I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 24 August 2021

10.00am

Via Skype for Business

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Maria Meredith

 

Deputy Chairperson

Chris Makoare

 

Members

Don Allan

 

 

Debbie Burrows

 

 

Nerissa Henry

 

 

Peter McGlashan

 

 

Tony Woodcock

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Blair Morrow

Democracy Advisor

 

19 August 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 027 278 6975

Email: Blair.morrow@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                   5

2          Apologies                                                                                 5

3          Declaration of Interest                                          5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                    5

6          Acknowledgements                                              5

7          Petitions                                                                 5

8          Deputations                                                           5

9          Public Forum                                                                            5

10        Extraordinary Business                                       5

11        Governing Body Member's Update                    7

12        Chairperson's Report                                           9

13        Board Member's Reports                                   15

14        Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021             19

15        Auckland Council's Performance Report: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board for March to June 2021                                                        23

16        Changes to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Community Facilities 2022-2024 Work Programme                                                          73

17        Road Name Approval for a New Private Road between Harlow Crescent and Epping Street, Glen Innes                                                            83

18        Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round One 2021/2022, grant allocations                              93

19        Seeking local board views on changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes                                                                            105

20        Proposal to make a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw                                                  145

21        Governance Forward Work Calendar             255

22        Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops                                                        259

23        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

24        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                         265

14        Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021

a.      Annual Financial Report                         265

15        Auckland Council's Performance Report:Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board for March to June 2021

b.      Maungakiekie Tāmaki Local Board financial report year ending June 2021                                                                   265


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 27 July 2021, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

Governing Body Member's Update

File No.: CP2021/08457

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on local activities that the Governing Body representative is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To provide the Governing Body Member an opportunity to update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Governing Body Member’s update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Blair Morrow – Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2021/08460

 

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the Chairperson is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing the Chairperson with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Chairperson’s report for August 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Chair M Meredith Monthly Report

11

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Blair Morrow – Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

Board Member's Reports

File No.: CP2021/08465

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the local board members are involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the board members report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Deputy Chair C Makoare Monthly Report

17

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Blair Morrow – Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021

File No.: CP2021/11265

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2020/2021 Annual Report for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 27 September 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2020/2021 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 27 September 2021. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market maintained by NZX Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA), local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      adopt the draft 2020/2021 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A to the agenda report.

b)      note that any proposed changes after the adoption will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body on 27 September 2021.

c)       note that the draft 2020/2021 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Annual Report, as set out in Attachment A to the agenda report, will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2020/2021 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which are expected to be made public by 28 September 2021.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities and the overall funding impact statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       The annual report contains the following sections:

 

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi is an introduction specific to each local board area and is presented in Te Reo Māori and English.

About this report

An overview of what is covered in this document.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved. Includes the activity highlights and challenges.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Funding impact statement

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

7.       The council’s climate change disclosures are covered in volume four of the annual report and sections within the summary annual report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

10.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

11.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2020/2021 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during July and August 2021

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 27 September 2021

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 28 September 2021

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2021.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Annual Financial Report - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Audrey Gan - Lead Financial Advisor Local Boards

Mark Purdie - Lead Financial Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

Auckland Council's Performance Report: Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board for March to June 2021

File No.: CP2021/12363

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board with an integrated performance report for March to June 2021, and the overall performance for the financial year against the approved 2020/2021 local board work programmes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an integrated view of performance for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board and includes financial performance and delivery against work programmes for the 2020/2021 financial year.

3.       90 activities within the agreed work programmes were delivered including multi-year projects that have progressed as expected. 14 activities were undelivered, put on hold or deferred and 11 activities have not progressed as expected during 2020/2021.

4.       Key activity achievements from the 2020/2021 work programme include:

·    the local board allocated $68,909.21 through its third community grant round, leaving no remaining funds for FY20/21

·    Onehunga War Memorial Pool and Leisure Centre operations has experienced a 13 per cent increase in centre visits when measured against last financial year (2019/2020)

·    a total of 180 students from across five schools took part in a range of activities to inspire and engage on pest education and management for schools

·    since February 2021, 101 cats have been desexed with an additional 165 cats booked in for desexing surgery in the local board area by the SPCA

5.       Key activities not delivered / not progressed as expected include:

·    Point England Reserve Service Assessment due to treaty settlement negotiations. It is planned to commence in FY2021/2022 beginning with iwi engagement

·    Local history of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki due to Covid-19 lockdowns and staffing issues

·    Fergusson Domain – renew and upgrade courts to multi-purpose courts as there has been unforeseen site issues including lack of information on existing drainage. The courts are still expected to be delivered by end of June 2022.

·    Lagoon Stadium – subsidised casual court access due to COVID-19 level changes, bookings were proving difficult to plan. However, staff and YMCA worked together to deliver free access and youth activities for the local community.

6.       Qualifying budgets of unfinished activities will be carried forward into 2021/2022 work programmes.

7.       The financial performance report is attached but is excluded from the public. This is due to restrictions on releasing annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the New Zealand Exchange (NZX) – on or about 30 September 2021.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for March to June 2021.

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group results for 2020/2021 are released to the New Zealand’s Exchange (NZX) which are expected to be made public on or about 30 September 2021.

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Emergency Budget was adopted on 30 July. The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board approved 2020/2021 work programmes for the following operating departments at their August 2020 business meeting:

·        Arts, Community and Events;

·        Parks, Sport and Recreation;

·        Libraries and Information;

·        Community Services: Service, Strategy and Integration; (Now part of Connected Communities department)

·        Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew;

·        Community Leases;

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services;

·        Plans and Places;

·        The West Initiative;

·        Auckland Unlimited (ATEED).

9.       As the work programmes were adopted two month later than normal due to effects of COVID-19, there has been a reduced timeframe to deliver these work programmes (10 months).

10.     Since the work programmes were approved the Customer and Communities Services directorate has been restructured. Two new departments were created - Connected Communities and Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships, and the Southern Initiative and Western Initiative moved into the directorate as a new department - Community and Social Innovation. Units from the previous departments Arts, Community and Events; Libraries and Information; and Service, Strategy and Integration were incorporated into the three new departments. The table below shows the distribution

Table 1: Changes to Departments in Customer and Communities Services directorate

Previous Department - Unit

Current Department - Unit

Arts, Community and Events - Community Places

Connected Communities – Community Places

Arts, Community and Events - Community Empowerment

Connected Communities – Community Empowerment

Arts, Community and Events - Community Empowerment (Youth)

Community and Social Innovation – Youth Empowerment

Arts, Community and Events - Arts & Culture

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Arts & Culture

Arts, Community and Events - Events

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Events

Service, Strategy and Integration

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Service and Asset Planning

Libraries

Connected Communities – Libraries

The Southern Initiative

Community and Social Innovation – The Southern Initiative

The Western Initiative

Community and Social Innovation – The Western Initiative

 

11.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

12.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that have been delivered as expected or multi-year activities which have progressed as planned (green), activities that are in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that are undelivered or have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Graph 2: Work Programme by RAG status

13.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities in each departments work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: work programme activity by activity status and department

Key activity achievements from the 2020/2021 work programme

14.     The key achievements in the delivery of the local board work programmes for 2020/2021 include:

·    Te Oro (Council Facility) – Operational Expenditure: Throughout the financial year, Te Oro has delivered a variety of programmes with various attendance and participants. For the period of March to June 2021, Te Oro delivered 38 programmes with 20 programme sessions, seven of which had Māori outcomes. There was a total of 11,392 attendees and participants.

·    Access to community places for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki: Despite experiencing one lockdown during the first week in March, participant numbers had increased by 16 per cent and booking hours have increased by 20 per cent compared to the previous update that was given for November 2020 to February 2021. The top two activity types were religious and meetings.

·    Local community grants: $41,908.46 was allocated for Local Grants Round One, $28,906.33 was allocated to Grants Round Two and $68,909.21 was allocated for Local Grants Round three, leaving no remaining funds.

·    Pest education and management for schools: A total of 180 students from across five schools (Golden Grove School, St Mary's School, Ellerslie Schools, St Joseph’s Onehunga and Oranga Primary) took part in a range of activities to inspire, engage and provide students with knowledge on what conservation issues are impacting their local environment. Activities included a school-based learning experience, local park biodiversity investigation and action planning and tools to integrate pest animal management in their schools.

·    Experiential learning and action for water in schools: A total of 300 students across four schools (Panama Road School, Stanhope Road School, Glen Innes School and Point England School) took part in a range of activities to inspire, engage and provide students with knowledge on what is impacting their local freshwater and marine environments.

·    Low carbon lifestyles: Over the financial year more than 215 homes have been door knocked. Follow-up phone calls are in progress to identify the changes households have undertaken as a result of the advice provided. Of the 174 households that have been phoned to date, 144 have changed their behaviour resulting in a saving of $51,000 per year on energy bills and around 27,000 kilograms of carbon dioxide emissions avoided.

·    SPCA cat desexing and microchipping programme: Since February 2021 when the local board re-allocated funding to support microchipping and desexing of cats in the local board area by the SPCA, 101 cats have been desexed and microchipped, including 48 male cats and 52 female cats. Bookings are still being processed, with additional 165 cats booked in for desexing surgery. This desexing work will improve animal welfare outcomes by reducing nuisance issues and protect native birds and the investment of other biodiversity conservation activities, leading to positive biodiversity outcomes in the area.

·    Onehunga War Memorial Pool and Leisure Centre: Onehunga Pool and Leisure Centre has experienced a 13 per cent increase in centre visits when measured against last financial year (2019/2020). This is due to the centre not having as many facility closures from Covid-19 restrictions compared to last financial year. Memberships are averaging just over 1,450 at the end of each month, which is slightly down on last year’s average. There was a big drop in membership following the Level 4 lockdown last year, but, encouragingly, memberships have been steadily.

·    The following Community Facilities – Build, Maintain, Renew work programme activities are now completed:

Taniwha Reserve – general park development

Taumanu Reserve – remediate erosion

Onehunga War Memorial – comprehensive renewal

Commissariat Playground – renew playspace

Hochstetter Pond – install interpretation signage

Panmure Basin – renew play space

Jellicoe Park – install and manage Christmas event lighting

Overview of work programme performance

Arts, Community and Events work programme

15.     In the Arts, Community and Events work programme, there are 14 activities that were completed by the end of the year, one activity that is in progress but delayed (amber) and one activity that has been deferred in the period March to June 2021 (grey). Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 1: Arts, Community and Events activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Youth Empowerment Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

Amber

In progress

Amber status due to 312 Hub experiencing staffing changes and have been working with the Strategic Grants Partnership team to strengthen organisational sustainability.

Te Oro Business Plan initiatives

Grey

Deferred

This project has been deferred due to emergency budget constraints.

 

Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

16.     In the Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme, there are eight activities that were completed by the end of the year (green), one activity that is in progress but delayed (amber) and three activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red). Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 2: Parks, Sport and Recreation activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Point England Reserve Service Assessment

Red

Not delivered

The treaty settlement is in progress. The Point England Reserve Service Assessment will not progress until the site related to the Treaty Settlement has been completed.

Lagoon Stadium – subsidized casual court access

Red

In progress

 

Due to COVID-19 level changes, bookings were proving difficult to plan. However, staff and YMCA worked together to deliver free access and youth activities for the local community.

CARRY FORWARD MT: Urban Forest (Ngahere) Knowing FY20

Amber

In progress

The project implementation was impacted by COVID-19 lock downs which delayed progress. However, the final Urban Ngahere Action Plan was approved on 22 June 2021 – Resolution MT/2012/104 and an information memo with the local board canopy cover analysis update will be sent in quarter one FY 2021/2022. This will complete the 'Knowing' phase which will inform the next 'Growing' phase of implementation.

CARRY FORWARD MT: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) tranche one

Red

In progress

 

Concerns were raised by mana whenua which impacted timelines. A resolution has been made with iwi to take sites forward for naming. There is a budget underspend which is signalled as a carry forward to complete trance one in financial year 2021/2022.

 

Libraries work programme

17.     In the Libraries work programme, there are eight activities that were completed by the end of the 2020/2021 financial year. There were no activities with significant impacts. 

Service Strategy and Integration work programme

18.     In the Service Strategy and Integration work programme, there is one activity that is in progress but delayed (amber) and one activity that has been deferred in in the period March to June 2021 (grey). Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

 

 

Table 3: Service Strategy and Integration activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Feedback on business case for LTP consideration

Amber

In progress

Delivery of indicative business case is delayed while Panuku reassess options. The option assessment will continue through the development of the indicative business case.

CARRY FORWARD Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Parks Management Plan

Grey

Deferred

Work prioritisation across the local parks management plans programme has delayed this project reaching the next decision point (draft plan for notification).

 

This project is on hold due to resourcing constraints. This allows time for engagement with the Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust who are currently in their establishment phase. We expect to re-initiate work on this project in Q2 FY2022.

 

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

19.     In the Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme, there are seven activities that were completed by the end of the year (green), four activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), and four activities that have been deferred in the period March to June 2021 (grey).  Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 4: Community Facilities activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Jubilee Bridge – renew and upgrade bridge

Amber

In progress

There has been a delay in completing geotechnical investigations on the Lagoon drive end due to the site currently being occupied by Auckland Manukau Eastern Transport Initiative (AMETI). Geotechnical investigations are now estimated to be completed in August 2021 when the AMETI project has vacated the site.

The next steps are to continue with detailed design including cultural design and present final design for the bridge structure to the local board by October 2021.

Fergusson Domain – renew and improve park assets

Amber

In progress

Detailed design and consenting phase are underway. Investigation for options to provide public toilet facilities at the Harriers Club building is also underway.

 

The next steps are to lodge for consents and provide an update on phase works to the local board by November 2021.

Fergusson Domain – renew and upgrade courts to multi-purpose courts

Amber

In progress

There have been delays in the design phase caused by unforeseen site issues including lack of information on existing drainage. This has resulted in more time being spent to locate assets and also redesigning of some of the drainage works that were not working. Consents were expected to be lodged in June 2021 but will now be lodged by August 2021. The courts are still expected to be delivered by end of June 2022.

 

The next steps are to complete design works and lodge for consents by August 2021.

Wai-o-taiki Nature Reserve – feasibility for track network

Amber

In progress

Investigations are complete and options are being drafted for local board workshop. There have been delays on this project due to issues with the original design professional, alternative experts have now been engaged and works are underway.

 

The next steps are to workshop options with the local board in September 2021.

Waikaraka Park – improve sports park and extend fields eight, nine and 10

Grey

Deferred

Project is deferred to next financial year 2021/2022 due to pending funding allocation. The project includes geotechnical, contamination, sport field and lighting investigation as well as working in collaboration with stakeholders.

Boundary Reserve East – development

Grey

Deferred

Physical works are underway. Part of the project scope has been deferred as per local board request and both the ends of the pathway are being laid as a temporary path for now. The connections with Tripoli Road and Dunkirk Road will be impacted by the Healthy Waters led shovel ready project to upgrade the culverts and therefore these connections are being placed as temporary paths with the agreement that Piritahi and Community Facilities will complete the permanent pathway once the culvert upgrade works is complete.

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Coast to Coast Walkway – renew walkway signage

Grey

Deferred

This project has been put on hold. Project planned to commence financial year 2021/2022.

 

The next step is to workshop recommendations with the local board once project is approved to progress further.

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki – Te Kete Rukuruku – Māori naming of parks and places

Grey

Deferred

This project has been put on hold and is planned to commence in the 2021/2022 financial year. The next steps are to workshop with the local board once project is approved to progress further.

 

Community Leases work programme

20.     In the Community Leases work programme, there 10 activities that were completed by the end of the year and two activities that have been approved in principle but not will be progressed until future financial years (green), seven activities deferred in in the period March to June 2021 (grey).  Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

 

 

Table 5: Community Leases activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Oranga Community Centre, 52C Waitangi Road, Onehunga: Royal New Zealand Plunket - One tree hill/Oranga

Grey

Deferred

A report to grant a new lease will be tabled at the September business meeting. This item is deferred to the FY2021-2022 work programme.

Elstree Reserve, 38A Elstree Avenue, Glen Innes: Tamaki Model Aeroclub Incorporated

Grey

Deferred

The group will present at a deputation to the local board in the near future. This item has been deferred to the FY2021-2022 work programme

Vic Cowen Park, 174 Penrose Road Mt Wellington: Auckland Central Model Railway Club

Grey

Deferred

This item has been workshopped with the local board to address rental issues which will be addressed by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee. The business report to endorse the new lease will be presented at the September business meeting.

Hamlin Park, 39 Hamlin Road Mt Wellington: Mt Wellington Cricket Incorporated

Grey

Deferred

Need to workshop with the local board. Leasing and EOI will not be progressed until this is completed. This item is being deferred to FY22/23 work programme

 

Savage Park, 10 Hamlin Road Mount Wellington: Scout Association of New Zealand - Maungerei Scout Group

Grey

Deferred

Waikaraka Park, 175-243 Neilson Street Te Papapa: Onehunga Combined Sports Trust Incorporated

Grey

Deferred

Waiting on Parks Maintenance to workshop options with the local board. Leasing will not be progressed until this is completed. This item is being deferred to 2021-2022 work programme.

Pt England Reserve, 122 Elstree Avenue Glen Innes: Tāmaki Model Aero Club Incorporated

Grey

Deferred

This land is subject to Treaty Settlement negotiations and has been deferred to the FY2021-2022 work programme

 

Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme

21.     In the Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme, there are 11 activities that were completed by the end of June 2021 (green). There were no activities with significant impacts.

Plans and Places work programme

22.     In the Plans and Places work programme, there are two activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber) in the period of March to June 2021.  Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 6: Plans and Places activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Local History of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

Amber

In progress

Panoramas from Maungakiekie and Maungarei have been put on display in Panmure outside of the library/community centre. Activations planned later in the year. Project has been delayed due to Covid-19 related delays and staffing issues.

CARRY FORWARD: Local History of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

Amber

Approved

 

Auckland Unlimited work programme

23.     In the Auckland Unlimited work programme, there are two activities that were completed by the end of June 2021 (green). There were no activities with significant impacts. 

The West Initiative work programme

24.     In the West Initiative work programme, there is one activity that was completed by the end of the June 2021 (green). There were no activities with significant impacts.  

Deferred activities

25.     The Lead Financial Advisors are identifying projects from the local board’s 2020/2021 Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operational budget which meet the criteria to be carried forward. These will be added to the work programme to be delivered in 2021/2022.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     This report informs the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board of the performance for the period March to June 2021 and the performance for the 2020/2021 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board remains committed to integrating and supporting work that contributes to outcomes for Māori. This includes enhancing partnerships and collaborative ways of working with mana whenua and mataawaka.

30.     The local board’s work programme contains many projects which provide direct outcomes for Māori and Māori engagement this includes:

·    continued collaboration with Ruapōtaka Marae where a draft business plan has been presented and work is underway to finalise the marae so it is ready to support the marae applications for Community Lease and Landowner Approval that will be submitted following the completion of the land transfer. 

·    the local board is supporting the programme Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places). However, due to treaty negotiations and shared interests to be resolved, it has been delayed. Tranche one is expecting to be completed in FY2021/2022.

·    the celebration of Matariki through bilingual Storytime at Panmure Library, star weaving at Onehunga and Panmure libraries as well as a workshop to build a pātaka kai at Onehunga Library. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     This report is provided to enable the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2020/2021 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial performance

32.     Auckland Council (Council) currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – on or about 30 September. Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to this report is excluded from the public. 

33.     Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the integrated performance report is under confidential cover.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Overview of work programme performance by department’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     Work programmes for 2021/2022 were approved at the board’s business meeting in June 2021.

36.     Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2021/2022 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board March to June 2021 Work Programme Update

35

b

Maungakiekie Tāmaki Local Board Financial report year ending June 2021 - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Simone Tongatule - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

Changes to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Community Facilities 2022-2024 Work Programme

File No.: CP2021/11564

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for amendments to the 2022-2024 Community Facilities work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board adopted the 2022-2024 Community Facilities work programme on 22 June 2021 (resolution number MT/2021/103).

3.       A new project is required in the work programme to renew the boiler at Onehunga Pool as a priority to ensure that the facility remains open. The estimated cost of the work is $110,000 to be funded from ABS Capex – Renewals in financial year 2021/2022.

4.       Reallocation of work programme renewals budget is required to fund the works. Two projects have been identified as requiring less local renewals funding for the financial year 2021/2022, totalling $60,000.

5.       Staff propose that the project to renew the clock at Tin Tacks Reserve is placed on hold and delivered when budget becomes available in future years and the allocated $50,000 renewals budget is reallocated to the Onehunga Pool boiler project. 

6.       Staff propose that $10,000 renewals budget is reallocated from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki – renew minor assets project and reallocated to the Onehunga Pool project.

7.       Staff have discussed the proposal and rationale for this change with the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board at a local board workshop held on 27 July 2021.

8.       Staff recommend that the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board approve the variations to the Community Facilities Work Programme 2022-2024.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      approve the amendments to its adopted 2022 – 2024 Community Facilities work programme, reallocating the following 2021/2022 asset-based services capital expenditure budgets to the new activity Onehunga Pool – renew boiler:

i)       $50,000 from the activity, Tin Tacks Reserve – renew clock (ID 2586)

ii)       $10,000 from the activity, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki – renew minor assets (ID 3051)

iii)      $50,000 from unallocated Asset Based Capital Expenditure.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board approved the Community Facilities work programme 2022-2024 on 22 June 2021 (resolution number MT/2021/103).

10.     As the financial year progresses, unpredicted failures of assets can occur and require immediate attention and prioritisation to the Local Board. As a result, the approved Communities Facilities work programme will need to be amended for these assets to be renewed which can cause delays or deferrals to the delivery in other projects.

Financial Year 2021/2022 Variations

11.     Staff have identified that the boiler at Onehunga Pool has reached its end of life, and renewing it requires amendments to the work programmes funding allocations of ABS Capex: Renewals in financial year 2021/2022 to keep the facility open to the public. The proposed variations are detailed under the Analysis and Advice section of this report.

12.     It has been determined that the boiler needs a replacement at an estimated cost of $110,000. This work will ensure the facility will remain open and requires immediate attention. Refer to proposed amendment to 2022 - 2024 Community Facilities work programme (Attachment A).

Budget Reductions

13.     Two projects have been identified as requiring less local renewals funding for the 2021/2022 financial year, totalling a reduction of $60,000. This funding is available to be reallocated at the discretion and prioritisation of the local board.

 

Table 1: Community Facilities Work Programme – approved financial allocations – financial year (FY) 2021/2022.

Resolution Number

Project ID

Activity Name

Activity Description

Budget source

Total Budget Allocation

MT/2021/103

2586

Tin Tacks Reserve – renew clock

Renew the clock in the centre of the reserve.

FY21/22 - investigate, design and consent, physical works.

Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) project

ABS: Capex – Renewals

 

 

$50,000

MT/2021/103

3051

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki – renew minor assets

Renew minor assets across the region as identified when inspected. The sites for delivery are as follows:

- Anns Creek - replace bollards.

- Fergusson Domain - renew line marking and park signage.

- Hornes Reserve - renew bollards and signage.

- Laishley House - renew steps and entranceway.

- Olive Road Pleasance - replace degraded seating.

- Panmure Basin - renew drinking fountain.

- Panmure Community Hall - renew minor assets.

- Lagoon Stadium - renew minor assets.

- Panmure Wharf - replace degraded bollards.

- Te Oro - renew minor assets in plant room, renew louvres and investigate window coverings at dance studio.

- Jordan Recreation Centre - renew accessway, carpark surface and waterproofing as identified in the asset assessment.

- Waikaraka Park Stone House - renew accessway components.

FY19/20 - investigate and design.

FY20/21 to FY23/24 - deliver physical works.

ABS: Capex – renewals

 

 

$100,000

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     The proposed project has been identified via asset condition assessments to ensure the asset remains fit for purpose and ensuring that the facility remains open to the public to use.

15.     There are several options available to the Local Board to address the boiler renewal. All options except ‘do nothing’ require a change to the adopted 2022 – 2024 Community Facilities work programme.

16.     The table below is an analysis of three options for the Onehunga Pool – renewal boiler project:

 

Table 2: Options Analysis

Options

 

Criteria

Finance

Comments

 

 

Local board outcome alignment

Risk

Implementation

CAPEX

(preliminary estimate only)

OPEX

(preliminary estimate only)

 

A – do nothing

N/A

High

No action

$0

$10,000 or more

This option is not recommended due to the Onehunga Pool not being able to function without the boiler. This will result in the facility being closed permanently. This is a high risk especially as the facility being contractually committed to the Third-Party Operator for being open, and such closure will result in payment for their loss in revenue.

 

B – Renew the boiler at Onehunga Pool once it has completely failed

Our physical and social environment is future proofed

High

Wait for the boiler to reach its end of life before renewing.

$150,000+

$0

This option is not recommended by staff due to the prolonged period the facility will need to be closed to replace the boiler. There is the potential for delays in accessing the correct boiler which would result in the facility remaining closed for longer.

 

C – Renew the boiler at Onehunga Pool immediately

Our physical and social environment is future proofed

Low

Confirm costs to procurement for delivery

$110,000

$0

This option is recommended due to the short timeframe remaining on the boiler’s life. By renewing the boiler sooner, there will be less disruptions to the facility and community.

 

Staff recommendation and next steps

Staff recommend option C as the boiler for the swimming pool requires a full replacement. The best timeframe to complete the works with limited disruption is immediately.

It is proposed that a new project is created, and $110,000 renewals budget is allocated. If this is approved, staff will progress to install the new boiler immediately.

17.     Staff recommend the proposed variations to change the current 2022 – 2024 Community Facilities work programme as outlined in Table 3. For the project to proceed, other projects in the programme will need to be re-prioritised. 

 

Table 3: How the proposed variation/s will impact the 2022 - 2024 Community Facilities work programme

Project ID

Activity Name

Budget variations

 FY2021-2022 

Details 

To be allocated

Onehunga Pool – renew boiler

Renewal budget:

 

FY21/22 $110,000

 

The project will see that the asset remains fit for purpose and the facility open for public use.

The estimated cost of work is $110,000.

 

2586

Tin Tacks Reserve – renew clock

Renewals budget variation:

Approved FY21/22 budget $50,000

Revised FY21/22 budget $0

 

Renewal budget reduction of $50,000 to be reallocated to Onehunga Pool renew boiler project

This project has not started and therefore can be deferred to future years once funding has become available to cover the cost of the boiler renewal.

3051

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki – renew minor assets

Renewals budget variations 

Approved FY21/22 budget $100,000 

Revised FY21/22 budget $90,000

 

Renewal budget reduction of $10,000 to be reallocated to Onehunga Pool renew boiler project.

The project forecast this financial year is less than anticipated due to detailed scoping and design, resulting in a reduction in the high-level budget of the 2021/2022 work programme

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

19.     This is an administrative report and the budget variations proposed in the report have no direct effect on climate change.  Each project will be considered individually to assess the impacts of climate change and the approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The type of impacts to be considered include:

·        maximum upcycling and recycling of old material

·        installation of energy efficiency measures

·        building design to ensure the maximum lifetime and efficiency of the building is obtained

·        lifecycle impacts of construction materials (embodied emissions)

·        exposure of building location to climate change hazards (sea level rise, flooding (floodplains), drought, heat island effect)

·        anticipated increase in carbon emissions from construction, including contractor emissions

·        lifecycle impacts of construction materials.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     Collaboration with staff will be ongoing throughout the life of the project to ensure integration into the operational maintenance and asset management systems.

21.     The decision sought for this report has no direct impact on other parts of the council group.  The overall 2020-2023 work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in an integrated team.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     Community facilities and open spaces provide important community services to the people of the local board area. They contribute to building strong, healthy, and vibrant communities by providing spaces where Aucklanders can participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art and recreational activities. These activities improve lifestyles and a sense of belonging and pride amongst residents.

23.     The proposed variations were discussed with the Local Board at their workshop on 27 July 2021.

24.     The activities in the work programme align with the listed Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes, as this was the relevant plan at the time of the work programme approval.

·        Maungakiekie-Tāmaki our physical and social infrastructure is future-proofed

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori.

26.     The projects discussed in this report will benefit Māori and the wider community through the provision of quality facilities and open spaces that promote good health, the fostering of family and community relationships and connection to the natural environment.

27.     Where aspects or the work programme are anticipated to have an impact on activity of importance to Maori, then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     Although there are significant financial variations, the proposed budget requirements for the 2021/2022 financial year can be achieved by reallocating budgets from proposed projects and utilising unallocated Local Renewal funding.

29.     Details of the proposed variations for funding are outline in Table 3 above.

30.     The budgets and allocations including the proposed variation requests are provided in Table 4 below.

2021/2022 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Budget Sources

Budget Amounts

ABS: Capex - Local Renewals - Total Budget

$4,851,962

ABS: Capex - Local Renewals – Allocated

 

$4,797,141

 

ABS: Capex – Local Renewals – Unallocated budget to be allocated to the Onehunga Pool - renew boiler project

$50,000

 

ABS: Capex – Local Renewals – budget to be reallocated to the Onehunga Pool - renew boiler project

 

$60,000

Table 4: Financial summary for 2021/2022 Community Facilities work programme

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     If the proposed project is not added to the current year Community Facilities work programme, the asset will deteriorate further, and the facility would need to be closed to the public.

32.     The COVID-19 pandemic could have a further negative impact on the delivery of the work programme if the COVID-19 alert level changes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Subject to the Local Board’s decision on the proposals outlined in this report, the 2022 – 2024 Community Facilities work programme will be amended to reflect the decision and works will commence on the projects as per the timings outlined in the approved work programme.

34.     The Local Board will continue to be updated on the progress of delivery of the work programme as part of the quarterly reports to the local board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Proposed ammendment to the 2022-2024 Community Facilities work programme

81

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tessa Dymond - Work Programme Lead

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - Acting General Manager Community Facilities

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

Attachment A – Proposed amendment to 2022 - 2024 Community Facilities work programme

Community Facilities Work Programme – to be amended

 

Activity Name

Activity Description

Activity Benefits

Further Decision Points for LB

LB Plan Outcomes

Lead Dept/Unit or CCO

Estimate completion date

Budget Source

FY2018/2019 or prior budget

FY2019/2020

FY2020/2021

FY2021/2022

FY2022/2023+

Total Cost

Tin Tacs Reserve – renew clock

Renew the clock in the center of the reserve.

FY21/22 - investigate, design and consent, physical works.

Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) project

Maintain current levels of service

No further decisions are anticipated

Our physical and social infrastructure is future-proofed

CF: Project Delivery

TBC – when funding becomes available in future years

ABS: Capex Local Renewal

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

 

Activity Name

Activity Description

Activity Benefits

Further Decision Points for LB

LB Plan Outcomes

Lead Dept/Unit or CCO

Estimate completion date

Budget Source

FY2018/2019 or prior budget

FY2019/2020

FY2020/2021

FY2021/2022

FY2022/2023+

Total Cost

Maungakiekie-Tamaki – renew minor assets

Renew minor assets across the region as identified when inspected. The sites for delivery are as follows:

- Anns Creek - replace bollards.

- Fergusson Domain - renew line marking and park signage.

- Hornes Reserve - renew bollards and signage.

- Laishley House - renew steps and entranceway.

- Olive Road Pleasance - replace degraded seating.

- Panmure Basin - renew drinking fountain.

- Panmure Community Hall - renew minor assets.

- Lagoon Stadium - renew minor assets.

- Panmure Wharf - replace degraded bollards.

- Te Oro - renew minor assets in plant room, renew louvres and investigate window coverings at dance studio.

- Jordan Recreation Centre - renew accessway, carpark surface and waterproofing as identified in the asset assessment.

- Waikaraka Park Stone House - renew accessway components.

FY19/20 - investigate and design.

FY20/21 to FY23/24 - deliver physical works.

Maintain current levels of service

No further decisions are anticipated

Our physical and social infrastructure is future-proofed

CF: Project Delivery

Estimated project completion date June 2024

ABS: Capex Local Renewal

$0

$400

$100,000

$90,000

$110,000

$300,400

 

Work Programme Project Onehunga Pool – renew boiler – For approval

 

Activity Name

Activity Description

Activity Benefits

Further Decision Points for LB

LB Plan Outcomes

Lead Dept/Unit or CCO

Estimate completion date

Budget Source

FY2018/2019 or prior budget

FY2019/2020

FY2020/2021

FY2021/2022

FY2022/2023+

Total Cost

Onehunga Pool – renew boiler

Renew the boiler at Onehunga Pool.

 

FY 21/22 - physical works

Maintain current levels of service

No further decisions are anticipated

Our physical and social infrastructure is future-proofed

CF: Project Delivery

June 2022

ABS: Capex – Renewals

$0

$0

$0

$110,000

$0

$110,000

 

 

 

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

Road Name Approval for a New Private Road between Harlow Crescent and Epping Street, Glen Innes

File No.: CP2021/11953

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board to name a new private road between Harlow Crescent and Epping Street, Glen Innes, being a commonly owned access lot (COAL), created by way of a subdivision development known as ‘Line-Epping Phase 2’ as part of the regeneration of the Line Road and Epping Street Neighbourhoods.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval.

3.       Fletcher Living (Applicant) have proposed the following names for consideration by the Local Board, for the new COAL between Harlow Crescent and Epping Street:

·   Medenine Lane

·   Tebaga Lane

·   Kasserine Lane 

4.       The Applicant advises that the proposed names are related to World War 2 battles from North Africa in which the NZ Division and 28th Māori Battalion that fought as part of the Allied 8th Army. This theme was chosen because many of the existing streets surrounding the development site are named after similar WW2 battles and soldiers, with many of the homes in the area being originally built for ex-service men and their families.

5.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana Whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      approves the name Tebaga Lane for the new private road (a COAL) created by way of subdivision between Harlow Crescent and Epping Street, Glen Innes, for ‘Line-Epping Phase 2’ by Fletcher Living, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references SUB60365304 and BUN60365302).

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent reference BUN60365302 (subdivision reference number SUB60365304) was issued in March 2021 for the construction of 34 new residential dwellings and associated commonly owned access lots (COALs) for ‘Line-Epping Phase 2’, as part of the wider regeneration of the Line Road and Epping Street Neighbourhoods.

7.       In accordance with the Standards, any road including private ways, COALs, and right of ways, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

8.       As part of this development stage, one of the new COALs requires a road name because it serves more than five lots. This can be seen in Attachment A, where the COAL that requires a name is highlighted in yellow.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval

10.     The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

11.     Theme (as described by the Applicant): The Tamaki area is unique in that many of the local streets are named after battles in which the NZ Division and 28th Māori Battalion fought in World War 2. Many of the original homes were built for ex-service men and their families, so this was deemed appropriate at that time. The proposed road names are in keeping with this existing theme. The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board have recently approved other names in the area following the same Māori Battalion and WW2 theme, such as Gazala Lane and Manahi Lane under Resolution number MT/2020/103.

12.     The background to the proposed names are as follows:

Proposed name

Meaning (provided by the Applicant, sources referenced)

 

Medenine Lane

 

During March 1943 the Māori Battalion was involved in two battles. The first battle was a defensive one at Medenine (6 March) and the second battle was an offensive one at Tebaga Gap (26-27 March).

In the battle of Medenine, the Māori Battalion repelled the full weight of a Panzer attack. Lt-Gen Montgomery called it “the perfect example of a defensive battle in its setting, its conduct and its outcome.”  The Allies had been forewarned of an attack known as ‘Operation Capri’ (Unternehmen Capri) by interception of German wireless communications and rushed reinforcements from Tripoli and Benghazi before the attack, which was a costly failure for the Axis forces.

(Source - 28th Māori Battalion Website at:

https://28maoribattalion.org.nz/memory/maori-battalion-diary-march-1943-0 and https://28maoribattalion.org.nz/story-of-the-28th/desert-fighters)

 

Tebaga Lane

After the victory at Medenine, the New Zealander’s next task was a sweeping ‘left hook' inland to seize Tebaga Gap and outflank the enemy's Mareth Line. The Battalion's objectives were Point 209 and a foothill the Māori named Hikurangi. Led by Captain Arapeta (Peter) Awatere, C Company seized the latter on 26 March and held it throughout a night of desperate counter-attacks from Panzer Grenadiers. Point 209 fell the next day, with 231 German prisoners taken. The Māori Battalion had suffered almost 100 casualties, including 22 dead. Among the fallen was 2nd Lieutenant Te Moananui-a-Kiwa Ngārimu, whose inspired leadership would earn him a posthumous Victoria Cross - the first Māori to win a VC with the New Zealand forces. (Source - 28th Maori Battalion Website at:

https://28maoribattalion.org.nz/story-of-the-28th/desert-fighters)

 

Kasserine Lane 

 

The Battle of Kasserine Pass took place in February 1943 at Kasserine Pass, a 2-mile-wide gap in the Grand Dorsal chain of the Atlas Mountains in Tunisia. It was part of a series of battles in the Tunisia Campaign of World War 2 involving NZ Divisions.

 

 

13.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in any close proximity.

14.     It is for the local board to decide upon the thematic suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

15.     The Guidelines require road names to reflect local themes. While all three proposed names link to the existing local road name theme of WW2 battles, most of the existing street names and battles involved NZ troops. The proposed name Kasserine Lane’ references the Battle of Kasserine Pass however it is not clear that NZ troops were directly involved in that engagement.

16.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

17.     Road Type: ‘Lane’ is an acceptable road type for the new private road, suiting the form and layout of the COAL.

18.     Consultation: mana whenua were consulted as part of the comprehensive Neighbourhood Regeneration Project for Line Road and Epping Street (by Tāmaki Regeneration), in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all applications, and in this instance the process has been adhered to.

23.     Whilst no Te Reo Māori road names are proposed, the Applicant has proposed names of WW2 battles where the 28th Māori Battalion fought, excepting proposed ‘Kasserine Lane’ where the Battalion Diary of the 28th Māori Battalion indicates that there was no involvement with the Battle of Kasserine Pass.

24.     Applicant Fletcher Living have taken over the development of the site from Tāmaki Regeneration Company (TRC) and that TRC undertook comprehensive consultation with mana whenua regarding road naming in the area as part of the Line Road and Epping Street Neighbourhood Regeneration Project. It was agreed that “for this site [mana whenua] are supporting the choice of names that are in keeping with the unique World War 2 naming tradition of the area” with a focus on battles that involved the 28th Māori Battalion. They also noted “before we commenced any works on-site we organised a blessing of the land with mana whenua”.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

26.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site & Location Plan

89

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Emerald James - Senior Subdivision Advisor

Authoriser

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round One 2021/2022, grant allocations

File No.: CP2021/11973

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round One 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.     This report presents applications received for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round One (Attachment B) 2021/2022.

3.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board adopted the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Community Grants Programme 2020/2021 on 27 April 2021 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

4.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $112,522 for the 2021/2022 financial year.

5.     Twenty-two applications were received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round One 2021/2022, requesting a total of $178,495.18.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants One 2021/2022, listed in Table One below:

Table One: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round One 2021/2022

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2211-109

Glen Innes Playcentre

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of an online professional development course on "Implementing a Bicultural Curriculum" in Early Childhood Education and Te Ao Māori cultural resources and tools for the Playcentre.

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-123

New Zealand Nepal Society Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the venue hire, purchase of a projector and a computer, educational resources, instructors’ honorarium and refreshment costs to run the Nepali language and culture classes in the local board area.

$8,850.00

Eligible

LG2211-129

Panmure Business Association Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of the "Tauoma, herehere o nga kai" mural project, including the cost of graphic design, background wall painting, and the digital print, mount, and installation of a signage board.

$3,679.00

Eligible

LG2211-132

Dolphin Theatre Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the royalty fees, advertising, electricity, cleaning, promotional photography, and promotional materials printing costs for the theatre production "Bridal Shop Confessions".

$5,953.00

Eligible

LG2211-102

Glen Innes Chinese Groups Incorporated

Community

Towards venue hire, purchase of a projector, and memory sticks, purchase and delivery charges for costumes from China, bus hire, stationery, and administration costs for "National Day & Mid-Autumn, Christmas, Chinese New Year, and Lantern events".

$8,070.00

Eligible

LG2211-105

Asthma New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards the wages of two asthma nurse educators.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-106

Communicare CMA (Auckland) Incorporated

Community

Towards the weekly venue hire cost of the Communicare Friendship Centres at Royal Oak Baptist Church, Mt Wellington Presbyterian Parish, Ellerslie, and St Matthias Church, Panmure for one year from 1 September 2021 to 31 August 2022 and the coordinators wages.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-108

The UpsideDowns Education Trust

Community

Towards the speech-language therapy fees for six children with Down Syndrome in the local board area.

$6,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-121

The Period Place

Community

Towards the delivery of 13 one-hour "Period Place Education Workshops" for 232 females within the local board area, specifically the cost of reusable menstrual products and education brochures.

$8,075.08

Eligible

LG2211-122

The Tongan Health Society Incorporated

Community

Towards the delivery of the “Pacific Elderly Day Programme”, including costs for speakers and instructors’ fee, transportation (pick up and drop off), consumables, resources for activities, advertising, and catering costs.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-127

T.W.H (Transformative Whakamana Hapu) Incorporated

Community

Towards the delivery of "Te Ara Taiohi" a youth mentoring programme, specifically the cost of flights, accommodation, van hire and tickets to a water park and adrenalin park.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-128

Graeme Dingle Foundation Auckland

Community

Towards three Kiwi Can Leaders' wages for the delivery of the "Kiwi Can" programme in Glen Innes and Glenbrae School for term four.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-131

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the cost of clinical supervision, counselling and programme resources used by the youth worker team and counsellors from 1 September 2021 to 31 March 2022.

$7,500.00

Eligible

LG2211-133

Dance Therapy NZ

Community

Towards the venue hire, programme facilitation, marketing, equipment and materials, coordination, client support and liaison costs for the "Arts 4 Us", "Stars", and "Dance 4 Us" programme.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-140

The Synergy Project Trust

Community

Towards the cost of venue hire, facilitation, resources, field teamwork, and administration for a youth mentorship programme called "Fuze".

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-142

Penrose Business Association Incorporated

Community

Towards information systems and accounting software subscriptions, annual website hosting fee, liability insurance, purchase of a laptop, and two networking event costs.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-117

Mountains to Sea Conservation Trust

Environment

Towards the cost of a seven day Mountain to Sea Conservation programme for Te Papapa School, including the programme cost, regional management contribution, national management contribution, health and safety and gear levy, transport, accommodation and kayak subcontractor costs.

$9,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-137

Eastern Bays Songbird Project Incorporated

Environment

Towards possum traps, rat traps and wooden trap boxes.

$7,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-118

The Auckland Rowing Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of eight pairs of sculling oars.

$7,600.00

Eligible

LG2211-119

One Tree Hill College

Sport and recreation

Towards the overall cost to uplift and replace the artificial turf on the school’s multipurpose sports court facility, including markings for tennis and netball courts and hockey.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-125

Auckland Basketball Services Limited

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire, affiliation fee, and coaching fees from 15 September 2021 to 31 May 2022.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-134

The Auckland Table Tennis Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of eight table tennis tables, wages for the project manager development coach and the development coach for the 'Tables in Communities” project.

$9,768.10

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$178,495.18

 

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       Auckland Council’s Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·     local board priorities

·     lower priorities for funding

·     exclusions

·     grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·     any additional accountability requirements.

 

9.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board adopted the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 27 April 2021 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

10.     The community grants programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The aim of the local board grants programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include:

·        local food production and food waste reduction

·        decreasing use of single-occupancy transport options

·        home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation

·        local tree planting and streamside revegetation

·        education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

14.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

16.     Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they can increase their chances of success in the future.

17.     A summary of each application received through Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round One 2021/2022 is provided in Attachment B.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grants processes.

19.     Eleven applicants applying to Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round one 2021/2022 indicate projects that target Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements.

21.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $112,522 for the 2021/2022 financial year.

22.     Twenty-two applications were received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round One 2021/2022, requesting a total of $178,495.18.

23.     Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Following the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board allocating funding for round one of the local grants, grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Grants Programme 2021/2022

101

b

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round One 2021/2022 - grant applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moumita Dutta - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

Seeking local board views on changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes

File No.: CP2021/12098

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal input from the local board into Auckland Council’s submission on the Department of Internal Affairs’ consultation on changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Context

2.       In 2020 the Government began a two-stage process to align Māori ward and general ward processes more closely.

3.       The first stage of the changes was completed on 1 March 2021 with the enactment of the Local Electoral (Māori Wards and Māori Constituencies) Amendment Act 2021. These changes were to:

·        remove all mechanisms from the Local Electoral Act 2001 for binding polls to be held on the establishment of Māori wards

·        provide councils (other than Auckland, which has its own legislation) with a fresh opportunity to make decisions on Māori wards in time for the 2022 local elections.

4.       The second stage of changes is intended by the Minister to provide an enduring process for councils to consider setting up Māori wards, by bringing even closer together the Māori wards process and general wards process.

Consultation timeframes

5.       The Department of Internal Affairs’ consultation on changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes is open for public submission with a closing date of 27 August.

6.       Auckland Council will be submitting on the consultation and local board views provided by 25 August will be appended to the Auckland Council submission.

Summary of the consultation

7.       This consultation is not about whether councils should have Māori wards, whether there should be binding polls on Māori wards, or whether there are other ways to improve Māori participation in local government.

8.       The Government has already agreed that establishing a Māori ward is a decision for councils to make. The Government now wants to improve how these decisions are made.

9.       The Government has identified six key differences between the Māori wards and general wards process that are the focus of their consultation. Those differences are:

·        The requirements for councils to consider ward systems

·        The timing of decisions

·        Opportunities for public input

·        Decision-making rights and the role of the Local Government Commission

·        How and when wards can be discontinued

·        The types of polls that councils can hold.

10.     This is a consultation with the public by the Minister and it precedes the drafting of the bill. There is also an opportunity to have a full submission on the draft bill when it is at the select committee stage.

11.     Further information and summary documents on the consultation on changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes can be found here: https://www.dia.govt.nz/maori-wards

12.     For the te reo Māori version of the consultation document, see attachment A.

13.     For the English version of the consultation document, see attachment B.

14.     A feedback template has been provided as attachment C to support your board with providing the most relevant information on this topic.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      endorse the feedback (as per Attachment C) into Auckland Council’s submission on the Department of Internal Affairs’ consultation on changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Te reo Māori version of the consultation document

107

b

English version of the consultation document

125

c

Draft Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board feedback - Māori Wards

143

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Simone Tongatule - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

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24 August 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

Proposal to make a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw

File No.: CP2021/12121

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek support for the draft proposal to make a new Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Auckland Council Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022, before it is finalised for public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Staff have prepared a draft proposal for a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw (Attachment A) to enable local boards to provide their views before it is finalised for public consultation.

3.       The draft proposal is to make a new bylaw under the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This bylaw would replace the current legacy bylaw, which expires in 2022 and contains provisions developed before the Freedom Camping Act 2011 was passed.

4.       The Freedom Camping Act 2011 allows freedom camping on all public land unless it is already prohibited under another enactment. The Act enables councils to make a bylaw to prohibit or restrict freedom camping in areas that meet statutory criteria for protection.

5.       This draft proposal replaces an earlier proposal developed in 2018 which was set aside by the Governing Body in 2019. Following decisions by the Governing Body in March and May 2021, the key changes compared with the 2018 proposal are that the new draft proposal:

·      excludes land held under the Reserves Act 1977 from scope (council would maintain the current default prohibition on camping on reserves under the Reserves Act 1977)

·      manages freedom camping only on land held under the Local Government Act 2002

·      seeks to prevent freedom camping impacts in sensitive areas, and to protect public health and safety and manage access in all areas, by:

scheduling 44 prohibited areas, where no freedom camping is allowed

scheduling 19 restricted areas, where freedom camping is allowed subject to site-specific restrictions

including general rules to manage freedom camping impacts in all other areas (campers must use certified self-contained vehicles, stay a maximum of two nights, depart by 9am and not return to the same area within two weeks).

6.       The proposed prohibited and restricted areas are those areas which the Bylaw Panel recommended should be prohibited and restricted in 2019, and which are held under the Local Government Act 2002. Areas held under the Reserves Act 1977 have been removed.

7.       The Panel’s recommendations draw on previous area assessments and take into account feedback from local board engagement and public consultation conducted in 2018 and 2019.

8.       The draft proposal includes one designated prohibited area and one designated restricted area located in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area. All designated areas are listed in the draft Bylaw schedules within Attachment A. All other council-managed land held under the Local Government Act 2002, including roads, is proposed to be covered by general rules.

9.       Staff recommend that the local board provide its view on the draft proposal, including the inclusion of general rules in the bylaw and the recommended settings for those rules.

10.     The key risks of the proposal are that:

·      it creates too few areas where freedom camping is allowed; this is partially mitigated by allowing freedom camping on most roads (subject to general rules), and council could decide to designate more restricted areas following consultation

·      the cumulative impact of all prohibitions under the Bylaw and other enactments is viewed as an effective ban; however staff looked closely at the requirements of the Freedom Camping Act 2011 in developing the proposal and will continue to monitor cumulative impact as bylaw development progresses.

11.     The local board’s views will be provided to the Governing Body in September with the recommendation that the finalised proposal is adopted for public consultation. Public consultation is scheduled for November, and Bylaw Panel deliberations for early 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      support the draft Statement of Proposal in Attachment A of this agenda report to make a new Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Auckland Council Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022 for public consultation.

Horopaki

Context

Freedom camping can have both positive and negative impacts

12.     For the purposes of this Bylaw, freedom camping is when someone stays overnight on council-managed land, including roadsides, in a vehicle or caravan.

13.     Freedom camping specifically refers to people staying in vehicles overnight as part of leisure travel, or because they are choosing to live in a vehicle for lifestyle reasons.

14.     Freedom camping provides a flexible and affordable way for Aucklanders and for domestic and international visitors to experience and enjoy the region. Many freedom campers will visit friends and family, attend events, and support local businesses during their stay.

15.     Freedom camping can however have negative impacts on the local environment and host communities if it is not well-managed. These impacts can be caused by:

16.     Freedom camping has become popularly associated with harmful and antisocial behaviours, but our research shows that most freedom campers visiting Auckland do camp responsibly.

17.     However, the presence of large numbers of campers – even responsible campers – is more likely to cause community concern in Auckland due to pressure on limited public space.

18.     Freedom camper numbers have been growing in Auckland and throughout the country over the last two decades. Once the current border restrictions are lifted overseas visitors are likely to return, and domestic freedom camping may continue to increase in the meantime.

19.     Auckland does not currently have enough places for freedom campers to go. This means there is often overcrowding in the places where it is allowed, or illegal camping in unsuitable areas once legal sites are full. Having more areas would reduce these supply-related issues.

20.     The council can regulate freedom camping to help prevent irresponsible camping and manage responsible freedom camping in a way that minimises its negative impacts.

Council must align its freedom camping regulation with the Freedom Camping Act 2011

21.     The Freedom Camping Act 2011 allows freedom camping on all public land unless it is prohibited under a bylaw or another enactment, such as the Reserves Act 1977.

22.     Auckland’s current Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2015 is a consolidation of pre-2010 legacy bylaw provisions developed before the Freedom Camping Act 2011 was passed. A new bylaw must be made that aligns with the national legislation before the current bylaw expires in 2022.

23.     The Freedom Camping Act 2011 is permissive by default but does allow council to make a bylaw to prohibit or restrict freedom camping in areas where certain statutory criteria are met. In particular, council must be satisfied that:

·      each area’s location can be clearly shown on a map and/or described

·      the prohibitions and restrictions in each area are necessary to:

-     protect the area (for example because it is environmentally or culturally sensitive)

-     protect the health and safety of the people who may visit the area

-     protect access to the area (for other users)

·      the cumulative impact of all prohibitions and restrictions (under the bylaw and other enactments) do not constitute an effective ban on freedom camping on council land.

A 2018 proposal to regulate freedom camping was set aside in August 2019

24.     Work to develop a freedom camping bylaw began in 2016. Staff assessed more than 1,000 areas for their suitability for freedom camping and need for protection under the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This process included extensive engagement with local boards.

25.     In late 2018 and early 2019 public feedback and formal local board views were sought on a proposal for a draft Freedom Camping in Vehicles bylaw. A Bylaw Panel deliberated on all feedback and made recommendations to the Governing Body. The Panel recommended scheduling 322 prohibited areas and 103 restricted areas, including a number of reserves.

26.     In August 2019 the Governing Body set aside the recommendations of the Bylaw Panel and instead requested advice on a new direction for bylaw development.

The Governing Body decided to exclude reserves from scope and include general rules

27.     The Governing Body considered staff advice in March 2021[1] and May 2021[2] and directed that a new proposal for a Freedom Camping Act 2011 bylaw be developed that:

·      only manages freedom camping on land held under the Local Government Act 2002, with camping on reserves continuing to be managed by the Reserves Act 1977

·      includes general rules to manage the generalised impacts of freedom camping, and ensure problems are not displaced from regulated to unregulated areas

·      relies on previous assessments (undertaken to develop the 2018 proposal) to identify land held under the Local Government Act 2002 that should be prohibited or further restricted through the bylaw.

28.     Staff have prepared a draft proposal to implement the Governing Body’s decisions (Attachment A). This proposal outlines the reasons and decisions that have led to the content of the proposed new Bylaw.

Potential changes to the Freedom Camping Act 2011 not yet confirmed

29.     In April and May 2021, the Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) publicly consulted on four proposals for change to the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This included making the use of self-contained vehicles mandatory for all freedom camping.

30.     The Governing Body approved Auckland Council’s submission, which incorporated local board views, in May 2021[3]. MBIE has not yet released any further information, and timeframes for any changes to the Act have not been confirmed.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

A new bylaw is proposed to manage freedom camping in vehicles on some council land

31.     The draft proposal would make a new Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022 that:

·      aligns with the Freedom Camping Act 2011

·      helps council to prevent freedom camping impacts in sensitive areas, and to protect public health and safety and manage access in all areas of land held under the Local Government Act 2002 (including roads controlled by Auckland Transport)

·      forms part of a wider regulatory framework of Acts, regulations and other bylaws[4].

32.     The Bylaw will be enforced by the Licensing and Regulatory Compliance unit using a graduated compliance model (information, education, enforcement).

33.     The table below summarises the main proposals:

Draft proposals

Reasons for draft proposal

To schedule 63 specific areas as follows:

Restrict freedom camping in 19 specific areas (where freedom camping is allowed subject to site-specific restrictions)

Listed in Schedule 1 of the draft Bylaw

 

To better manage areas that have been identified as needing additional regulation due to factors such as popularity, current use by others, demand for parking and the size of the parking areas.

These are the restricted areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel in 2019, with all reserves removed.

Prohibit freedom camping in 44 specific areas (where freedom camping is not allowed)

Listed in Schedule 2 of the draft Bylaw

 

To protect areas that have been identified as being environmentally or culturally sensitive, or where freedom camping would impact public health and safety and access in ways that cannot be adequately managed through restrictions.

These are the prohibited areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel in 2019, with all reserves removed.

To include general rules for all other areas as follows:

Require freedom campers to use certified self-contained vehicles

To prevent impacts from the depositing of toilet waste and wastewater into the environment, and the use of unsuitable areas for cooking

Allow freedom campers to stay a maximum of two nights in the same road or off-road parking area

To prevent impacts from the depositing of toilet waste and wastewater into the environment and ensure fair access to limited shared parking and amenities

Require freedom campers to vacate their parking space by 9am on the day of departure

To ensure fair access for shared parking and amenities for other campers and users of public space

Require freedom campers not return to stay in the same road or off-road parking area within a two-week period

To ensure fair access to limited shared parking and amenities for other campers and users of public space

34.     The draft proposal notes that the council does not intend to use the bylaw to manage:

·      issues associated with homelessness (people living in a vehicle involuntarily)

·      areas where access is already controlled or parking is reserved or charged for, for example gated carparks, land leased to other organisations and regional parks.

The draft proposal complies with statutory requirements

35.     The draft proposal has been prepared in accordance with statutory requirements. Staff consider the proposed draft Bylaw:

·      only prohibits or restricts freedom camping where it is necessary to protect sensitive areas, and/or to manage impacts on public health and safety and access to an area

·      uses a format and wording that are easy to read, understand and comply with

·      is authorised by statute, is not repugnant to other legislation, and is not unreasonable

·      does not give rise to any implications or inconsistencies with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990.

Staff recommend the local board consider and provide its views on the draft proposal

36.     Staff recommend that the local board consider the draft proposal in Attachment A and provide any views by resolution to the Governing Body before it is finalised for public consultation on 23 September 2021.

37.     For example, the board could support the draft proposal for public consultation, recommend changes or defer comment until after it has considered public feedback on the proposal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     Staff note that this is a regulatory process to manage existing activities enabled by central government policy. It is not causing these activities to occur or affecting the likelihood that they will occur. The decision sought in this report therefore has no specific climate impact.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.     The draft proposal impacts the operations of several council departments and council-controlled organisations, including Licensing and Regulatory Compliance, Parks, Sport and Recreation and Auckland Transport.

40.     The Licensing and Regulatory Compliance unit are aware of the impacts of the draft proposal and their primary role in implementing and managing compliance with the Bylaw.

41.     Council’s 86 park rangers help to manage compliance with council Bylaws, the Reserves Act 1977 and the Litter Act 1974 by carrying out education and monitoring on parks and reserves. However, rangers are not currently being warranted or renewing warrants, and Licensing and Regulatory Compliance will continue to carry out any enforcement required.

Enhanced service levels for Bylaw compliance activities are not currently budgeted

42.     Concern about the council’s ability to effectively implement the Bylaw and manage compliance within existing resources was a key theme of public and local board feedback received in 2019.

43.     In March 2021 the Governing Body requested advice about costed options for increasing the service levels for compliance associated with this Bylaw. Costings are being finalised and this advice will be provided alongside the proposal in September, for consideration during future Annual Plan cycles.

44.     There are multiple options for increasing investment in Bylaw implementation and both proactive and reactive Bylaw compliance activities. These include:

·      enhancement of council’s information technology systems, to enable the implementation of the new infringement notice regime

·      use of contracted security services, to increase responsiveness to complaints (similar to the current arrangements for Noise Control), or for additional proactive monitoring at seasonal ‘hotspots’

·      purchase of mobile printers, to enable infringement notices to be affixed to vehicles in breach of the Bylaw at the time of the offence

·      signage at all prohibited and restricted areas and at other areas as needed

·      camera surveillance technology to enable remote monitoring of known or emerging hotspots, for evidence-gathering purposes and/or to support real-time enforcement.

45.     Local boards can request further advice from Licensing and Regulatory Compliance if they wish to consider allocating local budget for enhanced local compliance activities.

46.     For example, Rodney Local Board recently allocated funds from its Locally Driven Initiatives budget to employ two Compliance Wardens for a six-month trial over the 2021-2022 summer period. The wardens will address low level compliance issues, including illegal freedom camping, with follow-up support from warranted compliance staff when required.

Ongoing land classification work won’t be completed with bylaw development timeframes

47.     Following the Governing Body’s decision in March 2021 to exclude reserves from scope, land status has become more relevant for identifying areas requiring protection in the bylaw.

48.     The council does not currently hold complete land classification data to establish definitive numbers of reserves. Parks and reserves can comprise multiple land parcels which may be held under different Acts.

49.     Since reporting to the Governing Body in March, staff have completed further investigation of the land status of the prohibited and restricted areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel. This has identified additional reserves, which has reduced the proposed prohibited areas (from 55 in the March report to 44 in the draft proposal) and restricted areas (from 21 to 19).

50.     Classifications are still being confirmed as part of the development of omnibus Local Park Management Plans. Five local board areas have completed this work, and an average of 94 percent of their parks were found to be held under the Reserves Act 1977.

51.     Ongoing land classification work will support bylaw implementation. It will not finish within the timeframe for bylaw development, so the status quo issues will remain.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

52.     The proposed draft Bylaw impacts on local boards’ governance role as it affects decision making over local assets, particularly parks and other council-controlled public places. There is also high community interest in freedom camping regulation in many local board areas.

53.     The local board has an opportunity to provide its views on this draft proposal by resolution to the Governing Body. The local board will also have further opportunity to provide its views to a Bylaw Panel on any public feedback to the proposal from people in their local board area.

 

 

All proposed prohibited and restricted areas previously discussed with local boards

54.     The draft proposal includes one designated prohibited area and one designated restricted area located in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area. All designated areas are listed in the draft Bylaw schedules within Attachment A. All other council-managed land held under the Local Government Act 2002, including roads, is proposed to be covered by general rules.

55.     The proposed prohibited and restricted areas are those areas which the Bylaw Panel recommended should be prohibited and restricted in 2019, and which are held under the Local Government Act 2002. Areas held under the Reserves Act 1977 have been removed.

56.     All areas proposed to be scheduled as prohibited or restricted were previously discussed with the relevant local boards in 2018.

Joint political working group provided views on general rules in May 2021

57.     Three local board representatives participated in a joint political working group on 21 May 2021 to provide views on options for including general rules in the Bylaw.

58.     The working group unanimously supported the inclusion of general rules in the Bylaw, and five out of six working group members supported the recommended settings included in the draft proposal. A summary of the working group’s views was reported to the Governing Body on 27 May 2021[5].

The new draft proposal responds to feedback provided on the 2018 proposal

59.     Local boards provided formal feedback on the 2018 draft proposal to the Bylaw Panel in 2019, following on from their early feedback given during engagement in 2017, and site-specific feedback provided in 2018.

60.     The table below details typical concerns expressed by local boards in their formal feedback and how the new draft proposal responds to these concerns:

Key local board concern (from 2019)

Draft proposal’s response to concern

The loss of protection in the legacy bylaws for most reserves and roadsides

·   Excludes reserves from the bylaw and continues to use the Reserves Act 1977 to manage all camping at reserves

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw, including roadsides

·   Notes individual roads can be scheduled as prohibited or restricted areas if problems arise in future

The provision for unrestricted freedom camping in the local board area

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw

Freedom camping at reserves and enforcement tools under the Reserves Act

·   The Reserves Act 1977 will be used to manage all camping at reserves, which means the status quo (prohibition) will continue

·   Notes that following changes in September 2019 to the Reserves Act 1977, $800 infringement notices can now be issued for breaches of this Act

Freedom camping in inner-city areas, unsafe areas and areas near sports fields, residential homes and campgrounds

·   Bylaw schedules designate individual sites that have been identified and assessed as unsuitable for freedom camping (prohibited areas), or where additional restrictions are needed to manage impacts (restricted areas)

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw

The potential effect on people experiencing homelessness

·   Clarifies that the bylaw will not be used to manage issues associated with homelessness and confirms the council’s commitment to a compassionate enforcement approach to protect vulnerable Aucklanders

Council’s ability to enforce bylaws and the cost of enforcement and monitoring

·   Although not contained in the proposal itself, advice will be provided to the Governing Body on options for increasing investment in bylaw implementation

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

61.     The Bylaw has relevance to Māori as kaitiaki of Papatūānuku. The proposal supports two key directions in the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau:

·      wairuatanga (promoting distinctive identity), in relation to valuing and protecting Māori heritage and Taonga Māori

·      kaitiakitanga (ensuring sustainable futures), in relation to environmental protection.

62.     The proposal also supports the Board’s Schedule of Issues of Significance by ensuring that sites of significance to Māori are identified and protected from freedom camping harms.

63.     Mana whenua and mataawaka were invited to provide feedback during the development of the 2018 proposal via dedicated hui and again through the public consultation process.

64.     Feedback received on specific prohibited and restricted areas identified in the 2018 proposal was incorporated into the deliberations. This included the identification of sites of significance to Māori, such as wahi tapu areas.

65.     General matters raised by Māori during engagement included the need to ensure:

·      the ability to add further sites of significance to the bylaw as these are designated

·      provision for temporary bans on freedom camping, e.g. in areas under a rahui

·      a compassionate approach to people experiencing homelessness

·      provision of sufficient dump stations to avoid environmental pollution

·      clear communication of the rules in the bylaw and at freedom camping sites.

66.     The draft proposal addresses these matters by proposing to prohibit freedom camping at sites of significance to Māori (such as Maraetai Foreshore and Onetangi Cemetery), provision in the Bylaw for temporary bans, and confirming council’s commitment to a compassionate enforcement approach to people experiencing homelessness.

67.     Mana whenua and mataawaka will have an opportunity to provide further feedback during public consultation on the proposal.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

68.     There are no financial implications to the local board for any decisions to support the draft proposal for public consultation. The Governing Body will consider any financial implications associated with public notification in September 2021.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

69.     Legal risks were discussed as part of the provision of legally privileged advice to interested local board members at a confidential workshop held in June 2021.

70.     The other key risks and possible mitigations are summarised in the table below.

 

 If...

Then...

Mitigation (partial)

The bylaw proposal does not create enough areas where freedom camping is allowed

 

Council may need to manage an increase in overcrowding, non-compliance, and harms over time.

The proposed bylaw would enable freedom campers to stay for up to two nights on most roads, subject to general rules.

Council could consider increasing the number of designated restricted areas following consultation, or if problems arise in future.

The cumulative impact of prohibitions and restrictions in the Bylaw and other enactments is viewed as an ‘effective ban’ on freedom camping in Auckland

The risk of legal challenge could increase.

Staff looked closely at the requirements of the Freedom Camping Act 2011 in developing the proposal, and cumulative impact will continue to be monitored.

Council can’t meet public expectation of increased enforcement

There may be a loss of social license for freedom camping and reputational risk for council.

Responsible Camping Ambassadors will assist compliance staff during the peak season, although future funding is not guaranteed.

The Governing Body or local boards could allocate additional funding to increase service levels for compliance activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

71.     Staff will present local board views and a finalised proposal to the Governing Body on 23 September 2021. The next steps for bylaw development are shown in the diagram below.

Diagram

Description automatically generated

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Freedom Camping in Vehicles Statement of Proposal and Draft Bylaw August 2021

155

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rebekah Forman - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2021/12234

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the board with the governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is required and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar is updated every month. Each update is reported to business meetings. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the attached Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Forward Work Calendar

257

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Blair Morrow – Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops

File No.: CP2021/09732

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a summary of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board workshops for 29 June and 20 July 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local board workshops are held to give board members an opportunity to receive information and updates or provide direction and have discussion on issues and projects relevant to the local board area. No binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the local board record of workshops held on 3 August to 17 August 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Record of Workshops

261

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Blair Morrow – Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 August 2021

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

14        Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021 - Attachment a - Annual Financial Report

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report contains.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

15        Auckland Council's Performance Report:Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board for March to June 2021 - Attachment b - Maungakiekie Tāmaki Local Board Financial report year ending June 2021

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report contains.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 



[1] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/03/GB_20210325_AGN_10148_AT_WEB.htm (Item 9, GB/2021/19)

[2] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_AGN_10145_AT_WEB.htm (Item 10, GB/2021/49)

[3] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_AGN_10145_AT_WEB.htm (Item 9, GB/2021/48)

[4] Freedom Camping Act; Litter Act; Resource Management Act; Fire and Emergency NZ Act; Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw; Auckland Council Traffic Bylaw; Auckland Transport Traffic Bylaw; Alcohol Control Bylaw; Dog Management Bylaw

[5] https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_MAT_10145_WEB.htm