I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōrākei Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 19 August 2021

3.00pm

St Chads Church and Community Centre
38 St Johns Road
Meadowbank

 

Ōrākei Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Mr Scott Milne, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Troy Elliott

 

Members

Troy Churton

 

 

Colin Davis, JP

 

 

Sarah Powrie

 

 

Margaret Voyce

 

 

David Wong, JP

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Kim Lawgun

Democracy Advisor

 

10 August 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 302 163

Email: Kim.lawgun@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     Public Forum - Laurence Carey - Waterbourne Beach Festival Event Proposal 5

9.2     Public Forum - Ross Harvey - Little Rangitoto Reserve                                  6

9.3     Public Forum - Youth of Ōrākei                                                                          6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Consultation on The Landing Pathways to the Sea concept plan refresh             9

12        Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021                                                                      47

13        Land owner approval for a new pathway in Vellenoweth Green, St Heliers         51

14        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Ōrākei Local Board for March to June 2021                                                                                                                               79

15        St Heliers Community Centre and Glendowie Hall Community Centre Management Agreements                                                                                                                123

16        Proposal to make a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw                           129

17        Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development                 239

18        Chairman and Board Member July 2021 report                                                     245

19        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      257

20        Ōrākei Local Board Workshop Proceedings                                                          263

21        Resolutions Pending Action report                                                                         273

22        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

23        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               279

12        Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021

a.      2020/2021 Ōrākei Local Board Annual Report                                              279

14        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Ōrākei Local Board for March to June 2021

b.      Operating Performance Financial Summary                                                 279


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the minutes of the Ōrākei Local Board meeting, held on Thursday, 15 July 2021, be confirmed as true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Part 13 of the Board’s Standing Orders provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōrākei Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Laurence Carey - Waterbourne Beach Festival Event Proposal

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the local board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Laurence Carey will be in attendance to present to the local board on the Waterbourne Beach Festival event proposal.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Laurence Carey for his attendance.

 

 

9.2       Public Forum - Ross Harvey - Little Rangitoto Reserve

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the local board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Ross Harvey will be in attendance to present to the local board on his concerns with bark chips blowing around Little Rangitoto Reserve Playground since the installation of the new inground timber edge on the safety surface.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Ross Harvey for his attendance.

 

 

9.3       Public Forum - Youth of Ōrākei

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the local board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Danica Loulie-Wijtenburg, Hien Tran, Doris Chen, Ashleigh Munapeyi and Ben MacSweeney will be in attendance to present to the local board on the Youth of Ōrākei’s progress and plans for this year.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Danica Loulie-Wijtenburg, Hien Tran, Doris Chen, Ashleigh Munapeyi and Ben MacSweeney for their attendance.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Consultation on The Landing Pathways to the Sea concept plan refresh 

File No.: CP2021/10105

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present feedback from stage one stakeholder engagement on The Landing Concept Plan Refresh and to confirm the process and material to be used for stage two public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A refresh of the Pathways to the Sea, the guiding document for future development at The Landing, forms part of the Ōrākei Local Board’s 2020-2021 work programme (sharepoint reference #1585 / resolution OR/2020/76).

3.       The need for this refresh is driven by significant growth demands from all incumbent stakeholders and a desire on the part of Auckland Council (AC) to realise some, or all, of the following outcomes:

·   Improved public access for both active and passive users of the site.

·   Stronger visual and physical connectivity through the site.

·   Development of a shared multipurpose space for gathering, events, boat set up etc.    

4.       The plan revision will work to create the right balance of outcomes at The Landing for those seeking water-based recreation on the harbour but also for those who want to enjoy the Tamaki Drive waterfront experience from dry land. The plan revision therefore aims to further enhance both the blue and green open space opportunities.

5.       The first phase of consultation with all stakeholders based at The Landing has now been completed and stakeholder feedback is summarised under ‘assessment findings’ (section 28) and more fully in Attachment A.

6.       The feedback has been used to inform three draft concept plan options (see Attachment B). The intent of consulting on these options is to identify services that are most cherished or desired, and to understand community support for degrees of change rather than present the most popular plan option for board approval. It’s possible that the final approved plan will combine design elements from all three plan options. 

7.       Option 1 provides for the undelivered outcomes identified in the Pathways to the Sea 2013 concept plan with some small changes that include the removal of the dinghy ramp located in the western corner of the site. The main element of this option is provision for the multi-sport paddling centre at the eastern end of the site, which is also carried through into options 2 and 3.

8.       Option 2 incorporates all aspects of option 1, but with a reduction in the footprint of the hardstand. This reduction allows for inclusion of a multi-use space along the top of the boat ramp for events, boat set up and improved pedestrian connectivity. 

9.       Option 3 represents ‘transformational change’ by creating a green park like environment at the heart of the site for multipurpose outcomes including passive recreation. This is achieved by removing the hard stand area and associated boat yard services.

10.     All changes have been made to address issues raised by stakeholders and deliver outcomes formalised by the board at a business meeting in April 2021 (see section 18).

11.     There is currently no budget allocated for delivery of any concept plan outcomes and all three plan options presented carry a high level of cost requiring internal and/or external funding. All building elements in the three plan options would require significant external partnership funding if they were to be built.

12.     Expectation will be raised by the consultation process and there is reputational risk involved should outcomes identified through the plan refresh fail to be funded and delivered. Risk is also linked to significant service level change at The Landing, including removal of the hardstand. This degree of change linked to a service that has been historically enjoyed is likely to be viewed negatively by associated users.  

13.     The local board is now being asked to approve, with any requested changes, the consultation material presented.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approve the three draft plan options presented in Attachment A for purposes of public consultation on The Landing 2013 plan (Pathways to the Sea) refresh project.

 

Horopaki

Context

14.     The Landing is a 3.2 hectare local park located on the edge of the Waitematā Harbour in close proximity to the city centre. It is held in fee simple by Auckland Council for recreation purposes and is subject to the Local Government Act 2002.

15.     Harbour facing open space is at a premium along Tāmaki Drive. The Landing represents the only open space in the general area that provides the range and extent of club and public facilities that support water-based recreation activities on the harbour (e.g. ramp, parking, toilets, storage areas and supporting buildings). These facilities enable the safe and accessible launching of motorised watercraft, sailing dinghies and numerous types of paddling craft for both clubs and the public.

16.     Plan outcomes and general improvements delivered at the site since 2013 include:

·   construction of the Hyundai Marine Sports Centre

·   installation of a second pontoon

·   additional dinghy storage areas

·   additional car parks.

17.     The most significant/notable 2013 plan outcomes (see Attachment E) that remain undelivered are predominantly at the eastern end of the site and include:

·   toilets/showers/changing rooms (#26)

·   AMSCT Operation Centre (#27)

·   multisport paddling centre (#28) providing for:

a.    Fergs Kayaks

b.    Auckland Canoe Club

c.    Hauraki Water Sports

d.    Ōrākei Water Sports

e.    Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Waka Centre.

 

18.     The refresh will consider the 2013 plan’s effectiveness in being able to address stakeholder issues and deliver on objectives approved at the April 2021 business meeting (OR/2021/45). These objectives, set out below, are a revision of those presented in the 2013 plan and have been established to ensure open space outcomes delivered by the plan refresh meet current and future (2021-2041) community plus regional needs:

·   Support opportunities to increase participation in water-based sport and recreation activities by maximising accessibility and public boat launching facilities.

·   Develop quality multipurpose park like open space that can accommodate events and passive recreation outcomes in order to increase the public’s enjoyment of The Landing.

·   Accommodate the various clubs and users of the site in an efficient way that supports their future development and growth.

·   Enhance The Landing as a destination for marine-related activities such as sailing, paddling and waka culture.

·   Improve visual and physical connections into and through the site and create a clear connection eastward through to Ōkahu Bay beach.

·   Acknowledge the significance of Ōkahu Bay to Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei.

19.     Yachting NZ has over several years expressed some interest in basing themselves at The Landing and plan option 3 accommodates a building / storage facility that could provide for additional users.

20.     An unsolicited proposal has also been lodged with council seeking access to the Landing for the purposes of operating a boutique electric ferry service from the southwest corner of The Landing to, and from, Waiheke Island. This electric ferry service has capacity to carry 35 vehicles and up to 150 passengers or cyclists. Because details, and therefore impacts, of this proposal have yet to be received it has not been included in any of the draft plan options prepared for consultation. The proposer has confirmed they will be providing their proposal in due course. 

Consultation process

21.     Consultation for the project has been broken down into stakeholder consultation (phase one) and public consultation (phase two) with Auckland Council partnering with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei on both these project phases.

22.     Stakeholder consultation, which included one to one meetings and a co-design workshop (25 May), has now been completed with the following entities:

·   Akarana Marine Sports Charitable Trust - AMSCT (including Auckland University High Performance Sports Coordinator)

·   Royal Akarana Yacht Club

·   Yachting NZ

·   Ōrākei Marina Management Trust

·   Fergs Kayaks

·   STF Ltd

·   Ōrākei Water Sports (Waka Ama) / Hauraki Water Sports Club (Waka Ama)

·   Ocean Blue Waka Ama

·   Waka NZ

·   Representative of mooring holders

·   The Harbourmaster (AT)

 

23.     The key issues identified from stakeholder feedback are summarised in ‘assessment findings’ below.

24.     Public consultation (phase two) shall start once draft plans to inform this process have been reviewed and approved by the local board.

25.     The three draft plan options proposed for consultation (Attachment B) have been developed in response to feedback given by Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei and stakeholders based at the site. Compared to the 2013 plan, they deliver degrees of change from minor (option 1) to transformational (option 3).

26.     With regard to consultation, the local board need to comply with decision-making requirements in section 78, part 6 of the Local Government Act 2002 (the LGA). This states that the council must, “in the course of its decision-making process …. give consideration to the views and preferences or persons likely to be affected by, or to have an interest in, the matter”.

27.     Consulting on multiple plan options is advised by staff on the basis that there should be open discussion on all potential outcomes and their impacts. Failure to seek feedback on degrees of change at the site limits the opportunities to consider all impacts of potential change before approving a ‘refreshed plan’. 

28.     Public consultation on approved draft options will be carried out in September / October 2021 and advertised on site and via the council’s website pages. A drop-in day will be held on site where interested parties can discuss the plan revision with staff and board members.

Stakeholder feedback

29.     A full list of themes and issues raised at the co-design workshop is attached (Appendix A) with the key feedback themes summarised as:

a.    Strong support for development at eastern end of site as per 2013 plan covering multi-sport paddling centre (#28), toilets / showers / changing rooms (#26) and dinghy Operation Centre (#27).

b.    Establish cultural, spiritual and environmental importance of Pokanoa Pt / The Landing to Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei and create a living presence (cultural design elements, storytelling, visual and physical connectivity).

c.    Increase storage capacity for all users.

d.    Create an events / gathering space and lift activation potential of site.

e.    Improve access and safety through site for all users (specifically pedestrians and vehicles). 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

30.     While stakeholders have shared many ideas as to how the site can be improved, there are also differences of opinion on what future site development should include. Views expressed through the public consultation process will likely be similar with the potential for some change elements to be polarising.

31.     The three plan options being tabled present a variety of outcomes and degrees of change that will give a good sense of what user and wider community aspirations are. All plan options improve pedestrian access through the site, but there are no design elements that improve the through flow of vehicles. Separating the vehicle entrance and exit to improve the through flow of traffic was considered as an additional design change but has not been included in any of the plan options due to what were considered to be relatively small gains. Nor has there been any attempt to increase car park capacity since space is at a premium and car park demand is generally met.   

32.     The most significant change option to the 2013 plan being tabled is the removal of the hardstand (boat yard) in option 3, resulting in the termination of a historic service that will impact on those boat owners (300 plus per year) who use this facility.

 

 

 

The Landing haul-out and hardstand services

33.     The Landing haul-out operation and associated hardstand use was assessed as part of the Pathways to the Sea 2013 concept planning process and continued need was identified then by the Ōrākei Local Board in order to:

·   Retain a haul-out and maintenance operation with an affordable “do it yourself” type flavour, supported by professional management of health and safety and Blue Flag accredited environmental management.

·   Meet the demand for haul-out and maintenance services for the existing and growing boat market.

·   Service the small boat owners mooring boats in the inner Waitematā Harbour.

·   Service the multi-hull boat market for haul-out, wash-down and maintenance services.

·   Support the services of the Harbour Master and provide emergency haul-out operations.

34.     The Harbour Master’s Office has confirmed, that while the emergency haul-out support provided at The Landing is extremely helpful, it is not critical to their operations so long as they can continue to use The Landing themselves for this activity.   

35.     A report (Auckland Haul Out and Hardstand Facilities Assessment 2021) funded by, and workshopped with, the board identified that the haul-out and hardstand provides a valued service to boat owners. Similar services are provided at commercial and club yards based throughout the region but with some of these services coming at a higher cost, less convenience, and reduced flexibility particularly around DIY maintenance practices. The Landing’s hardstand is iconic in many people’s minds and has existed for many years. 

36.     In 1996, ownership and administration of The Landing was transferred from the Ports of Auckland Limited to Auckland City Council. This included the boat hardstand that then occupied a site area of 13,400 m2, providing approximately 140 boat spaces. As part of site redevelopment in 2007/08 the footprint was reduced to its current consented area, providing for around 50 boats at any one time. This reduction was to enable other recreational uses within The Landing.

37.     The service provides for both long-term and short-term boat maintenance and operates close to capacity from September to December during the peak demand window. The long-term work taking between 3 to 14 weeks typically includes repainting, refits, fitting of imported new boats to suit local conditions, mechanical replacement, structural upgrades and damage repairs. Most of this type of work is scheduled during April to October. Short term routine haul outs typically take between 5 – 10 days to undertake with high demand during September to December in readiness for the summer boating season. Routine work typically includes survey inspections, antifoul, painting, engine and prop servicing and minor repairs.

38.     The shrinking of the operational footprint for the hardstand presented in plan option 2 may need to include a review of the service provided and potentially limit stays to short term routine maintenance. 

Plan options

39.     Decisions around the hardstand and the general set up for The Landing should be driven by provision for all relevant community activities and future needs in the context of the scarcity of parks close to the city centre that support blue and green recreation outcomes on the Waitematā Harbour. 

40.     Auckland’s coastline, harbours and rivers provide an ideal environment for a wide range of water sports including sailing, waka ama, kayaking, wind surfing and paddle boarding. However, supporting infrastructure such as parking and storage that makes access to the harbour easy, is limited.

41.     Three draft plan options have been prepared and staff recommend that all three go out for consultation, noting that the board have the option of consulting on amended and, or a reduced number of options.

42.     All three plan options include removal of the three buildings located within the eastern half of the site; these are commonly referred to as the Auckland Sailing Club building currently occupied by AMSCT, the Pokanoa Point toilet building occupied by Fergs Kayaks plus AMSCT and the building at the far end of the site which is leased to Fergs Kayaks. Plan options 1 and 2 do not provide replacement storage areas for AMSCT but do provide for Fergs Kayaks commercial activity (or alternative operator) on a reduced footprint. Option 3 with the new multi-use building facility fully replaces all current storage provided within the existing buildings.    

43.     Plan option 1 looks to deliver nearly all outcomes of the 2013 plan that have not been progressed to date, but with the following changes:

·   relocation of secure dinghy storage to location #22

·   removal of travel lift (no-longer required for haul out operations)

·   removal of the proposed dinghy ramp providing improved access to yacht moorings.

44.     The 2013 concept plan provided for a new dinghy ramp in the western corner of the site. The benefit of this ramp, given its location, is generally only going to benefit mooring holders. To assess the level of need, mooring owners were surveyed in 2019 and out of a total of 128 licenced mooring sites, 53 responses were received. While the majority of these respondents (93%) supported a new dinghy ramp, as provided for in the 2013 plan, the project was deferred in 2019 on the basis that the cost of installation was hard to justify given the low projected levels of use and other existing alternative launch sites.

45.     All three draft plan options no longer provide a new ramp as per the 2013 plan, meaning that the launching of dinghies is either via the main ramp at the Landing (which adds approximately 200m/300m to the average trip to moorings when compared with the 2013 plan dinghy ramp location) or via the public boat ramps at Hakumau Reserve. The only alternative launching site is from pier A at Ōrākei Marina (#5 on plan option 1) which is currently width restricted to kayak access only during daylight hours. 

46.     The use of pier A for the launching of dinghies could be improved but requires the widening of the security gate (proposed at council’s cost) positioned at the top of the pier and is subject to approval from the Ōrākei Marina Trust. Negotiation would be entered into with the marina if the option was well supported through the public consultation process but there are no guarantees improved access can be secured, with the Ōrākei Marina Trust looking for improved easement agreement terms at The Landing.

47.     Option 2 creates open space for events, boat set up and general recreation outcomes at the top of the boat ramp (#18) by reducing the footprint of the hardstand by approximately 36% and relocating the secure dinghy storage area (#10).

48.     The drafting of the 2013 plan considered the footprint of the hard stand. The decision to retain the pre 2013 footprint was made on the basis that this was the minimum space required to maintain a ‘self-funding’ service. The effect of shrinking the hardstand footprint reduces its operational capacity with both impacts on levels of service to customers and income generated for council. The local board would need to meet any shortfall in lost income in this instance. 

49.     Option 3 represents ‘transformational change’ through removal of the hardstand and delivery of a:              

·   Large ‘park like’ green multipurpose gathering and events space in the middle of the site (#10).

·   Greener and more inviting eastern entrance (#22) achieved by moving building elements linked to the multi-sport paddling centre (canoeing, operations centre and commercial / concessions) into the new multi-use building (#5).  

·   ‘Safe harbour’ concept with short length of sea wall (approximately 46 metres) to protect the water immediately in front of the Hyundai Marine Sports Centre with benefits particularly for novices and persons with disabilities (#9).

·   Multi-purpose building/storage facility along the southern Tamaki Drive boundary of the site (#5).

·   Elevated feature walkway (#2) over the proposed multi-purpose building that provides opportunity, through design and vantage points, to celebrate the culture, heritage, recreation and environmental significance of the site and surrounding area.

50.     There are multiple variations on the plan versions presented, with the intent at this stage to consider activity and spatial arrangements that address the issues / opportunities identified through stakeholder consultation and that deliver on the board objectives set out in section 18 of this memo.

51.     While option 3 represents the costliest option, all come at a high price. Budget to deliver  built elements is likely to be required from both internal (i.e. Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund / LTP budgets) and external sources. If provision gaps in, for instance, paddling sports are identified then charitable funding applications could be made through Sport NZ for the multi-sport paddling centre.

52.     Finance could also be bought in by a third party, such as Yachting NZ, who are currently looking to fund a building that would meet their own need for a new centralised operations centre. While none of the presented draft plan options specifically accommodate Yachting NZ, element #5 (multi-purpose building) in plan option 3 represents a footprint within which Yachting NZ could potentially build a facility.

53.     The building footprint is split into three areas and provides approximately 2200 m2 floor space that could meet Yachting NZ’s storage / workshop needs (1000 m2) plus an additional 1200 m2 for stakeholder storage and commercial activity. If required, this footprint could be shrunk to lessen the visual impacts.

54.     There are no guarantees that funding bids or agreements with external entities to deliver the built elements in all three design options will be successful.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

55.     The Ōrākei coastline is characterised by a sequence of bays and headlands with streams flowing from the higher inland areas through eroded valleys to the sea. The northern beaches are subject to the negative effects of stormwater and storm-surge (scouring and sand loss) from the Hauraki Gulf.

56.     Changes to the Pathways to the Sea Concept Plan for The Landing (2013) needs to factor in sea level rise and impacts on greenhouse gas emissions. More vehicle visitation to the site is likely to arise from further development but this is not thought to be to any significant extent. Parking provision at the site remains at current levels in plan options 1 and 2 and is slightly reduced in option 3. With active transport improvements currently being delivered on Tamaki Drive, and across other areas of the city, increased visitation is unlikely to result in a commensurate rise in greenhouse gas emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

57.     Community Facilities and Parks, Sports and Recreation staff are working together to ensure that service agreements, leases, licences and maintenance contracts at The Landing align with any approved plan changes. Additional departments whose views have been sought for the purposes of the plan refresh include Auckland Transport, Healthy Waters and the Coast Management Team within Infrastructure and Environmental Services.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

58.     The Ōrākei Local Board has funded the 2013 concept plan refresh through their 2020-2021 work programme and the board resolved (OR/2021/45) at the April 2021 business meeting to:

approve the initiation of the two-phase consultation as recommended in

paragraph 6 of the Executive summary in the agenda report on The Pathways to

the Sea Concept Plan for The Landing (2013) refresh.

 

59.     The project aligns with outcome two of the Ōrākei Local Board Plan 2020:

Our land, forests, waterways and marine environment are protected, restored and enhanced - Our area is a great place to live because of its natural features. These need to be treasured, especially as the area intensifies, so we will do even more to enhance our environment, restore its wairua and recognise its importance to the well-being of our people.

60.     The local board has requested that the refresh of the 2013 plan is fully informed by a consultation process and no board decisions will be made until consultation feedback has been provided to the board.

61.     All potential plan change decisions need to be considered in the context of impacts on service levels to the customer. Thorough consultation will allow the board to make a well-informed decision regarding any plan changes.

62.     Connected projects include creating a development plan for Hakumau Reserve (3-5 Tamaki Drive) and negotiating a new lease agreement with the Outboard Boating Club (OBC) for the eastern half of the same site. A lease agreement with OBC is being undertaken, in part, to improve access to the two ramps designated for ‘public use’ and which could benefit mooring holders who currently access moorings predominantly via the main ramp at The Landing.    

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

63.     Te Tiriti o Waitangi recognises the rangatiratanga of Auckland's hapū and iwi, and the inseparable bond between Tāmaki Makaurau the people and Tāmaki Makaurau the place. Local boards play a vital role in representing the interests of all Aucklanders and the Ōrākei Local Board is committed to its Treaty-based obligations and Māori participation and development.

64.     The following iwi were informed of this project and asked if they had an interest in the site:

·   Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

·   Ngāti Maru

·   Ngāti Pāoa

·   Ngāti Tamaoho

·   Ngāti Tamaterā

·   Ngāti Te Ata

·   Ngāti Whanaunga

·   Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

·   Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

·   Ngāti Whātua

·   Te Akiwaru-Waiohua

·   Te Ākitai Waiohua

·   Te Kawerau ā Maki

·   Te Patukirikiri

·   Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua

·   Waikato-Tainui

 

65.     Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei were the only iwi to request that the council partner with them on this project. Three meetings have been held with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei representatives and the council, including one workshop with the Ōrākei Local Board held on 18th May 2021.

66.     At these meetings Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei articulated the importance that the plan refresh addresses the following outcomes/priorities:

·   acknowledge the significance of Ōkahu Bay to Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei 

·   support physical and visual connections between The Landing and Ōkahu Bay 

·   develop the multi-sports paddling centre as a priority 

·   future proof against sea level rise

·   re-establish a Ngāti Whātua living presence through Ōkahu Bay (including The Landing) by means of design and outcomes that improve the environmental state of the bay

·   provide information/representation of how the bay functions as an ecological entity

·   recognise voyaging stories - waka Māhuhu-ki-te-rangi; Hobson’s arrival to Ōkahu Bay

·   better utilise the hardstand area

·   connect with the Glen Innes to Ōkahu Bay shared pathway

·   recognise and link with blue green connections in Pourewa Valley

·   meet the needs of an ethnically and demographically diverse community.

67.     Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei were involved in the development of the 2013 concept plan for The Landing and the key outcomes articulated above have been used to inform the three draft plan options presented for the 2021 plan refresh. These plans have been workshopped with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, who support the draft plan options being used for public consultation purposes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

68.     The Ōrākei Local Board has allocated $40,000 from their 2020-2021 operational budget to undertake the plan refresh.

69.     All three plan options presented come with significant financial implications. The removal of the three buildings in the eastern half of the site would generate capex budgets for replacement buildings but noting these are likely to represent a part contribution only to overall building costs, of for instance, the multi-sport paddling centre.  

70.     Plan options 1 and 2 require similar levels of funding, with costs largely linked to the build of the multi-sport paddling centre. Option 2 however presents a reduction in the size of the hardstand resulting in a loss of income generated by the associated service (boat haul-out plus temporary storage to enable boat maintenance, servicing and fit-out) with charges to the customer either having to rise and, or the board having to meet the shortfall in lost income through their own discretionary budgets.

71.     Revenue targets for The Landing have been budgeted for in the remaining years of the LTP and are planned for from FY22-FY31. Any changes implemented by the local board that result in a change to these targets will need to be met by the decision maker (the local board).

72.     Plan option 3 is transformational and significant cost is associated with all the key elements of the plan including an upgraded multi-sport paddling centre, a safe harbour concept and a multi-use building for storage/administrative space.

73.     With regard to the complete removal of the hardstand service in option 3, the finance implications for the local board are largely regarded as cost neutral since the cost of the service agreement with STF Ltd (the operator of the hardstand facility) has mostly been offset by the income generated by the service. However, the current service agreement with STF Ltd covers some general site maintenance including ramp cleaning, pontoon repairs, sweeping, weed control and managing the secure dinghy lockers. Budget would need to be secured from board discretionary operational funds to cover these general site maintenance and administrative tasks should the current service agreement be ended.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

74.     Failing to consult meaningfully and failing to consider the needs of those who use, or who have an interest in, The Landing could lead to a judicial review request being lodged with the High Court. This is mitigated by undertaking public consultation and considering all impacts of potential change before approving plan changes. 

75.     There is currently no budget allocated for delivery of any of the concept plan outcomes and all three plan options presented carry a high level of cost requiring internal and, or external funding. Expectation will be raised by the consultation process and there is reputational risk involved should some, or all, outcomes identified through the plan refresh fail to be funded and delivered.

76.     Risk is also linked to any significant service level change at The Landing, such as removal of the hardstand operation. The impacts, should the haul-out and hardstand be removed, will be significant for current users of the service (300 plus per year). Impacts include higher costs plus less convenience and flexibility particularly for DIY boat owners.

77.     A copy of a letter from the New Zealand Marina Operators Association (NZMOA) dated October 2018 (Attachment C) refers to the importance of the haul-out and hardstand services provided at The Landing and a concern that hard stand facilities across the Auckland Region are failing to keep up with demand. The NZMOA letter also alludes to the high environmental standards applied to STF’s operation (including Blue Flag accreditation) and lower standards being applied at club facilities, noting that clubs across Auckland provide approximately 24% of hardstand capacity in terms of land area.

78.     Clean Below, Good to Go is an initiative promoted by a collective of councils (including AC) and government organisations to stop the spread of invasive marine pests and weeds in NZ waters. It encourages the cleaning of hulls, which is best done out of water and at facilities where fouling material is safely collected. It could be argued that removing the haul-out and hardstand service makes it harder for boat owners to undertake hull maintenance and encourages DIY owners to utilise club facilities where controls around run off are looser than at The Landing. It may also result in a few owners cleaning boat hulls in the waters of the harbour.

79.     Counter to this argument is the fact that many boat owners displaced from The Landing are likely to, due to capacity issues at club run facilities, use commercial operators where infrastructure and operational standards will be comparable to The Landing. It is understood commercial hardstands in the Auckland region generally have capacity to pick up additional custom, at least outside of peak demand from September to December. However, there are no guarantees around what the marketplace will provide in the future, with the owners of two Auckland hard stand operations currently considering the sale of their respective businesses.  

80.     In addition to impacts on customers and environmental impacts, closure of the hardstand at The Landing could also affect a number of independent boat industry operators (i.e. trades people who service, maintain and fit out boats). Close to 600 businesses are registered to work within The Landing although the frequency or extent of use is unknown. A 2018 letter from the NZ Marine Association (Attachment D) highlights the importance of the hardstand in this regard.  

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

81.     Public consultation will be carried out in September / October 2021 and the findings from the consultation will be used to inform board decisions on the final plan version to be presented and adopted at a future business meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Stakeholder Feedback

21

b

Draft plan options for consultation

25

c

Marina Operators Association letter

31

d

NZ Marine Industry Association letter

33

e

Pathways to the Sea concept plan 2013

45

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

David Barker - Parks and Places Team Leader

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

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19 August 2021

 

 







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19 August 2021

 

 

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19 August 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021

File No.: CP2021/11222

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2020/2021 Annual Report for the Ōrākei Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 27 September 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2020/2021 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 27 September 2021. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market maintained by NZX Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA), local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      adopt the draft 2020/2021 Ōrākei Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A to the agenda report.

b)      note that any proposed changes after the adoption will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body on 27 September 2021.

c)      note that the draft 2020/2021 Ōrākei Local Board Annual Report, as set out in Attachment A to the agenda report, will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2020/2021 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which are expected to be made public by 28 September 2021.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities and the overall funding impact statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, the local board annual report is an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

6.       The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi is an introduction specific to each local board area and is presented in Te Reo Māori and English.

About this report

An overview of what is covered in this document.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved. Includes the activity highlights and challenges.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Funding impact statement

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

8.       The council’s climate change disclosures are covered in volume four of the annual report and sections within the summary annual report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

9.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

10.     Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

11.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

12.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

13.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2020/2021 Annual Report for the local board are:

·   Audit NZ review during July and August 2021

·   report to the Governing Body for adoption on 27 September 2021

·   release to stock exchanges and publication online on 28 September 2021

·   physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2020/2021 Ōrākei Local Board Annual Report - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Audrey Gan - Lead Financial Advisor Local Boards

Authorisers

Mark Purdie - Lead Financial Advisor

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Land owner approval for a new pathway in Vellenoweth Green, St Heliers

File No.: CP2021/11539

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Ōrākei Local Board for the land owner approval application from Auckland Transport for the construction of a new pathway within the Vellenoweth Green, St Heliers.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The applicant, Auckland Transport, has applied for land owner approval for the construction of a new pathway within the Vellenoweth Green, St Heliers. The pathway is required to improve pedestrian access and mobility along Tamaki Drive.

3.       The path will be an at-grade permeable pathway with LED up-lights located on the northern side of the path.

4.       The proposal is consistent with the Ōrākei Local Board Plan 2020, the St Heliers Bay Reserve/Vellenoweth Green Management Plan and the Auckland City Council (St Heliers Bay Reserve) Act 1995.

5.       The applicant carried out targeted engagement within a selected catchment area in the vicinity of the Vellenoweth Green to seek feedback from local businesses and residents on the proposal. In total, 87 per cent of 141 respondents supported the proposal. 

6.       Staff recommend that the Ōrākei Local Board approve the application as the proposed pathway will provide a safe and improved route for pedestrians along Tamaki Drive.

7.       If the Ōrākei Local Board supports the recommendation, staff will compile a land owner approval letter with associated conditions, allowing the applicant to proceed with the proposal.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approve the application from Auckland Transport for the construction of a new at grade permeable pathway with LED up-lights within the Vellenoweth Green, St Heliers. 

 

Horopaki

Context

Proposal

8.       The applicant, Auckland Transport, is requesting land owner approval for the establishment of a pathway within the Vellenoweth Green.

9.       The pathway is proposed to be located around the Moreton Bay Fig trees to improve pedestrian access/mobility around the base of the trees. The existing path within the road reserve has been raised by tree root growth and has become a health and safety hazard.

10.     The aim of the pathway is to provide a safe and practical solution for people and wheeled vehicles such as prams, mobility scooters and wheelchairs to move along the southern side of Tamaki Drive on the approach to the St Heliers Village.

11.     The proposed path will be a two-metre wide permeable path (PermeTek product or similar).

12.     PermeTek is porous paving that is anti-slip and suitable for wheeled vehicles and does not cause damage to tree roots as they grow.

13.     Consideration is being given to closing the existing footpath. The applicant is currently reviewing options on how to address the existing footpath and will report separately on this. The selected option will consider safety and accessibility for people utilizing the adjacent parking and walking towards St Heliers village or the beach area. 

14.     Works are proposed within the rootzone of the Moreton Bay Fig trees. The applicant submitted an arboriculture report with the land owner approval application and best arboriculture practice will be implemented throughout the duration of the works to ensure there are no adverse effects on the trees.

15.     Lighting in the form of LED up-lights is proposed to be located on the northern side of the pathway at 5-metre intervals.

16.     The pathway and lighting are shown in Attachment A.

Strategic and legislative alignment

17.     The proposal is consistent with the following documents:

Ōrākei Local Board Plan 2020

18.     The proposal aligns with Outcome 3: All parks and open space areas are attractive and well-used places for both active and passive recreation and Outcome 4: Our transport infrastructure is efficient and connected, enabling people to move around safely and effectively using a range of options. This is because the proposal will improve the footpath connection in the vicinity of the Vellenoweth Green and allow the safe movement of people through the area, without adversely affecting the amenity values and use of the Vellenoweth Green.

St Heliers Reserve Bay Reserve/Vellenoweth Green Management Plan

19.     The aim of the management plan is to protect and enhance the informal open space character of the Vellenoweth Green. The proposal is consistent with this as the proposal will not adversely affect the character of the reserve given its low impact design and location in the northern part of the Vellenoweth Green, and will also help to increase informal activity within the reserve through the provision of the pathway.

Auckland City Council (St Heliers Bay Reserve) Act 1995

20.     The proposal aligns with the St Heliers Bay Reserve Act 1995 (the Act) as the Act does not restrict or prohibit the construction of a pathway within the Vellenoweth Green. The proposed pathway is also consistent with the Reserves Act 1977 recreation reserve classification status by continuing to provide areas for recreation and the physical welfare and enjoyment of the public. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Specialist input

21.     The following council specialists have reviewed and support the proposal:

·   parks and places specialist

·   facilities manager

·   senior urban forest specialist.

Options considered

The applicant considered a number of options and alternatives to address the safety concerns the existing footpath presents. These options are briefly described below:

Do nothing

22.     This option is to have no path within the Vellenoweth Green and no crossing on Tamaki Drive near The Parade, with the existing footpath under the Moreton Bay fig trees being left in its current state. This option was considered however due to the health and safety risks associated with the existing footpath, it is considered unacceptable to leave the footpath under the Moreton Bay fig trees in its current state.

Retain refuge crossing on Tamaki Drive just east of The Parade / new crossing west of The Parade

23.     This option is to have no path within the Vellenoweth Green and to either retain the pedestrian crossing on Tamaki Drive just east of The Parade or install a new pedestrian crossing on Tamaki Drive west of The Parade. This option would have no impact on the Vellenoweth Green however requires the loss of several car parking spaces on Tamaki Drive to allow for the provision of a crossing facility.

Boardwalk

24.     This option is to have a raised timber boardwalk within the Vellenoweth Green from Tamaki Drive. This avoided any potential damage to the Moreton Bay Fig trees as the boardwalk posts could be built around the tree roots and the boardwalk would be raised however it would result in a visual change to the Vellenoweth Green.

Concrete path

25.     This option is to have an at grade concrete/asphalt path in the park. This would have less of an impact on the Vellenoweth Green (due to it being at grade) however, the path needs to be constructed on top of the tree roots which may result in future path damage/trips due to root growth.

Gravel path

26.     This option is to have an at grade gravel path in the park. As with the concrete path, this would have less of an impact on the Vellenoweth Green however, would need to be constructed on top of tree roots and would require a higher level of maintenance (due to the path being gravel).

Boardwalk at existing footpath or boardwalk at existing kerbside parking

27.     This option is to have a boardwalk in front of the Moreton Bay Fig trees continuing on from the existing footpath along Tamaki Drive (i.e. outside of the park). This would have no impact on the Vellenoweth Green and would result in a continuous path on the southern side of Tamaki Drive however, would need to constructed on top of tree roots and the design of the boardwalk would require the removal of 13 kerbside car parking spaces along Tamaki Drive.

Permeable paving at existing footpath

28.     This option is to have a permeable path continuing on from the existing footpath. This would have no impact on the Vellenoweth Green and would result in a continuous path on the southern side of Tamaki Drive however, would need to be constructed on top of tree roots and would potentially result in safety concerns for wheel chair and mobility scooter users.

Permeable pathway through Vellenoweth Green

29.     This option is to have a permeable pathway (PermeTek product or similar) located around the Moreton Bay Fig trees. This would result in a path within the Vellenoweth Green however, would not result in any adverse effects on trees, has less visual amenity effects (being at-grade) and is a permeable path suitable for pedestrians and people who are mobility restricted (e.g., in wheelchairs).

Preferred option

30.     The preferred and recommended option is the permeable pathway option. This is the preferred option for the following reasons:

·   the pathway will be porous, anti-slip and suitable for wheeled vehicles

·   the pathway will not cause damage to the Moreton Bay Fig trees as they grow

·   the pathway provides a safe route for pedestrians along the southern side of Tamaki Drive

·   the pathway will not adversely affect access to or use of the Vellenoweth Green

·   the pathway will be at grade and of a permeable materiality therefore visual amenity effects on the Vellenoweth Green will be mitigated

·   the pathway is consistent with the Ōrākei Local Board Plan 2020, the St Heliers Reserve Bay Reserve/Vellenoweth Green Management Plan and the Auckland City Council (St Heliers Bay Reserve) Act 1995.

·   council specialists have reviewed and support the proposal.

31.     If the Ōrākei Local Board approves the application and the preferred option, the applicant will be granted land owner approval to construct the pathway within the Vellenoweth Green. 

32.     If the local board declines the application, the applicant will not be able to construct the pathway and the alternative options within the road reserve will need to be further explored.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

33.     The proposed pathway will have a positive impact on climate and greenhouse gas emissions as it will encourage walking in the area as a result of improved accessibility along the southern side of Tamaki Drive. Furthermore, the proposal will not result in any adverse recreational effects on the Vellenoweth Green and will continue to encourage and promote healthy, low impact lifestyles. 

34.     The proposed pathway will be a permeteq, porous pathway that will be sensitive to the surrounding environment, in particular by allowing for the continued undamaged growth of the Moreton Bay Fig trees.

35.     The proposed pathway is located within a flood plain however as the path is a porous path, any surface/flood water will be able to flow unobstructed through and across the path.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.     The application and its effects have been assessed by a number of technical experts on behalf of both the applicant and the council. These areas of expertise include arboriculture, parks strategy and operational maintenance. 

37.     No other council groups are affected by the proposal beyond those consulted with.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.       At its June 2021 business meeting, the Ōrākei Local Board considered a report from the applicant on options for resolving the health and safety issues posed by the uneven footpath on the southern side of Tamaki Drive near the Vellenoweth Green.

39.     After considering the options, the local board requested that the applicant undertake engagement with nearby residents and businesses on the proposed pathway.

40.     Residents and businesses in the target area were shown plans and a rendition of what the proposed pathway might look like, complete with lighting, as well as alternative options considered.

41.     During the engagement, 141 people (44 businesses and 97 residents) were spoken to on the proposed pathway, with 87 per cent supporting the proposed pathway.

42.     The summary engagement report (completed by the applicant) is attached as Attachment B. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

43.     The proposed pathway will have a positive impact on Māori by encouraging and promoting healthy, low impact lifestyles without adversely affecting the recreational values associated with the Vellenoweth Green. This assists in demonstrating the council’s commitment to Māori by helping to advance Māori social, cultural and environmental wellbeing.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

44.     The construction, ownership and ongoing maintenance of the proposed pathway will be the responsibility of the applicant.

45.     There will be no financial cost to the local board for the proposal.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

46.     There are no significant risks to the council associated with the proposal and associated recommendation as strategically the proposal meets the council’s direction.

47.     The PermeTek product (or similar) proposed to be used for the pathway has a lifespan of 3 -5 years before it will need to be replaced. Any maintenance or replacement of the product, and the associated cost to undertake this, will be the responsibility of the applicant.

48.     Any regulatory matters will be completed through the resource consenting process.

49.     If the status quo was to be maintained (i.e. the local board declines the proposal), safe recreational connections along Tamaki Drive in the vicinity of the Vellenoweth Green may not be met. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

50.     If the local board approves the proposal, the applicant will receive land owner approval for the construction of a proposed permeable pathway (PermeTek product or similar) and LED lighting within the Vellenoweth Green. A land owner approval letter will be issued to the applicant with conditions that will mitigate any potential adverse effects on the park.

51.     If the local board declines the application, the pathway proposed will not be able to proceed and land owner approval will not be granted.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Pathway plan

57

b

Engagement report

59

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Darren Cunningham - Senior Land Use Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - Acting General Manager Community Facilities

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

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19 August 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Ōrākei Local Board for March to June 2021

File No.: CP2021/11859

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board with an integrated performance report for March to June 2021 and the overall performance for the financial year against the approved 2020/2021 local board work programmes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       This report provides an integrated view of performance for the Ōrākei Local Board and includes financial performance and delivery against work programmes for the 2020/2021 financial year.

2.       61 activities within the agreed work programmes were delivered including multi-year projects that have progressed as expected. Six activities were undelivered, cancelled, put on hold or deferred. Details of these are in the work programme update document (Attachment A).

3.       Key activity achievements from the 2020/2021 work programme include:

·   Community centres and libraries were well attended since the COVID-19 lockdowns

·   The completion of Selwyn Reserve toilets and changing rooms (3219) scheduled to open to the public by 19 July 2021.

·   Placemaking initiatives delivered in Ellerslie and Mission Bay.

·   The Eastern Bays Songbird Initiative (1767) which has resulted in the removal of 2,500 rats and more than 700 possums from the project zone.

·   Progress made in the programme management of the Pourewa Valley Integrated Plan (1932) with the establishment of a guardians group, Terms of Reference and a suggested governance structure.

·   The completion of lighting and signage renewals in the board area (lighting at Michaels Ave and St. Heliers beachfront boardwalk 3212 & 3352, signage at The Landing 2416 & 2485).

·   Feeder links to Ōrākei shared path (2497) largely completed with the last portion on hold until further construction from Waka Kotahi NZTA.

·   Ten ecological restoration projects are on track and will continue through the 2021/2022 Community Facilities work programme.

4.       Key activities not delivered / not progressed as expected include:

·   Hobson Bay walkway – Shore Road Reserve to Wilsons Beach stage 2 design and consent (2683)

·   Hakumau Reserve Concept Plan (1586)

·   The Landing Concept Plan refresh (1585)

·   Ōrākei local parks services assessment (2343)

5.       Qualifying budgets of unfinished activities will be carried forward into 2020/2021 work programmes.

6.       The financial performance report is attached but is excluded from the public. This is due to restrictions on releasing annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the New Zealand Exchange on or about 30 September 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for March to June 2021.

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group results for 2020/2021 are released to the New Zealand’s Exchange (NZX) which are expected to be made public on or about 30 September 2021.

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Emergency Budget was adopted on 30 July 2020. The Ōrākei Local Board approved 2020/2021 work programmes for the following operating departments at their August 2020 business meeting:

·   Arts, Community and Events

·   Parks, Sport and Recreation

·   Libraries and Information

·   Community Services: Service, Strategy and Integration; (Now part of Connected Communities department)

·   Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

·   Community Leases

·   Infrastructure and Environmental Services.

8.       As the work programmes were adopted two month later than normal due to effects of COVID-19, there has been a reduced timeframe to deliver these work programmes (10 months).

9.       Since the work programmes were approved the Customer and Communities Services directorate has been restructured. Two new departments were created - Connected Communities and Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships, and the Southern Initiative and Western Initiative moved into the directorate as a new department - Community and Social Innovation. Units from the previous departments Arts, Community and Events; Libraries and Information; and Service, Strategy and Integration were incorporated into the three new departments. The table below shows the distribution

Table 1: Changes to Departments in Customer and Communities Services directorate

Previous Department - Unit

Current Department - Unit

Arts, Community and Events - Community Places

Connected Communities – Community Places

Arts, Community and Events - Community Empowerment

Connected Communities – Community Empowerment

Arts, Community and Events - Community Empowerment (Youth)

Community and Social Innovation – Youth Empowerment

Arts, Community and Events - Arts & Culture

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Arts & Culture

Arts, Community and Events - Events

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Events

Service, Strategy and Integration

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Service and Asset Planning

Libraries

Connected Communities – Libraries

The Southern Initiative

Community and Social Innovation – The Southern Initiative

The Western Initiative

Community and Social Innovation – The Western Initiative

 

10.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet 2017 Ōrākei Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: work programme activities by outcome

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

11.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that have been delivered as expected or multi-year activities which have progressed as planned (green), activities that are in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that are undelivered or have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work Programme by RAG status

12.     Graph 3 below shows the activity status of activities in each department’s the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: work programme activity by activity status and department

Key activity achievements from the 2020/2021 work programme

13.     The key achievements in the delivery of the local board work programmes for 2020/2021 include:

·   The completion of Selwyn Reserve toilets and changing rooms (3219), scheduled to open to the public by 19 July 2021.

·   Placemaking initiatives were delivered in Ellerslie and Mission Bay.

·   The Eastern Bays Songbird Initiative (1767) which has resulted in the removal of 2,500 rats and more than 700 possums from the project zone.

·   Progress made in the programme management of the Pourewa Valley Integrated Plan (1932) with the establishment of a guardians group, Terms of Reference and a suggested governance structure.

·   The completion of lighting and signage renewals in the board area (lighting at Michaels Ave and St. Heliers beachfront boardwalk (3212 & 3352), and signage at The Landing (2416 & 2485).

·   Feeder links to Ōrākei shared path (2497) are largely completed with the last portion on hold until further construction from Waka Kotahi NZTA.

·   Community centres and libraries have been well attended since the COVID-19 lockdowns

·   Ten ecological restoration projects are on track and will continue through the 2021/2022 Community Facilities work programme.

Overview of work programme performance

Arts, Community and Events work programme

14.     In the Arts, Community and Events work programme, 18 activities were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green) and one activity was cancelled. This was Movies in Parks (850) due to COVID-19 restrictions at alert level two.

15.     The following events were delivered: Citizenship ceremonies (845), Anzac services (846), local civic events (847) and the Carols on the Green Christmas event (849).

16.     Placemaking projects in the Ōrākei Local Board area (836) included contracting a local resident, and engaging other local residents, businesses and community groups to beautify the Kupe Street / Kepa Road shops’ carpark. The Ellerslie Business Association completed activations such as markets and a community day in the Ellerslie Town Centre. Improving community safety featured as a part of placemaking in Mission Bay with the Selwyn Reserve Safety Project resulting in the completion a lighting, signage and activations review. A report concluding the findings and recommendations will be presented to the board in quarter three.

17.     Access to community places (841): During quarter three, venues were closed during the lockdown in the first week of March. However, compared to the previous quarter, participant numbers have increased by 16 per cent and booking hours have increased by 20 per cent.

18.     88 per cent of hirers would recommend the venues they have visited in the Ōrākei Local Board. The top two activity types were art/cultural events and religious.

19.     A total of $151,497 was allocated across the whole year as part of the community grants programme.

20.     A total of seven community leases were granted at the end of FY 2020/2021.

Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

21.     In the Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme, there are nine activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green), six activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), and three activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red). Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

22.     Funding for the Pourewa Valley Integrated Plan (2243) and Ōrākei Basin Monitoring and Implementing Action Plan (2244) was carried forward from the previous financial year and have both been completed.

23.     Programme management of the Pourewa Valley Integrated Plan (1932) is progressing with the establishment of a guardians group (made up of representative of wider stakeholders), Terms of Reference and a suggested governance structure. Further progress on the project hinges on the appointment of a field officer and the results of a wayfinding investigation. The findings will be discussed with the local board in September 2021.

24.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as delayed:

i)        The Landing Concept Plan Refresh (1585) was initially delayed but preliminary consultation with key stakeholders has now occurred as the first stage in the consultation process.

ii)       Expenditure on the Hakumau Reserve Concept Plan (1586) has been signalled as a carry-forward to enable the work to be completed in 2021/2022. Public consultation on the future development of the reserve can begin once lease negotiations with the Outboard Boating Club (OBC) are completed.  A two-year commercial lease for Lilliput minigolf activity will expire on 31 July 2022.

iii)      The Ōrākei local parks services assessment (2343) included a needs assessment for and community consultation on Nehu Triangle. Staff presented the findings to the local board in April 2021. The next step is to use the service assessment to inform a draft concept design that will be workshopped with the local board in August 2021.  

Libraries work programme

25.     In the Libraries work programme, there are nine activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green).

26.     St Heliers Library had an increase in ‘book a librarian’ sessions and digital drop-ins (1287), and preschool, children, and cultural programmes at both St Heliers and Remuera Libraries have been well attended this quarter.

Service Strategy and Integration work programme

27.     In the Service Strategy and Integration work programme, there is one activity that is in progress but delayed (amber).

28.     Ōrākei Local Parks Management Plan (2004): Staff brought a summary of issues for workshop discussion with the board in March. Some delays occurred due to work prioritisation across the local parks management plans programme, but the drafting of the plan has commenced and will be ready for notification in quarter three.

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

29.     In the Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme, there are seven activities that were completed by the end of the year, with 23 activities tracking in progress (green), four activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), and one activity that is significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered in the period March to June 2021 (grey).  Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

30.     The following projects were completed:

ID/Ref

Work Programme Name

2401

Renewal of retaining seawall at Anderson Bay Reserve

2416 & 2485

Signage renewed at The Landing, including the entrance signage

2793

Stonefields open space development – specimen tree planting

3212

Michaels Ave Reserve – renew amenity lighting

3352

Open space reserves – renew walkway lighting – St. Heliers beachfront boardwalk

3452

Ōrākei Community Centre CAB Fitout

 

31.     Michaels Ave Reserve – design and install 4 toilets and 4 changing rooms (3538): The payment of the grant has been completed. The Ellerslie Sports Club has sufficient funds and is awaiting final building consent to begin physical works. Lighting in the reserve has been renewed (3212).

32.     Selwyn Reserve toilets and changing rooms (3219): Physical works are nearing completion, with a view to opening the facility to the public by 19 July 2021.

33.     Ellerslie Village splash pad (3395): Physical works to make the splash pad operational are completed but the water feature remains turned off due to water restrictions.

34.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as delayed or on hold due to procurement restrictions during the financial year:

i)        The Akarana Marine Sport Charitable Trust (175) is now progressing completion of their internal fitout, following some delay in completing this work.

ii)       Michaels Ave Reserve (Ellerslie Recreation Centre) – renew carpark (2882): Design work is on hold pending completion of the changing rooms and the renewal and relocation of the play space (3538).

iii)      Ngahue Reserve Road Extension at Colin Maiden Park (2628): This project is dependent on the allocation of the Auckland Transport Capital Fund and approval by Auckland Transport.

iv)      Hobson Bay walkway on Shore Road Reserve to Wilsons Beach (2683): On hold due to a significant reduction in the local board’s capital budget.

v)      Feeder links to Ōrākei Spine shared path (2497): The feeder links through the Tahapa Reserves are largely completed. The last portion is on hold until construction of the final part of the feeder link In Tahapa East Reserve can tie in with section 2 of the shared path currently being constructed by Waka Kotahi NZTA.

vi)      The Akarana Marine Sport Charitable Trust (175) is now progressing completion of their internal fitout, following some delay in completing this work.

Community Leases work programme

35.     In the Community Leases work programme, there are five activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green), and two activities that have been deferred in in the period March to June 2021 (grey).  Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

36.     Madills Farm Reserve Community Lease to Eastern Suburbs Association Football Club Incorporated (2112) is deferred to the 2021-2022 financial year while the lease is clarified.

37.     The renewal of a community lease to Girl Guide Association New Zealand Mission Bay (384) is deferred due to delays receiving application from the group.

Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme

38.     In the Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme, there are ten activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green), and 11 activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber). Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

39.     The following projects were completed:

ID/Ref

Work Programme Name

1546

Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum

1762

Newmarket/Middleton Stream Restoration

1763

Madills Farm Stream Restoration

1764

Hobson Bay Catchment Project

1780

Wildlink Network Fund

1768

Ōrākei Schools Marine Project

1769

Sustainable Schools Moth Plant Initiative

2022

Okahu Bay Mussel Reef Restoration Trial

3656

Waiatarua wetland pest plant survey and management plan

1767

Eastern Bays Songbird Initiative

 

40.     Ten ecological restoration projects are on track and will continue through the 2021/2022 Community Facilities work programme. Planting maintenance and pest plant control follow-up is underway and will be completed by September 2021 across the following projects:

ID/Ref

Work Programme Name

1766

Victoria Portland Significant Ecological Area Restoration

1770

Andersons Beach Reserve phase four of ecological restoration and pest management

1771

Grampian Road Retention Dam – phase four

1772

Hobson Bay Walkway One – phase four

1773

Hobson Bay Walkway Two – Thomas Bloodworth Reserve and Hapua Reserve

1774

Lawry Reserve – phase three of ecological restoration and pest management

1775

Lingarth Reserve – phase three of ecological restoration and pest management

1777

Ngapipi Reserve and Ngapipi Cliff Reserve – phase four

1778

Pamela Place Reserve – phase four

1779

Stonefields ecological restoration – phase two

 

41.     Funding for the Pourewa Valley Integrated Plan (2243) and Ōrākei Basin Monitoring and Implementing Action Plan (2244) was carried forward from the previous financial year and have both been completed.

42.     Programme management of the Pourewa Valley Integrated Plan (1932 is progressing with the establishment of a guardians group (made up of representative of wider stakeholders), Terms of Reference and a suggested governance structure. Further progress on the project hinges on the appointment of a field officer and the results of a wayfinding investigation. The findings will be discussed with the local board in September 2021.

43.     The Eastern Bays Songbird Initiative (1767), led by the Eastern Bays Songbird Project, has resulted in the removal of 2,500 rats and more than 700 possums from the project zone. The group is now expanding into more suburbs in the Ōrākei Local Board area.

44.     The Wildlink Network Fund (1780) was fully allocated to seven community-led environmental projects involving restorative and enhancement works across the local board area. Recipients of the funds will report back to the local board on project outcomes in October 2021.

Deferred activities

45.     The Lead Financial Advisors are identifying projects from the local board’s 2020/2021 Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operational budget which meet the criteria to be carried forward. These will have been added to the work programme to be delivered in 2021/2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

46.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

47.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

48.     This report informs the Ōrākei Local Board of the performance for the in the period March to June 2021 and the performance for the 2020/2021 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

49.     Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei led Matariki Festival local activities as part of the Ōrākei community arts programmes (834). This included community planting at Pourewa Reserve, beginner Te Reo Māori lessons, weaving workshops and Matariki themed decoration of Tamaki Drive.

50.     Ōkahu Bay Mussel Reef Restoration Trial (2022) is a project in partnership between the Ōrākei Local Board and Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei and other parties. The local board budget for this financial year supported the resource consent process and community engagement.

51.     Pourewa Valley Integrated Plan Programme Management (2344) is based on an active partnership between the board and Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei.

52.     Māori responsiveness (840): The board contracted Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Whai Maia to deliver Takina sessions on te reo and tikanga Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

53.     This report is provided to enable the Ōrākei Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2020/2021 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial performance

54.     Auckland Council (Council) currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H.

55.     These obligations restrict the release of annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – on or about 30 September 2021.

56.     Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to this report (Attachment B) is excluded from the public, under confidential cover.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

57.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Overview of work programme performance by department’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

58.     Work programmes for 2021/2022 were approved at the board’s business meeting in June 2020.

59.     Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2021/2022 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Board March - June 2021 work programme update

89

b

Operating Performance Financial Summary - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Rachel Cho - Local Board Advisor

Suzanne Weld - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

St Heliers Community Centre and Glendowie Hall Community Centre Management Agreements

File No.: CP2021/11345

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for service agreement contracts with St Heliers Presbyterian Church for the operational management of St Heliers Community Centre, 100 St Heliers Bay Road, St Heliers and Glendowie Hall, 83 Crossfield Road, Glendowie.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       St Heliers Community Centre is situated at 100 St Heliers Bay Road, St Heliers and Glendowie Hall is situated at 83 Crossfield Road, Glendowie.

3.       The previous agreement, between Auckland Council and St Heliers Presbyterian Church for operational management of St Heliers Community Centre and Glendowie Hall (operating as Glendowie Community Centre) expired on 30 June 2021.

4.       Staff provided updates and recommendations to the local board in April and June 2021, with a final recommendation in June 2021 for a three-year term with St Heliers Community Church (SHPCC) for the operation of St Heliers and Glendowie Community Centres.

5.       The recommended term aligns with the timeline provided by SHPCC to set up a new legal trust to manage all community centre operations.

6.       Staff are confident that SHPCC will continue to operate the facilities successfully during this three-year term and will offer support to SHPCC and provide regular updates to the local board on their progress.

7.       Staff seek approval from the local board for the three-year term. If approval staff will finalise the new contracts with SHPCC for St Heliers and Glendowie Community Centres.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board::

a)      approve the service agreement contracts with St Heliers Presbyterian Church for the management and delivery of services at St Heliers Community Centre and Glendowie Hall (Glendowie Community Centre) for the term of three years from 1 July 2021 – 30 June 2024.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       St Heliers Presbyterian Church owns and operates the St Heliers Community Centre situated at 100 St Heliers Bay Road, St Heliers.  It aslo operates the council-owned facility Glendowie Hall situated at 83 Crossfield Road, Glendowie under a management agreement with Auckland Council.

9.       The previous agreement term was for five years from 1 July 2016 - 30 June 2021 and has now expired.

10.     On 8 April 2021, staff provided an update to the local board on the St Heliers and Glendowie Community Centres and recommended a five-year term for the new Service Agreement.

11.     At the April workshop, the local board expressed concerns about the St Heliers Presbyterian Church operations and requested that staff investigate and provide a report with more information and further advice.

12.     On 11 May 2021, staff met with the St Heliers Presbyterian Church Council to discuss concerns raised by the local board.

13.     It was acknowledged by the St Heliers Presbyterian Church Council (SHPCC), that the last two years have been unsettled due to internal operational performance concerns. These concerns have now been addressed by the Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa New Zealand and council staff are satisfied with the steps that have been taken.

14.     SHPCC confirmed that the community centres continued to operate under the governance of the St Heliers Presbyterian Church during this time with little interruption.

15.     The SHPCC is in the process of setting up a charitable trust. The trust will provide a separate governance structure to manage the activities of the centres and enable a clear and transparent overview of the community centres’ operations. SHPCC advised staff that it would take approximately two to three years for this legal entity to be completely set up.

16.     SHPCC remains committed to delivering community centre services from St Heliers and Glendowie and the partnership with the local board. They are enthusiastic about the improvement plans for their governance and intend to bring new life, energy and drive to the community centres with this change.

17.     On 10 June 2021, staff provided an update to the local board on the operations of SHPCC following the meeting with SHPCC.

18.     Staff are confident that SHPCC have managed the operational performance concerns well, have observed little impact during the period of the investigation and have no concerns about entering into a new agreement with SHPCC.

19.     Staff recommended entering into a three-year agreement with SHPCC. This is in line with the timeline provided by SHPCC to set up the new trust entity which will manage the operations of the community centres.

20.     The local board was satisfied with the update and indicated support for the change from a five-year agreement to a three-year agreement beginning 1 July 2021.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

21.     Table 1 outlines the options for future management of St Heliers Community Centre and Glendowie Community Centre.

Table 1: options for future management of St Heliers Community Centre and Glendowie Community Centre

Options

Option one

Status Quo

Option two

Three-year agreements

Option three

Discontinue partnership

Description

St Heliers Community Centre continues to operate the St Heliers Community Centre under a Service Agreement and the Glendowie Community Centre under a Community Centre Management Agreement for five years.

Agreement for the management of St Heliers and Glendowie Community Centres is reduced from five years to three years.

 

Staff will work closely with St Heliers Church Council and offer support while they set up their Trust.

End partnership with St Heliers Church and Community Centre for St Heliers and Glendowie Community Centres

Financial/other

implications

Existing funding is continued.

Existing funding is continued.

Local Board decision for future management of the Glendowie Community Centre.

Impacted stakeholders to be consulted

N/A

St Heliers Presbyterian Church and Ōrākei Local Board.

St Heliers Presbyterian Church, Ōrākei Local Board and local community.

Pros/Cons

Pro

No impact on service to community and to partners.

 

Con

Management agreement with new trust would be delayed.

An early termination of current agreement, would require more administration time and effort from staff and local board.

Pro

No impact on service to the community.

In line with given timeline for completion of the trust set up.

 

Con

A shorter agreement time for the SHPCC compared to previous agreements.

Pro

Opportunity to seek a new partner to manage the Glendowie Community Centre.

Con

Possible impact on levels of service, utilisation and revenue at Glendowie Community Centre.

Impact on levels of service at St Heliers Community Centre as a result of decreased funding.

Higher cost to the council to take over the management of the Glendowie Community Centre.

Decrease of facilities under community-led management in the local board area.

Impact to community as result of the change in management.

 

22.     Based on current performance, staff are confident that SHPCC will continue to meet the future service requirements as per the contract. Staff recommend option two, entering into a three-year contract for service with St Heliers Presbyterian Church for St Heliers and Glendowie Community Centres, commencing 1 July 2021. Staff will continue to work closely with SHPCC to offer support where required

23.     Option two is in line with the identified timeline for establishing the Charitable Trust. It will allow staff time to review the contract after three years and to provide advice for future management from 2024/2025.

24.     Staff will provide further advice to the local board for future management of St Heliers and Glendowie Community Centres for 2024/2025 in 2023/2024.

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     As these facilities are currently operational and activities are not anticipated to change, approving the new contract will not result in any change to matters relating to climate impact.

26.     SHPCC will be encouraged to look for opportunities to work in ways that support improving environmental outcomes within their facilities.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     Staff are confident that SHPCC will operate the St Heliers and Glendowie community centres successfully during this term.

28.     There are no known impacts on other departments in Auckland Council as a result of this decision.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     As the facility is already operated by SHPCC and activities will continue as usual, there are no expected negative outcomes on the community and the activities will continue as normal with no disruption.

30.     At the June workshop, the local board supported a three- year term contract, based on the information received from staff in response to their concerns.

31.     Approval will contribute to Ōrākei Local Board Plan 2020 Outcome 1: “Our communities are connected, engaged and resilient”, by supporting a local organisation to operate and deliver activities in their spaces for local community to connect and communicate with others.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     Community centres support a wide range of activities and groups and SHPCC is encouraged to create opportunities for all local communities, including Māori through their activities and access to their facilities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     Asset Based Services funding exists for this agreement and there are no new financial obligations as a result of the approval of this report

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     There is a risk that SHPCC may not meet the timeline indicated to set up the Trust. Staff will mitigate this by ensuring that regular updates are received by staff and that the local board is also kept up to date on their progress and any changes in the timeline.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     On approval of this report, staff will finalise the new contracts with SHPCC for St Heliers and Glendowie Community Centres.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Susan Ropati - Place Manager, Connected Communities

Authorisers

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Connected Communities

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Proposal to make a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw

File No.: CP2021/11647

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek support for the draft proposal to make a new Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Auckland Council Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022, before it is finalised for public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Staff have prepared a draft proposal for a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw to enable local boards to provide their views before it is finalised for public consultation.

3.       The draft proposal is to make a new bylaw under the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This bylaw would replace the current legacy bylaw, which expires in 2022 and contains provisions developed before the Freedom Camping Act 2011 was passed.

4.       The Freedom Camping Act 2011 allows freedom camping on all public land unless it is already prohibited under another enactment. The Act enables councils to make a bylaw to prohibit or restrict freedom camping in areas that meet statutory criteria for protection.

5.       This draft proposal replaces an earlier proposal developed in 2018 which was set aside by the Governing Body in 2019. Following decisions by the Governing Body in March and May 2021, the key changes compared with the 2018 proposal are that the new draft proposal:

·   excludes land held under the Reserves Act 1977 from scope (council would maintain the current default prohibition on camping on reserves under the Reserves Act 1977)

·   manages freedom camping only on land held under the Local Government Act 2002

·   seeks to prevent freedom camping impacts in sensitive areas, and to protect public health and safety and manage access in all areas, by:

o scheduling 44 prohibited areas, where no freedom camping is allowed

o scheduling 19 restricted areas, where freedom camping is allowed subject to site-specific restrictions

o including general rules to manage freedom camping impacts in all other areas (campers must use certified self-contained vehicles, stay a maximum of two nights, depart by 9am and not return to the same area within two weeks).

6.       The proposed prohibited and restricted areas are those areas which the Bylaw Panel recommended should be prohibited and restricted in 2019, and which are held under the Local Government Act 2002. Areas held under the Reserves Act 1977 have been removed.

7.       The Panel’s recommendations draw on previous area assessments and take into account feedback from local board engagement and public consultation conducted in 2018 and 2019.

8.       The draft proposal includes one designated prohibited area and one designated restricted area located in the Ōrākei Local Board area. All designated areas are listed in the draft Bylaw schedules within Attachment A. All other council-managed land held under the Local Government Act 2002, including roads, is proposed to be covered by general rules.

9.       Staff recommend that the local board provide its view on the draft proposal, including the inclusion of general rules in the bylaw and the recommended settings for those rules.

10.     The key risks of the proposal are that:

·   it creates too few areas where freedom camping is allowed; this is partially mitigated by allowing freedom camping on most roads (subject to general rules), and council could decide to designate more restricted areas following consultation

·   the cumulative impact of all prohibitions under the Bylaw and other enactments is viewed as an effective ban; however staff looked closely at the requirements of the Freedom Camping Act 2011 in developing the proposal and will continue to monitor cumulative impact as bylaw development progresses.

11.     The local board’s views will be provided to the Governing Body in September with the recommendation that the finalised proposal is adopted for public consultation. Public consultation is scheduled for November, and Bylaw Panel deliberations for early 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      support the draft Statement of Proposal in Attachment A of this agenda report to make a new Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Auckland Council Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022 for public consultation.

Horopaki

Context

Freedom camping can have both positive and negative impacts

12.     For the purposes of this Bylaw, freedom camping is when someone stays overnight on council-managed land, including roadsides, in a vehicle or caravan.

13.     Freedom camping specifically refers to people staying in vehicles overnight as part of leisure travel, or because they are choosing to live in a vehicle for lifestyle reasons.

14.     Freedom camping provides a flexible and affordable way for Aucklanders and for domestic and international visitors to experience and enjoy the region. Many freedom campers will visit friends and family, attend events, and support local businesses during their stay.

15.     Freedom camping can however have negative impacts on the local environment and host communities if it is not well-managed. These impacts can be caused by:

16.     Freedom camping has become popularly associated with harmful and antisocial behaviours, but our research shows that most freedom campers visiting Auckland do camp responsibly.

17.     However, the presence of large numbers of campers – even responsible campers – is more likely to cause community concern in Auckland due to pressure on limited public space.

18.     Freedom camper numbers have been growing in Auckland and throughout the country over the last two decades. Once the current border restrictions are lifted overseas visitors are likely to return, and domestic freedom camping may continue to increase in the meantime.

19.     Auckland does not currently have enough places for freedom campers to go. This means there is often overcrowding in the places where it is allowed, or illegal camping in unsuitable areas once legal sites are full. Having more areas would reduce these supply-related issues.

20.     The council can regulate freedom camping to help prevent irresponsible camping and manage responsible freedom camping in a way that minimises its negative impacts.

Council must align its freedom camping regulation with the Freedom Camping Act 2011

21.     The Freedom Camping Act 2011 allows freedom camping on all public land unless it is prohibited under a bylaw or another enactment, such as the Reserves Act 1977.

22.     Auckland’s current Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2015 is a consolidation of pre-2010 legacy bylaw provisions developed before the Freedom Camping Act 2011 was passed. A new bylaw must be made that aligns with the national legislation before the current bylaw expires in 2022.

23.     The Freedom Camping Act 2011 is permissive by default but does allow council to make a bylaw to prohibit or restrict freedom camping in areas where certain statutory criteria are met. In particular, council must be satisfied that:

·   each area’s location can be clearly shown on a map and/or described

·   the prohibitions and restrictions in each area are necessary to:

-    protect the area (for example because it is environmentally or culturally sensitive)

-    protect the health and safety of the people who may visit the area

-    protect access to the area (for other users)

·   the cumulative impact of all prohibitions and restrictions (under the bylaw and other enactments) do not constitute an effective ban on freedom camping on council land.

A 2018 proposal to regulate freedom camping was set aside in August 2019

24.     Work to develop a freedom camping bylaw began in 2016. Staff assessed more than 1,000 areas for their suitability for freedom camping and need for protection under the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This process included extensive engagement with local boards.

25.     In late 2018 and early 2019 public feedback and formal local board views were sought on a proposal for a draft Freedom Camping in Vehicles bylaw. A Bylaw Panel deliberated on all feedback and made recommendations to the Governing Body. The Panel recommended scheduling 322 prohibited areas and 103 restricted areas, including a number of reserves.

26.     In August 2019 the Governing Body set aside the recommendations of the Bylaw Panel and instead requested advice on a new direction for bylaw development.

The Governing Body decided to exclude reserves from scope and include general rules

27.     The Governing Body considered staff advice in March 2021[1] and May 2021[2] and directed that a new proposal for a Freedom Camping Act 2011 bylaw be developed that:

·   only manages freedom camping on land held under the Local Government Act 2002, with camping on reserves continuing to be managed by the Reserves Act 1977

·   includes general rules to manage the generalised impacts of freedom camping, and ensure problems are not displaced from regulated to unregulated areas

·   relies on previous assessments (undertaken to develop the 2018 proposal) to identify land held under the Local Government Act 2002 that should be prohibited or further restricted through the bylaw.

28.     Staff have prepared a draft proposal to implement the Governing Body’s decisions (Attachment A). This proposal outlines the reasons and decisions that have led to the content of the proposed new Bylaw.

Potential changes to the Freedom Camping Act 2011 not yet confirmed

29.     In April and May 2021, the Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) publicly consulted on four proposals for change to the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This included making the use of self-contained vehicles mandatory for all freedom camping.

30.     The Governing Body approved Auckland Council’s submission, which incorporated local board views, in May 2021[3]. MBIE has not yet released any further information, and timeframes for any changes to the Act have not been confirmed.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

A new bylaw is proposed to manage freedom camping in vehicles on some council land

31.     The draft proposal would make a new Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022 that:

·   aligns with the Freedom Camping Act 2011

·   helps council to prevent freedom camping impacts in sensitive areas, and to protect public health and safety and manage access in all areas of land held under the Local Government Act 2002 (including roads controlled by Auckland Transport)

·   forms part of a wider regulatory framework of Acts, regulations and other bylaws[4].

32.     The Bylaw will be enforced by the Licensing and Regulatory Compliance unit using a graduated compliance model (information, education, enforcement).

33.     The table below summarises the main proposals:

Draft proposals

Reasons for draft proposal

To schedule 63 specific areas as follows:

Restrict freedom camping in 19 specific areas (where freedom camping is allowed subject to site-specific restrictions)

Listed in Schedule 1 of the draft Bylaw

 

To better manage areas that have been identified as needing additional regulation due to factors such as popularity, current use by others, demand for parking and the size of the parking areas.

These are the restricted areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel in 2019, with all reserves removed.

Prohibit freedom camping in 44 specific areas (where freedom camping is not allowed)

Listed in Schedule 2 of the draft Bylaw

 

To protect areas that have been identified as being environmentally or culturally sensitive, or where freedom camping would impact public health and safety and access in ways that cannot be adequately managed through restrictions.

These are the prohibited areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel in 2019, with all reserves removed.

To include general rules for all other areas as follows:

Require freedom campers to use certified self-contained vehicles

To prevent impacts from the depositing of toilet waste and wastewater into the environment, and the use of unsuitable areas for cooking

Allow freedom campers to stay a maximum of two nights in the same road or off-road parking area

To prevent impacts from the depositing of toilet waste and wastewater into the environment and ensure fair access to limited shared parking and amenities

Require freedom campers to vacate their parking space by 9am on the day of departure

To ensure fair access for shared parking and amenities for other campers and users of public space

Require freedom campers not return to stay in the same road or off-road parking area within a two-week period

To ensure fair access to limited shared parking and amenities for other campers and users of public space

 

34.     The draft proposal notes that the council does not intend to use the bylaw to manage:

·   issues associated with homelessness (people living in a vehicle involuntarily)

·   areas where access is already controlled or parking is reserved or charged for, for example gated carparks, land leased to other organisations and regional parks.

The draft proposal complies with statutory requirements

35.     The draft proposal has been prepared in accordance with statutory requirements. Staff consider the proposed draft Bylaw:

·   only prohibits or restricts freedom camping where it is necessary to protect sensitive areas, and/or to manage impacts on public health and safety and access to an area

·   uses a format and wording that are easy to read, understand and comply with

·   is authorised by statute, is not repugnant to other legislation, and is not unreasonable

·   does not give rise to any implications or inconsistencies with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990.

Staff recommend the local board consider and provide its views on the draft proposal

36.     Staff recommend that the local board consider the draft proposal in Attachment A and provide any views by resolution to the Governing Body before it is finalised for public consultation on 23 September 2021.

37.     For example, the board could support the draft proposal for public consultation, recommend changes or defer comment until after it has considered public feedback on the proposal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     Staff note that this is a regulatory process to manage existing activities enabled by central government policy. It is not causing these activities to occur or affecting the likelihood that they will occur. The decision sought in this report therefore has no specific climate impact.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.     The draft proposal impacts the operations of several council departments and council-controlled organisations, including Licensing and Regulatory Compliance, Parks, Sport and Recreation and Auckland Transport.

40.     The Licensing and Regulatory Compliance unit are aware of the impacts of the draft proposal and their primary role in implementing and managing compliance with the Bylaw.

41.     Council’s 86 park rangers help to manage compliance with council Bylaws, the Reserves Act 1977 and the Litter Act 1974 by carrying out education and monitoring on parks and reserves. However, rangers are not currently being warranted or renewing warrants, and Licensing and Regulatory Compliance will continue to carry out any enforcement required.

Enhanced service levels for Bylaw compliance activities are not currently budgeted

42.     Concern about the council’s ability to effectively implement the Bylaw and manage compliance within existing resources was a key theme of public and local board feedback received in 2019.

43.     In March 2021 the Governing Body requested advice about costed options for increasing the service levels for compliance associated with this Bylaw. Costings are being finalised and this advice will be provided alongside the proposal in September, for consideration during future Annual Plan cycles.

44.     There are multiple options for increasing investment in Bylaw implementation and both proactive and reactive Bylaw compliance activities. These include:

·   enhancement of council’s information technology systems, to enable the implementation of the new infringement notice regime

·   use of contracted security services, to increase responsiveness to complaints (similar to the current arrangements for Noise Control), or for additional proactive monitoring at seasonal ‘hotspots’

·   purchase of mobile printers, to enable infringement notices to be affixed to vehicles in breach of the Bylaw at the time of the offence

·   signage at all prohibited and restricted areas and at other areas as needed

·   camera surveillance technology to enable remote monitoring of known or emerging hotspots, for evidence-gathering purposes and/or to support real-time enforcement.

45.     Local boards can request further advice from Licensing and Regulatory Compliance if they wish to consider allocating local budget for enhanced local compliance activities.

46.     For example, Rodney Local Board recently allocated funds from its Locally Driven Initiatives budget to employ two Compliance Wardens for a six-month trial during the 2021-2022 financial year. The wardens will address low level compliance issues, including illegal freedom camping, with follow-up support from warranted compliance staff when required.

Ongoing land classification work won’t be completed with bylaw development timeframes

47.     Following the Governing Body’s decision in March 2021 to exclude reserves from scope, land status has become more relevant for identifying areas requiring protection in the bylaw.

48.     The council does not currently hold complete land classification data to establish definitive numbers of reserves. Parks and reserves can comprise multiple land parcels which may be held under different Acts.

49.     Since reporting to the Governing Body in March, staff have completed further investigation of the land status of the prohibited and restricted areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel. This has identified additional reserves, which has reduced the proposed prohibited areas (from 55 in the March report to 44 in the draft proposal) and restricted areas (from 21 to 19).

50.     Classifications are still being confirmed as part of the development of omnibus Local Park Management Plans. Five local board areas have completed this work, and an average of 94 percent of their parks were found to be held under the Reserves Act 1977.

51.     Ongoing land classification work will support bylaw implementation. It will not finish within the timeframe for bylaw development, so the status quo issues will remain.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

52.     The proposed draft Bylaw impacts on local boards’ governance role as it affects decision making over local assets, particularly parks and other council-controlled public places. There is also high community interest in freedom camping regulation in many local board areas.

53.     The local board has an opportunity to provide its views on this draft proposal by resolution to the Governing Body. The local board will also have further opportunity to provide its views to a Bylaw Panel on any public feedback to the proposal from people in their local board area.

All proposed prohibited and restricted areas previously discussed with local boards

54.     The draft proposal includes one designated prohibited area and one designated restricted area located in the Ōrākei Local Board area. All designated areas are listed in the draft Bylaw schedules within Attachment A. All other council-managed land held under the Local Government Act 2002, including roads, is proposed to be covered by general rules.

55.     The proposed prohibited and restricted areas are those areas which the Bylaw Panel recommended should be prohibited and restricted in 2019, and which are held under the Local Government Act 2002. Areas held under the Reserves Act 1977 have been removed.

56.     All areas proposed to be scheduled as prohibited or restricted were previously discussed with the relevant local boards in 2018.

Joint political working group provided views on general rules in May 2021

57.     Three local board representatives participated in a joint political working group on 21 May 2021 to provide views on options for including general rules in the Bylaw.

58.     The working group unanimously supported the inclusion of general rules in the Bylaw, and five out of six working group members supported the recommended settings included in the draft proposal. A summary of the working group’s views was reported to the Governing Body on 27 May 2021[5].

The new draft proposal responds to feedback provided on the 2018 proposal

59.     Local boards provided formal feedback on the 2018 draft proposal to the Bylaw Panel in 2019, following on from their early feedback given during engagement in 2017, and site-specific feedback provided in 2018.

60.     The table below details typical concerns expressed by local boards in their formal feedback and how the new draft proposal responds to these concerns:

Key local board concern (from 2019)

Draft proposal’s response to concern

The loss of protection in the legacy bylaws for most reserves and roadsides

·    Excludes reserves from the bylaw and continues to use the Reserves Act 1977 to manage all camping at reserves

·    Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw, including roadsides

·    Notes individual roads can be scheduled as prohibited or restricted areas if problems arise in future

The provision for unrestricted freedom camping in the local board area

·    Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw

Freedom camping at reserves and enforcement tools under the Reserves Act

·    The Reserves Act 1977 will be used to manage all camping at reserves, which means the status quo (prohibition) will continue

·    Notes that following changes in September 2019 to the Reserves Act 1977, $800 infringement notices can now be issued for breaches of this Act

Freedom camping in inner-city areas, unsafe areas and areas near sports fields, residential homes and campgrounds

·    Bylaw schedules designate individual sites that have been identified and assessed as unsuitable for freedom camping (prohibited areas), or where additional restrictions are needed to manage impacts (restricted areas)

·    Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw

The potential effect on people experiencing homelessness

·    Clarifies that the bylaw will not be used to manage issues associated with homelessness and confirms the council’s commitment to a compassionate enforcement approach to protect vulnerable Aucklanders

Council’s ability to enforce bylaws and the cost of enforcement and monitoring

·    Although not contained in the proposal itself, advice will be provided to the Governing Body on options for increasing investment in bylaw implementation

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

61.     The Bylaw has relevance to Māori as kaitiaki of Papatūānuku. The proposal supports two key directions in the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau:

·   wairuatanga (promoting distinctive identity), in relation to valuing and protecting Māori heritage and Taonga Māori

·   kaitiakitanga (ensuring sustainable futures), in relation to environmental protection.

62.     The proposal also supports the Board’s Schedule of Issues of Significance by ensuring that sites of significance to Māori are identified and protected from freedom camping harms.

63.     Mana whenua and mataawaka were invited to provide feedback during the development of the 2018 proposal via dedicated hui and again through the public consultation process.

64.     Feedback received on specific prohibited and restricted areas identified in the 2018 proposal was incorporated into the deliberations. This included the identification of sites of significance to Māori, such as wahi tapu areas.

65.     General matters raised by Māori during engagement included the need to ensure:

·   the ability to add further sites of significance to the bylaw as these are designated

·   provision for temporary bans on freedom camping, e.g. in areas under a rahui

·   a compassionate approach to people experiencing homelessness

·   provision of sufficient dump stations to avoid environmental pollution

·   clear communication of the rules in the bylaw and at freedom camping sites.

66.     The draft proposal addresses these matters by proposing to prohibit freedom camping at sites of significance to Māori (such as Maraetai Foreshore and Onetangi Cemetery), provision in the Bylaw for temporary bans, and confirming council’s commitment to a compassionate enforcement approach to people experiencing homelessness.

67.     Mana whenua and mataawaka will have an opportunity to provide further feedback during public consultation on the proposal.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

68.     There are no financial implications to the local board for any decisions to support the draft proposal for public consultation. The Governing Body will consider any financial implications associated with public notification in September 2021.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

69.     Legal risks were discussed as part of the provision of legally privileged advice to interested local board members at a confidential workshop held in June 2021.

70.     The other key risks and possible mitigations are summarised in the table below:

If...

Then...

Mitigation (partial)

The bylaw proposal does not create enough areas where freedom camping is allowed

 

Council may need to manage an increase in overcrowding, non-compliance, and harms over time.

The proposed bylaw would enable freedom campers to stay for up to two nights on most roads, subject to general rules.

Council could consider increasing the number of designated restricted areas following consultation, or if problems arise in future.

The cumulative impact of prohibitions and restrictions in the Bylaw and other enactments is viewed as an ‘effective ban’ on freedom camping in Auckland

The risk of legal challenge could increase.

Staff looked closely at the requirements of the Freedom Camping Act 2011 in developing the proposal, and cumulative impact will continue to be monitored.

Council can’t meet public expectation of increased enforcement

There may be a loss of social license for freedom camping and reputational risk for council.

Responsible Camping Ambassadors will assist compliance staff during the peak season, although future funding is not guaranteed.

The Governing Body or local boards could allocate additional funding to increase service levels for compliance activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

71.     Staff will present local board views and a finalised proposal to the Governing Body on 23 September 2021. The next steps for bylaw development are shown in the diagram below.

Diagram

Description automatically generated

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Freedom Camping in Vehicles Statement of Proposal and Draft Bylaw August 2021

139

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rebekah Forman - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development

File No.: CP2021/11248

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To report the Ōrākei Local Board’s (Board) updated feedback appended to the Auckland Council submission on the Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development discussion document.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 14 June 2021, Te Tūāpapa Kura Kāinga – Ministry of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) released for public consultation a discussion document seeking to inform development of the Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development (GPS-HUD).

3.       At its      15 July 2021, the Board tabled its formal feedback which included references to paragraphs of the draft Auckland Council submission on the GPS-HUD discussion document.  Changes were required to the Board’s feedback to update these references to align to the Auckland Council submission which was not finalised until after the Board’s July 2021 business meeting.

4.       As local board feedback needed to be received no later than 26 July 2021 to be appended to the Auckland Council submission, the Chairman exercised his delegation appointed by the Board at its 16 April 2020 business meeting to ‘approve and submit the Board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, Parliament, select committees and other councils’ to update the Board’s feedback.

5.       Attached to this report (Attachment A) is a copy of the Board’s feedback which was appended to the final Auckland Council submission on the GPS-HUD discussion document for formal record.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      note its updated feedback appended to the final Auckland Council submission on the Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development discussion document.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development discussion document - Ōrākei Local Board feedback

241

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Chairman and Board Member July 2021 report

File No.: CP2021/11504

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board Chairman and Members with the opportunity to provide an update on projects, activities and issues in the local board area.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

a)      That the Ōrākei Local Board Chairman and Board Member August 2021 report be received.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Board Chairman and Board report - August 2021

247

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2021/11505

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Ōrākei Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Ōrākei Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·   clarifying what advice is required and when

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      note the draft governance forward work calendar as at August 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar - August 2021

259

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Ōrākei Local Board Workshop Proceedings

File No.: CP2021/11506

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the records for the Ōrākei Local Board workshops held following the previous business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local Board workshops are an informal forum held primarily for information or discussion purposes, as the case may be and at which no resolutions or decisions are made.

3.       Attached are copies of the records for the Ōrākei Local Board workshops held on 1, 8 and 22 July 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board records for the workshops held on 1, 8 and 22 July 2021 be noted.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Board workshop record - 1 July 2021

265

b

Ōrākei Local Board workshop record - 8 July 2021

267

c

Ōrākei Local Board workshop record - 22 July 2021

271

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Resolutions Pending Action report

File No.: CP2021/11510

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board with an opportunity to track reports that have been requested from staff.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board resolutions pending action report be noted.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Board resolutions pending action report - August 2021

275

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 



Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 August 2021

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Ōrākei Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

12        Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021 - Attachment a - 2020/2021 Ōrākei Local Board Annual Report

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial information that have an impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2021 that require release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

14        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Ōrākei Local Board for March to June 2021 - Attachment b - Operating Performance Financial Summary

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial information that have an impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2021 that require release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 



[1] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/03/GB_20210325_AGN_10148_AT_WEB.htm (Item 9, GB/2021/19)

[2] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_AGN_10145_AT_WEB.htm (Item 10, GB/2021/49)

[3] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_AGN_10145_AT_WEB.htm (Item 9, GB/2021/48)

[4] Freedom Camping Act; Litter Act; Resource Management Act; Fire and Emergency NZ Act; Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw; Auckland Council Traffic Bylaw; Auckland Transport Traffic Bylaw; Alcohol Control Bylaw; Dog Management Bylaw

[5] https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_MAT_10145_WEB.htm