next community activation is scheduled for between October/November 2021.

18.     Youth: Capacity building and participation Māngere-Ōtāhuhu (ID# 763): the board partnered with local youth groups to increase opportunities to embrace diversity of local youth to connect, and influence council decision-making and contribute to community outcomes and provide local youth a platform for greater input and influence as to what happens in their local area.

19.     Placemaking: Safe and resilient communities (ID# 769): the board empowered the community to improve the perceptions of safety in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu by the continuous development of Māngere-Ōtāhuhu safety action plan and partnering with the Māngere Town Centre Business Association in funding the Crime Prevention Officer initiative to reduce youth offending, homelessness, anti-social behaviour, and support crime prevention activities and enforcement agencies.

20.     Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Schools Waste Minimisation (ID# 1247): the board funded the waste minimisation project in ten schools to decrease the amount of waste they are sending to landfill by 40 per cent and engage students and teachers in waste reduction learning. Even schools completed their final waste audits and achieved waste to landfill reduction by between 12 and 23 per cent, or 35 kilograms per day.

21.     Access to Library services - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu (ID# 1919): provide a library service, assisting customers to find what they need, when they need it and help them navigate library services and digital offerings and engage with programmes.

22.     Whai Pūmanawa Literacy - we support communities to thrive - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu (ID# 1925): provide services, programmes and events that enable and support adult customers to connect and adapt to the changing world and enable customers and whānau to learn and grow and provide opportunities for knowledge creation and innovation.

 

Overview of work programme performance

Arts, Community and Events work programme

23.     In the Arts, Community and Events work programme, there are 29 activities that were completed by the end of the 2020/2021 financial year in June 2021 (green).

Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

24.     In the Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme, there are seven activities that were completed by the end of the 2020/2021 financial year in June 2021 (green), three activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), four activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and two activities that have been cancelled and deferred in the period March to June 2021 (grey). Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 2: Parks, Sport and Recreation activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

MO: Ngahere (Urban Forest) Growing programme FY21 (ID# 81)

Red

In progress

 Delays in presenting the information to the local board meeting for feedback the planting plan will be presented in August 2022.

There is underspend due to COVID-19 delays, which has been carried forward to complete this plan in 2021/2022.

Pukaki Crater Co-Management Committee (ID# 85)

Red

In progress

At a May workshop the local board provided support for the Pukaki Co-Management Committee to continue to investigate development of a forward plan for the crater and provide a refresh to the relationship and co-management agreements. The lease renewal discussion is on hold pending further advice from the committee. The activity has been carried forward to continue in 2021/2022. 

CARRY FORWARD MO: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) tranche one (ID# 2236)

Red

In progress

There is a budget underspend which has been carried forward to complete tranche one in 2021/2022.

CARRY FORWARD Pukaki Crater - access easement (ID# 2238)

Red

Not delivered

In May, the owner of 98 Pukaki Road was contacted and asked for their response to the question of formalising the Urupa access through an easement. To date, the property owner has not responded to the request. Further attempts will be made to gain a response before advice on the next steps is sought from the Pukaki Co-Management Committee. This has been carried forward to complete in 2021/2022.

MO: Play network - phase two service assessment (ID# 88)

Amber

In progress

At a May workshop, the local board provided support for the findings of the Play Network Assessment. The assessment will help guide play network investment and is presented for adoption at the August 2021 business meeting.

CARRY FORWARD Forest (Ngahere) Knowing FY20 (ID# 2214)

Amber

In progress

Draft Urban Ngahere Action Plan is  presented to the local board for direction in the August meeting.

This will complete the Knowing phase which will inform the next, Growing, phase of implementation.

CARRY FORWARD MO: Sport and Recreation Facilities Plan (ID# 2239)

Amber

In progress

The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Sport & Active Recreation Facilities Plan is completed and was workshopped with the local board on 23 June. Formal adoption has been recommended in a report to the local board in August 2021.

MO: Sport and recreation facilities grants (ID# 77)

Grey

Cancelled

Budget reallocated so the priority projects will be considered when recommending allocation of the 2021/2022 budget.

CARRY FORWARD Ōtuataua Stonefields Reserve Service Assessment (ID# 2237)

Grey

Cancelled

The project has been cancelled and the budget returned to the local board as a saving in T2.

 

Libraries work programme

25.     In the Libraries work programme, there are 11 activities that were completed by the end of the 2020/2021 financial year in June 2021 (green).

 

Table 3: Libraries activities with significant impact

Service Strategy and Integration work programme

26.     In the Service Strategy and Integration work programme, there is one activity that is in progress but is delayed (amber), one activity that is significantly delayed (red). Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 4: Service Strategy and Integration activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

CARRY FORWARD: Māngere Centre Park Master Plan (ID# 1688)

Red

In progress

Current status: At the March local board workshop, support was provided to undertake further stakeholder conversations.
The project has been carried forward to complete in 2021/2022.

Investigate and provide direction on future of Otahuhu Community Centre/Town Hall and former Library space (ID# 2057)

Amber

In progress

Current status: Workshop on 10 March to present additional information to support options. Site visit was held on 31 March. Meeting with High Street tenants was held on 28 June.

Next steps: Report options in September 2021.

 

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

27.     In the Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme, there are 14 activities that were completed by the end of the 2020/2021 financial year in June 2021 (green), seven activities that are in progress but are delayed or on hold (amber) and one activity that was cancelled and deferred in the period March to June 2021 (grey).  Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 5: Community Facilities activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Mangere-Otahuhu - renew park roading and car parks (ID# 2581)

Amber

On Hold

 The investigation and design of this project are on hold during financial year 2020/2021 due to the funding restraints, however funding is set to resume in financial year 2024/2025.

Moyle Park - install sand carpet, irrigation and lights (ID# 2719)

Amber

On Hold

 

Next steps: Physical works pushed out due to Covid Response budget, this project is Growth Funded. Full Scope on hold until the extent of works required is understood. Awaiting Healthy Waters Strom Water management modeling to investigate other options such as channel widening, culvert upgrading etc to compare with the sports field detention option.

Cyclamen Park - Playground Renewal (ID# 3078)

Amber

On Hold

 

Current status: Project has been deferred to financial year 2024 - resolution - MO/2021/12 - project placed on hold.

David Lange Park - develop concept plan (ID# 3224)

Amber

In progress

Current status: The project team are working to prepare the draft concept plan using all the results from past public consultation that took place in April 2021.

Otahuhu Portage - develop greenways link (ID# 3609)

Amber

On Hold

Current status: Mana whenua and community design phase concluded with design brief for concept design finalised to seek professional services for concept design phase.

Next steps: Due to deferment of project budgets, the concept design phase has been delayed.

Growth funding is deferred to financial year 2023.

 

Old School Reserve-renew Park signage (ID# 2990)

Grey

Cancelled

Project cancelled. The signage for Old School Reserve will now be delivered under project Māngere-Ōtāhuhu - renew signage -Te Kete Rukuruku - Māori naming of parks and places under SharePoint reference 2902. This is part of tranche one of the Te Kete Rukuruku programme. Noting, tranche one was adopted on the 26 February 2021.

 

 

Community Leases work programme

28.     In the Community Leases work programme, there are 14 activities that were completed by the end of the 2020/2021 financial year in June 2021 (green) and four activities that have been deferred in the period March to June 2021 (grey).  Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 6: Community Leases activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

12-16 High Street, Otahuhu - Lease area for part of the first floor of Former Ōtāhuhu Library (ID# 353)

Grey

Deferred

Item has been deferred to work programme 2021/2022.

Sturges Park, Otahuhu - Otahuhu Softball Sports Club Incorporated (ID# 360)

Grey

Deferred

New lease application forwarded to group to complete and return. Item has been deferred to work programme 2021/2022.

Walter Massey Park, Mangere East - Samoa Atia'e I Magele Incorporated (ID# 361)

Grey

Deferred

New lease application forwarded to group to complete and return. Item has been deferred to work programme 2021/2022.

Old School Reserve, Mangere - Nukutukulea Aoga Niue Incorporated (ID# 2083)

Grey

Deferred

Item has been deferred to work programme 2021/2022.

 

Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme

29.     In the Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme, there are 12 activities that were completed by the end of the 2020/2021 financial year in June 2021 (green).

Plans and Places work programme

30.     In the Plans and Places work programme, there is one regional activity that is on progress (green), which is the review of parts of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu area plan and Ōtara-Papatoetoe area plan.

Auckland Unlimited work programme

31.     In the Auckland Unlimited work programme, there are five activities that were completed by the end of the 2020/2021 financial year in June 2021 (green).

The Southern Initiative work programme

32.     In The Southern Initiative work programme, there is one activity which is on progress but is delayed (amber).

Table 9: The Southern Initiative / The West Initiative activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

CARRY FORWARD: Youth Initiatives - M-O (ID# 1975)

Amber

In progress

There was delay in getting the work programmes designed before it was presented to the local board for approval. Once this was done the funding was released in March 2021 for the delivery to commence in April 2021. The delivery of these programmes is to be completed by end of September 2021.

Deferred activities

33.     The Lead Financial Advisors have identified projects from the local board’s 2020/2021 Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operational budget which meet the criteria to be carried forward. These have been added to the work programme to be delivered in 2021/2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

34.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

35.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     This report informs the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board of the performance in the period March to June 2021 and the performance for the 2020/2021 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local board is really keen on engaging and partnering with mana whenua, Mataawaka and iwi authorities on various projects in the local board area to achieve one of the local board plan outcomes “we are the heart of Máori and Pasifika culture”. These projects include:

·        Māori Responsiveness Māngere-Ōtāhuhu (ID# 766): Engage with Mana Whenua and Mataawaka to identify appropriate projects that respond to Māori aspirations in a practical and effective way that respond to local Māori aspirations.

·        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Pop-Up Activations (ID# 782): Fund the delivery of a series of pop-up events that are free to attend and celebrates Māori culture.

·        Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) (ID# 2236): Māori naming (and associated story telling) of parks and places in partnership with mana whenua to value and promote Auckland’s Māori identity and use of te reo Māori.

·        Mangere-Otahuhu - renew park signage (ID# 2909): Renew and improve signs in parks and reserves in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area, with consideration to Maori dual naming requirements.

·        Old School Reserve-renew Park signage (ID# 2990): Renew park signage to ensure the onsite user groups are easily located and incorporates the Māori identity as part of the signage.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     This report is provided to enable the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2020/2021 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial performance

39.     Auckland Council (Council) currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – on or about 30 September. Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to this report is excluded from the public. 

40.     Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is under confidential cover.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

41.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Overview of work programme performance by department’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     Work programmes for 2021/2022 were approved at the board’s business meeting in June 2021.

43.     Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2021/2022 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Māngere Ōtāhuhu Mar-June 2021 work programme attachment

287

b

Work Programme T3 financial report - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Noha Zaki - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021

File No.: CP2021/11194

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2020/2021 Annual Report for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 27 September 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2020/2021 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 27 September 2021. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market maintained by NZX Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA), local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      adopt the draft 2020/2021 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A (to be tabled at the meeting)

b)      note that any proposed changes after the adoption will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body on 27 September 2021

c)      note that the draft 2020/2021 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Annual Report, as set out in Attachment A (to be tabled at the meeting), will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2020/2021 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which is expected to be made public by 28 September 2021.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities and the overall funding impact statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of its local board plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       The annual report contains the following sections:

 

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi is an introduction specific to each local board area and is presented in Te Reo Māori and English.

About this report

An overview of what is covered in this document.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved. Includes the activity highlights and challenges.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Funding impact statement

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

7.       The council’s climate change disclosures are covered in volume four of the annual report and sections within the summary annual report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

10.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

11.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2020/2021 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during July and August 2021

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 27 September 2021

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 28 September 2021

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2021.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft 2020/2021 Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Annual Report (to be tabled at the meeting) - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Hao Chen - Senior Finance and Performance Advisor

Authorisers

Mark Purdie – Manager Local Board Financial Advisors

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

27        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Māngere Ōtāhuhu Local Board for March to June 2021 - Attachment b - Work Programme T3 financial report

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

28        Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021 - Attachment a - Draft 2020/2021 Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Annual Report (to be tabled at the meeting)

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial adjustments, assumptions and judgements that have impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2021 that require release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.3      Attachment a    Māngere Ōtāhuhu Netball Centre presentation Page 339


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 










[1] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/03/GB_20210325_AGN_10148_AT_WEB.htm (Item 9, GB/2021/19)

[2] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_AGN_10145_AT_WEB.htm (Item 10, GB/2021/49)

[3] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_AGN_10145_AT_WEB.htm (Item 9, GB/2021/48)

[4] Freedom Camping Act; Litter Act; Resource Management Act; Fire and Emergency NZ Act; Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw; Auckland Council Traffic Bylaw; Auckland Transport Traffic Bylaw; Alcohol Control Bylaw; Dog Management Bylaw

[5] https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_MAT_10145_WEB.htm