I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 17 August 2021

5.00pm

The Gallery
Level 1, Manukau Civic Building
31-33 Manukau Station Road
Manukau

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Apulu Reece Autagavaia

 

Deputy Chairperson

Dawn Trenberth

 

Members

Dr Ashraf Choudhary, QSO, JP

 

 

Dr Ofa Dewes

 

 

Lotu Fuli

 

 

Swanie Nelson

 

 

Ross Robertson, QSO, JP

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Carol McGarry

Democracy Advisor

 

11 August 2021

 

Contact Telephone: +64 27 591 5024

Email: carol.mcgarry@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Auckland Kindergarten Association – Tamariki Puawai a Tāmaki 5

8.2     Deputation - East Tamaki Rugby Football Club                                               6

8.3     Deputation - Niue Community Trust                                                                  6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Governing Body Member Update                                                                                9

12        Board Members' Report                                                                                              11

13        Chairperson's Announcements                                                                                 13

14        Auckland Transport - Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board: Mangere East & Manukau Cycling Single Stage Business Case (SSBC) - Community Partner Working Group Engagement Approach                                                                                               15

15        Approval for a new private road name at 10, 12, and 14 Trimmer Terrace, Papatoetoe.                                                                                                                   21

16        Endorsement of Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui: Puhinui Regeneration Strategy and associated Charter (collaboration agreement)                                                        29

17        Transform Manukau: Public Arts Strategy Selection Panel Process                    41

18        Classification of reserve at 20 Newbury Street, Otara                                            53

19        Amendment to the Community Facilities work programme 2021-2024                59

20        Proposal to make a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw                             71

21        Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022                                                                   81

22        Urgent Decision - request to allocate up to $10,000 from the local community grants budget towards the Auckland Council's Mayoral Relief Fund to support victims of the tornado that occured in Papatoetoe on 19 June 2021                                    103

23        Local board resolution responses and information report                                  109

24        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      115

25        Record of Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Notes                                 119

26        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board for March to June 2021                                                                                                               133

27        Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021                                                                    185

28        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

29        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               189

26        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board for March to June 2021

b.      Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board financial performace report                       189

27        Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021

a.      Draft 2020/2021 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Annual Report                 189


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 15 June 2021, as true and correct

b)         confirm the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 29 June 2021, as true and correct

c)         confimr the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 27 July 2021, as true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Auckland Kindergarten Association – Tamariki Puawai a Tāmaki

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       The Chief Executive Officer of Auckland Kindergarten Association Pauline Winter will be in attendance to formally present to the board about the opportunities and challenges faced by the Auckland Kindergarten Association.

2.         Auckland Kindergarten Association is a charitable trust that operates 107 kindergartens, four KiNZ centres and five Playgroups across Tāmaki  Makaurau. Many of their properties are leased from Auckland Council and managed by local boards.

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      thank Pauline Winter from the Auckland Kindergarten Association for her attendance and presentation.

 

 

8.2       Deputation - East Tamaki Rugby Football Club

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Members of the East Tamaki Rugby Football Club will be in attendance to to give a progress report to the board on the club and their future intentions.

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      thank the members of the East Tamaki Rugby Football Club for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

8.3       Deputation - Niue Community Trust

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Casey Smith from the Niue Community Trust will be in attendance to introduce their new committee members and update the board on their activities.

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      thank Casey Smith and the Niue Community Trust committee members for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Governing Body Member Update

 

File No.: CP2021/11964

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board on regional matters.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal reports from the Manukau Ward Councillors.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

 

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Board Members' Report

 

File No.: CP2021/11138

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Providing board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board;

a)      receive the board members’ written and oral reports.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

 

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Chairperson's Announcements

 

File No.: CP2021/11157

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

This item gives the chairperson an opportunity to update the board on any announcements.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive the chairperson’s verbal update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

 

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Auckland Transport - Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board: Mangere East & Manukau Cycling Single Stage Business Case (SSBC) - Community Partner Working Group Engagement Approach

File No.: CP2021/11586

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report s

1.       To seek local board support for the proposed Communications and Engagement Approach and the formation of a Community Partner Working Group for the Māngere East & Manukau Cycling Single Stage Business Cases.

2.       Delegate a member(s) of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board to be a representative on the proposed Community Partner Working Group.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Auckland Transport - Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board: Mangere East & Manukau Cycling Single Stage Business Case (SSBC) - Community Partner Working Group Engagement Approach report is provided as Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      support the proposed Communications and Engagement approach and the formation of the Community Partner Working Group

b)      delegate a member(s) of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board to be a representative on the proposed Community Partner Working Group.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Transport - Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board: Mangere East & Manukau Cycling Single Stage Business Case (SSBC) - Community Partner Working Group Engagement Approach report

17

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Approval for a new private road name at 10, 12, and 14 Trimmer Terrace, Papatoetoe.

File No.: CP2021/11183

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board to name one new private road, being one commonly owned access lot (COAL), created by way of a subdivision development at 10, 12, and 14 Trimmer Terrace, Papatoetoe.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

3.       On behalf of the developer and applicant, Gemscott Trimmer Limited, agent Andrew Scott of CKL Ltd has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the local board.

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana Whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines.

5.       The proposed names for the new private road at 10, 12, and 14 Trimmer Terrace are:

·        Leuluai Lane (applicant preferred)

·        Onewhakaawa Lane (alternative 1)

·        Taaranga Lane (alternative 2)

·        Koopata Lane (alternative 3)

·        Kaaretu Lane (alternative 4).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      approve the name Leuluai Lane (applicant’s preferred name) for the new private road created by way of subdivision at 10, 12, and 14 Trimmer Terrace, Papatoetoe, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60369888 and SUB60369900).

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent reference BUN60369888 (subdivision reference number SUB60369900) was issued in May 2021 for a staged subdivision to create 14 residential fee simple titles; an additional 24 fee simple titles for car parking spaces which are to be amalgamated with the respective residential allotments; unit-title subdivision and one commonly owned access lots (COAL).

7.       Site and location plans of the development is provided in Attachments A and B.

8.       In accordance with the Standards, any road including private ways, COALs, and right of ways that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

9.       Therefore, in this development, the new COAL requires a road name because it serves more than five lots.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across Auckland. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval

11.     The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Maori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

12.     Names with either ancestral linkage to the site or with landscape and biodiversity themes have been chosen. All names were sent through to mana whenua by the applicant on 07 May 2021 for consideration.

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Leuluai Lane (applicant preferred)

Two of the three properties that make up the subject site were owned by former New Zealand rugby league representatives James Leuluai and his son Thomas Leuluai. The Leuluai family name is proposed and therefore the name would not be named after an individual.

Approval has been obtained from the Leuluai family

Onewhakaawa Lane (alternative 1)

‘Onewhakaawa’ refers to the draining nature of these soils.

Suggested by Ngati Tamaoho

Taaranga

(alternative 2)

Pimelea longifolia – An upright shrub formerly found in scrubland of the area.

Suggested by Ngati Tamaoho

Koopata Lane

(alternative 3)

Pelargonium inodorum – A small plant with vivid green leaves once common in the area.

Suggested by Ngati Tamaoho

Kaaretu Lane

(alternative 4)

Hierochloe redolens – A sweet-scented grass found in wet grassland of the area.

Suggested by Ngati Tamaoho

 

13.     All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context.

14.     Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

15.     ‘Lane’ is an acceptable road type for the new private road, suiting the form and layout of the COAL.

16.     Land Information New Zealand and mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     This report seeks the decision of the local board and the decision is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate.  The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

21.     On 07 May 2021, mana whenua were contacted by the applicant, as set out in the Guidelines with three different road names, Te Waiohua Lane, Huakaiwaka Lane and Leuluai Lane. Representatives of the following groups with an interest in the general area were contacted:

·    Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki (Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Tribal Trust)

·    Ngāti Maru (Ngāti Maru Rūnanga Trust)

·    Ngāti Pāoa (Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust)

·    Ngāti Pāoa (Ngāti Paoa Trust Board)

·    Ngāti Tamaoho (Ngāti Tamaoho Trust)

·    Ngāti Tamaterā Ngāti Tamaterā Settlement Trust

·    Ngāti Te Ata (Te Ara Rangatu o Te Iwi o Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua)

·    Ngāti Whanaunga (Ngāti Whanaunga Incorporated)

·    Te Kawerau ā Maki Te Kawerau Iwi Settlement

·    Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua (Makaurau Marae Māori Trust)

·    Te Ākitai Waiohua (Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority)

·    Waikato – Tainui (Te Whakakitenga o Waikato Incorporated)

22.     By the close of the consultation period, responses were received from Te Kawerau a Maki and Ngati Tamaoho.

23.     Te Kawerau a Maki defers to other mana whenua groups that have either been involved in this project or have ahi kaa status in this area.

24.     Ngati Tamaoho did not support the use of iwi names or tūpuna names for roads of this nature and has recommended four other road names which are now proposed by the applicant as alternatives (alternatives 1, 2, 3 and 4).

25.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the Council.

27.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Location plan

25

b

Site Plan

27

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elizabeth Salter - Subdivision Technical Officer

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Endorsement of Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui: Puhinui Regeneration Strategy and associated Charter (collaboration agreement)

File No.: CP2021/11290

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui Strategy: The Puhinui Regeneration Strategy.

2.       To ratify ‘Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui Charter - Te Puhinui Regeneration Charter’ and delegate the signing of this charter to the chair of the Ōtara Papatoetoe Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Eke Panuku, in collaboration with the Puhinui Steering Group have led the development of ‘Te Whakaoranga o Te Puhinui - The Puhinui Regeneration Strategy’(strategy). A copy of the strategy is provided in Attachment A. This is a living document that sets out principles, aspirational outcomes, strategic initiatives and a proposed capital works programme to support the return of wellbeing (whakaora) to people, place and nature within the Puhinui catchment.

4.       The strategy is a cross-council collaborative initiative and has been developed in partnership with mana whenua, namely Ngaati Te Ata, Ngaati Tamaoho and Te Ākitai, collectively known as Waiohua Iwi. The Waiohua Iwi are partnering directly with council, Eke Panuku, and wider project partners (including Crown entities) to realise this project over the long-term. The strategy and associated charter are the culmination of over three years collaboration across the council family, local boards, Kāinga Ora, and mana whenua partners.

5.       Te Whakaoranga o Te Puhinui Charter - Te Puhinui Regeneration Charter (charter) in Attachment B has arisen from this partnership to ensure ongoing project alignment and collaboration by clearly setting out shared values and commonly agreed ways of working together to deliver the proposed Regeneration Strategy. The charter is aspirational in nature and the purpose is

          “to realise Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui in a way that acknowledges, through whakapapa, the interconnectivity of people, place and nature so that through indigenous, place-based knowledge we learn how to inhabit and evolve our urban environments towards a flourishing future”.

6.       The charter would apply to the Puhinui catchment, which encompasses the Botanic Gardens and Tōtara Park (the headwaters of the catchment), Manukau Central, Wiri and parts of Homai and Puhinui, Puhinui Reserve and parts of the greenfield “Southern Gateway” development area west of the lower Puhinui. Whilst the charter was suggested and primarily driven by mana whenua, it represents input from numerous other sources and partners.

7.       The proposed charter has been supported in principle by the Puhinui Programme Steering Group consisting of senior leadership from Eke Panuku, Healthy Waters, Community Facilities, The Southern Initiative, Manurewa and Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Boards, Kāinga Ora and mana whenua.

8.       The endorsement of the strategy and ratification and signing of the charter will enable project alignment and momentum. Project leaders will be enabled to move individual projects within the catchment forward with greater confidence. Further to this, ratifying the charter at the governance level of the partner organisations is an important acknowledgement to mana whenua that they are equal partners in the work programme.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      endorse Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui (The Puhinui Regeneration Strategy) as shown in Attachment A for implementation

b)      ratify Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui Charter (Te Puhinui Regeneration Charter) as shown in Attachment B to the agenda report

c)      delegate authority to the chair of the Ōtara Papatoetoe Local Board to sign Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui Charter (Te Puhinui Regeneration Charter) on behalf of the board.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Te Puhinui is a culturally and ecologically significant stream from its headwaters within the Botanic Gardens and to its mouth in the Puhinui reserve. Puhinui Reserve is 199 hectares in size, part of which is a wildlife reserve that supports thousands of international migratory birds as well as native threatened species[1]. The Puhinui Catchment represents a unique opportunity to create connectivity for people, place and nature that extends from stream headwaters to the coast, from one expansive green space to another via a stream corridor.

Figure 1. Puhinui Catchment

10.     The Puhinui catchment flows into the Manukau Harbour. Both the stream and the harbour have significant water quality issues[2][3] which has been at the forefront of discussions with mana whenua. Mana whenua have led a ‘whakapapa’ centred approach to the regeneration of te Puhinui. The strategy and associated charter acknowledge the interdependency of people, place and nature, and seeks to return health (whakaora) to all.

11.     A Stormwater Management Plan (SMP) has been developed in parallel to Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui and is being prepared to support the resulting work programme. The SMP is a joint strategy between Healthy Waters and Kāinga Ora for managing stormwater within development and redevelopment areas and identifying stormwater management opportunities in other parts of the catchment. The planned work includes stream restoration, water quality wetlands, ponds and stormwater treatment devices, and flood management.

12.     Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui Strategy was created to ensure that future works within the catchment were aligned, coordinated and designed with a deep understanding of the people, place and nature of Te Puhinui. The strategy has been created in close partnership with mana whenua, with matauranga Māori shaping the project methodology. It has also had ongoing collaboration and input over a 3-year period from the Puhinui Programme Steering Group, cross council collaboration group, and wider Crown and Community partners. This approach has ensured that the strategy is place-sourced, culture-led and community-fed.

13.     The strategy outlines the purpose, principles and values required to return te Puhinui to health and details a series of strategic initiatives and a capital works programme to enable this. This programme of work is a combination of projects already underway, projects currently in planning, and aspirational projects.

14.     The strategy offers the opportunity to create connectivity between the commercial centre and the surrounding suburbs via good quality urban spaces in the heart of South Auckland, a culturally unique and diverse community. This is an area of high socio-economic deprivation where safe pedestrian connectivity would be highly beneficial.  

15.     The resultant delivery programme requires collaboration from a range of project partners to realise the intent of the strategy. A Puhinui Programme Steering Group was established in 2018 consisting of key council partners, Manurewa and Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Boards, mana whenua, and Kāinga Ora. There has also been ongoing coordination with other Crown entities namely Counties Manukau District Health Board, and Department of Conservation. These entities may sign up to the charter in the future.

16.     The charter has arisen from a workstream which originated with Eke Panuku Development Auckland. Panuku published “Transform Manukau – Renewal of Manukau Central[4]” in 2016 and the Manukau Framework Plan[5] in 2017. The framework plan identified key moves which would all be fulfilled by a stream connectivity and restoration project to connect the Botanic Gardens to the Puhinui Reserve (headwaters to sea) via a fully publicly owned cycle and walkway via a restored stream. Parts of this project are currently being delivered by Healthy Waters and Eke Panuku, however more funding would be needed to realise this project fully. This has not yet been identified or allocated. The stream corridor offers the opportunity to provide good quality urban open spaces to service future residential redevelopment and densification.

Figure 2 below shows the area studied for Transform Manukau.

 

Figure 2. Transform Manukau Area

         

         

18.     Te Whakaoranga o Te Puhinui Strategy is a direct response to the Manukau High Level Project Plan developed under Transform Manukau and subsequent Manukau Framework Plan (2017). It seeks to realise 'Key Move 1 - Realising the Potential of the Puhinui Stream'. This agreement recognises that the regeneration of the Puhinui will require collaboration and input from a wide range of project partners and stakeholders. The strategy takes a holistic approach to whakaoranga of the stream, which includes health of community, people, and the environment.

19.     This emerging partnership stands to benefit ongoing iwi relationships and future partnerships in South Auckland. The proposed charter reflects the intent of Waiohua Iwi to work with the council and other partners towards common goals. As a consequence of the partnership with mana whenua, the original extent of the project area has been broadened to take a whole of catchment approach. This is in line with the principles of Water Sensitive Design[6], or an Integrated Stormwater Management Approach as expressed in the Auckland Unitary Plan[7]. Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui Strategy includes an aspirational work programme which sets out projects and initiatives to foster high quality urban regeneration.

20.     Following the presentation of this report to the two local boards, staff will take a report to the Governing Body to ratify the singing of the charter. Following this, signatures will be requested from: Manurewa Local Board Chair - Joseph Allan, Ōtara Papatoetoe Local Board Chair – Apulu Reece Autagavaia, Mayor of Auckland (pending approval of southern councillors), Waiohua Iwi Chairs (Karen Wilson – Te Ākitai, Ngaati Tamaoho and Ngaati Te Ata signatories to be confirmed), Eke Panuku Board Chair (Paul Majurey) and Kāinga Ora Board Chair (Vui Mark Gosche).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Alignment with good practice and council policy

21.     The strategy and associated charter contribute to currently accepted good practice[8] for partnering and co-design[9] to determine the issue/problem, to design the process, and to develop solutions. Auckland Council, Eke Panuku, other charter partners and mana whenua will make joint decisions through the steering group; the specific process for this will be agreed following the signing of the charter. The intent and development of the strategy and charter is aligned with the purpose and principles of the Resource Management Act 1991[10] (RMA); and the purpose and principles and Parts 2 and 6 of the Local Government Act[11] (LGA). The charter is aligned with the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi[12].

22.     Te Arawhiti (Office of Māori Crown Relations) Principles for Building Closer Partnerships with Māori involve building relationships and sharing decision-making and planning together from the start, valuing each parties’ contribution and knowledge, and ensuring outcomes are meaningful to all parties. The Eke Panuku engagement process that has led to the strategy and charter meets these principles. A partnering framework was built in late 2018. Engagement during the course of 2019 and early 2020 built the objectives and outcomes for the strategy. The charter was a mana whenua led development within this workstream.

23.     The endorsement of the strategy and ratification of the charter will impact current and future relationships with mana whenua in the south through agreeing shared commitments, goals, and work processes. Urban renewal, stormwater, environmental and elements of transport projects will be impacted by the charter with regard to planning and implementation, procurement of services and on-going maintenance of infrastructure (including infrastructure that entails planting such as stormwater bio-infiltration devices, streamside planting and urban gardens). However, the scope of the charter is broad and doesn’t restrict other Auckland Council work in this catchment.

24.     The values and principles are presented under seven themes in the charter: rangatiratianga, kaitiakitanga, māutauranga, manaakitanga, tauritetanga, whanaungatanga, and tiakitanga. These themes and principles are explored further in the strategy.

25.     Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui strategy and the resulting charter meets the goals of the Auckland Council Maori Responsiveness Framework, Goal 1 an Empowered Organisation and Goal 2 Effective Maori Participation in the following ways: The governance and operations have mutually beneficial relationships with Māori at the governance, executive and operational levels; the partnership enables, supports and develops effective Māori participation in decision-making and democratic processes; and the partnership enables and institutes shared governance and other decision-making opportunities with Māori.

26.     This collaboration is an opportunity to set a positive precedent for partnership with mana whenua. Partnership with mana whenua is a foundation for this project and provides an opportunity to build projects that represent Māori aspirations. This project is viewed as a pilot partnership that may provide a model which could be applied across the region (while recognising that areas and iwi may differ across Tāmaki Makaurau). Therefore, this initiative is regionally significant from a relationship building perspective.

27.     Staff recommend that the local board endorse the strategy and ratify the charter. Ratifying the charter at the governance level of the partner organisations is an important acknowledgement to mana whenua that they are equal partners in the work programme. If governance support is achieved at the highest level in all partner organisations, then mana whenua can have confidence in organisational commitment to the principles of the charter and move forward with their aspects of the work programme.

28.     Te Waiohua Iwi partners have indicated that they want to be active partners in relationships and want to achieve outcomes for the benefit of whole catchment and community. They wish to develop a partnership model that is beyond consultation and engagement. Members have expressed their support for the successful partnering to date and see this work as a flagship opportunity that could set an example for other initiatives in the region.

29.     The Puhinui and Manukau fall within two local board areas, both of which have very unfavourable deprivation scores[13]. Counties Manukau’s population tends to be younger than the national average. Māori are over-represented in the most deprived population within Manukau Counties District Health Board[14].

30.     The successful delivery of the Puhinui project will also generate regional benefits. The connection of two significant public parks (the Botanic Gardens and the Puhinui Reserve) via an entirely publicly owned, well-designed cycle and walkway has the potential to attract visitors from around the region, which may serve to further invigorate the Manukau Town Centre.

31.     Ratification of the charter is not required to meet the obligations imposed by the Resource Management Act 1991 or the Local Government Act 2002. If the charter is not ratified, the work programme will continue in the absence of ratification, however it may impact project timelines and working relationships with mana whenua.

32.     Kāinga Ora are a significant landowner and developer in the catchment. Kāinga Ora has confirmed that it has reviewed the strategy and charter and has confirmed its ongoing desire to participate on the Puhinui Programme Steering Group.  Kāinga Ora has reviewed and approved the charter document and has approval by the board to become a signatory. 

Implementation

33.     Implementation of the strategy and associated charter can be achieved using existing council processes. Current relevant processes are:

·    Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·    Maori Responsiveness Framework

·    Puhinui Stormwater Management Plan

·    Transform Manukau Programme

·    Auckland region-wide network discharge consent.

Legal implications

34.     The project team have received legal advice on the implications and obligations resulting from this charter. This advice, and staff response to this advice is detailed in Table 1 below:

Table 1. legal advice on the charter and staff response

Legal advice

Staff response

The council should ensure that all mana whenua with interests in this area have been appropriately involved.

All mana whenua with interests in this area have delegated to Te Waiohua to represent their interests in this project/programme of work.

Kawenata translated to English includes the term “covenant” which has a more onerous obligations than that of a charter.

The term “Kawenata” was removed from the charter.

Assess the charter against the Auckland Council Engagement and Significance Policy.

The charter has been assessed as being of low significance under the significance and engagement policy.

Specify the Crown agencies that are party to the charter.

 

Kāinga Ora has currently agreed to be a signatory and further crown agencies are in negotiation around signing up to the charter (e.g. Te Papa Atawhai: Department of Conservation)

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

35.     The Puhinui Regeneration Programme aligns with a number of actions and intents in the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri - Auckland Climate Plan, but particularly Action area N1: Build the resilience of Auckland’s indigenous biodiversity, habitats and ecosystems to the impacts of climate change.

36.     The programme will create stormwater infrastructure, including stream corridors, that will contribute less sediment to the receiving environment during storm events due to reducing stream bank erosion, and reduced flooding impacts in existing and redeveloped areas. This will improve the resilience of Auckland’s stormwater infrastructure to climate impacts.

37.     The Puhinui Regeneration Programme has been designed to foster a high-level of mana whenua and wider community empowerment, ownership and involvement in the strategy. This is intended to enable kaitiakitanga and tiakitanga respectively, instilling a sense of guardianship over the natural environment and promoting behavioural change which will lead to improved environmental outcomes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

38.     The Puhinui Regeneration Programme has involved regular cross-council collaboration meetings which includes representatives from local boards, and the relevant council departments: Natural Environment Strategy, Healthy Waters, Parks, Sport and Recreation, and Community Facilities. All parties have had an opportunity to input into Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

39.     This catchment sits within the Manurewa and Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board areas. Representatives from both local boards are members of the Puhinui Programme Steering Group and have provided input into the charter through meetings.

40.     Both local boards have provided input into the wider Te Whakaoranga o Te Puhinui Programme through the standard Eke Panuku Local Board reporting processes.

41.     Meetings were held between the Manurewa Local Board, Ōtara Papatoetoe Local Board, southern councillors, and mana whenua to introduce the charter in May 2021.

42.     An informal launch of the regeneration strategy was held on 11 November 2020 and representatives from local charitable organisations, government agencies, businesses, and education facilities were invited to provide feedback on the draft strategy.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

43.     This work programme is a Māori responsiveness initiative in its entirety, and this report provides further detail.

44.     The development of the charter has been enabled through the receipt of additional Māori Outcomes Steering Group funding via Eke Panuku. This funding was allocated to Eke Panuku to support the capacity and capability of mana whenua to meaningfully partner on this programme.

45.     Mana whenua will continue to collaborate on the delivery of this programme through governance representation on the Puhinui Programme Steering Group and operational input through the Puhinui mana whenua working group which meets fortnightly. A specific Waiohua work-stream has been developed as part of the Puhinui Regeneration Programme.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

46.     The charter and strategy do not have any financial implications as standalone documents. However, they will impact the way that projects are identified, designed, and delivered, noting that these processes are subject to financial assessment and approval under the Investment Delivery Framework.

47.     Legal review has been provided by Legal Services on the public law implications of the charter. The advice is that the charter doesn’t commit the council to an enforceable contract. However, it does form a broad commitment to the parties’ relationships and collaboration around the type of work that is proposed to be carried out. The charter is not necessarily binding on the parties, however given the commitments that the charter sets out, not following through with (or potentially breaching) any of them could impact the council’s reputation and its relationship with the other charter partners.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     There is a risk that the strategy and associated charter will not be visible to the council staff that will be required to implement it. Mechanisms that could be used to mitigate this risk are the Puhinui Stormwater Management Plan, and the Auckland region-wide network discharge consent. Ongoing cross-council collaboration meetings, and a continuing leadership role funded by Eke Panuku are also expected to reduce this risk.

49.     There is a risk that if the Ōtara Papatoetoe Local Board endorses the strategy and ratifies the charter, it will create an expectation for the board to contribute funding to projects identified in the work programme. It is noted that the local board is already funding and leading on some of the workstreams identified, and that the strategy and charter do not single out entities for specific initiative delivery. Funding for future projects delivered through this programme will go through regular council and local board approval channels.

50.     The strategy and charter are referenced in the Puhinui SMP which identifies stormwater and stream related projects and approaches to inform development and redevelopment. The SMP is a joint plan between Kāinga Ora and Healthy Waters. There is a remaining implementation risk due to limited visibility of the SMP during later project development stages. If the catchment manager is not aware of the council’s commitment to the charter, project managers may not be aware of their implications when design and delivery occur. This is not considered a high risk as visibility of the charter can be maintained by adopting the SMP into the Auckland region-wide network discharge consent. Location and project specific requirements such as the charter can be published here.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     Should the local boards, Governing Body and wider project partners support the signing of this charter, the project team will arrange a small signing ceremony to occur in conjunction with a wider community and stakeholder launch of the strategy in Manukau. This is tentatively planned for late 2021. Eke Panuku will liaise with mana whenua, the local boards and Mayor’s Office to make arrangements.

52.     Healthy Waters staff will incorporate the charter into the Stormwater Management Plan.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Te Puhinui Regeneration Strategy (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Te Puhinui Regeneration Charter

39

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Perin Gerrand - Engagement Coordinator

Authorisers

Sara Zwart - Principal Regenerative Design Lead

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator



Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Transform Manukau: Public Arts Strategy Selection Panel Process

File No.: CP2021/11414

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To appoint an Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board representative on a selection panel for the appointment of a public arts consultant for the Transform Manukau Public Art Strategy.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Eke Panuku and Auckland Council Public Arts are initiating a Public Art Strategy for investment in public art in Manukau City Centre over the next ten years. The strategy will be developed in context of the Transform Manukau programme, Auckland Council’s Public Art Policy, existing public art provision in Manukau and a ‘place plan’ for the area.

3.       A ‘place plan’ looks holistically as the user experience of an area and considers all the elements that make up the experience of the public realm – urban design, public art and placemaking.

4.       In April 2021 an update on the Public Art Strategy was provided to Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board for oversight and monitoring.

5.       On 28th July 2021 an Expression of Interest (EOI) which details the curatorial framework brief for supplier has been sent to a list of potential public art strategy consultants.

6.       The proposed timeline for the appointment of Transform Manukau Public Art Strategy consultant includes:

Date

Item

17 August 2021

OPLB decision on their representation for public art consultant selection panel

27 August 2021

EOI submissions close

1 September 2021

Public Art Strategy selection panel

7 September 2021

Contract awarded

 

7.       The Manukau Public Art’s Strategy is in partnership with mana whenua as equal decision makers when determining the aspirations of public art in Manukau in reflection of Te Tiriti o Waitangi. The strategy must reflect the significance of the mana whenua voice.

8.       At present, the selection panel includes the following project team members:

·    Four mana whenua representatives

·    Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board representative, subject to approval

·    Eke Panuku Project Manager

·    Auckland Council Public Art Manager

·    Senior Public Art Project Manager

Note that the number of mana whenua representatives on selection panel will be amended to ensure there is an equal representation of mana whenua and non-mana whenua/non-Māori members.

9.       The expression of interest submissions will be evaluated using the evaluation criteria below and will focus on non-price attributes.

Evaluation Criteria

Weighting

‘Track record’: evidenced ability, range & experience
The supplier is required to:

·    Have proven ability, range and experience – evidenced by a range of successful project outcomes of scale

·    Have experience in preparing written reports for local government

·    Have experience working collaboratively with council, iwi and key project stakeholders

30%

 

Suitability for project
The supplier is required to:

·    Have an understanding of Mātauranga Māori

·    Have an understanding of contemporary art practice

·    Have an understanding of place-making/ urban design principles

·    Have some familiarity with Manukau and its community

50%

Professional merits: self-reliance, maturity, strong communication skills
The suppler is required to:

·    Be reliable, competent and an adaptable collaborator to work with multiple stakeholders on this project

20%

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      appoint an Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board representative and one alternate to the Transform Manukau Public Art Strategy selection panel to be convened on 1st September 2021 at 82 Wyndham Street, Auckland (Eke Panuku offices).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Transform Manukau Public Art and Implementation Plan Brief - Expression of Interest

43

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Richard Davison - Senior Project Planning Leader, Panuku Development Auckland

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Classification of reserve at 20 Newbury Street, Otara

File No.: CP2021/11488

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To revoke part a) of the resolution OP/2020/113 made on 18 August 2020 to classify Lot 54 DP 55184 as a “reserve”.

2.       To approve public notification of a proposed classification of Lot 54 DP 55184 and Lot 55 DP 60001 pursuant to Section 16(1) of the Reserves Act 1977 as local purpose (community facilities) reserve.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The redevelopment of Te Puke ō Tara, completed in July 2018, uncovered a legacy issue that needed a resolution by the local board and classification under the Reserves Act 1977. 

4.       Ōtara Recreation Centre Grounds and Ōtara N Kirk Pool Grounds were found to be sited on land (being Lot 54 DP 55184 and Lot 55 DP 60001) that is held as unclassified reserve subject to provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

5.       Classification is a mandatory statutory process under section 16 of the Reserves Act 1977 and if not undertaken would mean that Auckland Council is not meeting its statutory obligations.

6.       The classification issue was discussed with Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board at its meeting held on 18 August 2020 when the board resolved to classify Lot 54 DP 55184, as a “reserve” - OP/2020/113.

7.       The Act requires that all reserves are classified for their principal or primary purpose (e.g. recreation reserve, local purpose reserve, scenic reserve). Therefore, the resolution OP/2020/113 classifying Lot 54 DP 55184 as “reserve” is invalid.

8.       Lot 55 DP 60001 also needs to be classified.

9.       Staff recommend that the local board supports notification of the proposed classification of  Lots 54 55184 and 55 DP 60001 as local purpose (community facility) reserve pursuant to section 16(1) of the Act .

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)         agree pursuant to standing order 1.10.4 to revoke the following part resolution of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board, adopted at its meeting held on 18 August 2020, OP/2020/113a) on the basis that it contains a technical error:

a)  support the classification of Lot 54 DP55184 as a reserve

b)         approve public notification of the proposed classification of:

i)          Lot 54 Deposited Plan 55184 contained in Record of Title NA35A/1455, as local purpose (community facility) reserve; and

ii)         Lot 55 Deposited Plan 60001 contained in Record of Title NA21A/575, as local purpose (community facility) reserve

pursuant to Section 16(1) of the Reserves Act 1977.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     This report considers revoking part of Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board’s resolution OP/2020/113 that supported classification of Lot 54 DP55184 as “a reserve”. The resolution needed to be more specific on the type of reserve for the classification.

11.     The board is now asked to agree to the proposed classification of Lot 54 DP 55184 and Lot 55 DP 60001 as local purpose (community facility) reserves pursuant to section 16(1) of the Reserves Act 1977.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Lot 54 DP 55184

11.     Lot 54 DP 55184 is contained in Record of Title NA35A/1456 (outlined in blue in Attachment A) and comprises an area of 6234 m² (Lot 54).

12.     Lot 54 is held by the Crown through the Department of Conservation (DOC) as an unclassified local purpose reserve for civic, cultural and community purposes, subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 and vested in Auckland Council, in trust, for those purposes.

Lot 55 DP 60001

13.     Lot 55 DP 60001 is contained in Record of Title NA21A/575 (outlined in blue in Attachment A) and comprises an area of 6935 m² (Lot 55).

14.     Lot 55 is held by the Crown through DOC as an unclassified reserve for a site for a swimming pool and vested in Auckland Council, in trust, for those purposes.

15.     Both, Lot 54 and Lot 55, were reserve contributions from the adjoining state housing subdivision.

16.     Being Crown derived, classification of Lot 54 and Lot 55 is required in terms of Section 16(1) of the Reserves Act for which the Auckland Council has delegated authority from the Minister of Conservation to undertake the classification process without requiring any prior concurrence from DOC.

17.     To better accommodate the purpose for which Lot 54 and Lot 55 are currently used, it is proposed that both lots are classified as local purpose (community facilities) reserves.

Reserves Act 1977 - Public Notification

18.     Under section 16(4) of the Act, the council is required to publicly notify its intention to classify any reserves. 

19.     Section 16(5)(a) of the Act provides that where the proposed classification for any reserve is substantially the same as the purpose for which the reserves was held and administered immediately before the commencement of the Reserves Act (the Act came into force on 1 April 1978) public notification is not required.

20.     The proposed classification of Lot 54 DP 55184 does not alter the original purpose and can be seen to be substantially the same as the purpose for which the reserve was held and administered. Lot 54 DP 55184 has been held for the current purpose since 1968. Even though not required, it is recommended that classification of Lot 54 DP 55184 is publicly notified.

21.     None of the provisions under section 16(5) of the Act applies to Lot 55 DP 60001 and for that reason classification of Lot 55 will need to be publicly notified. 


 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     Lot 54 DP 55184 and Lot 55 DP 60001 are not located within a flood plain nor are they subject to erosion.

23.     The classification of these reserves will not have a specific impact on climate change. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     The proposed classification has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of advice in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     The local board has previously expressed support for the classification of the reserve to enable the activities that have been in operation on the site to continue.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Maori.

27.     Engagement with iwi identified as having an interest in the land will be undertaken and will involve:

·    staff to attend mana whenua forum to explain proposal

·    email to each relevant local iwi as required under Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 to explain proposal, requesting any response, and wait for twenty working days for that response.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     There are no financial implications created by the classification of the reserve except for the costs to publish notice of the classification, if approved, in the New Zealand Gazette. The fee for the notice is set by the word count in the notice and is unlikely to exceed $150.00. The costs incurred by publication in the New Zealand Gazette will be borne by Community Facilities.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     Classification is a mandatory statutory process under the Reserves Act 1977 and if not undertaken would mean the Council is not meeting its statutory obligations. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     Staff will undertake the following steps:

·    publicly advertise the proposed classification

·    attend a mana whenua forum to explain the proposal and follow up by an email to all relevant iwi representatives explaining the proposal, requesting any response and wait for 20 working days for that response

·    provided there are no objections, a formal report to the local board will be provided seeking a resolution to classify the reserves.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Aerial photo

57

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tamara Zunic - Specialist Technical Statutory Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Amendment to the Community Facilities work programme 2021-2024

File No.: CP2021/11597

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for amendments to the Community Facilities work programme 2021-2024 from the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board adopted its Community Facilities work programme 2021-2024 on 15 June 2021 (resolution OP/2021/90).

3.       As projects progress through the design and delivery process the specific work required and the cost of delivery can change, impacting the approved budget.  As a result, variations may be required to the work programme to accommodate updated timeframes and final costs for some projects. 

4.       Three projects approved in the 2021/2022 Community Facilities work programme have been identified for variations:

a)   Ōtara Town Centre – renew fish canopy (Project ID 20187) – additional ABS: Capex –Local Renewal budget of $250,000 is required in financial year 2021/2022. This is due to higher than anticipated costs for physical works and the complexities of the works which were revealed after the full investigation was completed. Findings also indicated that the fish canopy is in very poor condition and deemed unsafe which constitute a risk to safety.

b)   Allan Brewster Leisure Centre - renew roof and gutters (Project ID 30232) – reallocation of ABS: Capex – Local Renewal budget of $250,000 to Ōtara Town Centre – renew fish canopy project within financial year 2021/2022. It is recommended staging and sequencing the delivery of the construction to make sure the best project outcomes can be achieved. A high-level outline for each stage, scope, complexity, cost, timeframes, risks and impacts of the Allan Brewster Leisure Centre project will be defined as part of the detailed investigation and design phase. Key findings and recommendations will be presented to the local board for feedback and input. All discussions on future budget allocation to deliver the scope of works for this project will form part of the development of next year’s work programme.  

c)   Papatoetoe Recreation Reserve - replace hockey turf and upgrade facilities (Project ID 26814) – proposed for inclusion in the financial year 2021/2022 “risk adjusted programme (RAP)” to enable early investigation and design.

5.       Staff propose the reallocation of $250,000 of asset-based services ABS: Capex – Local Renewal budget in financial year 2021/2022 from Allan Brewster Leisure Centre - renew roof and gutters (Project ID 30232) to Ōtara Town Centre - renew fish canopy (Project ID 20187) to ensure sufficient budget is available to deliver the project and to address the urgent health and safety concerns.

6.       The proposed variations are within the local board 2021/2022 financial year budget envelope and will not substantially impact the approved projects or the overall work programme. 

7.       All of the matters in this report have been workshopped with the local board on 3 August 2021. The local board provided positive feedback and supported the proposal in principle.

8.       Staff will update the work programme to reflect the local board decision and progress updates will be provided to the local board as part of quarterly updates.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      approve the amendments to its adopted Community Facilities work programme 2021–2024 as per attachment A, specifically:

i)    reallocation of $250,000 of ABS: Capex – Local Renewal budget, within financial year 2021/2022, from Allan Brewster Leisure Centre - renew roof and gutters (Project ID 30232) to the Ōtara Town Centre – renew fish canopy (Project ID 20187) project.

ii)   inclusion of Papatoetoe Recreation Reserve - replace hockey turf and upgrade facilities (Project ID 26814) in the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) to enable an invasive investigation and detailed design stage to commence in the financial year 2021/2022.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board adopted its Community Facilities work programme (CF WP) 2021-2024 on 15 June 2021 (resolution OP/2021/90). The budget allocated for all projects in the work programme are best estimates only. Project costings are subject to change and refinement as projects progress through the design and delivery process. As a result, amendments may be required to the approved work programme to accommodate final project costs.

10.     The delivery timeline of an approved project may change following the completion of the investigation and design phase of the project. This may also require a variation to the approved work programme. 

Current budget allocation for the identified projects

11.     Staff have identified three projects in the current approved CF WP 2021-2024 where budget allocation needs to be realigned after investigation and design stage, to ensure delivery of the projects as planned.

12.     Current budget allocations for the three identified projects are noted in Table 1 below.

Table 1: Approved budget allocations for the identified projects on the CF WP 2021-2024

Project ID

Activity Name

Budget source

FY20/21 & prior

FY21/22

FY22/23

FY23/24

Total Budget Allocation

20187

Ōtara Town Centre - renew fish canopy

ABS: Capex Local Renewal

$599,999.60

$350,000

$0

$0

 $949,999.60

30232

Allan Brewster Leisure Centre - renew roof and gutters

ABS: Capex Local Renewal

$0

$455,845

$418,994                       

$0

      $874,839           

Project ID

Activity Name

Budget source

FY20/21 & prior

FY21/22

FY22/23

FY23/24

Total Budget Allocation

26814

Papatoetoe Recreation Reserve - replace hockey turf and upgrade facilities

ABS: Capex Local Renewal; Growth Capex

$0

$0

$300,000

$350,000

$650,000

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Proposed Variations to Financial Year 2021/2022 Community Facilities Work Programme

13.     Changes in risk drivers, in combination with other factors such as, compliance and health, safety and environmental issues and meeting service levels may require reprioritisation or reallocation of planned capital expenditure (capex) including increase or decrease of local renewal budget for approved projects.

14.     The proposed variations for the identified projects are detailed below:

Ōtara Town Centre - renew fish canopy (Project ID – 20187) – proposed budget increase in FY21/22

15.     In February 2021, an invasive investigation was undertaken which determined that the canopy is deemed to be unsafe and is in very poor condition, prompting concerns about safety.

16.     Further investigations determined that 23 glass panels are cracked or damaged and need to be replaced. Additionally, most of the metal framing requires treatment due to corrosion to several metal supports which also need to be replaced.

17.     Additional budget of $250,000 is required in financial year 2021/2022 to make the asset safe and to ensure delivery of full scope of the project.

18.     There are several factors which were identified during the investigation and design phase that are responsible for the requested budget increase, such as:

·        glass panel replacement methodology

·        remedial work of corrosion on the metal framing

·        the complexity of works at height

·        increase in construction costs

·        increase in material costs i.e., glass panels.  

19.     The proposed budget increase will also include costs for:

·        shrink wrap and scaffolding

·        rust removal and treatment of metal framing followed by painting (15 years warranty)

·        implementation of dust mitigation strategy

·        engineering observations and approvals 

·        all construction work to deliver the project.


 

 

20.     If the renewal of the canopy is not addressed:

·        the asset will deteriorate further, causing significant structural damage which will increase renewal costs.

·        the asset could become a hazardous unsafe environment posing a health and safety risk to members of the public.

21.     Auckland Council is required to fulfil its legal requirements under the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015, so far as is reasonably practicable to ensure that staff and the public are properly protected and to provide an environment that is without risks to health and safety. 

22.     Auckland Council is responsible for ensuring our buildings are safe for public use and meet legal building code requirements under the Building Act 2004.

23.     Staff propose that the canopy is restored to building code requirements to address urgent health and safety concerns, ensure compliance with legislative requirements and to avoid further deterioration of the asset.

 

Allan Brewster Leisure Centre - renew roof and gutters (Project ID 30232) – proposed budget reduction in FY21/22

24.     Staff are proposing to undertake a staged delivery model for the roof and gutters works at Allan Brewster Leisure Centre. The aerial view of the building is shown on Figure 1.

25.     Scope for each stage and sequencing of the works, cost estimates, risks and timeframes will be determined as part of investigation and design work.

26.     Findings and recommendations from the investigation and design phase will be presented to the local board for feedback and input. All discussions on future budget allocation to deliver the required scope of works for this project will form part of the development of next year’s work programme.  

27.     The recommendation of reducing the ABS: Capex - Local Renewal budget from $455,845 to $205,845 will make available $250,000 Local Renewal budget to be reallocated from Allan Brewster Leisure Centre - renew roof and gutters (Project ID 30232) to Ōtara Town Centre - renew fish canopy (Project ID 20187) in financial year 2021/2022.

28.     Reallocation of the proposed portion of the project budget is feasible and will allow the project to progress in the financial year 2021/2022 as proposed for staged delivery. It is not anticipated that the reallocation of budget will have any detrimental impact on the expected outcomes or level of service in the immediate future.

29.     The remaining budget of $205,845 will be sufficient to conduct the investigation and design phase, as well as address any identified weathertightness issues.

30.     Staff will discuss future budget allocation to deliver the required scope of works with the local board for achieving the outcomes of the project as part of the development of next year’s work programme.   

Figure 1. Aerial view of Allan Brewster Leisure Centre

 

Papatoetoe Recreation Reserve - replace hockey turf and upgrade facilities (Project ID – 26814) - inclusion in Risk adjusted programme

31.     Staff have identified this project for inclusion in the Risk Adjusted Programme to enable investigation and design of the hockey turf at Papatoetoe Recreation Ground in the financial year 2021/2022.

Staff recommendations

32.     The budget allocated to the ‘Ōtara Town Centre - renew fish canopy’ project is insufficient to deliver the physical works. It is recommended that funding of $250,000 be reallocated from ‘Allan Brewster Leisure Centre - renew roof and gutters’ to the ‘Ōtara Town Centre - renew fish canopy’ project to address the health and safety issues and structural remediation works as a priority.

33.     Inclusion of ‘Papatoetoe Recreation Reserve - replace hockey turf and upgrade facilities’ project will enable investigation and design work to begin in the current financial year, which will ensure that the project is ready for delivery as planned in future years.

34.     Proposed variations and how they will affect the current CF WP are shown in attachment A noted in Table 2 below:

Table 2: Proposed variations to financial year 2021/2022 CF WP

Project ID

Activity Name 

Activity Description 

Budget variations FY2021/2022

Details

20187

Ōtara Town Centre - renew fish canopy

Remediation and reparation of the fish canopy, including repair steel work joints, treat and rust prevent steel structures, repair mounting' replace damaged glass sheets and clean canopy.

 

·    FY18/19-FY19/20 - investigation and design

·    FY20/21-FY21/22 - physical works

 

Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) project

Budget increase of $250,000

Renewal budget variation

Approved FY21/22 budget $350,000

 

Revised FY21/22 budget $600,000

Request for increase in budget

 

Request for increase in budget is based on contract cost for physical works.

 

The objective of the project is to ensure that the asset is safe and fit for purpose.

 

It is recommended that the remedial work is undertaken as a priority to address safety and structural concerns.

  

30232

Allan Brewster Leisure Centre - renew roof and gutters 

Renew the roof of the South Auckland Woodturners, Day-care, Admin, Gym, Spotlight Theatre and Physically Disabled and Able Bodied (PHAB) Association Incorporated (renew all the roofs).

 

·    FY21/22 - investigation and design

·    FY21/22-FY22/23 - physical works

 

Risk-Adjusted Programme (RAP) Project

Budget reallocation of $250,000

Renewal budget variation

Approved FY21/22 budget $455,845

Revised FY21/22 budget $205,845

The proposed reduction of budget will ensure that the health and safety concerns for ‘Ōtara Town Centre - renew fish canopy’ project is addressed immediately.

 

The recommendation of reducing the ABS: Capex - Local Renewal budget from $455,845 to $205,845 will make available $250,000 Local Renewal budget to be reallocated from Allan Brewster Leisure Centre - renew roof and gutters (Project ID 30232) to Ōtara Town Centre - renew fish canopy (Project ID 20187) in financial year 2021/2022.

 

A staged delivery is proposed for the Allan Brewster project. A more detailed investigation and design stage will inform the scope of works, staging and sequencing, costs, timing and delivery. The local board will be kept informed and findings and recommendations from investigation and design phase will be presented to the local board for feedback. All future budget allocations to deliver the full scope of works will be discussed with the local board as part of the development of next year’s work programme.    

26814

Papatoetoe Recreation Reserve - replace hockey turf and upgrade facilities

Replace the whole hockey turf at Papatoetoe Recreation Reserve and upgrade the facilities.

 

FY22/23 – investigation and design

FY23/24 - physical works.

 

Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) project

 

Funding Source:

·    Growth - $300,000

·    Local Renewal - $350,000

Proposed for inclusion as Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) project

 

Capex – Growth budget

Approved FY22/23 $300,000

 

Renewal budget

Approved FY23/24 budget $350,000

 

Staff have identified this project in the CF WP for inclusion in the financial year 2021/2022 “risk adjusted programme (RAP)” to enable an invasive investigation and detailed design stage to commence in financial year 2021/2022.

 

 

.

 

35.     Staff will ensure that the proposed variations are within the local board’s financial year 2021/2022 budget envelope and will not substantially impact the approved projects or the overall work programme. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

36.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan area: 

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and 

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

37.     This is an administrative report and the budget variations proposed in the report have no direct effect on climate change. Each project will be considered individually to assess the impacts of climate change and the approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The types of impacts to be considered include:

·        maximum upcycling and recycling of old material 

·        installation of energy efficiency measures

·        building design to ensure the maximum lifetime and efficiency of the building is obtained 

·        lifecycle impacts of construction materials (embodied emissions) 

·        exposure of building location to climate change hazards (sea level rise, flooding (floodplains), drought, heat island effect)

·        anticipated increase in carbon emissions from construction, including contractor emissions

·        lifecycle impacts of construction materials.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

38.     The decision sought for this report has no direct impact on other parts of the council group.  The overall 2021-2024 work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in an integrated team.

39.     Collaboration with staff will be ongoing throughout the life of the projects to ensure integration into the operational maintenance and asset management systems. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

40.     Community facilities and open spaces provide important community services to the people of the local board area. They contribute to building strong, healthy and vibrant communities by providing spaces where Aucklanders can participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art and recreational activities. These activities improve lifestyles and a sense of belonging and pride amongst residents. 

41.     The activities in the work programme align with the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives:

Table 3: 2020 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan outcome and objective

Outcome  

Objective  

Outcome 4: Parks and facilities that meet our people’s needs 

Ensuring our parks and facilities meet local needs for sports, recreation, and community activity 

 

42.     The proposed variations were discussed with the local board at their workshop on 3 August 2021. The local board provided positive feedback and supported the proposal in principle.   

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

43.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori.

44.     The projects discussed in this report will benefit Māori and the wider community through the provision of quality facilities and open spaces that promote good health, the fostering of family and community relationships and connection to the natural environment.

45.     Where aspects or the work programme are anticipated to have an impact on activities of importance to Māori, then appropriate engagement will be undertaken. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

46.     The proposed variations are within the local board 2021/2022 financial year budget envelope and will not substantially impact the overall work programme. Details of proposed variations are outlined in Table 2 above as part of analysis and advice section of the report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

47.     The COVID-19 pandemic could have a further negative impact on the delivery of the work programme if the COVID-19 alert level changes.

48.     Amendments to the projects as outlined in Table 2 are essential for delivery of the full scope of the projects. If the local board does not approve the change, there is a risk that the projects identified may not be delivered within financial year 2021/2022. 

49.     It is likely that the assets will deteriorate further and might need to be closed, if not renewed in a timely way. Staff will continue to monitor the condition of the assets and consider action to be taken in the future.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

50.     Subject to local board’s decision on the proposal outlined in this report, the local board’s work programme will be amended to reflect the decision and works will commence on the project(s) as per the timing outlined in the approved work programme.

51.     Progress and updates on the work programme will be reported to the local board as part of the quarterly reports to the local board.  

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Proposed amendments to the 2022-2024 Community Facilities work programme

69

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Linda Pillay - Work Programme Lead

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - Acting General Manager Community Facilities

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Proposal to make a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw

File No.: CP2021/11548

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek support for the draft proposal to make a new Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Auckland Council Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022, before it is finalised for public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Staff have prepared a draft proposal for a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw to enable local boards to provide their views before it is finalised for public consultation.

3.       The draft proposal is to make a new bylaw under the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This bylaw would replace the current legacy bylaw, which expires in 2022 and contains provisions developed before the Freedom Camping Act 2011 was passed.

4.       The Freedom Camping Act 2011 allows freedom camping on all public land unless it is already prohibited under another enactment. The Act enables councils to make a bylaw to prohibit or restrict freedom camping in areas that meet statutory criteria for protection.

5.       This draft proposal replaces an earlier proposal developed in 2018 which was set aside by the Governing Body in 2019. Following decisions by the Governing Body in March and May 2021, the key changes compared with the 2018 proposal are that the new draft proposal:

·     excludes land held under the Reserves Act 1977 from scope (council would maintain the current default prohibition on camping on reserves under the Reserves Act 1977)

·     manages freedom camping only on land held under the Local Government Act 2002

·     seeks to prevent freedom camping impacts in sensitive areas, and to protect public health and safety and manage access in all areas, by:

scheduling 44 prohibited areas, where no freedom camping is allowed

scheduling 19 restricted areas, where freedom camping is allowed subject to site-specific restrictions

including general rules to manage freedom camping impacts in all other areas (campers must use certified self-contained vehicles, stay a maximum of two nights, depart by 9am and not return to the same area within two weeks).

6.       The proposed prohibited and restricted areas are those areas which the Bylaw Panel recommended should be prohibited and restricted in 2019, and which are held under the Local Government Act 2002. Areas held under the Reserves Act 1977 have been removed.

7.       The Panel’s recommendations draw on previous area assessments and take into account feedback from local board engagement and public consultation conducted in 2018 and 2019.

8.       The draft proposal includes two designated prohibited areas and no designated restricted areas located in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area. All designated areas are listed in the draft Bylaw schedules within Attachment A. All other council-managed land held under the Local Government Act 2002, including roads, is proposed to be covered by general rules.

9.       Staff recommend that the local board provide its view on the draft proposal, including the inclusion of general rules in the bylaw and the recommended settings for those rules.

10.     The key risks of the proposal are that:

·     it creates too few areas where freedom camping is allowed; this is partially mitigated by allowing freedom camping on most roads (subject to general rules), and council could decide to designate more restricted areas following consultation

·     the cumulative impact of all prohibitions under the Bylaw and other enactments is viewed as an effective ban; however staff looked closely at the requirements of the Freedom Camping Act 2011 in developing the proposal and will continue to monitor cumulative impact as bylaw development progresses.

11.     The local board’s views will be provided to the Governing Body in September with the recommendation that the finalised proposal is adopted for public consultation. Public consultation is scheduled for November, and Bylaw Panel deliberations for early 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      support the draft Statement of Proposal in Attachment A of this agenda report to make a new Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Auckland Council Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022 for public consultation.

Horopaki

Context

Freedom camping can have both positive and negative impacts

12.     For the purposes of this Bylaw, freedom camping is when someone stays overnight on council-managed land, including roadsides, in a vehicle or caravan.

13.     Freedom camping specifically refers to people staying in vehicles overnight as part of leisure travel, or because they are choosing to live in a vehicle for lifestyle reasons.

14.     Freedom camping provides a flexible and affordable way for Aucklanders and for domestic and international visitors to experience and enjoy the region. Many freedom campers will visit friends and family, attend events, and support local businesses during their stay.

15.     Freedom camping can however have negative impacts on the local environment and host communities if it is not well-managed. These impacts can be caused by:

16.     Freedom camping has become popularly associated with harmful and antisocial behaviours, but our research shows that most freedom campers visiting Auckland do camp responsibly.

17.     However, the presence of large numbers of campers – even responsible campers – is more likely to cause community concern in Auckland due to pressure on limited public space.

18.     Freedom camper numbers have been growing in Auckland and throughout the country over the last two decades. Once the current border restrictions are lifted overseas visitors are likely to return, and domestic freedom camping may continue to increase in the meantime.

19.     Auckland does not currently have enough places for freedom campers to go. This means there is often overcrowding in the places where it is allowed, or illegal camping in unsuitable areas once legal sites are full. Having more areas would reduce these supply-related issues.

20.     The council can regulate freedom camping to help prevent irresponsible camping and manage responsible freedom camping in a way that minimises its negative impacts.

Council must align its freedom camping regulation with the Freedom Camping Act 2011

21.     The Freedom Camping Act 2011 allows freedom camping on all public land unless it is prohibited under a bylaw or another enactment, such as the Reserves Act 1977.

22.     Auckland’s current Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2015 is a consolidation of pre-2010 legacy bylaw provisions developed before the Freedom Camping Act 2011 was passed. A new bylaw must be made that aligns with the national legislation before the current bylaw expires in 2022.

23.     The Freedom Camping Act 2011 is permissive by default but does allow council to make a bylaw to prohibit or restrict freedom camping in areas where certain statutory criteria are met. In particular, council must be satisfied that:

·     each area’s location can be clearly shown on a map and/or described

·     the prohibitions and restrictions in each area are necessary to:

-     protect the area (for example because it is environmentally or culturally sensitive)

-     protect the health and safety of the people who may visit the area

-     protect access to the area (for other users)

·     the cumulative impact of all prohibitions and restrictions (under the bylaw and other enactments) do not constitute an effective ban on freedom camping on council land.

A 2018 proposal to regulate freedom camping was set aside in August 2019

24.     Work to develop a freedom camping bylaw began in 2016. Staff assessed more than 1,000 areas for their suitability for freedom camping and need for protection under the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This process included extensive engagement with local boards.

25.     In late 2018 and early 2019 public feedback and formal local board views were sought on a proposal for a draft Freedom Camping in Vehicles bylaw. A Bylaw Panel deliberated on all feedback and made recommendations to the Governing Body. The Panel recommended scheduling 322 prohibited areas and 103 restricted areas, including a number of reserves.

26.     In August 2019 the Governing Body set aside the recommendations of the Bylaw Panel and instead requested advice on a new direction for bylaw development.

The Governing Body decided to exclude reserves from scope and include general rules

27.     The Governing Body considered staff advice in March 2021[15] and May 2021[16] and directed that a new proposal for a Freedom Camping Act 2011 bylaw be developed that:

·     only manages freedom camping on land held under the Local Government Act 2002, with camping on reserves continuing to be managed by the Reserves Act 1977

·     includes general rules to manage the generalised impacts of freedom camping, and ensure problems are not displaced from regulated to unregulated areas

·     relies on previous assessments (undertaken to develop the 2018 proposal) to identify land held under the Local Government Act 2002 that should be prohibited or further restricted through the bylaw.

28.     Staff have prepared a draft proposal to implement the Governing Body’s decisions (Attachment A). This proposal outlines the reasons and decisions that have led to the content of the proposed new Bylaw.

Potential changes to the Freedom Camping Act 2011 not yet confirmed

29.     In April and May 2021, the Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) publicly consulted on four proposals for change to the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This included making the use of self-contained vehicles mandatory for all freedom camping.

30.     The Governing Body approved Auckland Council’s submission, which incorporated local board views, in May 2021[17]. MBIE has not yet released any further information, and timeframes for any changes to the Act have not been confirmed.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

A new bylaw is proposed to manage freedom camping in vehicles on some council land

31.     The draft proposal would make a new Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022 that:

·     aligns with the Freedom Camping Act 2011

·     helps council to prevent freedom camping impacts in sensitive areas, and to protect public health and safety and manage access in all areas of land held under the Local Government Act 2002 (including roads controlled by Auckland Transport)

·     forms part of a wider regulatory framework of Acts, regulations and other bylaws[18].

32.     The Bylaw will be enforced by the Licensing and Regulatory Compliance unit using a graduated compliance model (information, education, enforcement).

33.     The table below summarises the main proposals:

Draft proposals

Reasons for draft proposal

To schedule 63 specific areas as follows:

Restrict freedom camping in 19 specific areas (where freedom camping is allowed subject to site-specific restrictions)

Listed in Schedule 1 of the draft Bylaw

 

To better manage areas that have been identified as needing additional regulation due to factors such as popularity, current use by others, demand for parking and the size of the parking areas.

These are the restricted areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel in 2019, with all reserves removed.

Prohibit freedom camping in 44 specific areas (where freedom camping is not allowed)

Listed in Schedule 2 of the draft Bylaw

 

To protect areas that have been identified as being environmentally or culturally sensitive, or where freedom camping would impact public health and safety and access in ways that cannot be adequately managed through restrictions.

These are the prohibited areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel in 2019, with all reserves removed.

To include general rules for all other areas as follows:

Require freedom campers to use certified self-contained vehicles

To prevent impacts from the depositing of toilet waste and wastewater into the environment, and the use of unsuitable areas for cooking

Allow freedom campers to stay a maximum of two nights in the same road or off-road parking area

To prevent impacts from the depositing of toilet waste and wastewater into the environment and ensure fair access to limited shared parking and amenities

Require freedom campers to vacate their parking space by 9am on the day of departure

To ensure fair access for shared parking and amenities for other campers and users of public space

Require freedom campers not return to stay in the same road or off-road parking area within a two-week period

To ensure fair access to limited shared parking and amenities for other campers and users of public space

34.     The draft proposal notes that the council does not intend to use the bylaw to manage:

·     issues associated with homelessness (people living in a vehicle involuntarily)

·     areas where access is already controlled or parking is reserved or charged for, for example gated carparks, land leased to other organisations and regional parks.

The draft proposal complies with statutory requirements

35.     The draft proposal has been prepared in accordance with statutory requirements. Staff consider the proposed draft Bylaw:

·     only prohibits or restricts freedom camping where it is necessary to protect sensitive areas, and/or to manage impacts on public health and safety and access to an area

·     uses a format and wording that are easy to read, understand and comply with

·     is authorised by statute, is not repugnant to other legislation, and is not unreasonable

·     does not give rise to any implications or inconsistencies with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990.

Staff recommend the local board consider and provide its views on the draft proposal

36.     Staff recommend that the local board consider the draft proposal in Attachment A and provide any views by resolution to the Governing Body before it is finalised for public consultation on 23 September 2021.

37.     For example, the board could support the draft proposal for public consultation, recommend changes or defer comment until after it has considered public feedback on the proposal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     Staff note that this is a regulatory process to manage existing activities enabled by central government policy. It is not causing these activities to occur or affecting the likelihood that they will occur. The decision sought in this report therefore has no specific climate impact.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.     The draft proposal impacts the operations of several council departments and council-controlled organisations, including Licensing and Regulatory Compliance, Parks, Sport and Recreation and Auckland Transport.

40.     The Licensing and Regulatory Compliance unit are aware of the impacts of the draft proposal and their primary role in implementing and managing compliance with the Bylaw.

41.     Council’s 86 park rangers help to manage compliance with council Bylaws, the Reserves Act 1977 and the Litter Act 1974 by carrying out education and monitoring on parks and reserves. However, rangers are not currently being warranted or renewing warrants, and Licensing and Regulatory Compliance will continue to carry out any enforcement required.

Enhanced service levels for Bylaw compliance activities are not currently budgeted

42.     Concern about the council’s ability to effectively implement the Bylaw and manage compliance within existing resources was a key theme of public and local board feedback received in 2019.

43.     In March 2021 the Governing Body requested advice about costed options for increasing the service levels for compliance associated with this Bylaw. Costings are being finalised and this advice will be provided alongside the proposal in September, for consideration during future Annual Plan cycles.

44.     There are multiple options for increasing investment in Bylaw implementation and both proactive and reactive Bylaw compliance activities. These include:

·     enhancement of council’s information technology systems, to enable the implementation of the new infringement notice regime

·     use of contracted security services, to increase responsiveness to complaints (similar to the current arrangements for Noise Control), or for additional proactive monitoring at seasonal ‘hotspots’

·     purchase of mobile printers, to enable infringement notices to be affixed to vehicles in breach of the Bylaw at the time of the offence

·     signage at all prohibited and restricted areas and at other areas as needed

·     camera surveillance technology to enable remote monitoring of known or emerging hotspots, for evidence-gathering purposes and/or to support real-time enforcement.

45.     Local boards can request further advice from Licensing and Regulatory Compliance if they wish to consider allocating local budget for enhanced local compliance activities.

46.     For example, Rodney Local Board recently allocated funds from its Locally Driven Initiatives budget to employ two Compliance Wardens for a six-month trial over the 2021-2022 summer period. The wardens will address low level compliance issues, including illegal freedom camping, with follow-up support from warranted compliance staff when required.

Ongoing land classification work won’t be completed with bylaw development timeframes

47.     Following the Governing Body’s decision in March 2021 to exclude reserves from scope, land status has become more relevant for identifying areas requiring protection in the bylaw.

48.     The council does not currently hold complete land classification data to establish definitive numbers of reserves. Parks and reserves can comprise multiple land parcels which may be held under different Acts.

49.     Since reporting to the Governing Body in March, staff have completed further investigation of the land status of the prohibited and restricted areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel. This has identified additional reserves, which has reduced the proposed prohibited areas (from 55 in the March report to 44 in the draft proposal) and restricted areas (from 21 to 19).

50.     Classifications are still being confirmed as part of the development of omnibus Local Park Management Plans. Five local board areas have completed this work, and an average of 94 percent of their parks were found to be held under the Reserves Act 1977.

51.     Ongoing land classification work will support bylaw implementation. It will not finish within the timeframe for bylaw development, so the status quo issues will remain.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

52.     The proposed draft Bylaw impacts on local boards’ governance role as it affects decision making over local assets, particularly parks and other council-controlled public places. There is also high community interest in freedom camping regulation in many local board areas.

53.     The local board has an opportunity to provide its views on this draft proposal by resolution to the Governing Body. The local board will also have further opportunity to provide its views to a Bylaw Panel on any public feedback to the proposal from people in their local board area.

All proposed prohibited and restricted areas previously discussed with local boards

54.     The draft proposal includes two designated prohibited areas and no designated restricted areas located in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area. All designated areas are listed in the draft Bylaw schedules within Attachment A. All other council-managed land held under the Local Government Act 2002, including roads, is proposed to be covered by general rules.

55.     The proposed prohibited and restricted areas are those areas which the Bylaw Panel recommended should be prohibited and restricted in 2019, and which are held under the Local Government Act 2002. Areas held under the Reserves Act 1977 have been removed.

56.     All areas proposed to be scheduled as prohibited or restricted were previously discussed with the relevant local boards in 2018.

Joint political working group provided views on general rules in May 2021

57.     Three local board representatives participated in a joint political working group on 21 May 2021 to provide views on options for including general rules in the Bylaw.

58.     The working group unanimously supported the inclusion of general rules in the Bylaw, and five out of six working group members supported the recommended settings included in the draft proposal. A summary of the working group’s views was reported to the Governing Body on 27 May 2021[19].

The new draft proposal responds to feedback provided on the 2018 proposal

59.     Local boards provided formal feedback on the 2018 draft proposal to the Bylaw Panel in 2019, following on from their early feedback given during engagement in 2017, and site-specific feedback provided in 2018.

60.     The table below details typical concerns expressed by local boards in their formal feedback and how the new draft proposal responds to these concerns:

Key local board concern (from 2019)

Draft proposal’s response to concern

The loss of protection in the legacy bylaws for most reserves and roadsides

·   Excludes reserves from the bylaw and continues to use the Reserves Act 1977 to manage all camping at reserves

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw, including roadsides

·   Notes individual roads can be scheduled as prohibited or restricted areas if problems arise in future

The provision for unrestricted freedom camping in the local board area

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw

Freedom camping at reserves and enforcement tools under the Reserves Act

·   The Reserves Act 1977 will be used to manage all camping at reserves, which means the status quo (prohibition) will continue

·   Notes that following changes in September 2019 to the Reserves Act 1977, $800 infringement notices can now be issued for breaches of this Act

Freedom camping in inner-city areas, unsafe areas and areas near sports fields, residential homes and campgrounds

·   Bylaw schedules designate individual sites that have been identified and assessed as unsuitable for freedom camping (prohibited areas), or where additional restrictions are needed to manage impacts (restricted areas)

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw

The potential effect on people experiencing homelessness

·   Clarifies that the bylaw will not be used to manage issues associated with homelessness and confirms the council’s commitment to a compassionate enforcement approach to protect vulnerable Aucklanders

Council’s ability to enforce bylaws and the cost of enforcement and monitoring

·   Although not contained in the proposal itself, advice will be provided to the Governing Body on options for increasing investment in bylaw implementation

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

61.     The Bylaw has relevance to Māori as kaitiaki of Papatūānuku. The proposal supports two key directions in the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau:

·     wairuatanga (promoting distinctive identity), in relation to valuing and protecting Māori heritage and Taonga Māori

·     kaitiakitanga (ensuring sustainable futures), in relation to environmental protection.

62.     The proposal also supports the Board’s Schedule of Issues of Significance by ensuring that sites of significance to Māori are identified and protected from freedom camping harms.

63.     Mana whenua and mataawaka were invited to provide feedback during the development of the 2018 proposal via dedicated hui and again through the public consultation process.

64.     Feedback received on specific prohibited and restricted areas identified in the 2018 proposal was incorporated into the deliberations. This included the identification of sites of significance to Māori, such as wahi tapu areas.

65.     General matters raised by Māori during engagement included the need to ensure:

·     the ability to add further sites of significance to the bylaw as these are designated

·     provision for temporary bans on freedom camping, e.g. in areas under a rahui

·     a compassionate approach to people experiencing homelessness

·     provision of sufficient dump stations to avoid environmental pollution

·     clear communication of the rules in the bylaw and at freedom camping sites.

66.     The draft proposal addresses these matters by proposing to prohibit freedom camping at sites of significance to Māori (such as Maraetai Foreshore and Onetangi Cemetery), provision in the Bylaw for temporary bans, and confirming council’s commitment to a compassionate enforcement approach to people experiencing homelessness.

67.     Mana whenua and mataawaka will have an opportunity to provide further feedback during public consultation on the proposal.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

68.     There are no financial implications to the local board for any decisions to support the draft proposal for public consultation. The Governing Body will consider any financial implications associated with public notification in September 2021.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

69.     Legal risks were discussed as part of the provision of legally privileged advice to interested local board members at a confidential workshop held in June 2021.

70.     The other key risks and possible mitigations are summarised in the table on the following page.

If...

Then...

Mitigation (partial)

The bylaw proposal does not create enough areas where freedom camping is allowed

 

Council may need to manage an increase in overcrowding, non-compliance, and harms over time.

The proposed bylaw would enable freedom campers to stay for up to two nights on most roads, subject to general rules.

Council could consider increasing the number of designated restricted areas following consultation, or if problems arise in future.

The cumulative impact of prohibitions and restrictions in the Bylaw and other enactments is viewed as an ‘effective ban’ on freedom camping in Auckland

The risk of legal challenge could increase.

Staff looked closely at the requirements of the Freedom Camping Act 2011 in developing the proposal, and cumulative impact will continue to be monitored.

Council can’t meet public expectation of increased enforcement

There may be a loss of social license for freedom camping and reputational risk for council.

Responsible Camping Ambassadors will assist compliance staff during the peak season, although future funding is not guaranteed.

The Governing Body or local boards could allocate additional funding to increase service levels for compliance activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

71.     Staff will present local board views and a finalised proposal to the Governing Body on 23 September 2021. The next steps for bylaw development are shown in the diagram below.

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Freedom Camping in Vehicles Statement of Proposal and Draft Bylaw August 2021 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rebekah Forman - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki – General Manager - Community & Social Policy

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022

File No.: CP2021/09856

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       For the local board to adopt its Joint Council-Controlled Organisations (CCO) Engagement Plan 2021-2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The review panel for the independent review of Auckland Council’s substantive council-controlled organisations presented its findings to the Governing Body and local board chairs in August 2020. All 64 recommendations were adopted.

3.       Recommendations 6, 34, and 53 were designated as those that CCOs would work with local boards to implement. Recommendation 34 (b) of the 2020 CCO Review advised the preparation of joint CCO engagement plans for each local board. 

4.       A template for the joint engagement plan has been developed in conjunction with local board members and CCO staff over the last six months. While it will be signed, it will be a live document that will be updated as required.

5.       Workshops have been held at all 21 local boards with CCO staff.  Local boards have provided their views on CCO delivery and engagement in their area, and the degree of engagement they expect for each project or programme, both for the local board and for the community.

6.       These discussions have formed the basis of the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 that is provided as Attachment A.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      adopt the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 in Attachment A as agreed between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations: Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Panuku Development Auckland, and Watercare

b)      note that the Joint Engagement Plan is a live document that will be updated as needed, with changes reported to the local board each quarter.

c)      authorise the chair of the local board to sign this agreement on behalf of the local board, in conjunction with representatives from the four CCOs.

Horopaki

Context

7.       In November 2019, the Governing Body approved the draft terms of reference for an independent review of Auckland Council’s substantive council-controlled organisations (CCOs) (GB/2019/127).

8.       These terms of reference required the independent review panel to consider whether CCOs were an efficient and effective model for delivering services, and whether the CCO decision-making model had enough political oversight, public transparency and accountability.

CCO Review Findings

9.       The independent panel presented the findings of the CCO Review to the Governing Body and local board chairs on 11 August 2020. 

10.     The review made 64 recommendations noting that the recommendations should be considered as a package. On 27 August 2020, the Governing Body resolved to agree in principle all of the review’s recommendations (GB/2020/89). 

11.     Local boards provided input to the CCO Review by:

·   participating in the CCO Review process

·   providing feedback on the final report to the Governing Body in August 2020.

12.     The 64 recommendations were divided up into categories of work:

·   those to be implemented by the council’s chief executive

·   those the council’s chief executive would work with CCO chief executive(s) to implement

·   those that the Panuku Development Auckland board would consider and report back on

·   those that CCOs would work with local boards to implement; this last group includes recommendations 6, 34, and 53. 

13.     Recommendation 34 was that CCOs and local boards reset how they engage with one another, by means of: 

a)    a workshop to develop a more meaningful way for CCOs and local boards to work together 

b)    the preparation of joint CCO engagement plans for each local board

c)    more initiative by local boards in integrating their own planning with CCO planning

d)    liaison between CCOs and local boards at a more senior level so CCOs can quickly remedy local board concerns

e)    the preparation of joint CCO six-monthly reports for each local board

f)     the communication of clear, up-to-date information from CCOs to local boards on projects in their area.

14.     This report focusses on activities undertaken to deliver part (b) of recommendation 34, the preparation of a joint CCO engagement plan for each local board.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Developing a joint CCO engagement plan template

15.     Prior to the 2020 CCO Review, the Governance Manual for substantive council-controlled organisations set the expectation that each CCO would prepare a local board engagement plan every three years, by 31 July following local board elections, and report to local boards accordingly. These engagement plans were created separately by the five CCOs, and were generic across all 21 local boards.

16.     Recommendation 34 (b) of the 2020 CCO Review advised the preparation of joint CCO engagement plans for each local board. 

17.     A template for the joint engagement plan has been developed iteratively over the last six months, with input from Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Panuku Development Auckland, and Watercare staff.

18.     The template includes:

·   CCO responsibilities

·   local board commitments

·   local board plan outcomes and objectives

·   names of local board members and staff from the CCOs and local board services

·   leads and/or delegations in place

·   an overview of the IAP2 Public Participation Spectrum that is used to indicate the degree of engagement in each project

·   work programme tables for each CCO.

19.     The sections on CCO responsibilities and local board commitments have largely been imported from previous engagement plans, or directly from the Governance Manual.

20.     Local board plan outcomes and objectives have been included to ensure these are front and centre when CCOs are working with local boards.

21.     While directly addressing recommendation 34(a), the joint engagement plan also addresses other elements of recommendation 34 as follows:

·   documents key contacts, including senior CCO representatives of the organisation well placed to quickly respond to and resolve local concerns (34d)

·   gives local boards the opportunity to highlight projects likely to be most significant to them as governors, and contributes to a “no surprises” environment

·   the process of developing, agreeing and documenting levels of engagement for each project or programme is the first step towards ensuring the communication of clear, up-to-date information from CCOs to local boards on projects in their area (34f).

22.     This template was shared with local boards for feedback via the Chairs’ Forum (December 2020 and May 2021) and via a memo in May 2021.

23.     It will be used for the 2021 financial year, with feedback from this 2021 process taken into account and any necessary changes incorporated for future years.

A workshop to develop a more meaningful way for CCOs and local boards to work together 

24.     In delivering parts (a) and (b) of recommendation 34, staff have linked the two outcomes together and supported local boards and CCOs to customise the content of each local board’s engagement plan via a joint workshop.

25.     Staff from the four CCOs have attended joint workshops facilitated by Local Board Services at each of the 21 local boards between May and July 2021.

26.     These workshops have provided local boards with the opportunity to share their views on CCO delivery and engagement in their area. They included an outline of each CCO’s work programme relating to the local area, and local boards have provided their views on the degree of engagement they expect for each project or programme.

27.     The local board also indicated their preference for whether and how community engagement is undertaken for each project.

Customised engagement plans

28.     The discussions that took place at the joint workshops are reflected in the customised version of the engagement plan provided for this local board as Attachment A.

29.     This plan represents a point in time, and will be subject to change over the course of the year. It is a “live document” that will be updated when needed. Major changes to the CCO work programme, or to the agreed level of local board and public engagement, will be workshopped with the local board ahead of any change. Minor changes will be summarised and reported on each quarter.

30.     Work programme items that will be confirmed with the formal adoption of the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 (LTP) will be included as they become available. This includes items from the Economic Development Action Plan, and the Regional Land Transport Plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     The adoption of the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have a direct impact on climate.

32.     Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     Adopting the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 is likely to have a positive impact on other parts of the council as well as between the respective CCOs within each local board area.

34.     These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes, and will give council staff greater visibility of CCO work programmes.

35.     To avoid or reduce disruption, staff will align the processes for the local board work programme and the updating of the CCO engagement plans over time.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     Local board engagement plans will enable local boards to customise engagement between CCOs and communities in their areas, by signalling those issues and projects which are of most significance within their communtiies.

37.     Local boards provided input to the CCO Review by:

·   participating in the CCO Review process

·   providing feedback on the final report to the Governing Body in August 2020.

38.     Local boards have been kept up to date on the development of the engagement plan template via:

·   input and feedback at December 2020 Chairs’ Forum

·   update at May 2021 Chairs’ Forum

·   a memo to all local board members in May 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     Adopting the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 is likely to have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

40.     While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     The adoption of the Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.     It is likely that there will be changes made to work programme items in the engagement plan during the year, or to the level of engagement that the board or the community will have. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, contains a table recording changes made since it was signed, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.     With the engagement plans completed for all 21 local boards, staff will develop a reporting framework that best responds to the type of projects and the level of engagement to which local boards and CCOs have agreed.

44.     CCOs will work with local boards to ensure that any major changes to the work programme or to engagement levels are workshopped with the board, and well documented.

45.     Minor changes will be noted within the live document and shared with the local board each quarter.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022

87

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead, Senior Advisor Operations and Planning, Local Board Services

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Urgent Decision - request to allocate up to $10,000 from the local community grants budget towards the Auckland Council's Mayoral Relief Fund to support victims of the tornado that occured in Papatoetoe on 19 June 2021

File No.: CP2021/11266

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To notify the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board of a decision made on 29 July 2021 under the local board’s urgent decision-making process to allocate up to $10,000 from the local community grants budget towards the Auckland Council's Mayoral Relief Fund to support victims of the tornado that occurred in Papatoetoe on 19 June 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the urgent decision made on 29 July to allocate up to $10,000 from the board’s local community grants workline #389 (Financial year 2021/2022) of locally driven initiatives budget to the Mayoral Relief Fund to support residents affected by the tornado that occurred in Papatoetoe on 19 June 2021 as outlined in Attachment A.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Signed Urgent decision - request to allocate up to $10,000 from the local community grants budget towards the Auckland Council's Mayoral Relief Fund to support victims of the tornado that occurred in Papatoetoe on 19 June 2021

105

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Local board resolution responses and information report

 

File No.: CP2021/10136

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       This report provides a summary of resolution responses and information reports for circulation to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board.

Information reports for the local board:

2.      The board provided its feedback on Auckland Council’s submission on Te Waihanga New Zealand Infrastructure Commission’s consultation document: He Tūāpapa ki te Ora, Infrastructure for a better future, Aotearoa New Zealand Infrastructure Strategy.  A copy of the feedback is provided as Attachment A.

3.      The board provided its feedback on Auckland Council’s submission on the Discussion Document on the Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development.  A copy of the feedback is provided as Attachment B.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/sThat the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the feedback on He Tūāpapa ki te Ora, Infrastructure for a better future, Aotearoa New Zealand Infrastructure Strategy, provided as Attachment A

b)      note the feedback on the Discussion Document on the Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development, provided as Attachment B.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

He Tūāpapa ki te Ora, Infrastructure for a better future, Aotearoa New Zealand Infrastructure Strategy - feedback

111

b

Discussion Document on the Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development - feedback

113

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2021/11162

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Work Calendar

117

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Record of Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2021/11170

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board record for the workshops held on 1 June, 8 June, 22 June, 29 June, 6 July and 27 July 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 12.1.4, the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its local board workshops held over the past month.

3.       Resolutions or decisions are not made at workshops as they are solely for the provision of information and discussion. This report attaches the workshop record for the period stated below.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)         note the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board workshop records for: 1 June, 8 June, 22 June, 29 June, 6 July and 27 July 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Record, 1 June 2021

121

b

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Record, 8 June 2021

123

c

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Record, 22 June 2021

125

d

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Record, 29 June 2021

127

e

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Record, 6 July 2021

129

f

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Record, 27 July 2021

131

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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17 August 2021

 

 

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17 August 2021

 

 

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17 August 2021

 

 

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17 August 2021

 

 

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17 August 2021

 

 

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17 August 2021

 

 

Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board for March to June 2021

File No.: CP2021/11481

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board with an integrated performance report for March to June 2021, and the overall performance for the financial year against the approved 2020/2021 local board work programmes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an integrated view of performance for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board and includes financial performance and delivery against work programmes for the 2020/2021 financial year.

3.       One hundred and six activities within the agreed work programmes were delivered including multi-year projects that have progressed as expected. Eight activities were undelivered, cancelled, put on hold or deferred and nine projects/activities have not progressed as expected during 2020/2021.

4.       Key activity achievements from the 2020/2021 work programme include:

·    Community grants Ōtara-Papatoetoe 948: the local board gave community groups and individuals $222,227.52 during this period, as well as $51,000 to the Mayoral Relief Fund for residents who were affected by the Papatoetoe tornado.

·    Build Capacity: Community-led response to social concerns (859): the local board and community successfully opposed Hunters Corner Liquor application, which was denied in April.

·    Ngati Ōtara Park - develop multi-purpose facility and park (2453): Ngati Ōtara Multi-Purpose Facility was completed after years of work and advocacy from the local board and community.

5.       Key activities not delivered / not progressed as expected include:

·    Placemaking: Safe and resilient communities (916): there have been delays in completing the survey and the final economic recovery plan, which has led to delays in providing further safety recommendations. Survey results are expected to be presented to the board in quarter one of financial year 2022.

·    OP Learn to Ride (108): this programme is in progress, however COVID-19 affected delivery as events could not be held. A workshop to make future recommendations for this programme will be held in August 2021.

·    Diversity Festival (944): the Diversity Festival was scheduled for delivery on Saturday 20 February however COVID-19 alert level restriction for Auckland at the time meant the event was cancelled. The next Diversity Festival is scheduled for 30 October 2021.

6.       Qualifying budgets of unfinished activities were carried forward into 2021/2022 work programmes.

7.       The financial performance report is attached but is excluded from the public. This is due to restrictions on releasing annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the New Zealand Exchange (NZX) – on or about 30 September.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for March to June 2021.

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group results for 2020/2021 are released to the New Zealand’s Exchange (NZX) which are expected to be made public on or about 30 September 2021.

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Emergency Budget was adopted on 30 July. The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board approved 2020/2021 work programmes for the following operating departments at its August 2020 business meeting:

·        Arts, Community and Events;

·        Parks, Sport and Recreation;

·        Libraries and Information;

·        Community Services: Service, Strategy and Integration; (Now part of Connected Communities department)

·        Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew;

·        Community Leases;

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services;

·        Plans and Places;

·        The Southern Initiative;

·        ATEED.

9.       As the work programmes were adopted two months later than normal due to effects of COVID-19, there has been a reduced timeframe to deliver these work programmes (10 months).

10.     Since the time the work programmes were approved, the Customer and Communities Services directorate has been restructured. Two new departments were created - Connected Communities and Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships, and the Southern Initiative and Western Initiative moved into the directorate as a new department - Community and Social Innovation. Units from the previous departments Arts, Community and Events; Libraries and Information; and Service, Strategy and Integration were incorporated into the three new departments. The table below shows the distribution

Table 1: Changes to Departments in Customer and Communities Services directorate

Previous Department - Unit

Current Department - Unit

Arts, Community and Events - Community Places

Connected Communities – Community Places

Arts, Community and Events - Community Empowerment

Connected Communities – Community Empowerment

Arts, Community and Events - Community Empowerment (Youth)

Community and Social Innovation – Youth Empowerment

Arts, Community and Events - Arts & Culture

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Arts & Culture

Arts, Community and Events - Events

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Events

Service, Strategy and Integration

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Service and Asset Planning

Libraries

Connected Communities – Libraries

The Southern Initiative

Community and Social Innovation – The Southern Initiative

The Western Initiative

Community and Social Innovation – The Western Initiative

 

11.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

12.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which indicates the progress or performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that have been delivered as expected or multi-year activities which have progressed as planned (green), activities that are in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that are undelivered or have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work Programme by RAG status

13.     The graph below shows the status of activities in each department’s work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: work programme activity by activity status and department

Key activity achievements from the 2020/2021 work programme

14.     The key achievements in the delivery of the local board work programmes for 2020/2021 include:

·    Diverse Participation: Empower diverse communities (909): Diversity Forum which had a focus on Iftar and Muslim communities, and included a speech from Meng Foon, the Race Relations Commissioner was successfully held in May. The activity line also involved networking activities for different ethnic groups, translating COVID-19 messaging to small ethnic language groups such as Kurdish, Syriac, Aramaic, and funding cultural performances at Hunters Plaza.

·    Programming in community places Ōtara-Papatoetoe (929): World of Cultures Festival was successfully delivered. The event also received additional external funding from both the Department of Internal Affairs and Foundation North.

·    Ngati Ōtara Park - develop multi-purpose facility and park (2453): Ngati Ōtara Multi-Purpose Facility completed after years of work and advocacy from the local board and community.

·    Local civic events Ōtara-Papatoetoe (943): Ngati Ōtara Multi-Purpose Facility opening event was successfully delivered and included speeches from both the local board Chair, Apulu Reece Autagavaia, and Mayor Phil Goff.

·    Community grants Ōtara-Papatoetoe (948): the board gave community groups and individuals $222,227.52 during this period, as well as allocating $51,000 to the Mayoral Relief Fund for residents who were affected by the Papatoetoe tornado.

·    Build Capacity: Community-led response to social concerns (859): the local board and community successfully opposed Hunters Corner Liquor application, which was denied in April. The community also held a protest and the local board objected to Thirsty Liquor Bairds Road at the hearing held on 1 July 2021. The outcome is still to be confirmed.

·    Revitalising town centres (854): Ōtara Music and Arts Centre (OMAC) delivered 27 programmes with 197 sessions to a combined total of 8,347 participants and attendees including a programme with Ōtara Pools and Leisure Centre that established a kaumatua social group to keep Māori seniors engaged and connected.

·    Papatoetoe Centennial Pool: Operations (106): there has been a 21 per cent increase in total active visits, compared to last financial year (131,192 vs 108,551). Fitness membership has gone up from 254 to 300, an 18 per cent increase. The NPS (customer satisfaction) score has increased 2 points to 48 per cent when compared to the same time last year, with a lot of positive feedback for the cleanliness of the facility, supportive staff, and friendliness.

·    Whai Pūmanawa Literacy - we support communities to thrive (Children and Youth) - Ōtara-Papatoetoe (1416): specialist Pasifika staff visited five classes at Papatoetoe Central School to talk about Tongan culture during Pasifika Month. In addition, ten classes from Papatoetoe West School visited with the brief for staff "to talk about the history of the library and how it's influencing the community in the future". Children are encouraged to actively engage with our local heritage and learn skills to take them into the future.

Overview of work programme performance

Arts, Community and Events work programme

15.     In the Arts, Community and Events work programme, there are 22 activities that were completed by the end of the year (green), two activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), and one activity that was cancelled in the period March to June 2021 (grey). Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 1: Arts, Community and Events activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Diverse Participation: Empower diverse communities (909)

Amber

In progress

A networking forum to provide an inclusive platform for culturally diverse community leaders to respond to community concerns and aspirations is to be held 30 September 2021.

Placemaking: Safe and resilient communities (916)

Amber

In progress

There have been delays in completing the survey and final economic recovery plan, which has led to delays in providing further safety recommendations. Survey results are expected to be presented to the board in quarter one of financial year 2022.

Diversity Festival (944)

Grey

Cancelled

The Diversity Festival was scheduled for delivery on Saturday 20 February at Hayman Park, Manukau, however, due to the COVID-19 alert level restriction for Auckland at the time, the event was cancelled. The next Diversity Festival is scheduled for 30 October 2021.

 

Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

16.     In the Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme, there are eight activities that were completed by the end of the year (green), one activity that is in progress but delayed (amber), and four activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red). Activities with significant impact are discussed below:


 

Table 2: Parks, Sport and Recreation activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

OP Learn to Ride (108)

Red

In progress

COVID-19 affected delivery as events could not be held. A workshop to make future recommendations for this programme will be held in August 2021.

OP: Ngahere (Urban Forest) Growing Programme (110)

Red

In progress

Delays in presenting the Ngahere Action Plan to the local board which has delayed the information to the local board on the annual planting plan.

Puhinui Reserve and Colin Dale Park service assessment (116)

Red

In progress

A hui was held in May. Staff will continue to partner with mana whenua to develop service outcomes, with a further hui scheduled in quarter one of the new financial year (21/22).

OP: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) tranche one (2248)

Red

In progress

Three further names received, and staff are now waiting on last 20 names of tranche one, expected in quarter one of 2021/2022.

Manukau Sports Bowl-inform a masterplan (112)

Amber

In progress

Staff to undertake analysis and prepare draft assessment for direction at a workshop in FY22.

 

Libraries work programme

17.     In the Libraries work programme, there are 10 activities that were completed by the end of the year (green).

Service Strategy and Integration work programme

18.     In the Service Strategy and Integration work programme, there are two activities (Investigate community need and demand in Papatoetoe recognising current provision and anticipated growth (1960) and Manukau Sports Bowl Master Plan (2328) that were completed by the end of the year (green).

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

19.     In the Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme, there are 48 activities that were completed by the end of the year (green), three activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), and one activity that was cancelled in the period March to June 2021 (grey). Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 3: Community Facilities activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Allan Brewster Recreation Centre - comprehensive renewal (2510)

Amber

In progress

Fire remediation works completed. All items except the stadium heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) have been completed and handed over. Next steps: Complete Stadium HVAC work.

Otara-Papatoetoe - Auckland Urban Forest (Ngahere) Strategy - Planting Plan (3126)

Amber

In progress

Programme has been placed on hold due to the funding restraints in the Emergency Budget from COVID-19, however funding is set to resume in financial year 2021/2022.

Colin Dale Park Development - undertake landowner’s works (Stage 2) (3232)

Amber

In progress

Final review of the resource consent application is being undertaken by the park user group. Once complete, the application will be lodged.

Papatoetoe Recreation Grounds - sports lighting and sportsfields upgrades (2731)

Grey

Cancelled

Cancelled because there was a new line created to reflect the Parks, Sports and Recreation Fund of $1.9M allocated to Papatoetoe Recreation Grounds - upgrade sports field surface, drainage and irrigation and lighting (30214) and the Growth funding that was allocated to this item has moved to East Tamaki Reserve (28543) to upgrade the sports fields to include sand carpets, irrigation and ancillary works.

 

Community Leases work programme

20.     In the Community Leases work programme, there are 19 activities that were completed by the end of the year (green).

Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme

21.     In the Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme, there are six activities that were completed by the end of the year (green) and one activity that is in progress but is delayed (amber). Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 4: Infrastructure and Environment Services activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

OPE Year Three: Sustainable Communities with Ōtara-Papatoetoe Enviroschools (1589)

Amber

In progress

Staff are requesting part of the budget to be carried forward to initiate Ōtara ope maara kai action during July to September 2021 to work around the availability of teachers and tutors. If granted, the carry-forward will also support a water collection system due to an issue with water supply.

 

Plans and Places work programme

22.     In the Plans and Places work programme, there is one activity (A review of parts of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu area plan and of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe area plan (1949), that was completed by the end of the year (green).

Auckland Unlimited work programme

23.     In the Auckland Unlimited work programme, there are three activities (Young Enterprise Scheme (OP) (1913), PopUp Business School South Auckland (OP) (1933), O-P: Business Growth Accelerator (2279) that were completed by the end of the year (green).

The Southern Initiative work programme

24.     In The Southern Initiative work programme, there is one activity (Youth Connections - O-P delivery reporting from 2019/20 (1976) that was completed by the end of the year (green).

Deferred activities

25.     The Lead Financial Advisors are identifying projects from the local board’s 2020/2021 Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operational budget which meet the criteria to be carried forward. These will be added to the work programme to be delivered in 2021/2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

27.     The local board invested in a number of projects which aim to restore biodiversity and improve water quality, as well as building awareness around individual carbon emissions and behavioural changes at a local level. These projects include: 

·    Manukau Harbour Forum (1816)

·    Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum (1545)

·    Ōtara Waterways and Lake Trust: Ōtara-Papatoetoe projects (1611)

·    OP: Ngahere (Urban Forest) Growing Programme FY21 (110)

·    OP: Ecological volunteers programme FY21 (113)

·    Event partnership fund – Eye on Nature (947)

·    Taonga tuku iho - Legacy - we preserve our past, ensure our future. (Environment) – Ōtara-Papatoetoe (1420)

·    OPE Year Three: Sustainable Communities with Ōtara-Papatoetoe Enviroschools (1589).

28.     Work programmes were approved in August 2020 and delivery is underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate change impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. Any changes to the timing of approved projects are unlikely to result in changes to emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     This report informs the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board of the performance for the period March to June 2021 and the performance for the 2020/2021 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     The local board is committed to working with, and alongside mana whenua and mataawaka to achieve significant outcomes for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe community.

32.     The local board’s work programme contains many projects which provide direct outcomes for Māori and Māori engagement, including:

·    Whakatipu i te reo Māori - we grow the Māori language Celebrating te ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori (1414)

·    Whai Pūmanawa Literacy - we support communities to thrive (Pre-school) - Ōtara-Papatoetoe (1415)

·    Puhinui Reserve and Colin Dale Park service assessment (116)

·    Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) tranche one (2248)

·    A review of parts of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu area plan and of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe area plan (1949)

·    Operational expenditure for Fresh Gallery Ōtara (Council facility) (852)

·    Māori Responsiveness (913) which includes the Increasing Māori Input into Local Board Decision-Making group project 2020-2021.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     This report is provided to enable the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2020/2021 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial performance

34.     Auckland Council (council) currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – on or about 30 September. Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to this report is excluded from the public. 

35.     Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the trimester report is under confidential cover.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Overview of work programme performance by department’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     Work programmes for 2021/2022 were approved at the board’s business meeting in June 2021.

38.     Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2021/2022 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board T3 work programme update

143

b

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board financial performace report - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Abbot - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021

File No.: CP2021/11191

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2020/2021 Annual Report for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 27 September 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2020/2021 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 27 September 2021. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market maintained by NZX Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA), local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the annual report is being presented as confidential and will be tabled at the meeting.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      adopt the draft 2020/2021 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A to be tabled at the meeting

b)      note that any proposed changes after the adoption will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body on 27 September 2021

c)      note that the draft 2020/2021 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Annual Report, as set out in Attachment A to the agenda report, will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2020/2021 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which are expected to be made public by 28 September 2021.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities and the overall funding impact statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of its local board plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       The annual report contains the following sections:

 

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi is an introduction specific to each local board area and is presented in Te Reo Māori and English.

About this report

An overview of what is covered in this document.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved. Includes the activity highlights and challenges.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Funding impact statement

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

7.       The council’s climate change disclosures are covered in volume four of the annual report and sections within the summary annual report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

10.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

11.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2020/2021 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during July and August 2021

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 27 September 2021

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 28 September 2021

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2021.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft 2020/2021 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Annual Report – Confidential – TO BE TABLED AT THE MEETING

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Faithe Smith - Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Mark Purdie - Manager Local Board Financial Advisors

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

26        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board for March to June 2021 - Attachment b - Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board financial performace report

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial information that have an impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2021 that require release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

27        Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021 - Attachment a - Draft 2020/2021 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Annual Report

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains t detailed financial information that have an impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2021 that require release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 



[1] Puhinui Reserve

[2] Puhinui freshwater report card

[3] Manukau marine report card

[4] Transform Manukau - Renewal of Manukau Central, Panuku 2016

[5] Manukau Framework Plan, Panuku 2017

 

[6] Water Sensitive Design for Stormwater, Auckland Council Guideline Document 2015/004

[7] Chapter E1, Policy 10

[8] Page 6 of Te Arawhiti Engagement Guidelines; Te Arawhiti is the Office for Maori Crown Relations.

[9] Te Arawhiti: Building Closer Partnerships with Maori: Principles

[10] In particular s5, s6 (e), s7 (a) and (aa) and s8.

[11] In particular s (3) (d), s14 (d) and (h), 77 (c), s81, s82 (2)

[12] Te Puni Kōkiri: Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi as Expressed by the Courts and the Waitangi Tribunal Wellington, 2002

[13] Auckland Prosperity Index Report 2020

[14] Population of Counties Manukau DHB

[15] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/03/GB_20210325_AGN_10148_AT_WEB.htm (Item 9, GB/2021/19)

[16] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_AGN_10145_AT_WEB.htm (Item 10, GB/2021/49)

[17] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_AGN_10145_AT_WEB.htm (Item 9, GB/2021/48)

[18] Freedom Camping Act; Litter Act; Resource Management Act; Fire and Emergency NZ Act; Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw; Auckland Council Traffic Bylaw; Auckland Transport Traffic Bylaw; Alcohol Control Bylaw; Dog Management Bylaw

[19] https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_MAT_10145_WEB.htm