I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Manurewa Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 19 August 2021

6.00pm

Manurewa Local Board Office
7 Hill Road
Manurewa

 

Manurewa Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Joseph Allan

 

Deputy Chairperson

Melissa Moore

 

Members

Anne Candy

 

 

Tabetha Gorrie

 

 

Rangi McLean

 

 

Glenn Murphy

 

 

Ken Penney

 

 

Dave Pizzini

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Rohin Patel

Democracy Advisor

 

13 August 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 914 618

Email: rohin.patel@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Blue Light JAM                                                                               5

8.2     Deputation - David Riley                                                                                      6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Governing Body Members' Update                                                                              9

12        Members' Update                                                                                                         11

13        Chairperson's Update                                                                                                 13

14        Auckland Transport Monthly Report – August 2021                                               15

15        Auckland Transport – Local Board Transport Capital Fund Report August 2021 21

16        Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022                                                                   27

17        Endorsement of Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui: Puhinui Regeneration Strategy and associated Charter (collaboration agreement)                                                        47

18        Manurewa Rangatahi Youth Scholarships 2021-2022 - Criteria Change Confirmation                                                                                                                                       59

19        Proposal to make a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw                             63

20        For Information: Reports referred to the Manurewa Local Board                         73

21        Manurewa Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar - August 2021      85

22        Manurewa Local Board Workshop Records                                                             89

23        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Manurewa Local Board for March to June 2021                                                                                                                               99

24        Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021                                                                    141

25        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

26        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               145

23        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Manurewa Local Board for March to June 2021

b.      Financial performance report                                                                         145

24        Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021

a.      Draft 2020/2021 Manurewa Local Board Annual Report                              145


1          Welcome

 

A board member will lead the meeting in prayer.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 15 July 2021, as true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Manurewa Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Blue Light JAM

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.   Regina Sheck and Ajayana Timali-Siau from Blue Light JAM will provide an update to the board on the programme for 2021. 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      thank Regina Sheck and Ajayana Timali-Siau from Blue Light JAM for their presentation and attendance.

Attachments

a          6 August 2021, Manurewa Local Board - Deputation - Blue Light JAM presentation.................................................................................................. 149

 

 

8.2       Deputation - David Riley

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.   David Riley will speak to the board about boosting children’s literacy and promoting storytelling in south Auckland.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      thank David Riley for his presentation and attendance regarding boosting children’s literacy and promoting storytelling in south Auckland.

Attachments

a          2 August 2021, Manurewa Local Board - Deputation - David Riley presentation.................................................................................................. 161

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Governing Body Members' Update

File No.: CP2021/10963

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the ward area Governing Body members to update the local board on Governing Body issues they have been involved with since the previous local board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Standing Orders 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provides for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive verbal updates from Councillors Angela Dalton and Daniel Newman.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Members' Update

File No.: CP2021/10964

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for members to update the Manurewa Local Board on matters they have been involved in over the last month.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for members of the Manurewa Local Board to give a written or verbal update on their activities for the month.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the update from members.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Chairperson's Update

File No.: CP2021/10965

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Manurewa Local Board Chairperson to update the local board on issues he has been involved in.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for the Manurewa Local Board Chairperson to update the local board on his activities over the last month.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal report from the Manurewa Local Board Chairperson.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Auckland Transport Monthly Report – August 2021

File No.: CP2021/11861

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Manurewa Local Board about transport related matters.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       No decision is required this month. This report contains information about the following:

·    Auckland Transport (AT) local and regional projects and activities

·    Te Mahia Station

·    Waiata Shore Bridge

·    Town Centre Footpath Maintenance.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport August 2021 report.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       AT is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. AT reports on a regular basis to local boards, as set out in the Local Board Engagement Plan. This reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

4.       This section of the report contains information about relevant projects, issues and initiatives. It provides summaries of the detailed advice and analysis provided to the local board during workshops and briefings.

Regional Land Transport Plan

5.       The finalised $37 billion investment plan has been approved by Auckland Transport’s Board of Directors as the Regional Land Transport Plan 2021-2031.The record investment, the largest in Auckland Transport’s history, sets out a plethora of projects over the next decade all across Tāmaki Makaurau. Auckland Transport received 5818 public submissions during the RLTP consultation, with overall support for the direction of the RLTP, and in particular, strong support for investment in public transport.

6.       The 10-year plan focuses on areas which AT, Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency and KiwiRail will respond to help address our region’s transport challenges. All of Auckland’s 21 local boards provided submissions on the RLTP, which was also endorsed for approval by all Auckland Councillors. 

7.       Of the $37 billion invested into the RLTP, 50 per cent goes towards capital expenditure, with 50 per cent for maintenance, operations and renewals. The share of funding for new projects can be broken down into:

·    public transport and environmental – 49 per cent

·    strategic and local roads – 24 per cent

·    walking and cycling – eight per cent

·    spatial priorities – seven per cent

·    safety – six per cent

·   optimisation and technology – four per cent.                                                    

8.       The projects in the 2021-2031 RLTP will provide some transformational improvements to the way we move around Tāmaki Makaurau. People will have better access to the rapid transit network through projects like the City Rail Link (CRL) and the Eastern Busway. Auckland Transport will also deliver 200km of new and upgraded cycleways and shared paths. All of this investment will give people more travel options and reduce how much we have to rely on our cars.

9.       The RLTP reflects and aligns the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan, and the objectives and recommendations of four separate, but interconnected plans undergoing a refresh which are: the Auckland Transport Alignment Project (ATAP), the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 (LTP), the Regional Fuel Tax (RFT) and the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport.

10.     Key projects in the RLTP for the Manurewa Local Board are the Coxhead safety project and the Claude/Hill Road safety project.

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

11.     Through Auckland Councils’ Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and Auckland Transports’ Regional Land Transport Plan the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) was confirmed as $20 million per year, for the 21 local boards. This is at the same level as pre-Covid budgets.

12.     Manurewa Local Board’s allocation is $1,177,506 for the 2021/2022 financial year, with the same amount for the 2022/2023 financial year. The board will hold an initial consideration on costed projects on a separate report on this agenda, followed by consideration of additional projects at the September meeting.

13.     It is strongly recommended that the board allocate both years budgets to ensure that investigation and planning for these projects can begin as soon as practical.

Town Centre Footpath

14.     During 2020/21 AT undertook a staged maintenance in the Manurewa Town Centre. The focus being was repairing broken tiles, trip hazards and raised or lowered utility service lids. Despite the Covid budget all the stages were delivered apart from the section outside the post office. This was the last stage as there are multiple service lids and AT have been working with utility providers to coordinate the repairs. Each utility undertakes its own works on their respective assets. Work on this is planned in the first quarter of this financial year. There are currently supply chain issues with the red tiles, but delivery is expected in the next month. The board will be updated in the near future.

Te Mahia Station

15.     In 2018 the Manurewa Local Board purchased land between Te Mahia Station and Great South Road to improve access and amenity to the station. This was because of increased patronage, particularly for the rapidly increasing residential area to the west of the station.

16.     Following a site visit earlier this year AT appointed a project manager to progress the project. They have undertaken some scoping work and provided an update on the proposal.

17.     A proposal to fund the works is reported in a separate item. Investigation to date concluded that no consents are required. In the near future AT will liaise with the board about mana whenua engagement.

18.     At an upcoming workshop further details on timing and details of costings can be discussed.

Waiata Shores Bridge

19.     After an initial site visit with the Manurewa and Papakura boards chairs, AT appointed a project manager to investigate the proposal. Fletcher Development are currently undertaking a substantial residential development in Waiata Shores with a network of shared paths. The bridge will connect the development in Waiata Shores with the existing Wattle Downs development and a coastal paths network.

20.     The local board chairs wrote to the AT Chief Executive seeking funding for further investigation. A project manager from AT has been appointed and a second site visit was undertaken with AT Executive GM Integrated Networks, the Manurewa local board chair and colleagues from Community Facilities and Parks, Sport and Recreation.

21.     Until the feasibility work is completed details on timing and potential costing cannot be determined.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     AT engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

23.     AT’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

24.     There is a growing global, national and local need to urgently address the threats posed by climate change through reducing GHG emissions. The scientific evidence is compelling. In New Zealand the Climate Change Response (Zero-Carbon) Act was enacted in 2019, which requires national GHG emissions to be net-zero6 by 2050. In June 2019 Auckland Council declared a climate emergency, followed by the endorsement in July 2020 of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri.

25.     Auckland’s Climate Plan: tackling climate change will require a very significant change to the way we travel around our region although the timing and the detail of how this change might unfold are still to become obvious. Climate change targets, development of the RLTP through ATAP occurred with a strong awareness of central government climate change legislation and Auckland Council climate change targets. Auckland Council through its C40 obligations and the Auckland Climate Plan has committed to a 50 percent reduction in emissions by 2030, the amount required to keep the planet within 1.5°C of warming by 2100.

26.     Roughly five percent of Auckland’s road and rail strategic networks are found in areas susceptible to coastal inundation, including parts of the state highway network which are crucial links for freight movements and access to key regional destinations. Over 1,000km (or about 13 percent) of AT’s local road network has recently been identified as vulnerable to a 1-in-100-year flood event. AT is currently identifying and prioritising the risks of climate change to the transport system (assets, services, customers and staff) to permit a more strategic approach to designing and managing our assets in the future.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     The impact of information (or decisions) in this report are confined to AT and do not impact on other parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     The purpose of this report is to inform the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     There are no impacts specific to Māori for this reporting period. AT is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi-the Treaty of Waitangi-and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori.

30.     Our Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to with 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them.

31.     This plan in full is available on the AT’s Website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about              

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     Risks are managed as part of each AT project.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     AT will provide an information report to the July meeting and will include an update of projects funded through the recent Regional Land Transport Plan review.

35.     Upcoming workshops include:

·    Te Mahia Station

·    Speed Bylaw Tranche 2b

·    Auckland Transport Connected Communities.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bruce Thomas – Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Ioane Afoa – Regional Hub Manager South

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Auckland Transport – Local Board Transport Capital Fund Report August 2021

File No.: CP2021/11630

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek a resolution from the local board to approve the projects they wish Auckland Transport to deliver from the Local Board Transport Capital fund (LBTCF).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report covers:

·    a summary of the LBTCF

·    a summary of Auckland Transport’s advice on projects that the board wishes to progress

·    projects that require further investigation

·    advice on the financial implications of these decisions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport local board transport capital fund report August 2021

b)      request that Auckland Transport commits $1,253,000 from the Local Board’s Transport Capital fund to the following:

·    Te Mahia Amenity Upgrade - $728,000

·    Great South Road Crossing - $390,000

·    Real Time Display - $10,000

·    Five Bus Shelters - $125,000

c)      request AT report to the September meeting of the board on the following:

·    Roys Road Traffic Calming Measures

·    Dennis Road and David Road Pedestrian safety

·    Clayton Park School Pedestrian Crossing

d)      request AT provide an update on the Waiata Shores Bridge project at the September meeting of the local board.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       The LBTCF is a capital budget established by the Governing Body to allow Local Boards to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of AT’s work programme.

4.       Projects must be safe, not impede network efficiency and be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

5.       The 2021/31 Long Term Plan re-established the Local Board Capital Fund (LBCF) at its pre-Covid Level of $20 million. There has been a minor adjustment in board’s funding, based on the agreed allocation formula. Manurewa’s allocation for 2021/22 and 22/023 is $1,177,506 per annum.

6.       Some projects have yet to be costed, and some of those previously costed may have changed, noting that the CPI for construction rose by 13.4 per cent in the last year. Some of the newer projects are in the early stages of investigation and cost may be a best estimate.

7.       For projects that have recent or fixed costs it is recommended that the board approve funding to progress these projects via this report.

8.       Other projects have needed further analysis by AT to ensure that they are not projects that are on AT’s funding priorities and a current rough order of cost (ROC) is determined. These will be reported to the board’s September meeting.

9.       It is recommended that both years are allocated to allow for planning, consultation and design to begin as soon as possible.

10.     At the workshop on 8 July the board gave an indication on projects that they wish to consider for funding based on existing projects and some newly identified. Since then, AT have worked with board staff and the board chair to refine the list. The analysis and advice below will assist in allocating the funds, at this meeting and the subsequent business meeting.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Decision Making

11.     From feedback at the workshop, the following projects are recommended for funding and/or obtaining a ROC for reporting in September. These are in priority order.

Te Mahia Station

12.     In 2018 the Manurewa Local Board purchased the land between Te Mahia station and Great South Road to improve access and amenity to the station. This was to increase patronage, particularly for the rapidly increasing residential area to the west of the station.

13.     Following a site visit earlier this year AT appointed a project manager to progress the project. They have undertaken some scoping work and have provided an update on the proposal.

14.     AT’s initial estimate of cost is $728,000 and this includes $145,000 of contingency (25 per cent). As we progress through the investigation and design, AT will narrow this percentage as more details are known and it can be more accurately priced.

15.     The breakdown is worth noting the following approximate allowances:

·    civil contractor works - $400,000

·    design and contamination testing - $45,000

·    AT direct costs – $40,000

·    CCTV works - $30,000

·    stakeholder engagement and design - $25,000

·    improved amenity physical works - $30,000

·    contingency - $145,000.

16.     An initial estimate by a private sector developer who may have a role in the project had a lower figure, that just covered the cost of the physical works, not labour or a contingency. The board can be briefed in more detail at a workshop on the cost break down.

17.     The estimated cost does not include any contribution from the developer at this stage.

18.     If approved, the project could be completed by the second quarter of next year.

Great South Road Signalised Pedestrian Crossing

19.     A proposal on Great South Road, to enable safer access across this busy arterial route particularly to the temple at 100-106, for seniors in the residential enclave around 107 and close to the bus stop at 117.

20.     This was assessed as part of the Community Safety Fund but was below this funding threshold. It has a rough order of cost of $390,000. The board are advised that there is little likelihood of any AT funding for this as a consequence of the recovery budget.

21.     It is recommended that the crossing be funded.

Roys Rd traffic calming measures

22.     Two speed humps (or cushions as this is a bus route) to reduce speeds and provide a safer crossing for more vulnerable foot and cycle traffic to the park and playground.

23.     This was requested by the board in July 2019 and the ROC was assessed at $65,000.

24.     That the ROC be reviewed, and confirmation AT don’t have current funding for the project be assured and be reported to the September meeting.

Dennis Road and David Road – Pedestrian safety

25.     Noting the ECE development further up the road will be putting in at least one speed calming device. Advice on the location of the Hillpark pedestrian crossing in relation to the walkway land is required.

26.     That the ROC be calculated, and confirmation AT don’t have current funding for the project be assured and be reported to the September meeting.

Clayton Park School pedestrian crossing

27.     That the ROC be calculated, and confirmation AT don’t have current funding for the project be assured and be reported to the September meeting.

Real Time Display

28.     Install a real-time passenger transport electronic sign for the Great South Road site of Southmall. This would assist passengers to make informed decisions in order to make their bus or train in a timely manner. This would also inform people that are unaware of the station that it is nearby and can be accessed through the mall.

29.     The estimate for this is $10,000.

30.     It is recommended that the signage be funded.

Additional Bus Shelters

31.     At the workshop the board requested bus shelters be considered as part of the Local Board Capital Fund. The board sought the shelters in the areas of highest deprivation. AT Metro staff are currently finalising the list of sites.

32.     It is recommended that five shelters be funded at $25,000 per site.

Waiata Shores Bridge

33.     The local board chairs of Manurewa and Papakura requested AT fund an investigation into the viability of a bridge across the Papakura Stream to provide an important link for current and soon-to-be-constructed shared path networks.

34.     This would be a joint Papakura and Manurewa project if it is proceeded with.

35.     Following a recent site visit the initial investigation is about to progress.

36.     It is highly unlikely that there will be sufficient information to recommend any further funding by September but an update to the board will be provided, plus options for the next steps.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement 

37.     Auckland Transport engages closely with council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and council’s priorities.

38.     The above projects would all contribute towards improving outcomes for active transport and therefore reducing Auckland’s carbon footprint.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.     Auckland Transport will follow established processes where decisions in this report impact on other parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

40.     The local board are the decision makers with regards to the LBTCF. Auckland Transport administers the fund and provides technical advice.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

41.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     In total the board has $2,355,012 to allocate. The total sums for the proposed projects are as follows:

·    Te Mahia amenity upgrade $728,000

·    Great South Rd Crossing $390,000

·    Real Time Display $10,000

·    Five Bus Shelters $125,000.

43.     If adopted the board would allocate $1,253,000 of its budget, leaving $1,102,012 for consideration of projects to be reported back in September.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.     Auckland Transport will put risk management strategies in place on a project-by-project basis.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

45.     Following approval of the recommendations Auckland Transport proceed to delivery of the projects.

46.     The projects referred for ROC and investigation will be reported back to the November meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bruce Thomas Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Ioane Afoa, Area Manager South

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022

File No.: CP2021/09821

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       For the local board to adopt its Joint Council-Controlled Organisations (CCO) Engagement Plan 2021-2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The review panel for the independent review of Auckland Council’s substantive council-controlled organisations presented its findings to the Governing Body and local board chairs in August 2020. All 64 recommendations were adopted.

3.       Recommendations 6, 34, and 53 were designated as those that CCOs would work with local boards to implement. Recommendation 34 (b) of the 2020 CCO Review advised the preparation of joint CCO engagement plans for each local board. 

4.       A template for the joint engagement plan has been developed in conjunction with local board members and CCO staff over the last six months. While it will be signed, it will be a live document that will be updated as required.

5.       Workshops have been held at all 21 local boards with CCO staff.  Local boards have provided their views on CCO delivery and engagement in their area, and the degree of engagement they expect for each project or programme, both for the local board and for the community.

6.       These discussions have formed the basis of the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 that is provided as Attachment A.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      adopt the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 as agreed between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations: Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Panuku Development Auckland, and Watercare

b)      note that the Joint Engagement Plan is a live document that will be updated as needed, with changes reported to the local board each quarter

c)      authorise the chair of the local board to sign this agreement on behalf of the local board, in conjunction with representatives from the four CCOs.

Horopaki

Context

7.       In November 2019, the Governing Body approved the draft terms of reference for an independent review of Auckland Council’s substantive council-controlled organisations (CCOs) (GB/2019/127).

8.       These terms of reference required the independent review panel to consider whether CCOs were an efficient and effective model for delivering services, and whether the CCO decision-making model had enough political oversight, public transparency and accountability.

CCO Review Findings

9.       The independent panel presented the findings of the CCO Review to the Governing Body and local board chairs on 11 August 2020. 

10.     The review made 64 recommendations noting that the recommendations should be considered as a package. On 27 August 2020, the Governing Body resolved to agree in principle all of the review’s recommendations (GB/2020/89). 

11.     Local boards provided input to the CCO Review by:

·   participating in the CCO Review process

·   providing feedback on the final report to the Governing Body in August 2020.

12.     The 64 recommendations were divided up into categories of work:

·   those to be implemented by the council’s chief executive

·   those the council’s chief executive would work with CCO chief executive(s) to implement

·   those that the Panuku Development Auckland board would consider and report back on

·   those that CCOs would work with local boards to implement; this last group includes recommendations 6, 34, and 53. 

13.     Recommendation 34 was that CCOs and local boards reset how they engage with one another, by means of: 

a)    a workshop to develop a more meaningful way for CCOs and local boards to work together 

b)    the preparation of joint CCO engagement plans for each local board

c)    more initiative by local boards in integrating their own planning with CCO planning

d)    liaison between CCOs and local boards at a more senior level so CCOs can quickly remedy local board concerns

e)    the preparation of joint CCO six-monthly reports for each local board

f)     the communication of clear, up-to-date information from CCOs to local boards on projects in their area.

14.     This report focusses on activities undertaken to deliver part (b) of recommendation 34, the preparation of a joint CCO engagement plan for each local board.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Developing a joint CCO engagement plan template

15.     Prior to the 2020 CCO Review, the Governance Manual for substantive council-controlled organisations set the expectation that each CCO would prepare a local board engagement plan every three years, by 31 July following local board elections, and report to local boards accordingly. These engagement plans were created separately by the five CCOs, and were generic across all 21 local boards.

16.     Recommendation 34 (b) of the 2020 CCO Review advised the preparation of joint CCO engagement plans for each local board. 

17.     A template for the joint engagement plan has been developed iteratively over the last six months, with input from Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Panuku Development Auckland, and Watercare staff.

18.     The template includes:

·   CCO responsibilities

·   local board commitments

·   local board plan outcomes and objectives

·   names of local board members and staff from the CCOs and local board services

·   leads and/or delegations in place

·   an overview of the IAP2 Public Participation Spectrum that is used to indicate the degree of engagement in each project

·   work programme tables for each CCO.

19.     The sections on CCO responsibilities and local board commitments have largely been imported from previous engagement plans, or directly from the Governance Manual.

20.     Local board plan outcomes and objectives have been included to ensure these are front and centre when CCOs are working with local boards.

21.     While directly addressing recommendation 34(a), the joint engagement plan also addresses other elements of recommendation 34 as follows:

·   documents key contacts, including senior CCO representatives of the organisation well placed to quickly respond to and resolve local concerns (34d)

·   gives local boards the opportunity to highlight projects likely to be most significant to them as governors, and contributes to a “no surprises” environment

·   the process of developing, agreeing and documenting levels of engagement for each project or programme is the first step towards ensuring the communication of clear, up-to-date information from CCOs to local boards on projects in their area (34f).

22.     This template was shared with local boards for feedback via the Chairs’ Forum (December 2020 and May 2021) and via a memo in May 2021.

23.     It will be used for the 2021 financial year, with feedback from this 2021 process taken into account and any necessary changes incorporated for future years.

A workshop to develop a more meaningful way for CCOs and local boards to work together 

24.     In delivering parts (a) and (b) of recommendation 34, staff have linked the two outcomes together and supported local boards and CCOs to customise the content of each local board’s engagement plan via a joint workshop.

25.     Staff from the four CCOs have attended joint workshops facilitated by Local Board Services at each of the 21 local boards between May and July 2021.

26.     These workshops have provided local boards with the opportunity to share their views on CCO delivery and engagement in their area. They included an outline of each CCO’s work programme relating to the local area, and local boards have provided their views on the degree of engagement they expect for each project or programme.

27.     The local board also indicated their preference for whether and how community engagement is undertaken for each project.

Customised engagement plans

28.     The discussions that took place at the joint workshops are reflected in the customised version of the engagement plan provided for this local board as Attachment A.

29.     This plan represents a point in time, and will be subject to change over the course of the year. It is a “live document” that will be updated when needed. Major changes to the CCO work programme, or to the agreed level of local board and public engagement, will be workshopped with the local board ahead of any change. Minor changes will be summarised and reported on each quarter.

30.     Work programme items that will be confirmed with the formal adoption of the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 (LTP) will be included as they become available. This includes items from the Economic Development Action Plan, and the Regional Land Transport Plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     The adoption of the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have a direct impact on climate.

32.     Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     Adopting the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 is likely to have a positive impact on other parts of the council as well as between the respective CCOs within each local board area.

34.     These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes, and will give council staff greater visibility of CCO work programmes.

35.     To avoid or reduce disruption, staff will align the processes for the local board work programme and the updating of the CCO engagement plans over time.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     Local board engagement plans will enable local boards to customise engagement between CCOs and communities in their areas, by signalling those issues and projects which are of most significance within their communtiies.

37.     Local boards provided input to the CCO Review by:

·   participating in the CCO Review process

·   providing feedback on the final report to the Governing Body in August 2020.

38.     Local boards have been kept up to date on the development of the engagement plan template via:

·   input and feedback at December 2020 Chairs’ Forum

·   update at May 2021 Chairs’ Forum

·   a memo to all local board members in May 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     Adopting the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 is likely to have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

40.     While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     The adoption of the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.     It is likely that there will be changes made to work programme items in the engagement plan during the year, or to the level of engagement that the board or the community will have. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, contains a table recording changes made since it was signed, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.     With the engagement plans completed for all 21 local boards, staff will develop a reporting framework that best responds to the type of projects and the level of engagement to which local boards and CCOs have agreed.

44.     CCOs will work with local boards to ensure that any major changes to the work programme or to engagement levels are workshopped with the board, and well documented.

45.     Minor changes will be noted within the live document and shared with the local board each quarter.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manurewa Local Board Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022

33

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kat Ashmead, Senior Advisor Operations and Planning, Local Board Services

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Endorsement of Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui: Puhinui Regeneration Strategy and associated Charter (collaboration agreement)

File No.: CP2021/11285

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui Strategy: The Puhinui Regeneration Strategy.

2.       To ratify ‘Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui Charter - Te Puhinui Regeneration Charter’ and delegate the signing of this charter to the chair of the Manurewa Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Eke Panuku, in collaboration with the Puhinui Steering Group have led the development of ‘Te Whakaoranga o Te Puhinui - The Puhinui Regeneration Strategy’(strategy) (Attachment A). This is a living document that sets out principles, aspirational outcomes, strategic initiatives and a proposed capital works programme to support the return of wellbeing (whakaora) to people, place and nature within the Puhinui Catchment.

4.       The strategy is a cross-council collaborative initiative and has been developed in partnership with mana whenua, namely Ngaati Te Ata, Ngaati Tamaoho and Te Ākitai, collectively known as Waiohua Iwi. The Waiohua Iwi are partnering directly with council, Eke Panuku, and wider project partners (including Crown entities) to realise this project over the long-term. The strategy and associated charter are the culmination of over three years collaboration across the council family, local boards, Kāinga Ora, and mana whenua partners.

5.       Te Whakaoranga o Te Puhinui Charter - Te Puhinui Regeneration Charter (charter) (Attachment B) has arisen from this partnership to ensure ongoing project alignment and collaboration by clearly setting out shared values and commonly agreed ways of working together to deliver the proposed Regeneration Strategy. The charter is aspirational in nature and the purpose is

          “We seek to realise Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui in a way that acknowledges, through whakapapa, the interconnectivity of people, place and nature so that through indigenous, place-based knowledge we learn how to inhabit and evolve our urban environments towards a flourishing future”.

6.       The charter would apply to the Puhinui catchment, which encompasses the Botanic Gardens and Tōtara Park (the headwaters of the catchment), Manukau Central, Wiri and parts of Homai and Puhinui, Puhinui Reserve and parts of the greenfield “Southern Gateway” greenfield development area west of the lower Puhinui. Whilst the charter was suggested and primarily driven by mana whenua, it represents input from numerous other sources and partners.

7.       The proposed charter has been supported in principle by the Puhinui Programme Steering Group consisting of senior leadership from Eke Panuku, Healthy Waters, Community Facilities, The Southern Initiative, Manurewa and Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Boards, Kāinga Ora and mana whenua.

8.       The endorsement of the strategy and ratification and signing of the charter will enable project alignment and momentum. Project leaders will be enabled to move individual projects within the catchment forward with greater confidence. Further to this, ratifying the charter at the governance level of the partner organisations is an important acknowledgement to mana whenua that they are equal partners in the work programme.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      endorse Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui (The Puhinui Regeneration Strategy) as shown in Attachment A for implementation

b)      ratify Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui Charter (Te Puhinui Regeneration Charter) as shown in Attachment B to the agenda report

c)      delegate authority to the chair of the Manurewa Local Board to sign Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui Charter (Te Puhinui Regeneration Charter).

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Te Puhinui is a culturally and ecologically significant stream from its headwaters within the Botanic Gardens and to its mouth in the Puhinui reserve. Puhinui Reserve is 199 hectares in size, part of which is a wildlife reserve that supports thousands of international migratory birds as well as native threatened species[1]. The Puhinui Catchment represents a unique opportunity to create connectivity for people, place and nature that extends from stream headwaters to the coast, from one expansive green space to another via a stream corridor.

Figure 1. Puhinui Catchment

10.     The Puhinui catchment flows into the Manukau Harbour. Both the stream and the harbour have significant water quality issues[2] [3] which has been at the forefront of discussions with mana whenua. Mana whenua have led a ‘whakapapa’ centred approach to the regeneration of te Puhinui. The strategy and associated charter acknowledge the interdependency of people, place and nature, and seeks to return health (whakaora) to all.

11.     A Stormwater Management Plan (SMP) has been developed in parallel to Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui and is being prepared to support the resulting work programme. The SMP is a joint strategy between Healthy Waters and Kāinga Ora for managing stormwater within development and redevelopment areas and identifying stormwater management opportunities in other parts of the catchment. The planned work includes stream restoration, water quality wetlands, ponds and stormwater treatment devices, and flood management.

12.     Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui Strategy was created to ensure that future works within the catchment were aligned, coordinated and designed with a deep understand of the people, place and nature of Te Puhinui. The strategy has been created in close partnership with mana whenua, with matauranga Māori shaping the project methodology. It has also had ongoing collaboration and input over a 3-year period from the Puhinui Programme Steering Group, cross council collaboration group, and wider Crown and Community partners. This approach has ensured that the strategy is place-sourced, culture-led and community-fed.

13.     The strategy outlines the purpose, principles and values required to return te Puhinui to health and details a series of strategic initiatives and a capital works programme to enable this. This programme of work is a combination of projects already underway, projects currently in planning and aspirational projects.

14.     The strategy offers the opportunity to create connectivity between the commercial centre and the surrounding suburbs via good quality urban spaces in the heart of South Auckland, a culturally unique and diverse community. This is an area of high socio-economic deprivation where safe pedestrian connectivity would be highly beneficial.  

15.     The resultant delivery programme requires collaboration from a range of project partners to realise the intent of the strategy. A Puhinui Programme Steering Group was established in 2018 consisting of key council partners, Manurewa and Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Boards, mana whenua, and Kāinga Ora. There has also been ongoing coordination with other Crown entities namely Counties Manukau District Health Board, and Department of Conservation. These entities may sign up to the charter in the future.

16.     The charter has arisen from a workstream which originated with Eke Panuku Development Auckland. Panuku published “Transform Manukau – Renewal of Manukau Central[4]” in 2016 and the Manukau Framework Plan[5] in 2017. The framework plan identified key moves which would all be fulfilled by a stream connectivity and restoration project to connect the Botanic Gardens to the Puhinui Reserve (headwaters to sea) via a fully publicly owned cycle and walkway via a restored stream. Parts of this project are currently being delivered by Healthy Waters and Eke Panuku, however more funding would be needed to realise this project fully. This has not yet been identified or allocated. The stream corridor offers the opportunity to provide good quality urban open spaces to service future residential redevelopment and densification. Figure 2 below shows the area studied for Transform Manukau.

Figure 2. Transform Manukau Area

           

17.     Te Whakaoranga o Te Puhinui Strategy is a direct response to the Manukau High Level Project Plan developed under Transform Manukau and subsequent Manukau Framework Plan (2017). It seeks to realise 'Key Move 1 - Realising the Potential of the Puhinui Stream'. This agreement recognises that the regeneration of the Puhinui will require collaboration and input from a wide range of project partners and stakeholders. The strategy takes a holistic approach to whakaoranga of the stream, which includes health of community, people, and the environment.

18.     This emerging partnership stands to benefit ongoing iwi relationships and future partnerships in South Auckland. The proposed charter reflects the intent of Waiohua Iwi to work with the council and other partners towards common goals. As a consequence of the partnership with mana whenua, the original extent of the project area has been broadened to take a whole of catchment approach. This is in line with the principles of Water Sensitive Design[6], or an Integrated Stormwater Management Approach as expressed in the Auckland Unitary Plan[7]. Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui Strategy includes an aspirational work programme which sets out projects and initiatives to foster high quality urban regeneration.

19.     Following the presentation of this report to the two local boards, staff will take a report to the Governing Body to ratify the singing of the charter. Following this, signatures will be requested from: Manurewa Local Board Chair - Joseph Allan, Ōtara Papatoetoe Local Board Chair – Apulu Reece Autagavaia, Mayor of Auckland (pending approval of Southern Councillors), Waiohua Iwi Chairs ((Karen Wilson – Te Ākitai, Ngaati Tamaoho and Ngaati Te Ata signatories to be confirmed)), Eke Panuku Board Chair (Paul Majurey) and Kāinga Ora Board Chair (Vui Mark Gosche).

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Alignment with good practice and council policy

 

20.     The strategy and associated charter contribute to currently accepted good practice[8] for partnering and co-design[9] to determine the issue/problem, to design the process, and to develop solutions. Auckland Council, Eke Panuku, other charter partners and mana whenua will make joint decisions through the steering group, the specific process for this will be agreed following the signing of the charter. The intent and development of the strategy and charter is aligned with the purpose and principles of the Resource Management Act 1991[10] (RMA); and the purpose and principles and Parts 2 and 6 of the Local Government Act[11] (LGA). The charter is aligned with the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi[12].

21.     Te Arawhiti (Office of Māori Crown Relations) Principles for Building Closer Partnerships with Māori involve building relationships and sharing decision-making and planning together from the start, valuing each parties’ contribution and knowledge, and ensuring outcomes are meaningful to all parties. The Eke Panuku engagement process that has led to the strategy and charter meets these principles. A partnering framework was built in late 2018. Engagement during the course of 2019 and early 2020 built the objectives and outcomes for the strategy. The charter was a mana whenua led development within this workstream.

22.     The endorsement of the strategy and ratification of the charter will impact current and future relationships with mana whenua in the south through agreeing shared commitments, goals, and work processes. Urban renewal, stormwater, environmental and elements of transport projects will be impacted by the charter with regard to planning and implementation, procurement of services and on-going maintenance of infrastructure (including infrastructure that entails planting such as stormwater bio-infiltration devices, streamside planting and urban gardens). However, the scope of the charter is broad and doesn’t restrict other Auckland Council work in this catchment.

23.     The values and principles are presented under seven themes in the charter: rangatiratianga, kaitiakitanga, māutauranga, manaakitanga, tauritetanga, whanaungatanga, and tiakitanga. These themes and principles are explored further in the strategy.

24.     Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui strategy and the resulting charter meets the goals of the Auckland Council Maori Responsiveness Framework, Goal 1 an Empowered Organisation and Goal 2 Effective Maori Participation in the following ways: The governance and operations have mutually beneficial relationships with Māori at the governance, executive and operational levels; the partnership enables, supports and develops effective Māori participation in decision-making and democratic processes; and the partnership enables and institutes shared governance and other decision-making opportunities with Māori.

This collaboration is an opportunity to set a positive precedent for partnership with mana whenua. Partnership with mana whenua is a foundation for this project and provides an opportunity to build projects that represent Māori aspirations. This project is viewed as a pilot partnership that may provide a model which could be applied across the region (while recognising that areas and iwi may differ across Tāmaki Makaurau). Therefore, this initiative is regionally significant from a relationship building perspective.

25.     Staff recommend that the local board elect to endorse the strategy and ratify the charter. Ratifying the charter at the governance level of the partner organisations is an important acknowledgement to mana whenua that they are equal partners in the work programme. If governance support is achieved at the highest level in all partner organisations, then mana whenua can have confidence in organisational commitment to the principles of the charter and move forward with their aspects of the work programme.

26.     Te Waiohua Iwi partners have indicated that they want to be active partners in relationships and want to achieve outcomes for the benefit of whole catchment and community. They wish to develop a partnership model that is beyond consultation and engagement. Members have expressed their support for the successful partnering to date and see this work as a flagship opportunity that could set an example for other initiatives in the region.

27.     The Puhinui and Manukau fall within two local board areas, both of which have very unfavourable deprivation scores [13]. Counties Manukau’s population tends to be younger than the national average. Māori are over-represented in the most deprived population within Manukau Counties District Health Board [14].

28.     The successful delivery of the Puhinui project will also generate regional benefits. The connection of two significant public parks (the Botanic Gardens and the Puhinui Reserve) via an entirely publicly owned, well-designed cycle and walkway has the potential to attract visitors from around the region, which may serve to further invigorate the Manukau Town Centre.

29.     Ratification of the charter is not required to meet the obligations imposed by the Resource Management Act 1991 or the Local Government Act 2002. If the charter is not ratified, the work programme will continue in the absence of ratification, however it may impact project timelines and working relationships with mana whenua.

30.     Kāinga Ora are a significant landowner and developer in the catchment. Kāinga Ora has confirmed that it has reviewed the strategy and charter and has confirmed its ongoing desire to participate on the Puhinui Programme Steering Group. Kāinga Ora has reviewed and approved the charter document and has approval by the board to become a signatory. 

Implementation

31.     Implementation of the strategy and associated charter can be achieved using existing council processes. Current relevant processes are:

·    Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·    Maori Responsiveness Framework

·    Puhinui Stormwater Management Plan

·    Transform Manukau Programme

·    Auckland region-wide network discharge consent.

Legal implications

32.     The project team have received legal advice on the implications and obligations resulting from this charter. This advice, and staff response to this advice is detailed in Table 1 below:

Table 1. legal advice on the charter and staff response

Legal advice

Staff response

The council should ensure that all mana whenua with interests in this area have been appropriately involved.

All mana whenua with interests in this area have delegated to Te Waiohua to represent their interests in this project/programme of work.

Kawenata translated to English includes the term “covenant” which has a more onerous obligations than that of a charter.

The term “Kawenata” was removed from the charter.

Assess the charter against the Auckland Council Engagement and Significance Policy.

The charter has been assessed as being of low significance under the significance and engagement policy.

Specify the Crown agencies that are party to the charter.

 

Kāinga Ora have currently agreed to be signatories and further crown agencies are in negotiation around signing up to the charter (e.g. Te Papa Atawhai: Department of Conservation).

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

33.     The Puhinui Regeneration Programme aligns with a number of actions and intents in the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri - Auckland Climate Plan, but particularly Action area N1: Build the resilience of Auckland’s indigenous biodiversity, habitats and ecosystems to the impacts of climate change.

34.     The programme will create stormwater infrastructure, including stream corridors, that will contribute less sediment to the receiving environment during storm events due to reducing stream bank erosion, and reduced flooding impacts in existing and redeveloped areas. This will improve the resilience of Auckland’s stormwater infrastructure to climate impacts.

35.     The Puhinui Regeneration Programme has been designed to foster a high-level of mana whenua and wider community empowerment, ownership and involvement in the strategy. This is intended to enable kaitiakitanga and tiakitanga respectively, instilling a sense of guardianship over the natural environment and promoting behavioural change which will lead to improved environmental outcomes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.     The Puhinui Regeneration Programme has involved regular cross-council collaboration meetings which includes representatives from local boards, and the relevant council departments: Natural Environment Strategy, Healthy Waters, Parks, Sport and Recreation, and Community Facilities. All parties have had an opportunity to input into Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

37.     This catchment sits within the Manurewa and Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board areas. Representatives from both local boards are members of the Puhinui Programme Steering Group and have provided input into the charter through meetings.

38.     Both local boards have provided input into the wider Te Whakaoranga o Te Puhinui Programme through the standard Eke Panuku Local Board reporting processes.

39.     Meetings were held between the Manurewa Local Board, Ōtara Papatoetoe Local Board, southern councillors, and mana whenua to introduce the charter in May 2021.

40.     An informal launch of the regeneration strategy was held on 11 November 2020 and representatives from local charitable organisations, government agencies, businesses, and education facilities were invited to provide feedback on the draft strategy.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

41.     This work programme is a Māori responsiveness initiative in its entirety, and this report provides further detail.

42.     The development of the charter has been enabled through the receipt of additional Māori Outcomes Steering Group funding via Eke Panuku. This funding was allocated to Eke Panuku to support the capacity and capability of mana whenua to meaningfully partner on this programme.

43.     Mana whenua will continue to collaborate on the delivery of this programme through governance representation on the Puhinui Programme Steering Group and operational input through the Puhinui mana whenua working group which meets fortnightly. A specific Waiohua work-stream has been developed as part of the Puhinui Regeneration Programme.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

44.     The charter and strategy do not have any financial implications as standalone documents. However, they will impact the way that projects are identified, designed, and delivered, noting that these processes are subject to financial assessment and approval under the Investment Delivery Framework.

45.     Legal review has been provided by Legal Services on the public law implications of the charter. The advice is that the charter doesn’t commit the council to an enforceable contract. However, it does form a broad commitment to the parties’ relationships and collaboration around the type of work that is proposed to be carried out. The charter is not necessarily binding on the parties, however given the commitments that the charter sets out, not following through with (or potentially breaching) any of them could impact the council’s reputation and its relationship with the other charter partners.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

46.     There is a risk that the strategy and associated charter will not be visible to the council staff that will be required to implement it. Mechanisms that could be used to mitigate this risk are the Puhinui Stormwater Management Plan, and the Auckland region-wide network discharge consent. Ongoing cross-council collaboration meetings, and a continuing leadership role funded by Eke Panuku are also expected to reduce this risk.

47.     There is a risk that if the Manurewa Local Board endorses the strategy and ratifies the charter, it will create an expectation for the board to contribute funding to projects identified in the work programme. It is noted that the local board is already funding and leading on some of the workstreams identified, and that the strategy and charter do not single out entities for specific initiative delivery. Funding for future projects delivered through this programme will go through regular council and local board approval channels.

48.     The strategy and charter are referenced in the Puhinui SMP which identifies stormwater and stream related projects and approaches to inform development and redevelopment. The SMP is a joint plan between Kāinga Ora and Healthy Waters. There is a remaining implementation risk due to limited visibility of the SMP during later project development stages. If the catchment manager is not aware of the council’s commitment to the charter, project managers may not be aware of their implications when design and delivery occur. This is not considered a high risk as visibility of the charter can be maintained by adopting the SMP into the Auckland region-wide network discharge consent. Location and project specific requirements such as the charter can be published here.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

49.     Should the local boards, Governing Body and wider project partners support the signing of this charter, the project team will arrange a small signing ceremony to occur in conjunction with a wider community and stakeholder launch of the strategy in Manukau. This is tentatively planned for late 2021. Eke Panuku will liaise with mana whenua, the local boards and Mayor’s Office to make arrangements.

50.     Healthy Waters staff will incorporate the charter into the Stormwater Management Plan.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Puhinui Reneration Strategy (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Puhinui Regeneration Charter

57

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Perin Gerrand - Engagement Coordinator

Authorisers

Sara Zwart - Principal Regenerative Design Lead

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 



Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator



Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Manurewa Rangatahi Youth Scholarships 2021-2022 - Criteria Change Confirmation

File No.: CP2021/11656

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve changes to the criteria for the Manurewa Rangatahi Youth Scholarships 2021-2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The aim of the Manurewa Rangatahi Youth Scholarships 2021-2022 is to support local young people to develop and grow as leaders.

3.       Funding these scholarships will enable young people aged 14-24 to move into further education, training or attend events that will develop their leadership potential.

4.       The Manurewa Local Board has allocated funding toward youth scholarships in the FY 20/21 work programme.

5.       Some minor changes have been made to the scholarship criteria to ensure clarity and consistency with learnings from previous years.

6.       These changes require local board approval.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      approve the application timeframe for the Manurewa Rangatahi Youth Scholarships opening on 13 September 2021 and closing on 15 October 2021

b)      support its involvement in a two-hour workshop in September 2021, after the closing of the scholarship round, to review the applications prior to the 18 November business meeting decision

c)      endorse the suggested Manurewa Rangatahi Youth Scholarships criteria changes as outlined in Table 1.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Manurewa Rangatahi Youth Scholarships have been funded by the local board for the past four years. The scholarships have enabled young people to move into further education, training and attend events that develop their leadership potential.

8.       The 2020/2021 Manurewa Local Board Work Programme includes a budget of $30,000 for the Manurewa Rangatahi Youth Scholarships 2021/2022.

9.       The local board assess the applications to ensure that they align with their priorities: to support rangatahi to develop and grow as leaders, foster Māori culture, help young people contribute, prosper and thrive; enable people to participate, celebrate and contribute to their local community and improve the overall wellbeing of Manurewa.

10.     The youth scholarships will be advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, and community networks.

11.     The applications will be assessed by a panel of local board members and two youth council representatives for their alignment to the following application criteria:

·   aged between 14 and 24 years old

·   are New Zealand citizens/residents living in the Manurewa Local Board area

·   show excellent and outstanding achievements and/or

·   demonstrate leadership potential or contribution to community

·   will undertake study at a tertiary or training institution in 2022 or participate in a conference or event in New Zealand that is significantly based on youth leadership and development.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Staff presented changes to the application criteria at a local board workshop on 29 July 2021 as per an annual review cycle. This helps to improve the application form and process, making it a more user-friendly experience leading to more applications (see below).

Table 1 – proposed changes to application criteria

Current

Proposed amended wording

Reason

If you have received a scholarship ‘twice in a row’ then you cannot receive this grant.

Two successful years in a row

Clearer wording for better understanding

Primary phone number

Preferred phone number

Clearer wording for better understanding

Not stated

The board will consider funding course related costs only where fees are not covered by the Government

To add clarity on the point that the Government already supports first year free fees.

Provide documentation confirming enrolment

Proof of enrolment confirmation to be sought post-approval and pre-payment

Wording in the application to be changed to require proof of enrolment prior to payment being made, as proof of enrolment into a course of study can be difficult at the time of scholarship application, as enrolment may not have yet occurred

 

13.     Staff also advised on opening and closing dates for the Manurewa Rangatahi Youth Scholarships round, being 13 September 2021 through to 15 October 2021. This was in consultation with the grants team to ensure their capacity to support.

14.     The panel will meet in September 2021 to assess the applications.

15.     The final report will be presented at the 18 November 2021 business meeting for approval.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     Staff note that due to COVID-19, there is an increased uptake in online and virtual education and activity. This has a positive impact on the environment through reduced carbon emissions resulting from travel. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     The scholarships are managed and delivered by the Youth Empowerment Team with administrative support and expertise from council’s Grants Team.

18.     The local board Communications Advisor will assist with the marketing and promotion of the scholarships.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The scholarships contribute to the local board achieving the following 2020 Local Board Plan outcomes: Our communities are inclusive, vibrant, healthy and connected and our prosperous local economy supports local people.

20.     According to the 2018 census 41.8 per cent of the population is aged 24 and under in Manurewa.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The 2018 census confirmed that the Manurewa Local Board area has the highest Māori population in Auckland – at 26 per cent identifying as Māori.

22.     The local board priority that the scholarship shows most alignment to is outcome 2 – We are proud of our strong Māori identity and thriving Māori community.

23.      Promotion of the youth scholarships will be targeted to ensure the correct audience is captured. Specific target groups being:

·        Manurewa Marae and their rangatahi programmes

·        Manurewa High School, James Cook High, Alfriston College, South Auckland Middle school

·        Manurewa Youth Providers and community networks

·        Manurewa Youth Council for sharing with their networks

·        JAM programme through Bluelight.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The 2021/2022 work programme includes $30,000 for the scholarships. The changing criteria will have no impact on this funding.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     There is a heightened risk of students not completing studies if there is another COVID-19 lockdown, especially noting some students attend universities outside of Auckland. Funds will need to be returned to the local board if activities do not go ahead and staff will advise successful applicants of this.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Staff will work with the grants team to adjust the application form to suit the recommended changes.

27.     The Manurewa Rangatahi Youth Scholarships will open on 13 September 2021 and close on 15 October 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Melissa Lelo – Specialist Advisor, Youth Empowerment

Authorisers

Gael Surgenor - General Manager Community & Social Innovation

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Proposal to make a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw

File No.: CP2021/11649

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek support for the draft proposal to make a new Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Auckland Council Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022, before it is finalised for public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Staff have prepared a draft proposal for a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw to enable local boards to provide their views before it is finalised for public consultation.

3.       The draft proposal is to make a new bylaw under the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This bylaw would replace the current legacy bylaw, which expires in 2022 and contains provisions developed before the Freedom Camping Act 2011 was passed.

4.       The Freedom Camping Act 2011 allows freedom camping on all public land unless it is already prohibited under another enactment. The Act enables councils to make a bylaw to prohibit or restrict freedom camping in areas that meet statutory criteria for protection.

5.       This draft proposal replaces an earlier proposal developed in 2018 which was set aside by the Governing Body in 2019. Following decisions by the Governing Body in March and May 2021, the key changes compared with the 2018 proposal are that the new draft proposal:

·     excludes land held under the Reserves Act 1977 from scope (council would maintain the current default prohibition on camping on reserves under the Reserves Act 1977)

·     manages freedom camping only on land held under the Local Government Act 2002

·     seeks to prevent freedom camping impacts in sensitive areas, and to protect public health and safety and manage access in all areas, by:

scheduling 44 prohibited areas, where no freedom camping is allowed

scheduling 19 restricted areas, where freedom camping is allowed subject to site-specific restrictions

including general rules to manage freedom camping impacts in all other areas (campers must use certified self-contained vehicles, stay a maximum of two nights, depart by 9am and not return to the same area within two weeks).

6.       The proposed prohibited and restricted areas are those areas which the Bylaw Panel recommended should be prohibited and restricted in 2019, and which are held under the Local Government Act 2002. Areas held under the Reserves Act 1977 have been removed.

7.       The Panel’s recommendations draw on previous area assessments and take into account feedback from local board engagement and public consultation conducted in 2018 and 2019.

8.       The draft proposal includes one designated prohibited area and no designated restricted areas located in the Manurewa Local Board area. All designated areas are listed in the draft Bylaw schedules within Attachment A. All other council-managed land held under the Local Government Act 2002, including roads, is proposed to be covered by general rules.

9.       Staff recommend that the local board provide its view on the draft proposal, including the inclusion of general rules in the bylaw and the recommended settings for those rules.

10.     The key risks of the proposal are that:

·     it creates too few areas where freedom camping is allowed; this is partially mitigated by allowing freedom camping on most roads (subject to general rules), and council could decide to designate more restricted areas following consultation

·     the cumulative impact of all prohibitions under the Bylaw and other enactments is viewed as an effective ban; however staff looked closely at the requirements of the Freedom Camping Act 2011 in developing the proposal and will continue to monitor cumulative impact as bylaw development progresses.

11.     The local board’s views will be provided to the Governing Body in September with the recommendation that the finalised proposal is adopted for public consultation. Public consultation is scheduled for November, and Bylaw Panel deliberations for early 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      support the draft Statement of Proposal in Attachment A of this agenda report to make a new Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Auckland Council Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022 for public consultation.

Horopaki

Context

Freedom camping can have both positive and negative impacts

12.     For the purposes of this Bylaw, freedom camping is when someone stays overnight on council-managed land, including roadsides, in a vehicle or caravan.

13.     Freedom camping specifically refers to people staying in vehicles overnight as part of leisure travel, or because they are choosing to live in a vehicle for lifestyle reasons.

14.     Freedom camping provides a flexible and affordable way for Aucklanders and for domestic and international visitors to experience and enjoy the region. Many freedom campers will visit friends and family, attend events, and support local businesses during their stay.

15.     Freedom camping can however have negative impacts on the local environment and host communities if it is not well-managed. These impacts can be caused by:

16.     Freedom camping has become popularly associated with harmful and antisocial behaviours, but our research shows that most freedom campers visiting Auckland do camp responsibly.

17.     However, the presence of large numbers of campers – even responsible campers – is more likely to cause community concern in Auckland due to pressure on limited public space.

18.     Freedom camper numbers have been growing in Auckland and throughout the country over the last two decades. Once the current border restrictions are lifted overseas visitors are likely to return, and domestic freedom camping may continue to increase in the meantime.

19.     Auckland does not currently have enough places for freedom campers to go. This means there is often overcrowding in the places where it is allowed, or illegal camping in unsuitable areas once legal sites are full. Having more areas would reduce these supply-related issues.

20.     The council can regulate freedom camping to help prevent irresponsible camping and manage responsible freedom camping in a way that minimises its negative impacts.

Council must align its freedom camping regulation with the Freedom Camping Act 2011

21.     The Freedom Camping Act 2011 allows freedom camping on all public land unless it is prohibited under a bylaw or another enactment, such as the Reserves Act 1977.

22.     Auckland’s current Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2015 is a consolidation of pre-2010 legacy bylaw provisions developed before the Freedom Camping Act 2011 was passed. A new bylaw must be made that aligns with the national legislation before the current bylaw expires in 2022.

23.     The Freedom Camping Act 2011 is permissive by default but does allow council to make a bylaw to prohibit or restrict freedom camping in areas where certain statutory criteria are met. In particular, council must be satisfied that:

·     each area’s location can be clearly shown on a map and/or described

·     the prohibitions and restrictions in each area are necessary to:

-     protect the area (for example because it is environmentally or culturally sensitive)

-     protect the health and safety of the people who may visit the area

-     protect access to the area (for other users)

·     the cumulative impact of all prohibitions and restrictions (under the bylaw and other enactments) do not constitute an effective ban on freedom camping on council land.

A 2018 proposal to regulate freedom camping was set aside in August 2019

24.     Work to develop a freedom camping bylaw began in 2016. Staff assessed more than 1,000 areas for their suitability for freedom camping and need for protection under the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This process included extensive engagement with local boards.

25.     In late 2018 and early 2019 public feedback and formal local board views were sought on a proposal for a draft Freedom Camping in Vehicles bylaw. A Bylaw Panel deliberated on all feedback and made recommendations to the Governing Body. The Panel recommended scheduling 322 prohibited areas and 103 restricted areas, including a number of reserves.

26.     In August 2019 the Governing Body set aside the recommendations of the Bylaw Panel and instead requested advice on a new direction for bylaw development.

The Governing Body decided to exclude reserves from scope and include general rules

27.     The Governing Body considered staff advice in March 2021[15] and May 2021[16] and directed that a new proposal for a Freedom Camping Act 2011 bylaw be developed that:

·     only manages freedom camping on land held under the Local Government Act 2002, with camping on reserves continuing to be managed by the Reserves Act 1977

·     includes general rules to manage the generalised impacts of freedom camping, and ensure problems are not displaced from regulated to unregulated areas

·     relies on previous assessments (undertaken to develop the 2018 proposal) to identify land held under the Local Government Act 2002 that should be prohibited or further restricted through the bylaw.

28.     Staff have prepared a draft proposal to implement the Governing Body’s decisions (Attachment A). This proposal outlines the reasons and decisions that have led to the content of the proposed new Bylaw.

Potential changes to the Freedom Camping Act 2011 not yet confirmed

29.     In April and May 2021, the Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) publicly consulted on four proposals for change to the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This included making the use of self-contained vehicles mandatory for all freedom camping.

30.     The Governing Body approved Auckland Council’s submission, which incorporated local board views, in May 2021[17]. MBIE has not yet released any further information, and timeframes for any changes to the Act have not been confirmed.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

A new bylaw is proposed to manage freedom camping in vehicles on some council land

31.     The draft proposal would make a new Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022 that:

·     aligns with the Freedom Camping Act 2011

·     helps council to prevent freedom camping impacts in sensitive areas, and to protect public health and safety and manage access in all areas of land held under the Local Government Act 2002 (including roads controlled by Auckland Transport)

·     forms part of a wider regulatory framework of Acts, regulations and other bylaws[18].

32.     The Bylaw will be enforced by the Licensing and Regulatory Compliance unit using a graduated compliance model (information, education, enforcement).

33.     The table below summarises the main proposals:

Draft proposals

Reasons for draft proposal

To schedule 63 specific areas as follows:

Restrict freedom camping in 19 specific areas (where freedom camping is allowed subject to site-specific restrictions)

Listed in Schedule 1 of the draft Bylaw

 

To better manage areas that have been identified as needing additional regulation due to factors such as popularity, current use by others, demand for parking and the size of the parking areas.

These are the restricted areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel in 2019, with all reserves removed.

Prohibit freedom camping in 44 specific areas (where freedom camping is not allowed)

Listed in Schedule 2 of the draft Bylaw

 

To protect areas that have been identified as being environmentally or culturally sensitive, or where freedom camping would impact public health and safety and access in ways that cannot be adequately managed through restrictions.

These are the prohibited areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel in 2019, with all reserves removed.

To include general rules for all other areas as follows:

Require freedom campers to use certified self-contained vehicles

To prevent impacts from the depositing of toilet waste and wastewater into the environment, and the use of unsuitable areas for cooking

Allow freedom campers to stay a maximum of two nights in the same road or off-road parking area

To prevent impacts from the depositing of toilet waste and wastewater into the environment and ensure fair access to limited shared parking and amenities

Require freedom campers to vacate their parking space by 9am on the day of departure

To ensure fair access for shared parking and amenities for other campers and users of public space

Require freedom campers not return to stay in the same road or off-road parking area within a two-week period

To ensure fair access to limited shared parking and amenities for other campers and users of public space

34.     The draft proposal notes that the council does not intend to use the bylaw to manage:

·     issues associated with homelessness (people living in a vehicle involuntarily)

·     areas where access is already controlled or parking is reserved or charged for, for example gated carparks, land leased to other organisations and regional parks.

The draft proposal complies with statutory requirements

35.     The draft proposal has been prepared in accordance with statutory requirements. Staff consider the proposed draft Bylaw:

·     only prohibits or restricts freedom camping where it is necessary to protect sensitive areas, and/or to manage impacts on public health and safety and access to an area

·     uses a format and wording that are easy to read, understand and comply with

·     is authorised by statute, is not repugnant to other legislation, and is not unreasonable

·     does not give rise to any implications or inconsistencies with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990.

Staff recommend the local board consider and provide its views on the draft proposal

36.     Staff recommend that the local board consider the draft proposal in Attachment A and provide any views by resolution to the Governing Body before it is finalised for public consultation on 23 September 2021.

37.     For example, the board could support the draft proposal for public consultation, recommend changes or defer comment until after it has considered public feedback on the proposal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     Staff note that this is a regulatory process to manage existing activities enabled by central government policy. It is not causing these activities to occur or affecting the likelihood that they will occur. The decision sought in this report therefore has no specific climate impact.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.     The draft proposal impacts the operations of several council departments and council-controlled organisations, including Licensing and Regulatory Compliance, Parks, Sport and Recreation and Auckland Transport.

40.     The Licensing and Regulatory Compliance unit are aware of the impacts of the draft proposal and their primary role in implementing and managing compliance with the Bylaw.

41.     Council’s 86 park rangers help to manage compliance with council Bylaws, the Reserves Act 1977 and the Litter Act 1974 by carrying out education and monitoring on parks and reserves. However, rangers are not currently being warranted or renewing warrants, and Licensing and Regulatory Compliance will continue to carry out any enforcement required.

Enhanced service levels for Bylaw compliance activities are not currently budgeted

42.     Concern about the council’s ability to effectively implement the Bylaw and manage compliance within existing resources was a key theme of public and local board feedback received in 2019.

43.     In March 2021 the Governing Body requested advice about costed options for increasing the service levels for compliance associated with this Bylaw. Costings are being finalised and this advice will be provided alongside the proposal in September, for consideration during future Annual Plan cycles.

44.     There are multiple options for increasing investment in Bylaw implementation and both proactive and reactive Bylaw compliance activities. These include:

·     enhancement of council’s information technology systems, to enable the implementation of the new infringement notice regime

·     use of contracted security services, to increase responsiveness to complaints (similar to the current arrangements for Noise Control), or for additional proactive monitoring at seasonal ‘hotspots’

·     purchase of mobile printers, to enable infringement notices to be affixed to vehicles in breach of the Bylaw at the time of the offence

·     signage at all prohibited and restricted areas and at other areas as needed

·     camera surveillance technology to enable remote monitoring of known or emerging hotspots, for evidence-gathering purposes and/or to support real-time enforcement.

45.     Local boards can request further advice from Licensing and Regulatory Compliance if they wish to consider allocating local budget for enhanced local compliance activities.

46.     For example, Rodney Local Board recently allocated funds from its Locally Driven Initiatives budget to employ two Compliance Wardens for a six-month trial over the 2021-2022 summer period. The wardens will address low level compliance issues, including illegal freedom camping, with follow-up support from warranted compliance staff when required.

Ongoing land classification work won’t be completed with bylaw development timeframes

47.     Following the Governing Body’s decision in March 2021 to exclude reserves from scope, land status has become more relevant for identifying areas requiring protection in the bylaw.

48.     The council does not currently hold complete land classification data to establish definitive numbers of reserves. Parks and reserves can comprise multiple land parcels which may be held under different Acts.

49.     Since reporting to the Governing Body in March, staff have completed further investigation of the land status of the prohibited and restricted areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel. This has identified additional reserves, which has reduced the proposed prohibited areas (from 55 in the March report to 44 in the draft proposal) and restricted areas (from 21 to 19).

50.     Classifications are still being confirmed as part of the development of omnibus Local Park Management Plans. Five local board areas have completed this work, and an average of 94 percent of their parks were found to be held under the Reserves Act 1977.

51.     Ongoing land classification work will support bylaw implementation. It will not finish within the timeframe for bylaw development, so the status quo issues will remain.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

52.     The proposed draft Bylaw impacts on local boards’ governance role as it affects decision making over local assets, particularly parks and other council-controlled public places. There is also high community interest in freedom camping regulation in many local board areas.

53.     The local board has an opportunity to provide its views on this draft proposal by resolution to the Governing Body. The local board will also have further opportunity to provide its views to a Bylaw Panel on any public feedback to the proposal from people in their local board area.


 

All proposed prohibited and restricted areas previously discussed with local boards

54.     The draft proposal includes one designated prohibited area and no designated restricted areas located in the Manurewa Local Board area. All designated areas are listed in the draft Bylaw schedules within Attachment A. All other council-managed land held under the Local Government Act 2002, including roads, is proposed to be covered by general rules.

55.     The proposed prohibited and restricted areas are those areas which the Bylaw Panel recommended should be prohibited and restricted in 2019, and which are held under the Local Government Act 2002. Areas held under the Reserves Act 1977 have been removed.

56.     All areas proposed to be scheduled as prohibited or restricted were previously discussed with the relevant local boards in 2018.

Joint political working group provided views on general rules in May 2021

57.     Three local board representatives participated in a joint political working group on 21 May 2021 to provide views on options for including general rules in the Bylaw.

58.     The working group unanimously supported the inclusion of general rules in the Bylaw, and five out of six working group members supported the recommended settings included in the draft proposal. A summary of the working group’s views was reported to the Governing Body on 27 May 2021[19].

The new draft proposal responds to feedback provided on the 2018 proposal

59.     Local boards provided formal feedback on the 2018 draft proposal to the Bylaw Panel in 2019, following on from their early feedback given during engagement in 2017, and site-specific feedback provided in 2018.

60.     The table below details typical concerns expressed by local boards in their formal feedback and how the new draft proposal responds to these concerns:

Key local board concern (from 2019)

Draft proposal’s response to concern

The loss of protection in the legacy bylaws for most reserves and roadsides

·   Excludes reserves from the bylaw and continues to use the Reserves Act 1977 to manage all camping at reserves

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw, including roadsides

·   Notes individual roads can be scheduled as prohibited or restricted areas if problems arise in future

The provision for unrestricted freedom camping in the local board area

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw

Freedom camping at reserves and enforcement tools under the Reserves Act

·   The Reserves Act 1977 will be used to manage all camping at reserves, which means the status quo (prohibition) will continue

·   Notes that following changes in September 2019 to the Reserves Act 1977, $800 infringement notices can now be issued for breaches of this Act

Freedom camping in inner-city areas, unsafe areas and areas near sports fields, residential homes and campgrounds

·   Bylaw schedules designate individual sites that have been identified and assessed as unsuitable for freedom camping (prohibited areas), or where additional restrictions are needed to manage impacts (restricted areas)

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw

The potential effect on people experiencing homelessness

·   Clarifies that the bylaw will not be used to manage issues associated with homelessness and confirms the council’s commitment to a compassionate enforcement approach to protect vulnerable Aucklanders

Council’s ability to enforce bylaws and the cost of enforcement and monitoring

·   Although not contained in the proposal itself, advice will be provided to the Governing Body on options for increasing investment in bylaw implementation

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

61.     The Bylaw has relevance to Māori as kaitiaki of Papatūānuku. The proposal supports two key directions in the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau:

·     wairuatanga (promoting distinctive identity), in relation to valuing and protecting Māori heritage and Taonga Māori

·     kaitiakitanga (ensuring sustainable futures), in relation to environmental protection.

62.     The proposal also supports the Board’s Schedule of Issues of Significance by ensuring that sites of significance to Māori are identified and protected from freedom camping harms.

63.     Mana whenua and mataawaka were invited to provide feedback during the development of the 2018 proposal via dedicated hui and again through the public consultation process.

64.     Feedback received on specific prohibited and restricted areas identified in the 2018 proposal was incorporated into the deliberations. This included the identification of sites of significance to Māori, such as wahi tapu areas.

65.     General matters raised by Māori during engagement included the need to ensure:

·     the ability to add further sites of significance to the bylaw as these are designated

·     provision for temporary bans on freedom camping, e.g. in areas under a rahui

·     a compassionate approach to people experiencing homelessness

·     provision of sufficient dump stations to avoid environmental pollution

·     clear communication of the rules in the bylaw and at freedom camping sites.

66.     The draft proposal addresses these matters by proposing to prohibit freedom camping at sites of significance to Māori (such as Maraetai Foreshore and Onetangi Cemetery), provision in the Bylaw for temporary bans, and confirming council’s commitment to a compassionate enforcement approach to people experiencing homelessness.

67.     Mana whenua and mataawaka will have an opportunity to provide further feedback during public consultation on the proposal.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

68.     There are no financial implications to the local board for any decisions to support the draft proposal for public consultation. The Governing Body will consider any financial implications associated with public notification in September 2021.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

69.     Legal risks were discussed as part of the provision of legally privileged advice to interested local board members at a confidential workshop held in June 2021.

70.     The other key risks and possible mitigations are summarised in the table below.

If...

Then...

Mitigation (partial)

The bylaw proposal does not create enough areas where freedom camping is allowed

 

Council may need to manage an increase in overcrowding, non-compliance, and harms over time.

The proposed bylaw would enable freedom campers to stay for up to two nights on most roads, subject to general rules.

Council could consider increasing the number of designated restricted areas following consultation, or if problems arise in future.

The cumulative impact of prohibitions and restrictions in the Bylaw and other enactments is viewed as an ‘effective ban’ on freedom camping in Auckland

The risk of legal challenge could increase.

Staff looked closely at the requirements of the Freedom Camping Act 2011 in developing the proposal, and cumulative impact will continue to be monitored.

Council can’t meet public expectation of increased enforcement

There may be a loss of social license for freedom camping and reputational risk for council.

Responsible Camping Ambassadors will assist compliance staff during the peak season, although future funding is not guaranteed.

The Governing Body or local boards could allocate additional funding to increase service levels for compliance activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

71.     Staff will present local board views and a finalised proposal to the Governing Body on 23 September 2021. The next steps for bylaw development are shown in the diagram below.

Diagram

Description automatically generated

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Freedom Camping in Vehicles Statement of Proposal and Draft Bylaw August 2021 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rebekah Forman - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki – General Manager - Community & Social Policy

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

For Information: Reports referred to the Manurewa Local Board

File No.: CP2021/10655

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Manurewa Local Board to receive reports and resolutions that have been referred from the Governing Body committee meetings, Council Controlled Organisations, forums or other local boards for information.

2.       The following information was circulated to the local board:

No.

Report Title

Item no.

Meeting Date

Governing Body Committee or Council Controlled Organisation or Forum or Local Board

1

Resource management system reform: Natural and Built Environment Bill exposure draft submission

17

15 July 2021

Ōrākei Local Board resolutions circulated to all local boards for their information

2

Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development

18

15 July 2021

Ōrākei Local Board resolutions circulated to all local boards for their information

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the following information from the Governing Body committee meetings, Council Controlled Organisations, forums or other local board meetings:

No.

Report Title

Item no.

Meeting Date

Governing Body Committee or Council Controlled Organisation or Forum or Local Board

1

Resource management system reform: Natural and Built Environment Bill exposure draft submission

17

15 July 2021

Ōrākei Local Board resolutions circulated to all local boards for their information

2

Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development

18

15 July 2021

Ōrākei Local Board resolutions circulated to all local boards for their information

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Board Resource management system reform: Natural and Built Environment Bill exposure draft submission

75

b

Ōrākei Local Board Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development

79

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Manurewa Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar - August 2021

File No.: CP2021/10976

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present to the Manurewa Local Board the three months Governance Forward Work Calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Governance Forward Work Calendar is a schedule of items that will come before the local board at business meetings and workshops over the next three months. The Governance Forward Work Calendar for the Manurewa Local Board is included in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

i)    ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

ii)   clarifying what advice is required and when

iii)   clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month, be included on the agenda for business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      note the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manurewa Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar August 2021

87

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 



Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Manurewa Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2021/10977

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Manurewa Local Board’s records for the workshops held on 1 July, 8 July and 29 July 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under Standing Order 12.1.1 the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its local board workshops held over the past month.

3.       Resolutions or decisions are not made at workshops as they are solely for the provision of information and discussion.

4.       This report attaches the workshop record for the period stated below.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      note the Manurewa Local Board workshop records held on:

i)        1 July 2021

ii)       8 July 2021

iii)      29 July 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

1 July 2021 - Manurewa Local Board Workshop Record

91

b

8 July 2021 - Manurewa Local Board Workshop Record

93

c

29 July 2021 - Manurewa Local Board Workshop Record

95

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Manurewa Local Board for March to June 2021

File No.: CP2021/11428

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Manurewa Local Board with an integrated performance report for March to June 2021, and the overall performance for the financial year against the approved 2020/2021 local board work programmes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an integrated view of performance for the Manurewa Local Board and includes financial performance and delivery against work programmes for the 2020/2021 financial year.

3.       One hundred and eighteen activities within the agreed work programmes were delivered including multi-year projects that have progressed as expected. Eleven activities were undelivered, cancelled, put on hold or deferred and 10 multi-year projects/activities have not progressed as expected during 2020/2021.

4.       Key activity achievements from the 2020/2021 work programme include:

·    completion of renewal works, including Weymouth Boat Ramp and two playground renewals

·    a record number of applications to the Lifelong Learning Fund being received

·    activities delivered by Manurewa Waste Wise Champions and Manukau Beautification Trust to reduce illegal dumping

·    adoption of 57 te reo Māori names for parks and two te reo Māori names for libraries as dual names and bilingual signage at Te Pua / Keith Park as part of Te Kete Rukuruku tranche one.

5.       Key activities not delivered / not progressed as expected include:

·    Randwick Park skate park activation could not to be delivered due to Covid-19 impacts. Unspent funds of $15,500 from this work programme line were made available to the board for reallocation

·    Rukumoana Place and Burundi Foreshore - remediate landslide was not progressed due to the need for further investigations to refine the options analysis by the engineer to an advanced concept plan for the board's consideration. A further geotechnical report and topographical survey will be undertaken to inform concept options.

6.       The budgets of unfinished activities that qualify, will be carried forward into 2020/2021 work programmes.

7.       The financial performance report is attached but is excluded from the public. This is due to restrictions on releasing annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – on or about 30 September.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for March to June 2021

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group results for 2020/2021 are released to the New Zealand’s Exchange (NZX) which are expected to be made public on or about 30 September 2021.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Emergency Budget was adopted on 30 July 2020. The Manurewa Local Board approved 2020/2021 work programmes for the following operating departments at their August 2020 business meeting:

·        Arts, Community and Events

·        Parks, Sport and Recreation

·        Libraries and Information

·        Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

·        Community Leases

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        The Southern Initiative

·        Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development.

9.       As the work programmes were adopted two months later than normal due to effects of COVID-19, there has been a reduced timeframe to deliver these work programmes (10 months).

10.     Since the work programmes were approved the Customer and Community Services directorate has been restructured. Two new departments were created - Connected Communities and Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships. The Southern Initiative and Western Initiative moved into the directorate as a new department - Community and Social Innovation. Units from the previous departments Arts, Community and Events; Libraries and Information; and Service, Strategy and Integration were incorporated into the three new departments. The table below shows the distribution.

Table 1: Changes to Departments in Customer and Community Services directorate

Previous Department - Unit

Current Department - Unit

Arts, Community and Events - Community Places

Connected Communities – Community Places

Arts, Community and Events - Community Empowerment

Connected Communities – Community Empowerment

Arts, Community and Events - Community Empowerment (Youth)

Community and Social Innovation – Youth Empowerment

Arts, Community and Events - Arts and Culture

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Arts and Culture

Arts, Community and Events - Events

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Events

Service, Strategy and Integration

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Service and Asset Planning

Libraries

Connected Communities – Libraries

The Southern Initiative

Community and Social Innovation – The Southern Initiative

The Western Initiative

Community and Social Innovation – The Western Initiative

11.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: work programme activities by outcome

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

12.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that have been delivered as expected or multi-year activities which have progressed as planned (green), activities that are in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that are undelivered or have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work Programme by RAG status


 

13.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each departments the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: work programme activity by activity status and department

Key activity achievements from the 2020/2021 work programme

14.     The key achievements in the delivery of the local board work programmes for 2020/2021, aligned to outcomes in the Manurewa Local Board Plan, include:

People in Manurewa are actively connecting everywhere, every day

·    The Lifelong Learning Fund had 28 applicants in the 2020/2021 work programme year, which is the highest number of applications since the inception of the fund.

·    Manurewa Seniors network held its first hui with representatives from local groups and organisations. This was followed by a free social drop in lunch for residents aged 55 and older at Manu Tukutuku.

·    Manurewa Youth Council highlights for the 2020/2021 year include:

supporting youth engagement on the draft local board plan resulting in around 300 submissions being received from young people

attending the inaugural Auckland Youth Voice awards, where they won Project of the Year Finalist (2020 Elections Campaign), Youth Advocacy Group of the Year and Young Person of the Year (Brittney Flavell)

completing a number of submissions on Government consultations, including the Mental Health Amendment Bill and the Congestion Pricing Inquiry

organising a trip to the local mosque to commemorate Ramadan

launching an art campaign to help create a new mural for The Space.

·    Renewal works completed as part of the 2020/2021 work programme include:

Volta Park Playground, which was opened on 12 December 2020

Weymouth Boat Ramp, which was opened on 30 January 2021

Aronia Reserve Playground, which was opened on 17 April

Installation of new gateway signage for Nathan Homestead.

·    The board adopted a concept plan for the redevelopment of Clendon Community Centre Reserve at its March business meeting. The plan was developed with input from the local community and mana whenua.

·    The following community groups have benefitting from the board’s funding of increased access to Te Matariki Clendon Community Centre and Manurewa Leisure Centre in 2020/2021:

Manurewa Leisure Centre: Mātātoa - Time 2 Train’s community and kura programmes, Walking Samoans, Te Kaha O Te Rangatahi, Ngā Toa Matarau and Te Whare Kura o Manurewa

Te Matariki Clendon Community Centre: Mātātoa - Time 2 Train, What Hope and Te Wharekura O Manurewa.

·    Visits to Manurewa Pool and Leisure Centre from groups benefiting from the board subsidising entry fees for the year included 6,878 people ages 65 and over, 522 people with disabilities and 7,322 adults supervising children.

·    One hundred and fourteen active recreation activations were delivered at 22 locations with over 3100 participants.

A prosperous local economy supporting local people

·    The Southern Initiative engaged the following providers to deliver programmes as part of the board’s Youth Connections 2020/2021 work programme:

KidsCoin was funded to provide the 3 Bags Full (3BF) programme to support three rangatahi who were at risk of dropping out of school due to family financial pressures. All three rangatahi successfully completed the programme, are continuing to attend school and have a clearer idea about what they want to do in future

Mā Te Huruhuru was funded to support 10 rangatahi into demand led workforce development and 10 more rangatahi into an enterprise programme. This resulted in nine rangatahi getting into employment, two pursuing their entrepreneurial ideas and four considering further education to their chosen career pathways. Five remaining rangatahi are continuing to be supported to find either employment or education that will align with their career ambitions.

Our environment is a source of pride and enjoyment for the community

·    The Tōtara Park ecological restoration work programme line contributed towards the planting of over 40,000 plants. Two thousand plants were funded by the local board carry-forward budget, 26,000 were funded by Healthy Waters regional budgets, and 12,000 by Matariki Tu Rākau - One Billion Trees. Over 400 metres of fencing was built to exclude stock from the new planting site and to 300 metres of an exposed stream. Staff note that the planting site will have a low impact on other users of the park and includes access points for mountain bikers.

·    The following activities were delivered through the Good in the Hood - Manurewa Waste Wise Champions work programme item:

the Manukau Beautification Trust installed and monitored 18 illegal dumping signs (designed by the Pride Project) in illegal dumping hotspot areas across Manurewa

two Manurewa Waste Wise Champions were hired and trained, and have since worked alongside four playgroups, seven schools and 11 sports or activity groups. A total of 6,870 flyers have been delivered on 71 streets with 169 chance engagements. They have registered 57 street level champions and attended four community events

in total, the Manukau Beautification Trust and Waste Wise Champions reported 219 incidences of illegal dumping over an eight-month period.

Overview of work programme performance

Arts, Community and Events work programme

15.     In the Arts, Community and Events work programme, there are 28 activities that were completed by end of June 2021 (green), no activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), one activity that is significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and one activity that has been cancelled and deferred in the period March to June 2021 (grey). Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 2: Arts, Community and Events activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Community House development and support

Red

In progress

 

This work will not be completed by the end of June 2021. Staff are recommending a carry forward of the funds into 2021/2022 work programme to so it can be completed. 

 

 

Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

16.     In the Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme, there are 14 activities that were completed by end of June 2021 (green), one activity that is in progress but is delayed (amber), two activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and one activity that has been cancelled and deferred in in the period March to June 2021 (grey). Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 3: Parks, Sport and Recreation activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Randwick Park skate park activation

Red

Not delivered

The 12-week skate activation programme could not to be delivered due to Covid-19 impacts. Unspent funds of $15,500 from this work programme line were reallocated by the board at its April 2021 business meeting.

MR: Te Kete Rukuruku tranche two

Red

Cancelled

Te Kete Rukuruku tranche two was not delivered in this financial year due to delays in completion of tranche one. The budget for this activity was reallocated by the board at its December 2020 and April 2021 business meetings.

MR: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) tranche one

Amber

In progress

 

57 te reo Māori names for parks and two te reo Māori names for libraries were adopted by the board at its March business meeting.

A further 45 names have been received and are under review for adoption. Iwi are still to provide the remaining 20 names. Staff expect these to be provided in Quarter One of 2021/2022. The unspent budget has been recommended as a carry forward to complete tranche one.

 

Libraries work programme

17.     In the Libraries work programme, there are nine activities that were completed by end of June 2021 (green), no activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and no activities that have been cancelled and deferred in in the period March to June 2021 (grey).

 

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

18.     In the Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme, there are 45 activities that were completed by end of June 2021 (green), three activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), two activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and one activity that has been cancelled or deferred in the period March to June 2021 (grey).  Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 4: Community Facilities activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Burundi Avenue Reserve - add a new Puhinui inlet jetty

Red

On Hold

This project is on hold awaiting budget allocation from Māori Outcomes.

Clendon Community House / Finlayson Community House - refurbish facility

Amber

In progress

A quotation was requested earlier this year to undertake refurbishment work during the current financial year. This includes targeted refurbishment of the kitchen, main common area and hallway. Despite earlier assurances from the contractor, it is now unlikely that works can be undertaken within this financial year, due to the contractor’s increasing workload throughout 2021.

Manurewa Aquatic Centre - renew changing room, sauna, ceiling and foyer

Amber

On Hold

Due to funding requirements elsewhere in the work programme, it is proposed to defer this project to financial year 2021/2022. A memo has been drafted to present to the local board.

 

Manurewa Aquatic Centre - renew lap pool floor

 

Amber

On Hold

Due to funding requirements elsewhere in the work programme, it is proposed to defer this project to financial year 2021/2022. A memo has been drafted to present to the local board.

Rukumoana Place and Burundi Foreshore - remediate landslide

Red

In progress

Staff advise that further investigations are required to refine the options analysis by the engineer to an advanced concept plan for the board's consideration. A further geotechnical report and topographical survey of adjacent property will be undertaken in July to inform concept options.

 

Community Leases work programme

19.     In the Community Leases work programme, there are 10 activities that were completed by end of June 2021 (green), no activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and seven activities that have been cancelled and deferred in in the period March to June 2021 (grey).

 

Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme

20.     In the Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme, there are seven activities that were completed by end of June 2021 (green), no activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and no activities that have been cancelled and deferred in in the period March to June 2021 (grey).


 

The Southern Initiative work programme

21.     In The Southern Initiative work programme, there is one activity that was completed by end of June 2021 (green), no activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and no activities that have been cancelled and deferred in in the period March to June 2021 (grey).

Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development work programme

22.     In the Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development work programme, there are four activities that were completed by end of June 2021 (green), no activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and no activities that have been cancelled and deferred in in the period March to June 2021 (grey).

Deferred activities

23.     The Lead Financial Advisors are identifying projects from the local board’s 2020/2021 Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operational budget which meet the criteria to be carried forward. These will be added to the work programme to be delivered in 2021/2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     This report informs the Manurewa Local Board of the performance for the in the period March to June 2021 and the performance for the 2020/2021 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     The board adopted 57 te reo Māori names for parks and two te reo Māori names for libraries as dual names at its March business meeting, as part of Te Kete Rukuruku tranche one. The board acknowledged Te Ākitai Waiohua, Ngāti Tamaoho and Ngāti Pāoa for restoring te reo Māori names and the kōrero that tell the stories behind them. A whakarewatanga for bilingual signage at Te Pua / Keith Park was held on 24 May 2021.

28.     Nathan Homestead hosted the ‘Aroha Mai’ exhibition. This celebrated the traditional Māori medicine system, Rongoā, which uses nature as a way of healing. It featured botanical study drawings and photographs of Rongoā plants, and a portable live Rongoā forest.

29.     The Bilingual Hikoi event was delivered on 20 March 2021. It was attended by community groups, businesses and families representing Manurewa's diverse communities.

30.     As part of the board’s mātauranga Māori Glenveagh Park Reserve Stream Restoration project, Te Pu-a-ngaa Maara worked with Waimahia Intermediate school for an awa monitoring programme with Te Kete Waiora. A Waitiaki community day was held on 16 July 2021, where Te Pu-a-ngaa Maara and The Pride Project facilitated experiential learning about water quality, whakapapa o te wai, plant and pest identification, and tākaro Māori (Māori games).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     This report is provided to enable the Manurewa Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2020/2021 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial performance

32.     Auckland Council (Council) currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – on or about 30 September. Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to this report is excluded from the public. 

33.     Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is under confidential cover.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Overview of work programme performance by department’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     Work programmes for 2021/2022 were approved at the board’s business meeting in June 2020.

36.     Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2021/2022 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Work programme update

109

b

Financial performance report - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robert Boswell - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 



Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021

File No.: CP2021/11239

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2020/2021 Annual Report for the Manurewa Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 27 September 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2020/2021 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 27 September 2021. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market maintained by NZX Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA), local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      adopt the draft 2020/2021 Manurewa Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A to the agenda report.

b)      note that any proposed changes after the adoption will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body on 27 September 2021.

c)      note that the draft 2020/2021 Manurewa Local Board Annual Report, as set out in Attachment A to the agenda report, will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2020/2021 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which are expected to be made public by 28 September 2021.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities and the overall funding impact statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       The annual report contains the following sections:

 

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi is an introduction specific to each local board area and is presented in Te Reo Māori and English.

About this report

An overview of what is covered in this document.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved. Includes the activity highlights and challenges.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Funding impact statement

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

7.       The council’s climate change disclosures are covered in volume four of the annual report and sections within the summary annual report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

10.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

11.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2020/2021 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during July and August 2021

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 27 September 2021

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 28 September 2021

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2021.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft 2020/2021 Manurewa Local Board Annual Report - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Faithe Smith - Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Mark Purdie – Manager Local Board Financial Advisors

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Manurewa Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

23        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Manurewa Local Board for March to June 2021 - Attachment b - Financial performance report

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial information that have an impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2021 that require release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

24        Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021 - Attachment a - Draft 2020/2021 Manurewa Local Board Annual Report

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial information that have an impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2021 that require release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    6 August 2021, Manurewa Local Board - Deputation - Blue Light JAM presentation                       Page 149

Item 8.2      Attachment a    2 August 2021, Manurewa Local Board - Deputation - David Riley presentation                             Page 161


Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 













Manurewa Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 
















[1] Puhinui Reserve

[2] Puhinui freshwater report card

[3] Manukau marine report card

[4] Transform Manukau - Renewal of Manukau Central, Panuku 2016

[5] Manukau Framework Plan, Panuku 2017

 

[6] Water Sensitive Design for Stormwater, Auckland Council Guideline Document 2015/004

[7] Chapter E1, Policy 10

[8] Page 6 of Te Arawhiti Engagement Guidelines; Te Arawhiti is the Office for Maori Crown Relations.

[9] Te Arawhiti: Building Closer Partnerships with Maori: Principles

[10] In particular s5, s6 (e), s7 (a) and (aa) and s8.

[11] In particular s (3) (d), s14 (d) and (h), 77 (c), s81, s82 (2)

[12] Te Puni Kōkiri: Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi as Expressed by the Courts and the Waitangi Tribunal Wellington, 2002

[13] Auckland Prosperity Index Report 2020

[14] Population of Counties Manukau DHB

[15] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/03/GB_20210325_AGN_10148_AT_WEB.htm (Item 9, GB/2021/19)

[16] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_AGN_10145_AT_WEB.htm (Item 10, GB/2021/49)

[17] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_AGN_10145_AT_WEB.htm (Item 9, GB/2021/48)

[18] Freedom Camping Act; Litter Act; Resource Management Act; Fire and Emergency NZ Act; Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw; Auckland Council Traffic Bylaw; Auckland Transport Traffic Bylaw; Alcohol Control Bylaw; Dog Management Bylaw

[19] https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_MAT_10145_WEB.htm