I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Rodney Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 18 August 2021

3.00pm

Council Chambers,
50 Centreway Road, Orewa

 

Rodney Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Phelan Pirrie

 

Deputy Chairperson

Beth Houlbrooke

 

Members

Brent Bailey

 

 

Steve Garner

 

 

Danielle Hancock

 

 

Tim Holdgate

 

 

Louise Johnston

 

 

Vicki Kenny

 

 

Colin Smith

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Robyn Joynes

Democracy Advisor

 

13 August 2021

 

Contact Telephone: +64 212447174

Email: robyn.joynes@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

Local Board Member

Organisation

Position

Brent Bailey

Central Shooters Inc

Auckland Shooting Club

Royal NZ Yacht Squadron

President

Member

Member

Steven Garner

Warkworth Tennis and Squash Club

Sandspit Yacht Club

Warkworth Gamefish Club

President

Member

Member

Louise Johnston

Blackbridge Environmental Protection Society

Treasurer

Vicki Kenny

International Working Holidays Ltd

Nannies Abroad Ltd

Waitemata Riding Club

National Party Helensville Electorate

Director/Owner/CEO

Director/Owner/CEO

Member

Treasurer

Danielle Hancock

Kaukapakapa Residents and Ratepayers Association

Pest Free Kaukapakapa

New Zealand Biosecurity Services Limited

Member

 

Pest Free Coordinator

Operations Manager

Tim Holdgate

Landowners Contractors Protection Association

Agricultural & Pastoral Society - Warkworth

Vice Chairman

 

Committee member

Beth Houlbrooke

Kawau Island Boat Club

Springboard Advisory Board

Matakana Coast Trail Trust

Member

Member

Contractor

Phelan Pirrie

Muriwai Volunteer Fire Brigade

Grow West Ltd

North West Country Incorporated

Officer in Charge

Director

Manager

Colin Smith

 

 


Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation: North Shore Model Aero Club Inc                                                 5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Rodney Local Board workshop records                                                                     7

12        Governance forward work calendar                                                                          13

13        Rodney Ward Councillor update                                                                                19

14        Urgent Decision –  feedback on Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development discussion document                                                              27

15        Nomination for Kaipara Moana Remediation Joint Committee                              37

16        Road names for subdivision at Ara Hills, Stage 3, Kikorangi Drive, Orewa         43

17        Auckland Transport update August 2021                                                                 53

18        Proposal to make a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw                             63

19        Future management of motorised vehicles driving on Muriwai Beach                73

20        Detailed Business Case for the Huapai Domain Indoor Multisport Facility         81

21        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Rodney Local Board for March to June 2021                                                                                                                             109

22        Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021                                                                    159

23        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

24        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               163

21        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Rodney Local Board for March to June 2021

b.      Rodney Local Board Quarterly Performance Report June 2021 - Financial Appendix                                                                                                           163

22        Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021

a.      Rodney Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021                                            163

C1       Woodhill Sands Equestrian Centre (Covering report)                                          163


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 21 July 2021, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Rodney Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation: North Shore Model Aero Club Inc

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Richard Falls from the North Shore Model Aero Club Inc has requested a deputation to provide an update on the club’s activities.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      thank Mr Falls from the North Shore Model Aero Club for his presentation.

 

Attachments

a          North Shore Model Aero Club Inc presentation........................................... 167

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Rodney Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2021/01634

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Attached are the Rodney Local Board workshop records for 4 and 11 August 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the workshop records for 4 and 11 August 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop record 4 August

9

b

Workshop record 11 August

11

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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18 August 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Governance forward work calendar

File No.: CP2021/02931

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present to the Rodney Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Rodney Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months until the end of the electoral term. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

2.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

· ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

· clarifying what advice is required and when

· clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the governance forward work calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work calendar

15

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Rodney Ward Councillor update

File No.: CP2021/01377

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Rodney Local Board allocates a period of time for the Ward Councillor, Greg Sayers, to update them on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      receive Cr Sayers’ update on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ward Councillor update June-July 2021

21

b

Ward Councillor update July- August 2021

25

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Urgent Decision –  feedback on Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development discussion document 

File No.: CP2021/10969

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.   To inform the Rodney Local Board that an urgent decision was made and approved under delegation to the chairperson and deputy chairperson to provide feedback on the discussion document on the Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.    At the 20 November 2019 Rodney Local Board meeting the local board considered the urgent decision-making process and passed resolution RD/2019/147:

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      adopt the urgent decision-making process for matters that require a decision where it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirement of a quorum

b)      delegate authority to the chairperson and deputy chairperson, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board

c)      agree that the relationship manager, chairperson and deputy chairperson (or any person/s acting in these roles) will authorise the urgent decision-making process by signing off the authorisation memo

d)      note that all urgent decisions will be reported to the next ordinary meeting of the local board.   CARRIED

3.       The Ministry of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) released for public consultation a discussion document seeking to inform the development of the Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development (GPS-HUD).

4.       The GPS-HUD is intended to communicate the long-term vision and change required for housing and urban development in Aotearoa New Zealand. This will shape future government policy, investment and programmes of work.

5.       It is intended that the GPS-HUD is also a mechanism to align government policy and activity that affects housing and urban development.

6.       The draft Auckland Council submission on the Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development was circulated to elected members on 14 July 2021. 

7.       The deadline for local board feedback to be appended to the final Auckland Council submission was 26 July 2021.

8.       The last Rodney Local Board business meeting was held on 21 July 2021, and its next business meeting will be held on 18 August 2021.

9.       This timeframe did not align with scheduled Rodney Local Board business meetings, as the agenda for the 21 July business meeting closed on 9 July 2021, therefore, it was necessary to seek an urgent decision to formalise the local board’s position.

10.     A memo from council staff providing an overview of the discussion document on the Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development that was circulated to elected members on 17 June 2021 is contained in Attachment B to the agenda report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note Rodney Local Board’s feedback on the discussion document on the Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development approved by the chairperson and deputy chairperson under delegation (Attachment A to the agenda report).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo to elected members on GPS Housing and Urban Development

29

b

Rodney urgent decision GPS on Housing and Urban Development

33

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Justin Kary – Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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18 August 2021

 

 

Nomination for Kaipara Moana Remediation Joint Committee

File No.: CP2021/11669

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To nominate an Auckland Council representative for the Kaipara Moana Remediation Joint Committee from elected members on the Rodney Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 30 July 2020 the Governing Body agreed for Auckland Council to sign a memorandum of understanding with the Crown, Kaipara Uri entities (Ngā Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara Development Trust, Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua, and Te Uri o Hau Settlement Trust) and the Northland Regional Council to progress the Kaipara Moana Remediation programme.  The Governing Body also agreed to set up the Kaipara Moana Remediation Joint Committee (Joint Committee) with the Northland Regional Council, and in partnership with Kaipara Uri entities (GB/2020/79; RD/2020/86).  The memorandum of understanding was signed on 9 October 2019 and the Kaipara Moana Remediation Joint Committee held its inaugural meeting that day.

3.       The Kaipara Moana Remediation programme was proposed as a ten-year environmental project with a focus on reducing sediment loss into the Kaipara Harbour (Kaipara Moana) and an overall budget of around $284 million. In July 2020 the Crown confirmed in principle funding of $100 million for the first six years of the programme, conditional on councils and others (i.e. land-owners, industry associations, philanthropic entities) providing matched funding to reach $200 million for the six years.

4.       The purpose of the Joint Committee is to carry out decision-making relating to funding allocated to provide environmental and associated outcomes for Kaipara Moana.  The Terms of Reference for the Joint Committee is provided in Attachment A to the agenda report.

5.       Membership on the Joint Committee is six from Kaipara Uri entities, and three elected members each from Auckland Council and Northland Regional Council.  The chairperson, (presently Tame Te Rangi), is appointed from the Kaipara Uri entity representatives, while the deputy-chairperson, (presently Northland Regional Council Chair Penny Smart), is appointed from the council representatives.

6.       Auckland Council members appointed to the Joint Committee by the Governing Body were Councillor Greg Sayers, Councillor Daniel Newman, and Rodney Local Board Chairperson Phelan Pirrie. 

7.       Rodney Local Board Chairperson Phelan Pirrie has resigned and therefore a replacement is required.

8.       The Governing Body is responsible for appointments by Auckland Council to Joint Committees and other bodies.  The elected member nominated by the Rodney Local Board to be a member of the Joint Committee will be reported to the Governing Body for appointment.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      nominate a Rodney Local Board member to be appointed to the Kaipara Moana Remediation Joint Committee.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Terms of Reference - Kaipara Moana Remediation Joint Committee

39

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

John Hutton - Manager Treaty Settlements

Authorisers

Phil Wilson - Director, Governance & CCO Partnerships

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Road names for subdivision at Ara Hills, Stage 3, Kikorangi Drive, Orewa

File No.: CP2021/11243

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Rodney Local Board to name six new public roads and names for the extension of two existing roads within the subdivision being undertaken by A V Jennings Pty Limited, at Kikorangi Drive, Ara Hills, Orewa.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development the applicant shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region.

3.       A V Jennings Pty Limited has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the local board:

Preferred names

Alternative

Arawaru Avenue                     Road 1

Haurapa Lane           or       Waiti Lane

Kōawa Road                           Road 2

Matomato Drive        or       Muramura Drive

Halcyon Bay Lane                   Road 3

Akau Avenue            or       White Peaks Way

Tāhuna Avenue                      Road 4

Kitakita Road            or       Hiriwa Street

Maheu Lane                            Road 5

Hāpira Lane              or       Tranquillity Lane

Kāuru Lane                             Road 6

Pounamu Lane         or       Leafy Trail Lane

Kikorangi Drive                       Extension

 

Aquamarine Avenue               Extension

 

 

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245.  The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the guidelines.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve six new road names for the new public roads and two names for the extension of two existing public roads as follows in the A V Jennings Pty Limited subdivision at Ara Hills, Kikorangi Drive, Orewa in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974

 

i)          Arawaru Avenue           (Road 1)

ii)         Kōawa Road                 (Road 2)

iii)        Halcyon Bay Lane        (Road 3)

iv)        Tāhuna Avenue            (Road 4)

v)         Maheu Lane                  (Road 5)

vi)        Kāuru Lane                   (Road 6)

vii)       Kikorangi Drive             (Extension)

viii)      Aquamarine Avenue     (Extension).

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The 68-lot subdivision, (Council Ref BUN20441333), currently under construction was approved on 29 September 2019.

6.       Site and location plans of the subdivision can be found in Attachments A and B.

7.       In accordance with the standards, all public roads require a name.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names.  These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region. The guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

9.       The guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

 

10.     Theme: The applicant has chosen a suite of names that they consider reflect the special natural and coastal environment of the area.

11.     In this regard the names for the new roads and their relevance are detailed as below:

Proposed Names for Road 1

Meaning

Arawaru Avenue

(preference)

Beach/Coast
‘The sound of running water’ in Māori – an evocative, alliterative name that reflects the nearby coast and estuary

Haurapa Lane

(alternative)

Pathways/Connection
‘Haurapa’ means to ‘search or track’ in Māori, reflecting the concepts of pathways/connection

Waiti Lane

(alternative)

Colours of the environment
Waiti is a Māori loan word for ‘white’ reflecting the waves/water of the nearby coast

 

Proposed Names for Road 2

Meaning

Kōawa Road

(preference)

Beach/Coast
‘Kōawa’ is a Māori word meaning ‘watercourse, waterway, canal’, reflecting the fact that this street crosses a creek towards Stage 7

Matomato Drive

(alternative)

Colours of the environment
‘Matomato’ is a Māori word meaning to ‘be green (of foliage), to grow vigorously, ‘flourish’, reflecting the fact that this street winds through revegetated bush to Stage 7

Muramura Drive

(alternative)

 

Colours of the environment
‘Muramura’ means ‘colourful, vibrant, bold, blaze of colour in Māori, reflecting the many colours of the environment in the Orewa/Hibiscus Coast area

 

Proposed Names for Road 3

Meaning

Halcyon Bay Lane

(preference)

Beach/Coast
Halcyon Bay lane is a pretty, evocative name representing the nearby ocean and beaches

Akau Avenue

(alternative)

 

Beach/Coast
Akau’ is a Māori word for ‘shore, coast, riverbank or reef’, reflecting the nearby shoreline

White Peaks Way

(alternative)

 

Colours of the environment
‘White Peaks Way’ is an evocative-sounding name that reflects the white peaks of the waves at nearby Orewa Beach

 

Proposed Names for Road 4

Meaning

Tāhuna Avenue

(preference)

Beach/Coast
‘Tāhuna’ means ‘seaside, beach, sandy shore’, reflecting the elevated location with views to the sea

Kitakita Road

(alternative)

Colours of the environment
‘Kitakita means ‘to be bright (of colours), intense, fast’, reflecting the many colours of the environment

Hiriwa Street

(alternative)

 

Colours of the environment
‘Hiriwa’ means ‘silver’ in Māori, suggesting the silver waves of the nearby coast, and the silver flashes of the fish within

 

Proposed Names for Road 5

Meaning

Maheu Lane

(preference)

Pathways/connection
‘Maheu’ means a ‘trail or track through fern or scrub’ is a Māori word meaning ‘watercourse, waterway, canal’, reflecting the fact that this street crosses a creek towards Stage 7

Hāpira Lane

(alternative)

Colours of the environment
‘Hāpira’ means ‘sapphire’ in Māori, reflecting the colour of the nearby ocean and Orewa estuary

Tranquillity Lane

(alternative)

Beach/Coast
‘Tranquillity Lane’ reflects the tranquil East Coast nearby as well as the tranquillity of the greenway

 

Proposed Names for Road 6

Meaning

Kāuru Lane

(preference)

Beach/Coast
Kāuru’ means ‘head of river, stream or tree’, reflecting beach/coast theme

Pounamu Lane

(alternative)

Colours of the environment
‘Pounamu’ means ‘to be dark green’ in Māori, as well as greenstone/jade, reflecting the nearby greenway

Leafy Trail Lane

(alternative)

Pathways/connection
Reflects the ‘lane-like’ feel of this road, and that this lane bisects the greenway

 

12.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the guidelines and the standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

13.     In respect of the existing road extensions, it is considered logical to continue with the existing road name.

14.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location

15.     Road type: The road types ‘Lane, Avenue, Road, Drive, and Street are acceptable road types for the new roads given their layout and form.

16.     Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     To aid local board decision making, the guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

21.     On 2 July 2021, 12 mana whenua groups with an interest in the general area were contacted by council on behalf of the applicant through the Resource Consent Unit’s central facilitation process as set out in the guidelines.

22.     By the close of the consultation period no responses had been received from any of the 12 groups.

23.     Dependent on the scale of the development and its level of significance, not all road naming applications receive comments from mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

25.     A V Jennings Pty Limited has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Locality Plan Ara Hills 3A

49

b

Scheme Plan Ara Hills Stage 3A - New

51

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bruce Angove – Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Auckland Transport update August 2021

File No.: CP2021/11738

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Rodney Local Board members on transport related matters in the Rodney Local Board area, including the Local Board Transport Capital Fund and Auckland Transport’s Community Safety Fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      This report covers:

·      Auckland Transport responses to resolutions made by the local board in relation to the Regional Land Transport Plan

·      a summary of Auckland Transport projects and operations in the local board area

·      a summary of the board’s Transport Capital Fund and Community Safety Fund projects

·      a summary of general information items.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      receive Auckland Transport’s update August 2021.

Horopaki

Context

3.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. As set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan, we report on a monthly basis to local boards. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important role local boards play in the governance of Auckland on behalf of their local communities. 

4.       This report updates the local board on Auckland Transport projects and operations in the Rodney Local Board area, it summarises consultations and Traffic Control Committee decisions, and includes information on the status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) and Community Safety Fund (CSF).

5.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by the Governing Body and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme.

6.       The CSF is a capital budget established by Auckland Transport for use by local boards to fund local road safety initiatives. The purpose of this fund is to allow elected members to address long-standing local road safety issues that are not regional priorities and are therefore not being addressed by the Auckland Transport programme.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Response to resolutions 

7.       In response to resolution number RD/2021/217 The local board provided feedback on the 2021-2031 Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP), resolution RD/2021/217. Responses to this feedback are provided in paragraph 10 below.

8.       All 21 local boards resolved official feedback on the RLTP with over 740 points for consideration. This feedback was reviewed by the RLTP team, was presented to the Regional Transport Committee, Auckland Council’s Planning Committee and the Auckland Transport Board to help inform their decision making.

9.       In terms of responding to local board feedback it is our intention to come back, formally, on all the points. However, given the volume of feedback, this will have to be done in stages, based on whether we have an immediate response to the feedback or if it requires further investigation from the wider organisation. All comments that do not directly relate to the RLTP have been forwarded to the relevant part of Auckland Transport for their information.

10.     Please see below for a table outlining the local board feedback and Auckland Transports response.

Advocacy

Response

Support enough funding for Auckland Transport to renew and maintain 12 per cent of Auckland's roading network each year to ensure safe, well-maintained roads

Thank you for this comment supporting increased road maintenance and renewals.

Support the proposed return to pre-Emergency Budget levels of funding for the Transport Capital Funds for local boards   

Thank you for this comment supporting the reinstatement of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

Support the proposed investment in safety programmes to achieve the Vision Zero strategy, in particular the Auckland Transport Safety Programme, Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency's state highway Safer Networks Programme, the SH16 Brigham Creek-Waimauku safety and access improvements and the School Speed Management Programme

Thank you for this comment supporting Vision Zero and safety-related investment.

Acknowledge the inclusion in the budget the project to improve the Hill Street intersection in Warkworth and supports requests for funding to be allocated towards it

Thank you for this comment supporting Hill Street Intersection improvements.

Support the proposed $100m investment in SH16 Northwest Bus Improvements

Thank you for this comment supporting the Northwest Interim Bus Improvements.

Support walking, cycling and public transport connections for large infrastructure and development projects to connect them to the wider transport network to allow for safe, realistic alternatives to using cars, with services provided at the outset so that good transport patterns can be established

Thank you for this comment supporting investments providing connections for sustainable modes of travel.

Support funding for public transport provision for Warkworth given its high growth rate, including bus lanes, bus routes and land for park and rides

Thank you for this comment supporting investment in Warkworth to provide better public transport outcomes.

Support the inclusion of walking and cycling in the Matakana Road Safety Programme

We have requested a response from the relevant department of Auckland Transport and will come back to the local board with a response.

Support funding to be allocated to Sandspit Link Road, Western Link Road, Wider Western Link and Southern interchange as described in the Supporting Growth Programme's Warkworth Indicative Strategic Transport Network

We have requested a response from the Supporting Growth and will come back to the local board with a response.

Support public transport provision for Milldale being delivered as soon as possible

We have requested a response from the relevant department of Auckland Transport and will come back to the local board with a response.

Request that the $84.9 million in funding for Additional Seal Extensions, now known as the Unsealed Roads Improvement Programme, that was allocated in the 2018 Regional Land Transport Plan is retained in the new 2021-2031 Regional Land Transport Plan as a distinct line item

The RLTP team is still working on the response to this item.

Requests greater clarity in reporting from Auckland Transport on their road renewal and maintenance programmes

We have requested a response from the relevant department of Auckland Transport and will come back to the local board with a response.

Request that funding for rapid transit to Huapai is included as a line item in the plan to indicate that work, to at least develop the project, will begin within the next 10 years

The RLTP team is still working on the response to this item.

Request that significantly more funding is allocated for footpaths as $49 million over 10 years will only have a minor impact in addressing the large shortage of footpaths across Auckland, particularly in Rodney

Thank you for this comment supporting new footpaths. The budget for new footpaths in the RLTP has been increased to $4m per annum.

Request that the extension of the Western train line to Huapai is included as an item in the plan to indicate that work, at least to develop the project, will begin within the next 10 years

The RLTP team is still working on the response to this item.

Suggest that $51m for park and ride facilities across the region is inadequate and that more funding should be allocated for these facilities to support growth, particularly in Rodney which has the second-highest growth of all local boards

The RLTP team is still working on the response to this item.

Request that Auckland Transport partner with the Rodney Local Board to fund and deliver a park and ride in Kumeū with funding to be allocated as a discrete line item in the Regional Land Transport Plan 

The RLTP team is still working on the response to this item.

Support the inclusion of the Kumeū Alternative Access and requests that funding be allocated to it to begin work within the next ten years

The RLTP team is still working on the response to this item.

Express extreme disappointment that the Albany Transport Network Improvements: The Avenue/Dairy Flat Highway intersection upgrade, Lucas Creek bridge upgrade, Gills Road link including upgrade of Gills Road intersection with Dairy Flat Highway, is not in the draft Regional Land Transport Fund

The RLTP team is still working on the response to this item.

Request that The Avenue/Dairy Flat Highway intersection upgrade, Lucas Creek bridge upgrade, Gills Road link including upgrade of Gills Road intersection with Dairy Flat Highway project, which was previously funded in the first three years of the 2018-2028 Regional Land Transport Plan, be reinstated in full

The RLTP team is still working on the response to this item.

Request that, should funding constraints preclude The Avenue/Dairy Flat Highway intersection upgrade, Lucas Creek bridge upgrade, Gills Road link including upgrade of Gills Road intersection with Dairy Flat Highway project commencing with an upgrade of The Avenue/Dairy Flat Highway intersection be included in the 2021-2031 Regional Land Transport Plan

The RLTP team are still working on the response to this item.

Auckland Transport projects and operations in the local board area

11.     The table below has a general summary of projects of interest to the local board with their current status. Please note that all timings are indicative and are subject to change:

 

Name

AT area

Update

Matakana Link Road

Major Projects

No update this month, last update:

Although the project has been faced with relatively bad weather recently, the Matakana Link Road project has continued with the construction of the bridge, wetland and stormwater.

The road diversion on Matakana Road is working well, allowing works to proceed on the roundabout without being an inconvenience to road users and the construction team.

A good summer season allowed for the bulk of the earthworks. The next works on site will be the continuation of the bridge, roundabout and the installation of service trenches.

The project is within the planned time and budget.

Huapai Improvements (Huapai Special Housing Area)

 

Major Projects

SH16/Access Road – consultation has now been closed out and final designs have been sent to all businesses in the Access Road area. We are waiting on confirmation of the construction start date once a contractor has been appointed. Enabling works are set to start this week.

Station Road – updated designs have been sent to residents on Station Road, inviting them to contact us to arrange a meeting if they’d like to discuss further.

Hill Street intersection Improvement

Major Projects

Auckland Transport is currently tendering for the detailed design of Hill Street. Upon appointment of a supplier, detailed design and pre-implementation work is expected to occur from October 2021 to early 2023.

Matakana Road - Melwood Drive to Green Road

Road Safety

Road Safety is currently investigating this corridor for improvements. The safety improvement is likely to be improved road markings, skid resistance at bends and providing/upgrading guardrails at high-risk locations.

The project is currently programmed for staged delivery i.e. road marking upgrade is likely to be FY21/22 installation and other safety improvements are for FY22/23 installation.

Please note this project is subject to funding availability.

Sandspit Road Safety

Road Safety

This project is currently under construction and will be completed in the next couple months. It involves shape correction, shoulder widening and improving the surfacing at the bend near Hamilton Road intersection.

Shape correction and shoulder widening have been completed. Surfacing improvement is expected to be installed by end of August or early September 2021.

Dairy Flat Highway area wide treatment - Pine Valley Road to Green Road

Road Safety

A wide centreline treatment between Pine Valley Road and Green Road to mitigate the risk associated with head-on type issues for this corridor, as part of the overall Dairy Flat Highway safety improvements.

Under construction, at 95 per cent completion.

Coatesville Riverhead and Old Railway Intersection

Road Safety

To provide a safer turning facility for vehicles turning from Coatesville-Riverhead Highway into Old Railway Road i.e. right-turn bay.

This project is currently at external consultation with the community. The project is programmed for FY21/22 construction.

Rural Delineation Project – improved delineation and signage on rural roads.

Road Safety

Under construction.

New bus stop and shelter - 984 Matakana Rd, Matakana

AT Metro

Construction complete.

New bus stop and shelter - 987 Matakana Rd, Matakana

AT Metro

Construction complete.

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

12.    Following the Auckland Council Emergency Budget the amount of funding in the Local Board Transport Capital Fund for 2020/2021 was $286,459. At the November 2020 business meeting the local board resolved (RD/2020/162) that:

·        $235,000 would be allocated for the delivery of the Hudson Road footpath project with the remaining balance of $398,000 to be allocated from the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate.

·        $52,000 from the Local Board Transport Capital fund for completing the design for the Dairy Flat School footpath. With the remaining balance of $440,000 to be allocated from the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate.

13.    Please see below for an update on the projects:

Item

Update

Hudson Road footpath

Complete.

Diary Flat School footpath

The tender has been awarded to Traffic Systems Limited (TSL) for Dairy Flat School. Planned construction commencement is now expected on the 30 August. It has been delayed due to contractor resourcing.

 

14.     Following the approval of the Regional Land Transport programme the Local Board Transport Capital Fund allocation to the local board for the years 2021/22 and 2022/23 is $2,361,062.

15.     Auckland Transport has scheduled a workshop to discuss the fund on 8 September 2021.

Community Safety Fund

16.     The CSF is funded from Auckland Transport’s safety budget and is dependent on the level of funding Auckland Transport receives from council.

17.     The below table has an update on the projects in the fund:

Priority

Project

Update

1

Motutara Road – crossing

In detailed design.

2

Motutara Road - footpath extension

Removed from CSF following consultation.

3

Coatesville – speed calming

Driver feedback sign has been installed.

4

Matakana Road – signalised mid-block

In construction.

5

Matua / Tapu Road – intersection improvements

Detail design complete. Construction is dependent on budget availability.

6

Matua / Oraha Road – intersection improvements

Road Safety Audit has identified a missing crossing link across the northern side of Matua Rd. This will need to be investigated and may result in further parking loss and therefore reconsulted externally. This is also budget dependent.

7

Rata Street - pedestrian crossing

Detail design complete. Construction is dependent on budget availability.

8

Kaipara College - pedestrian crossing

Detail design complete. Construction is dependent on budget availability.

9

Waitoki School – speed calming

Removed from CSF as per local board decision.

10

Whangateau - speed warning signs

Completed.

11

Kumeu – signalised mid bloc crossing

Completed.

12

Woodcocks Road – crossing

Completed.

Unsealed Roads Improvement Framework

18.     Auckland has a road network of 7,300km, of which 795km is unsealed. The unsealed road network is largely located in five local board areas: Rodney, Franklin, Waiheke Island, Aotea/Great Barrier and Waitakere. Auckland Transport has a programme to progressively upgrade the unsealed road network. AT has reviewed the approach to prioritising and upgrading the unsealed road network to allow AT to deliver more improvements to benefit more people.

19.     The new prioritisation approach involves assessing roads against data proxies and qualitative information using the following criteria: strategic fit, safety, public health, cost, climate change and natural environment. This ensures the prioritisation process is simple, robust and repeatable, and aligns with AT strategic objectives.

20.     The new approach also allows for a broad range of treatment options, rather than defaulting to a full seal, including surface strengthening, road widening, safety improvements, pothole, corrugation and drainage improvements, dust mitigation, and full seal. 

21.     The budget allocation is also adjusted to fund the highest priorities across each treatment type, resulting in more kilometres of road being treated each year with the same budget, while also having the treatment align to customer needs and ensuring that sealing is still implemented.

22.     AT ran workshops with all the affected local boards and received their feedback. Overall, there was strong support from all the local boards for the new prioritisation process and treatment options.

23.     AT has now assessed the roads and applied the new prioritisation approach to develop the future programme. The below table outlines the programme for 2021/2022 under the new methodology:

2021/2022 Programme

Road

Start

End

Treatment Description

Local Board

Man O War Bay Road (North)

204

4335

Localised Improvement Works

Waiheke

Old Kaipara Road (Warkworth)

0

5630

Localised Improvement Works

Rodney

Wilson Road (Warkworth)

490

1350

Localised Improvement Works

Rodney

Puriri Bay Road

1187

1983

Maintenance Seal

Aotea Great Barrier

Puriri Bay Road

474

1187

Maintenance Seal

Aotea Great Barrier

Puriri Bay Road

1983

2291

Maintenance Seal

Aotea Great Barrier

Awaawaroa Road

954

1370

Maintenance Seal

Waiheke

Brook Road (Waiuku)

2174

2414

Maintenance Seal

Franklin

Ahuroa Road (Warkworth)

5393

7837

Seal Extension

Rodney

Ahuroa Road (Warkworth)

4935

5393

Seal Extension

Rodney

Mclachlan Road (Kumeu)

548

4425

Widening/Drainage/Strengthening

Rodney

 

24.     Delivery of the new programme will begin in the next financial year (2021/2022).

25.     Following the development of the 2021/2022 programme our intention is to have three years of the programme developed and publicised. The local board will be updated when this information is available and prior to public release.

Traffic Control Committee Decisions

26.     Auckland Transport’s resolution and approval process ensures the most appropriate controls and restrictions are put in place and can be legally enforced. The decisions made by AT’s Traffic Control Committee in the Rodney Local Board during July 2021 are as follows:


Street Name

Suburb

Report Type

Nature of Restriction

Decision

Maryvale Road / Edward Able Street / Henry Tayler Rise / Lordland Road / Ricketts Road / Archibald Drive

Pine Valley

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes

NSAAT (not stopping at all times parking restriction) / Traffic Island / Road Hump / Footpath / Give-Way Control / Roundabout

Approved in Principle

Muriwai Road / Denehurst Drive / Amber Place / Freshfields Road / Rosella Grove / Pollard Lane

Waimauku

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes

NSAAT / Road Hump / Pedestrian Crossing / Give-Way Control / Stop Control / P5 Parking / Traffic Island / Footpath / School Crossing Point / School Patrol / “Slow” Advisory Marking / Edge Line / Removal Of Edge Line

Approved with Conditions

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.     Auckland Transport engages closely with council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and council’s priorities.

28.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     The impact of information in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no local, sub-regional or regional impacts.

31.     Please see below for a summary of items sent to the local board for their information or feedback:

Item

Date sent to local board

FYI: Huapai Special Housing Project update

09/07/21

FYI: Coatesville-Riverhead Highway, Riverhead - Parking Restrictions

26/07/21

Road Safety Business Review – webinar

27/07/21

Update: Climate Change Risk Assessment

03/08/21

Update: Unsealed Road Improvement Framework

10/08/21

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     There are no financial implications in receiving this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks. Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for all their projects.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     Auckland Transport will provide a further report to the Rodney Local Board at its next meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ben Halliwell – Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Paul Thompson – Head of Community Engagement

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Proposal to make a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw

File No.: CP2021/11601

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek support for the draft proposal to make a new Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Auckland Council Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022, before it is finalised for public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Staff have prepared a draft proposal for a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw to enable local boards to provide their views before it is finalised for public consultation.

3.       The draft proposal is to make a new bylaw under the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This bylaw would replace the current legacy bylaw, which expires in 2022 and contains provisions developed before the Freedom Camping Act 2011 was passed.

4.       The Freedom Camping Act 2011 allows freedom camping on all public land unless it is already prohibited under another enactment. The Act enables councils to make a bylaw to prohibit or restrict freedom camping in areas that meet statutory criteria for protection.

5.       This draft proposal replaces an earlier proposal developed in 2018 which was set aside by the Governing Body in 2019. Following decisions by the Governing Body in March and May 2021, the key changes compared with the 2018 proposal are that the new draft proposal:

·     excludes land held under the Reserves Act 1977 from scope (council would maintain the current default prohibition on camping on reserves under the Reserves Act 1977)

·     manages freedom camping only on land held under the Local Government Act 2002

·     seeks to prevent freedom camping impacts in sensitive areas, and to protect public health and safety and manage access in all areas, by:

o   scheduling 44 prohibited areas, where no freedom camping is allowed

o   scheduling 19 restricted areas, where freedom camping is allowed subject to site-specific restrictions

o   including general rules to manage freedom camping impacts in all other areas (campers must use certified self-contained vehicles, stay a maximum of two nights, depart by 9am and not return to the same area within two weeks).

6.       The proposed prohibited and restricted areas are those areas which the Bylaw Panel recommended should be prohibited and restricted in 2019, and which are held under the Local Government Act 2002. Areas held under the Reserves Act 1977 have been removed.

7.       The Panel’s recommendations draw on previous area assessments and take into account feedback from local board engagement and public consultation conducted in 2018 and 2019.

8.       The draft proposal includes seven designated prohibited areas and five designated restricted areas located in the Rodney Local Board area. All designated areas are listed in the draft Bylaw schedules within Attachment A to the agenda report. All other council-managed land held under the Local Government Act 2002, including roads, is proposed to be covered by general rules.

9.       Staff recommend that the local board provide its view on the draft proposal, including the inclusion of general rules in the bylaw and the recommended settings for those rules.

10.     The key risks of the proposal are that:

·        it creates too few areas where freedom camping is allowed; this is partially mitigated by allowing freedom camping on most roads (subject to general rules), and council could decide to designate more restricted areas following consultation

·        the cumulative impact of all prohibitions under the Bylaw and other enactments is viewed as an effective ban; however staff looked closely at the requirements of the Freedom Camping Act 2011 in developing the proposal and will continue to monitor cumulative impact as bylaw development progresses.

11.     The local board’s views will be provided to the Governing Body in September with the recommendation that the finalised proposal is adopted for public consultation. Public consultation is scheduled for November, and Bylaw Panel deliberations for early 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      support the draft Statement of Proposal in Attachment A to make a new Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Auckland Council Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022 for public consultation.

Horopaki

Context

Freedom camping can have both positive and negative impacts

12.     For the purposes of this Bylaw, freedom camping is when someone stays overnight on council-managed land, including roadsides, in a vehicle or caravan.

13.     Freedom camping specifically refers to people staying in vehicles overnight as part of leisure travel, or because they are choosing to live in a vehicle for lifestyle reasons.

14.     Freedom camping provides a flexible and affordable way for Aucklanders and for domestic and international visitors to experience and enjoy the region. Many freedom campers will visit friends and family, attend events, and support local businesses during their stay.

15.     Freedom camping can however have negative impacts on the local environment and host communities if it is not well-managed. These impacts can be caused by:

16.     Freedom camping has become popularly associated with harmful and antisocial behaviours, but our research shows that most freedom campers visiting Auckland do camp responsibly.

17.     However, the presence of large numbers of campers – even responsible campers – is more likely to cause community concern in Auckland due to pressure on limited public space.

18.     Freedom camper numbers have been growing in Auckland and throughout the country over the last two decades. Once the current border restrictions are lifted overseas visitors are likely to return, and domestic freedom camping may continue to increase in the meantime.

19.     Auckland does not currently have enough places for freedom campers to go. This means there is often overcrowding in the places where it is allowed, or illegal camping in unsuitable areas once legal sites are full. Having more areas would reduce these supply-related issues.

20.     The council can regulate freedom camping to help prevent irresponsible camping and manage responsible freedom camping in a way that minimises its negative impacts.

Council must align its freedom camping regulation with the Freedom Camping Act 2011

21.     The Freedom Camping Act 2011 allows freedom camping on all public land unless it is prohibited under a bylaw or another enactment, such as the Reserves Act 1977.

22.     Auckland’s current Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2015 is a consolidation of pre-2010 legacy bylaw provisions developed before the Freedom Camping Act 2011 was passed. A new bylaw must be made that aligns with the national legislation before the current bylaw expires in 2022.

23.     The Freedom Camping Act 2011 is permissive by default but does allow council to make a bylaw to prohibit or restrict freedom camping in areas where certain statutory criteria are met. In particular, council must be satisfied that:

·     each area’s location can be clearly shown on a map and/or described

·     the prohibitions and restrictions in each area are necessary to:

-      protect the area (for example because it is environmentally or culturally sensitive)

-      protect the health and safety of the people who may visit the area

-      protect access to the area (for other users)

·     the cumulative impact of all prohibitions and restrictions (under the bylaw and other enactments) do not constitute an effective ban on freedom camping on council land.

A 2018 proposal to regulate freedom camping was set aside in August 2019

24.     Work to develop a freedom camping bylaw began in 2016. Staff assessed more than 1,000 areas for their suitability for freedom camping and need for protection under the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This process included extensive engagement with local boards.

25.     In late 2018 and early 2019 public feedback and formal local board views were sought on a proposal for a draft Freedom Camping in Vehicles bylaw. A Bylaw Panel deliberated on all feedback and made recommendations to the Governing Body. The Panel recommended scheduling 322 prohibited areas and 103 restricted areas, including a number of reserves.

26.     In August 2019 the Governing Body set aside the recommendations of the Bylaw Panel and instead requested advice on a new direction for bylaw development.

The Governing Body decided to exclude reserves from scope and include general rules

27.     The Governing Body considered staff advice in March 2021[1] and May 2021[2] and directed that a new proposal for a Freedom Camping Act 2011 bylaw be developed that:

·        only manages freedom camping on land held under the Local Government Act 2002, with camping on reserves continuing to be managed by the Reserves Act 1977

·        includes general rules to manage the generalised impacts of freedom camping, and ensure problems are not displaced from regulated to unregulated areas

·        relies on previous assessments (undertaken to develop the 2018 proposal) to identify land held under the Local Government Act 2002 that should be prohibited or further restricted through the bylaw.

28.     Staff have prepared a draft proposal to implement the Governing Body’s decisions (Attachment A). This proposal outlines the reasons and decisions that have led to the content of the proposed new Bylaw.

Potential changes to the Freedom Camping Act 2011 not yet confirmed

29.     In April and May 2021, the Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) publicly consulted on four proposals for change to the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This included making the use of self-contained vehicles mandatory for all freedom camping.

30.     The Governing Body approved Auckland Council’s submission, which incorporated local board views, in May 2021[3]. MBIE has not yet released any further information, and timeframes for any changes to the Act have not been confirmed.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

A new bylaw is proposed to manage freedom camping in vehicles on some council land

31.     The draft proposal would make a new Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022 that:

·        aligns with the Freedom Camping Act 2011

·        helps council to prevent freedom camping impacts in sensitive areas, and to protect public health and safety and manage access in all areas of land held under the Local Government Act 2002 (including roads controlled by Auckland Transport)

·        forms part of a wider regulatory framework of Acts, regulations and other bylaws[4].

32.     The Bylaw will be enforced by the Licensing and Regulatory Compliance unit using a graduated compliance model (information, education, enforcement).

33.     The table below summarises the main proposals:

Draft proposals

Reasons for draft proposal

To schedule 63 specific areas as follows:

Restrict freedom camping in 19 specific areas (where freedom camping is allowed subject to site-specific restrictions)

Listed in Schedule 1 of the draft Bylaw

To better manage areas that have been identified as needing additional regulation due to factors such as popularity, current use by others, demand for parking and the size of the parking areas.

These are the restricted areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel in 2019, with all reserves removed.

Prohibit freedom camping in 44 specific areas (where freedom camping is not allowed)

Listed in Schedule 2 of the draft Bylaw

 

To protect areas that have been identified as being environmentally or culturally sensitive, or where freedom camping would impact public health and safety and access in ways that cannot be adequately managed through restrictions.

These are the prohibited areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel in 2019, with all reserves removed.

To include general rules for all other areas as follows:

Require freedom campers to use certified self-contained vehicles

To prevent impacts from the depositing of toilet waste and wastewater into the environment, and the use of unsuitable areas for cooking

Allow freedom campers to stay a maximum of two nights in the same road or off-road parking area

To prevent impacts from the depositing of toilet waste and wastewater into the environment and ensure fair access to limited shared parking and amenities

Require freedom campers to vacate their parking space by 9am on the day of departure

To ensure fair access for shared parking and amenities for other campers and users of public space

Require freedom campers not return to stay in the same road or off-road parking area within a two-week period

To ensure fair access to limited shared parking and amenities for other campers and users of public space

34.     The draft proposal notes that the council does not intend to use the bylaw to manage:

·       issues associated with homelessness (people living in a vehicle involuntarily)

·       areas where access is already controlled or parking is reserved or charged for, for example gated carparks, land leased to other organisations and regional parks.

The draft proposal complies with statutory requirements

35.     The draft proposal has been prepared in accordance with statutory requirements. Staff consider the proposed draft Bylaw:

·       only prohibits or restricts freedom camping where it is necessary to protect sensitive areas, and/or to manage impacts on public health and safety and access to an area

·       uses a format and wording that are easy to read, understand and comply with

·       is authorised by statute, is not repugnant to other legislation, and is not unreasonable

·       does not give rise to any implications or inconsistencies with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990.

Staff recommend the local board consider and provide its views on the draft proposal

36.     Staff recommend that the local board consider the draft proposal in Attachment A and provide any views by resolution to the Governing Body before it is finalised for public consultation on 23 September 2021.

37.     For example, the local board could support the draft proposal for public consultation, recommend changes or defer comment until after it has considered public feedback on the proposal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     Staff note that this is a regulatory process to manage existing activities enabled by central government policy. It is not causing these activities to occur or affecting the likelihood that they will occur. The decision sought in this report therefore has no specific climate impact.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.     The draft proposal impacts the operations of several council departments and council-controlled organisations, including Licensing and Regulatory Compliance, Parks, Sport and Recreation and Auckland Transport.

40.     The Licensing and Regulatory Compliance unit are aware of the impacts of the draft proposal and their primary role in implementing and managing compliance with the Bylaw.

41.     Council’s 86 park rangers help to manage compliance with council Bylaws, the Reserves Act 1977 and the Litter Act 1974 by carrying out education and monitoring on parks and reserves. However, rangers are not currently being warranted or renewing warrants, and Licensing and Regulatory Compliance will continue to carry out any enforcement required.

Enhanced service levels for Bylaw compliance activities are not currently budgeted

42.     Concern about the council’s ability to effectively implement the Bylaw and manage compliance within existing resources was a key theme of public and local board feedback received in 2019.

43.     In March 2021 the Governing Body requested advice about costed options for increasing the service levels for compliance associated with this Bylaw. Costings are being finalised and this advice will be provided alongside the proposal in September, for consideration during future Annual Plan cycles.

44.     There are multiple options for increasing investment in Bylaw implementation and both proactive and reactive Bylaw compliance activities. These include:

·        enhancement of council’s information technology systems, to enable the implementation of the new infringement notice regime

·        use of contracted security services, to increase responsiveness to complaints (similar to the current arrangements for Noise Control), or for additional proactive monitoring at seasonal ‘hotspots’

·        purchase of mobile printers, to enable infringement notices to be affixed to vehicles in breach of the Bylaw at the time of the offence

·        signage at all prohibited and restricted areas and at other areas as needed

·        camera surveillance technology to enable remote monitoring of known or emerging hotspots, for evidence-gathering purposes and/or to support real-time enforcement.

45.     Local boards can request further advice from Licensing and Regulatory Compliance if they wish to consider allocating local budget for enhanced local compliance activities.

46.     For example, Rodney Local Board recently allocated funds from its Locally Driven Initiatives budget to employ two Compliance Wardens for a six-month trial over the 2021-2022 summer period. The wardens will address low level compliance issues, including illegal freedom camping, with follow-up support from warranted compliance staff when required.

Ongoing land classification work won’t be completed with bylaw development timeframes

47.     Following the Governing Body’s decision in March 2021 to exclude reserves from scope, land status has become more relevant for identifying areas requiring protection in the bylaw.

48.     The council does not currently hold complete land classification data to establish definitive numbers of reserves. Parks and reserves can comprise multiple land parcels which may be held under different Acts.

49.     Since reporting to the Governing Body in March, staff have completed further investigation of the land status of the prohibited and restricted areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel. This has identified additional reserves, which has reduced the proposed prohibited areas (from 55 in the March report to 44 in the draft proposal) and restricted areas (from 21 to 19).

50.     Classifications are still being confirmed as part of the development of omnibus Local Park Management Plans. Five local board areas have completed this work, and an average of 94 percent of their parks were found to be held under the Reserves Act 1977.

51.     Ongoing land classification work will support bylaw implementation. It will not finish within the timeframe for bylaw development, so the status quo issues will remain.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

52.     The proposed draft Bylaw impacts on local boards’ governance role as it affects decision making over local assets, particularly parks and other council-controlled public places. There is also high community interest in freedom camping regulation in many local board areas.

53.     The local board has an opportunity to provide its views on this draft proposal by resolution to the Governing Body. The local board will also have further opportunity to provide its views to a Bylaw Panel on any public feedback to the proposal from people in their local board area.

All proposed prohibited and restricted areas previously discussed with local boards

54.     The draft proposal includes seven designated prohibited areas and five designated restricted areas located in the Rodney Local Board area. All designated areas are listed in the draft Bylaw schedules within Attachment A. All other council-managed land held under the Local Government Act 2002, including roads, is proposed to be covered by general rules.

55.     The proposed prohibited and restricted areas are those areas which the Bylaw Panel recommended should be prohibited and restricted in 2019, and which are held under the Local Government Act 2002. Areas held under the Reserves Act 1977 have been removed.

56.     All areas proposed to be scheduled as prohibited or restricted were previously discussed with the relevant local boards in 2018.

Joint political working group provided views on general rules in May 2021

57.     Three local board representatives participated in a joint political working group on 21 May 2021 to provide views on options for including general rules in the Bylaw.

58.     The working group unanimously supported the inclusion of general rules in the Bylaw, and five out of six working group members supported the recommended settings included in the draft proposal. A summary of the working group’s views was reported to the Governing Body on 27 May 2021[5].

The new draft proposal responds to feedback provided on the 2018 proposal

59.     Local boards provided formal feedback on the 2018 draft proposal to the Bylaw Panel in 2019, following on from their early feedback given during engagement in 2017, and site-specific feedback provided in 2018.

60.     The table below details typical concerns expressed by local boards in their formal feedback and how the new draft proposal responds to these concerns:

Key local board concern (from 2019)

Draft proposal’s response to concern

The loss of protection in the legacy bylaws for most reserves and roadsides

·   Excludes reserves from the bylaw and continues to use the Reserves Act 1977 to manage all camping at reserves

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw, including roadsides

·   Notes individual roads can be scheduled as prohibited or restricted areas if problems arise in future

The provision for unrestricted freedom camping in the local board area

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw

Freedom camping at reserves and enforcement tools under the Reserves Act

·   The Reserves Act 1977 will be used to manage all camping at reserves, which means the status quo (prohibition) will continue

·   Notes that following changes in September 2019 to the Reserves Act 1977, $800 infringement notices can now be issued for breaches of this Act

Freedom camping in inner-city areas, unsafe areas and areas near sports fields, residential homes and campgrounds

·   Bylaw schedules designate individual sites that have been identified and assessed as unsuitable for freedom camping (prohibited areas), or where additional restrictions are needed to manage impacts (restricted areas)

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw

The potential effect on people experiencing homelessness

·   Clarifies that the bylaw will not be used to manage issues associated with homelessness and confirms the council’s commitment to a compassionate enforcement approach to protect vulnerable Aucklanders

Council’s ability to enforce bylaws and the cost of enforcement and monitoring

·   Although not contained in the proposal itself, advice will be provided to the Governing Body on options for increasing investment in bylaw implementation

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

61.     The Bylaw has relevance to Māori as kaitiaki of Papatūānuku. The proposal supports two key directions in the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau:

·     wairuatanga (promoting distinctive identity), in relation to valuing and protecting Māori heritage and Taonga Māori

·     kaitiakitanga (ensuring sustainable futures), in relation to environmental protection.

62.     The proposal also supports the Board’s Schedule of Issues of Significance by ensuring that sites of significance to Māori are identified and protected from freedom camping harms.

63.     Mana whenua and mataawaka were invited to provide feedback during the development of the 2018 proposal via dedicated hui and again through the public consultation process.

64.     Feedback received on specific prohibited and restricted areas identified in the 2018 proposal was incorporated into the deliberations. This included the identification of sites of significance to Māori, such as wahi tapu areas.

65.     General matters raised by Māori during engagement included the need to ensure:

·     the ability to add further sites of significance to the Bylaw as these are designated

·     provision for temporary bans on freedom camping, e.g. in areas under a rahui

·     a compassionate approach to people experiencing homelessness

·     provision of sufficient dump stations to avoid environmental pollution

·     clear communication of the rules in the bylaw and at freedom camping sites.

66.     The draft proposal addresses these matters by proposing to prohibit freedom camping at sites of significance to Māori (such as Maraetai Foreshore and Onetangi Cemetery), provision in the Bylaw for temporary bans, and confirming council’s commitment to a compassionate enforcement approach to people experiencing homelessness.

67.     Mana whenua and mataawaka will have an opportunity to provide further feedback during public consultation on the proposal.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

68.     There are no financial implications to the local board for any decisions to support the draft proposal for public consultation. The Governing Body will consider any financial implications associated with public notification in September 2021.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

69.     Legal risks were discussed as part of the provision of legally privileged advice to interested local board members at a confidential workshop held in June 2021.

70.     The other key risks and possible mitigations are summarised in the table below.

If...

Then...

Mitigation (partial)

The bylaw proposal does not create enough areas where freedom camping is allowed

 

Council may need to manage an increase in overcrowding, non-compliance, and harms over time.

The proposed bylaw would enable freedom campers to stay for up to two nights on most roads, subject to general rules.

Council could consider increasing the number of designated restricted areas following consultation, or if problems arise in future.

The cumulative impact of prohibitions and restrictions in the Bylaw and other enactments is viewed as an ‘effective ban’ on freedom camping in Auckland

The risk of legal challenge could increase.

Staff looked closely at the requirements of the Freedom Camping Act 2011 in developing the proposal, and cumulative impact will continue to be monitored.

Council can’t meet public expectation of increased enforcement

There may be a loss of social license for freedom camping and reputational risk for council.

Responsible Camping Ambassadors will assist compliance staff during the peak season, although future funding is not guaranteed.

The Governing Body or local boards could allocate additional funding to increase service levels for compliance activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

71.     Staff will present local board views and a finalised proposal to the Governing Body on 23 September 2021. The next steps for bylaw development are shown in the diagram below.

Diagram

Description automatically generated

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Freedom Camping in Vehicles Statement of Proposal and Draft Bylaw August 2021 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rebekah Forman - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Future management of motorised vehicles driving on Muriwai Beach

File No.: CP2021/11744

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on the continued engagement with the community and implementation of measures to manage motorised vehicles driving on Muriwai Beach in the future.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Locals and visitors driving motorised vehicles on Muriwai Beach has increased. 

3.       People driving motorised vehicles on Muriwai Beach is of concern in relation to beach user safety and enjoyment, environmental protection and driving behaviour. 

4.       Council currently addresses concerns and negative impacts through signage and barriers, information and education, a permit system, temporary closures and through the Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw (2013). 

5.       At a Parks, Arts, Community and Events committee workshop on 24 February 2021, staff provided information about key issues and presented proposed options for future management of vehicles driving on the beach.

6.       Following the Parks, Arts, Community and Events committee workshop, staff engaged with the community on three options: 

·        seasonal closures   

·        controlled access points and area restrictions   

·        full closure. 

7.       Community and stakeholder engagement occurred between April and August 2021. This included a Have Your Say online survey, public meetings, community steering group meetings and a local board workshop.

8.       This report seeks local board support for continued community engagement and implementation of measures to manage motorised vehicles driving on the beach in the future.

9.       On 9 September 2021, staff will take a report to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events committee for a decision about future management.

10.     The decision will be communicated to the local board, including information about implementation.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      provide local board feedback on the continued engagement with the community and implementation of measures to manage motorised vehicles driving on Muriwai Beach in the future.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     People driving vehicles on Muriwai Beach has increased in recent years, causing negative impacts to the environment, the local community and beach users. 

12.     The beach can be accessed by vehicles at three separate points: 

·        Coast Road (in Muriwai Regional Park, approx. 2 kms up the beach) 

·        Rimmer Road (via an easement managed by Hancock Forestry and the Department of Conservation, approx. 15 kms up the beach)  

·        Wilson Road (a paper road controlled by Auckland Transport, approx. 30 kms up the beach). 

13.     Between 1 October 2020 and 31 January 2021, a total of 24,600 vehicles accessed Muriwai Beach via these three public access points.

14.     Muriwai Beach is one of only two beaches in Tāmaki Makaurau where the public can drive vehicles on the beach – the other is Kariotahi Beach.

15.     Key concern areas related to motorised vehicles driving on the beach are beach user safety and enjoyment, environmental protection including risk of fire, and driving behaviour. 

Beach user safety and enjoyment

16.     Many different user groups access the beach on a regular basis, including swimmers, walkers, surfers, horse riders, film crews and 4WD / off-road vehicle drivers. 

17.     Vehicles driving on the beach can cause safety issues for other beach users which has led to other users not occupying areas of the beach where vehicles are.

18.     Issues include death and injury, damage to property, conflict between different user groups and loss of enjoyment.

Environmental protection and fire risk

19.     The dune system at Muriwai is home to some threatened and endangered species. The dunes are being degraded and destabilised by vehicles illegally accessing them via the beach.

20.     Fires are prohibited at Muriwai Beach and Muriwai Regional Park. There is an ongoing history of illegally lit fires in the back-dunes and adjacent forest. 

21.     Between 2015 and 2020 there were 145 fire events recorded by council, Ngā Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara Ngahere Ltd and Fire and Emergency New Zealand.

22.     Tidal conditions and the remote location can restrict the ability to access parts of the beach, increasing the risks associated with fires.

Driving behaviour

23.     Council has received complaints about the behaviour of people driving on the beach. This includes accessing the dunes, speeding, driving in a dangerous manner, crashes and damaged vehicles left on the beach.

24.     Concerns have also been raised by the Police and local community regarding non-complying vehicles and road worthiness with some vehicles not having warrants of fitness, being unregistered and drivers not holding the correct class of driver’s license.

How council has addressed impacts until now

25.     Council has worked to address impacts of vehicles through actions such as signage, educational information, additional staff resources at peak times and a permit system.

26.     A number of vehicle users on the beach do not have a permit and are not aware of the rules associated with driving on the beach.

27.     Council has previously restricted vehicle access to the beach to reduce the risk of fire at high-risk times for example, through prohibited fire seasons and prohibiting fires during Guy Fawkes week.

28.     The Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw (2013) creates the offence of driving a vehicle on a beach without written prior council approval and driving a vehicle in prohibited areas.

29.     The isolated nature of Muriwai Beach, and the number of vehicles breaching the bylaw, makes the bylaw difficult to enforce. 

30.     Enforcement action is undertaken by Police utilising the infringement provisions of transport regulations.

Future management of motorised vehicles driving on the beach

31.     In December 2020, staff provided a memo to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee (PACE) about vehicle management over the 2020/2021 summer period – a seasonal closure between 23 December 2020 and 10 January 2021.

32.     The memo also said that staff would bring options about future management of motorised vehicles driving on the beach. 

33.     At a PACE committee workshop on 24 February 2021, staff presented four options for future management of vehicles driving on the beach:

·        status quo – including high fire-risk closures  

·        seasonal closures   

·        controlled access points and area restrictions   

·        full closure. 

34.     The committee requested that status quo be disregarded as an option with direction that change is required. 

35.     Staff were asked to review impacts and options for future management of vehicles accessing the beach, including community and stakeholder engagement.

36.     Based on public consultation and discussions with members of the steering group the following measures have been suggested to manage the future use of the beach:

·    increased education and signage

·    greater emphasis on promoting environmental protection of the beach and dunes systems

·    enforcement – work with NZ Police to support increased enforcement

·    seasonal Restrictions - particularly around the closed fire season

·    continued working with the community steering group

·    paid permit

·    managed access options.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Staff have reviewed ways to manage vehicles on the beach

37.     To complete the review of impacts and options for future management of driving on the beach, staff have: 

·        monitored vehicle usage and impacts of vehicles to beach users and the environment 

·        engaged with the community and stakeholders

·        worked to complete full analysis of the options.

Council engaged with the community, mana whenua, the local board and key stakeholders

38.     A Have Your Say online survey was open from 9 April to 14 May 2021. The purpose of the survey was to understand the views of the community and asked questions about the three options:

·        Season closures: for example, restricting vehicle access to the beach at core times, i.e., Christmas / New Year period, Christmas to after Auckland Anniversary weekend, Guy Fawkes and other times where required for fire risk reduction.​

·        Controlled access: for example, gated access points to control vehicle access to the beach (access would be restricted to authorised paid permit holders, Surf Lifesaving and emergency services vehicles only).​

·        Permanent closure: for example, close all public vehicle access points to Muriwai beach (except for Surf Lifesaving and other emergency services vehicles).

39.     2165 submissions were received and analysed with trends and findings outlined below.

40.     Attitudes to motorised vehicles driving on the beach are mixed:

·        Sixty-four per cent of submitters are seeing some level of concerning driver behaviour on the beach

·        thirty-five per cent say they have no concern about driver behaviour

·        thirty-eight per cent of submitters preferred seasonal closure, 32 per cent preferred controlled access, and 20 per cent preferred permanent closure to vehicles

·        twenty-one per cent said that the beach needed better policing

·        four in 10 submitters said they were not in support of closure, or the options provided.

41.     There is a link between levels of concern about driver behaviour and the restrictions or closure options they support:

·        submitters who have no concerns tend to support seasonal closures

·        submitters who sometimes see concerning behaviour support controlled access

·        submitters who often see concerning behaviour support permanent closure.

42.     Although Muriwai residents are among those more likely to see concerning driver behaviour, they tend not to support permanent closure of the beach to vehicles, with seven in 10 saying they drive on the beach themselves.

43.     Three public meetings were held in April 2021. Locations, dates, and a summary of these meetings is below:

·        Waimauku War Memorial Hall (15 April 2021) – many attendees objected to the full closure of the beach to vehicles. The lack of police presence on the beach was mentioned. There is a desire for better education and signage.

·        South Head Golf Club (22 April 2021) – attendees said that the current permit process and/or enforcement isn’t working and there is a discrepancy between the number of permits issued and the number of vehicles accessing the beach. Creating a community steering group was suggested and supported by the majority of attendees.

·        Muriwai Surf Club (27 April 2021) – attendees said that 4WDs are being targeted, and any rules will apply to all vehicles. Attendees brought up wanting increased police presence, and community enforcement was suggested. It was also suggested that there should be a timeframe to allow for users to change their behaviour and prove that the community can solve the issues before any action is taken regarding gated vehicle access to the beach.

44.     The community steering group was formed in June 2021, with representatives from various Auckland 4WD clubs, Muriwai residents, an environmental group, and a board riders club.

45.     Community steering group meetings were held on 29 June and 13 July 2021.

46.     The steering group discussed the issues and reached a consensus about management of vehicles driving on the beach.

47.     Members of the steering group committed to continue meeting and working with council to find solutions, including collaborating with council on education via signage and social media messaging.

48.     The Auckland 4WD Association offered to fund an educational sign for the beach.

49.     The steering group collectively agreed to the paid permit management option.

50.     It was also agreed that gates restricting access to vehicles with paid permits was an option.

51.     Several representatives of the 4WD community wanted to give the paid permit and education approach time, to see if a change in behaviour occurs before the installation of gates.

52.     Most agreed that the installation of gates was a last resort.

53.     Conversations with iwi on this issue are in progress and their position is not known at the current time.

54.     The Rodney Local Board chairperson has been actively involved in the engagement process.

55.     Staff work with other agencies who have interests or responsibilities relating to vehicles driving on the beach. These agencies are:

·        NZ Police

·        Auckland Transport

·        Department of Conservation

·        Ngā Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara Ngahere Ltd

·        Hancock Forestry

·        Fire and Emergency New Zealand

·        Muriwai First Response

·        Muriwai Surf Life Saving Club.

Auckland Council’s Regional Parks Management Plan is being reviewed

56.     The Regional Parks Management Plan (2010) identifies the issue of vehicles accessing the beach through the regional park.

57.     The management plan is being reviewed. Consultation on the review in 2020 included 106 submissions commenting on Muriwai Regional Park.

58.     Feedback told us that people value the opportunity to drive on the beach but that there is at times tension between vehicle drivers on the beach and other users.

59.     Concerns about damage to the dunes, plants and wildlife were also raised.

60.     Some locals commented the beach was not safe or enjoyable and most submitters agreed vehicle use on the beach was a problem which needed to be addressed.

61.     Following a second round of consultation in 2021, staff will develop the final Regional Parks Management Plan which will be presented to the PACE committee for adoption in 2022.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

62.     Coastal erosion as a result of a changing climate is an ongoing management issue at Muriwai Beach. Vehicles driving through this fragile beach and dune ecosystem will accelerate the impacts of coastal erosion.

63.     Through better management and control of vehicle access, the number of vehicles on the beach is likely to reduce, reducing the overall contribution of vehicles towards coastal erosion in these fragile areas.

64.     Minimisation of vehicles on the beach will reduce carbon emissions, and help to change the behaviour of park users, encouraging other low-impact modes of transport, such as walking.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

65.     Staff have worked with other council departments and CCO’s to develop the advice detailed in this report, including Auckland Transport, Infrastructure and Environmental Services, Legal Services, Licensing and Regulatory Compliance and Parks, Sport and Recreation.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

66.     At a local board workshop on 4 August 2021, staff provided an update on the impact of vehicles driving on beaches, the options in this report and the consultation and engagement process.

67.     The number and type of vehicles driving on the beach and around the entry points have raised concerns for the local community relating to driving behaviour.

68.     Some local community beach users are not visiting areas of the beach that they did in the past, due to increased number of vehicles and behaviour of drivers.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

69.     Mana whenua have a long history and association with Te Oneone Rangatira / Muriwai Beach, with Māori occupation dating back 800 years.

70.     Mana whenua have a very important and active kaitiaki role and work closely with council on environmental and management issues.

71.     Ngā Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara Development Trust have been consulted with and indicated a potential change in their position. They were not able to provide an updated position at the time of this report. 

72.       In 2018, when council reviewed the public safety and nuisance bylaws, iwi position was in support of the exclusion of vehicles from Te Oneone Rangatira.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

73.     Currently the costs associated with managing vehicles on the beach is from the Regional Parks internal budget.

74.     The financial implications for future management are currently being reviewed before staff report to the PACE committee.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

75.     Community and stakeholder views about the options are split. Staff anticipate that any changes to the status quo will result in some beach users being unhappy with the outcome.

76.     To ensure that the views of all stakeholders are captured and considered, staff have engaged with the community and stakeholders through the survey, public meetings, workshops and steering groups.

77.     Risks and mitigations associated with the options for future management will be included in the PACE committee report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

78.     On 25 August 2021, staff will workshop the options for future management with the PACE committee.

79.     A report will be taken to the PACE committee meeting on 9 September 2021, where the committee will make a decision about future management.

80.     Staff will keep the local board informed on the decision and associated implementation plan.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Scott De Silva – Manager Regional Parks

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Detailed Business Case for the Huapai Domain Indoor Multisport Facility

File No.: CP2021/11906

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek endorsement of the detailed business case and approval for the concept design from the Rodney Local Board for the Huapai Domain Indoor Multi-sport Facility located within Huapai Recreation Reserve.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A detailed business case that was undertaken between October 2020 and March 2021 on the viability of the proposed Huapai Domain Indoor Multi-sport Facility, located on Huapai Recreation Reserve, has concluded that the project has a compelling case for investment.

3.       In 2014, the Rodney Local Board consulted with the community regarding the need for a new indoor court facility within the Kumeū-Huapai area and investigated facility options. Currently no full-sized indoor court facilities are available to the public in the area.

4.       Currently, there is a provisional shortfall of two indoor courts, as per recommendations detailed in The Community Facilities Network Plan 2015.

5.       Funding for the project was included within the One Local Initiative 10-year Programme in 2018. In 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this budget was deferred.

6.       The detailed business case was progressed in 2020 for a base facility with two indoor multi-sport courts, with consideration of two location options within Huapai Recreation Reserve.

7.       Option 2, consisting of a base facility with two indoor multi-sport courts and squash courts at Location A within Huapai Recreation Reserve, was identified as the preferred option in the detailed business case.

8.       High level quantity surveying cost estimates have been completed based on the preferred current concept design option. The current total project cost estimates of $24.3 million were provided in March 2020.

9.       There are significant cost risks associated with delayed delivery of the project and cost escalations should be managed through ongoing cost risk reviews based upon the availability of funding and associated timelines to deliver the project.  Based on the timing of project delivery, changes in the design scope and removal of non-essential service provision may be required.

10.     Staff recommend that the local board endorse the detailed business case for the Huapai Domain Indoor Multi-sport Facility located on Huapai Recreation Reserve, approve the concept design Option 2 and provide direction on the preferred next steps.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      endorse the findings of the Detailed Business Case for the Huapai Domain Indoor Multisport Facility located within Huapai Recreation Reserve.

b)      approve the location and levels of provision as illustrated in the concept design (Option 2) for the Huapai Domain Indoor Multi-sport Facility, car park and netball courts as included within the detailed business case summary (Attachment A to the agenda report).

c)      acknowledge that Option 2 is a concept design only and will be refined through the next design phases and ongoing community and local board engagement.

d)      provide direction on the preferred next steps, including the option to investigate alternative funding sources, to progress the Huapai Domain Indoor Multisport Facility.

Horopaki

Context

11.     Huapai Recreation Reserve (Huapai Domain) is located to the west of Huapai town centre and borders Main Road / State Highway 16. The reserve is predominantly a sports park with areas of recreational space and open land. The main vehicle entrance to the reserve is from Tapu Road, and the reserve has pedestrian access links with the surrounding residential areas.

12.     The reserve has sports fields that cater for cricket and football, four netball courts, a playground, skate facilities and toilet amenities. Several areas within the park are used for informal recreation and have not been developed specifically for sports use.

13.     There are three sports clubs associated with the park. Norwest United Football Club and Kumeū Cricket Club have individual clubroom facilities located at the park. Western United Netball Club use the netball courts within the park but have no dedicated clubroom space.

14.     Kumeū Racquets Club is located within Huapai and their membership includes squash, badminton and pickleball playing members. The club occupies a dedicated facility on privately owned land. The building is aging and will require significant upgrade work in the near future.

15.     In 2014, the Rodney Local Board consulted with the community regarding the need for a new indoor court facility within the Kumeū-Huapai area and investigated facility options. Over the following six years, options were investigated, and locations explored. Huapai Domain was identified as the preferred site, as it has areas within the park where the facility could be located without adversely affecting the existing outdoor sports areas.

16.     Funding of $22.4 million for the new facility was estimated within the One Local Initiative 10 Year Programme resolved by the Finance and Performance Committee in 2018.

The One Local Initiative 10-year Programme

17.     The One Local Initiative (OLI) 10-year Programme was initiated through the 2018-2028 Long-Term Plan (LTP) to improve local board’s advocacy. Whilst there was no guarantee of funding, the process was designed to give local board projects a better opportunity to be progressed through the provision of more comprehensive advice, robust investigation and business cases.

18.     In 2018, the Finance and Performance Committee resolved to allocate $170 million of funding in the 2018-2028 LTP budget for the funding of One Local Initiatives with a local level of provision. The Rodney Local Board OLI project was identified for funding (resolution number FIN/2018/85).

19.     Options for a new indoor court facility within the Kumeū-Huapai area have been investigated and locations explored over several years. The timeline is summarised below in Table 1:

Table 1: Project timeline

Year

Activity

2016

A Needs Assessment was commissioned by the Rodney Local Board and delivered by Visitor Solutions. The assessment identified the need for a new indoor facility in the Kumeū / Huapai / Helensville / Riverhead area and that the best location would be in the Kumeū-Huapai area.

2017

The Kumeū-Huapai Centre Plan was prepared using a community-led approach. Through several community consultations and public workshops, the community requested a gathering space to encourage community events and a space to play sports and exercise.

The Rodney Local Board commissioned a feasibility study delivered by Visitor Solutions which identified potential sites and layouts for the indoor multi-sport facility. Funding, management, and timeframe details were also considered. The feasibility study identified Huapai Domain as the preferred site location.

2018

The Environment and Community Committee resolved that the provision of one-to-two indoor courts in the Rodney area by 2026 was essential to address the future anticipated gap in recreation and leisure facilities resulting from significant population growth (resolution number ENV/2018/131).

Rodney Local Board approved a local indoor court facility in Huapai Domain as their key advocacy project for the OLI Programme (resolution number RD/2018/25).

The Finance and Performance Committee resolved to allocate $170 million of funding in the 2018-2028 LTP budget for the funding of OLIs with a local level of provision. The Rodney Local Board OLI project met the OLI programme criteria and funding was allocated for it (resolution number FIN/2018/85).

2019

An Indicative Business Case (IBC) was completed for the indoor multi-sport facility and recommended that the Reduced Scope option be assessed in the Detailed Business Case (DBC). The Rodney Local Board endorsed the findings of the IBC (resolution number RD/2019/69).

A Service Requirements Assessment (SRA) was undertaken by Auckland Council to help refine the scope and design of the project (November 2019 – March 2020). The process involved consultation with Kumeū Racquets Club, the local community through workshops and events, and mana whenua through the March 2020 North-West Mana Whenua Forum. The Service Requirements Assessment incorporated the consultation feedback and identified four options for further consideration in the DBC.

2020/2021

Preliminary design work was undertaken, and a quantity surveying assessment of the IBC options was completed by The Value Practice in March 2020.

Work was paused on the development of the DBC due to COVID-19 and the subsequent 2020 Auckland Council Emergency Budget. A hold was placed on all projects in the OLI programme that had not commenced construction.

In response to the funding pause, Rodney Local Board allocated discretionary funds to progress the DBC and concept design for Option 2. The purpose of progressing the DBC was to position the project to be able to request and receive funding if the OLI programme was reinstated in financial year 2021/2022 or thereafter. The work was recommenced in October 2020.

A Project Control Steering Group (PCSG) was formed with representatives from the Rodney Local Board, Kumeū Racquets Club, Kumeū Cricket Club, Norwest United Football, Rodney Basketball, Western United Netball Club, and Auckland Council project staff. During the preparation of the Detailed Business Case, the Project Control Steering Group met three times (29 October 2020, 3 December 2020, and 11 February 2021).

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Indoor court provision shortfall

20.     There is high demand for indoor sport in the Kumeū-Huapai area, which is not currently provided for. At the current population level in 2021, there is a provision shortfall of two indoor courts.

21.     The local benchmark for indoor court provision in Auckland, as cited in The Community Facilities Network Plan 2015, is one indoor court per 9,000 people within a five-kilometre catchment for urban areas, or within a 30-minute drive to a satellite facility for rural areas.

22.     The population in Kumeū-Huapai is projected to reach 17,902 during 2021. Within five- kilometres of the catchment area the population reached 24,204 in 2020.

23.     There are no full-sized indoor court facilities available to the public in the area. Current local court facilities are provided at Kumeū Community Hall, Huapai Reserve and local schools including Kaipara College, Helensville College and Waimauku School.

24.     The Kumeū Racquets Club owns a private three-court squash and badminton facility located within Kumeū township. The building is aging and is likely to require significant upgrade work in the near future. The club has indicated it may be willing to re-locate to the proposed new multisport facility at Huapai Domain and contribute funding of approximately $1.5 million towards the building. In return the club has requested the facility includes provision for four squash courts.

Benefit cost analysis

25.     The project will provide significant value for money with a benefit-cost ratio (BCR) of 1.6. The BCR was conducted on four short-listed options, as defined in the Service Requirements Assessment. The four options were made up of a combination of two locations (Location A and Location D) and two provision levels (Base facility or Base facility with squash courts). Refer Attachment A.

26.     While all four options returned a positive BCR over 1.0, the option which returned the highest BCR was Option 2; a facility at Location A which included the provision of squash courts. Refer Attachment A.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 2: Benefit cost analysis options and summary

 

Option 1

Option 2

(preferred)

Option 3

Option 4

Description

Base facility with two indoor multi-sport courts

Base facility with two indoor multi-sport courts and squash courts

Base facility with two indoor multi-sport courts

Base facility with two indoor multi-sport courts and squash courts

Location

Location A

Location A

Location D

Location D

Total costs[6]

$20.7 million

$21.7 million [7]

$23 million

$24 million

Total benefits over 30 years

$32 million

$32.85 million

$32 million

$32.85 million

Benefit-cost ratio

1.55

1.62

1.39

1.46

 

27.     The main benefits of the project are:

·    physical and mental health benefits through increased physical activity and participation

·    social and community benefits through improved public and community space

·    economic benefit through employment and revenue from facilities

·    environmental benefits through associated landscaping and stormwater management.

Preferred option

28.     The BCR analysis showed Option 2 ranked better than the other options due to the added benefits and amenity of providing squash facilities. Option 2 would provide the social outcomes associated with the other options but also provide more support for local clubs.

29.     Option 2 was among the more cost-effective options as Location A is a more cost-effective site. The cost difference between building at Location A or D is significant, with Location D estimated to cost approximately $2.3 million more. The higher cost of locating the facility at Location D is predominantly due to the increased pavement/asphalt area needed (~3000m2) to connect carpark areas and provide access around the facility.

30.     Option 2 would also attract an estimated $1.5 million financial contribution from the Kumeū Racquets Club through the sale of their current land and buildings within Kumeū.

31.     Further analysis was conducted to evaluate and rank the four options considering the Economic, Environmental, Social and Cultural aspects. The result confirmed Option 2 as the highest scoring and recommended option.  Option 2 scored higher due to cost advantages and social advantages.  Refer Attachment A.

Concept development

32.     Following the identification of the preferred option, the facility concept design was further developed in alignment with Option 2. Specific internal spaces and areas were detailed, along with the outdoor areas including the car park and pavement arrangement (refer to Figure 1 below).

33.     The concept design was developed in consultation with representatives from local clubs; Kumeū Cricket Club, Kumeū Racquets Club, Norwest United Football, Rodney Basketball, and Western United Netball Club and with iwi.

34.     The development of the concept design considered operational advice and design considerations from two council facility managers, from Stanmore Bay Pool and Leisure Centre and the Allan Brewster Centre, which have both indoor multisport courts and squash courts.

Figure 1: Huapai Domain indoor multisport facility overall concept drawing

 

35.     The final concept design features the following amenities, as outlined in Table 3:

Table 3: Concept design amenities

Floor

Amenities

Ground Floor

(refer to Figure 2)

·    two indoor multi-sport courts

·    male and female changing rooms

·    male and female toilets (separate to the changing rooms)

·    gym (331 m2)

·    kitchen (32m2)

·    reception and foyer

·    referees’ room

·    physio room

·    staff areas and staff storage spaces

·    storage space

·    three core areas for staircases (in three locations), a lift, and building services

·    four squash courts with a seating area facing the courts

First Floor

(refer to Figure 3)

·    function room (148 m2)

·    kitchen (72m2)

·    meeting room (84 m2)

·    gallery/bleachers (overlooking the multisport courts)

·    office (35 m2)

·    shared office area (74 m2)

·    toilets

·    staff area

·    additional storage areas

External

(refer to Figure 1)

·    four new relocated netball courts

·    access walkways (covered and uncovered)

·    a car parking area with 138 bays (eight for disabled)

·    a driveway and vehicle maneuvering suitable for buses (including drop-off zones), and

·    a paved area, over which the building could be extended at a later date, to add indoor cricket facilities (three lanes)

 

Figure 2: Huapai Domain indoor multisport facility concept drawing – ground floor

 

Figure 3: Huapai Domain indoor multisport facility concept drawing – first floor

Project cost estimate

36.     An updated project cost estimate has been completed based on the development of the preferred concept design - Option 2. The cost estimate is $24.3 million in today’s dollars for the facility, including the relocation of the netball courts and skate half pipe, and development of a car park.

Table 4: Updated cost estimate for the preferred option (Option 2)

Item

Cost $M

Indoor court facility (5311 m2 CFA)

$14.4

Car parking

$1.94

Netball courts and skate half pipe relocation

$1.54

Landscaping

$0.35

Design / Construction monitoring

$1.82

Total Indicative Physical Works

$20.05

Council costs

Consenting, project management, development contributions

$1.20

Contingency (15%)

$3.05

Total indicative budget estimate

$24.30

 

37.     While the estimated sum is greater than the original project budget estimate of $22.4 million, the quantity surveyor indicated there are several ways that the estimated project cost could be reduced. The three most significant suggestions that could reduce the project cost would be to:

a)    Commission a geotechnical and land contamination assessment to confirm the ground improvements needed. The current geotechnical report by WSP (February 2020) was a geotechnical desktop appraisal, which indicated that 0-1.3m of non-engineered fill existed across the site. As such, a conservative allowance for earthworks had to be assumed in the cost estimate.

b)    Consider a design and build procurement model, which allows for contractor innovation such as enabling the contractor to select the most cost-effective building materials for the facility and to adjust the building design to achieve a similar outcome but at a lower build cost.

c)    Amend the design scope and make reductions in the scale of the building footprint through removal of non-essential services offered through the facility such as the proposed meeting room and gym.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·    to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

It is anticipated that there will be an increase in carbon emissions from construction, including contractor emissions. Staff will seek to minimise carbon and contractor emissions as far as possible through the construction phase of the project.

39.     The construction of a multisport facility will require the use of new building materials, some of which have high embodied energy, such as concrete, and emit greenhouse gases during manufacture.

40.     To mitigate the potential negative impact on the climate, the building design will use sustainably sourced materials and other environmentally friendly building material options, where possible.

41.     The building design will also reduce emissions during operation through incorporating efficient building systems and solutions (lighting, heating and cooling).

42.     Mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions will be achieved through sourcing of low-carbon material options (including sourcing materials locally) and the use of products with environmental declarations for embodied carbon reductions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

43.     The provision of an indoor court facility is strongly aligned with local and regional strategic plans and desired outcomes. The project will address provisioning shortages in the Kumeū-Huapai area and establish a facility that caters to multiple sporting codes.

44.     Council specialist staff from the Customer and Community Services Directorate support the development.

45.     Representatives from Community Facilities and Parks, Sport and Recreation teams were members of the PCSG.

46.     Staff consider the facility will provide for a range of sporting codes and community groups within a growing area of the region. The facility will encourage residents to become more physically active and connected to their community.

47.     The Parks, Sport and Recreation team supports the project through the OLI programme and have recommended further investigation and analysis of the facility’s operational sustainability, should the project be progressed on a community-led or partnership basis.

48.     Additionally, the project aligns with the following key plans listed below:

·    Auckland Plan 2050

·    Auckland Council Long-term Plan 2018-2028

·    Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan 2014-2024

·    Auckland Council Sport Investment Plan 2019-2039 

·    Auckland Sport Sector Facilities Priority Plan 2017 

·    Community Facilities Network and Action Plan 2015

·    Kumeū-Huapai Centre Plan 2017

·    Aktive Strategic Framework 2020-2040

·    Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau (2017).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

49.     The provision of an indoor court facility is strongly aligned with local and regional strategic plans and desired outcomes. The project will address provisioning shortages in the Kumeū-Huapai area and establish a facility that caters to multiple sporting codes.

50.     The project aligns with the following Rodney Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives:

Table 5: Rodney Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives

Outcome

Objective

Outcome 3: Infrastructure and development meets the needs of our growing communities

Our facilities and infrastructure meet the needs of our growing communities

Outcome 4: Our communities are resilient and have access to what they need

Council facilities cater to local needs and are well used by their communities

Outcome 5: Our local parks and recreation facilities meet the needs of our growing community

Our communities have great local options for indoor and outdoor sport and recreation that provide opportunities for all ages and abilities

 

51.     The proposed facility will deliver significant benefits to the community. There is high demand for indoor sport in the Kumeū-Huapai area and there are no full-sized indoor court facilities available to the public in the area.  

52.     The concept design includes areas for the wider community to gather through the proposed inclusion of function and meeting rooms within the overall design. This provides opportunities for local community groups to make use of the space as well as sporting groups.

53.     Feedback from representatives of local sports and community groups indicates strong support for a facility in the proposed location. This has been conveyed through the PCSG meetings.

54.     The Rodney Local Board has previously indicated support for the development of a new local indoor court facility in Huapai Domain and identified the project as its key advocacy project for the One Local Initiative programme (resolution number RD/2018/25).

55.     The Rodney Local Board allocated discretionary funds of $150,000 in financial year 2020/2021 from the Locally Driven Initiatives budget to progress the detailed business case.

56.     The project is included in the Rodney Local Board Plan 2020 as a key initiative –

“Support the delivery of the Kumeū-Huapai indoor courts facility and a multi-sport facility in Warkworth”.

57.     The Rodney Local Board Chair is a member of the PCSG and has worked closely with the group on the project.

58.     A memo was circulated to local board members on 19 May 2021 summarising the completion of the detailed business case phase.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

59.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the LTP, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework and the Rodney Local Board Plan 2020.

60.     Engagement with mana whenua on this project has been undertaken and iwi have been appreciative of the early engagement process. Fifteen mana whenua groups who had indicated interest in the project at the March 2020 North-West Mana Whenua Forum were contacted. Two mana whenua groups expressed interest in working with council on the project: Ngāti Manuhiri and Ngā Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara.

61.     A site visit with Ngāti Manuhiri was conducted on 9 December 2020. Due to COVID-19 restrictions and internal changes at Ngā Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara, a site visit with Ngā Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara was not able to be successfully organised during the preparation of the DBC.

62.     The groups indicated that they look forward to more active engagement and would invest more time and thought into the project once it had received funding and was progressing through the detailed design phase.

63.     Through engagement in sport and activity, it is expected that the proposed facility will have a positive impact on Māori. Local mana whenua groups have expressed interest in actively participating in the design and implementation of the project.

64.     Five local marae and two mana whenua groups (Ngāti Manuhiri and Ngā Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara) have been identified as potential users and key project delivery partners / stakeholders.

65.     The multisport facility is expected to be well used by Māori, especially by rangitahi (youth). Consultation with mana whenua groups has also identified interest in using space in the new facility to host kapa haka, Rongoā Māori (medicine/massage), and arts.

66.     Following confirmation of funding and the project timeline, mana whenua groups will be contacted again. Mana whenua will be engaged as partners through the detailed design phase to enable them to participate in the creative process and ensure appropriate implementation of Te Aranga design principles into the final design.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

67.     The Finance and Performance Committee resolved to allocate $170 million of funding in the 2018-2028 LTP budget for the funding of OLIs with a local level of provision. The Rodney Local Board OLI project was identified as an advocacy project through the OLI process (resolution number FIN/2018/85).

68.     The local board allocated $1 million of Locally Driven Initiative capital expenditure funding within the Community Facilities work programme to support the delivery of the Kumeū-Huapai indoor multisport facility [RD/2020/35]. 

69.     A high-level indicative cost estimate for the design and construction of the preferred option (Option 2) is $24.3 million.  This figure could increase due to timing of delivery and material cost escalations.

70.     The detailed business case predicts that the facility will require operational costs of $357,400 per annum with estimated revenue generation of $375,500 per annum. Refer Attachment A.

71.     In 2020 Auckland Council reassessed forward work programmes and budgets due to COVID-19 and implemented the 2020/2021 Auckland Council Emergency Budget. A hold was placed on all OLI programme projects that had not commenced construction. This included the Huapai Domain Indoor Multi-sport Facility.

72.     To keep the project progressing, the Rodney Local Board allocated $150,000 of Locally Driven Initiative capital expenditure funding in the Community Facilities 2020/2021 work programme to support the delivery of a detailed business case for the Huapai Domain Indoor Multi-sport Facility.

73.     The Kumeū Racquets Club have indicated a willingness to contribute funding of approximately $1.5 million towards the building, reducing the overall cost to council of delivering the project.

74.     A total budget of $217,995 has been approved by the local board for the project over previous financial years.

75.     Due to the impact of COVID-19 and the implementation of the Auckland Council Emergency Budget, funding to progress the Huapai Multiuse Facility is now dependent upon a phased and prioritised approach to be confirmed after year four of the 2021-2031 LTP.

76.     For the project to progress, the OLI programme funding or equivalent will need to be confirmed or alternative sources of funding will need to be found through the support of a private or corporate investor, funding grants or other initiatives.

77.     Depending on the availability of funding through the OLI programme after year three of the 2021-2031 LTP, local board funding has been provisionally allocated for financial years 2024/2025 and 2025/2026 to contribute to the design and consents phase.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

78.     Risks and mitigation measures are outlined in Table 6.

Table 6: Risks and mitigations

Risks identified

Comments

Mitigation

Budget

Insufficient funding

Funding for the project through the OLI programme of work is uncertain.

Investigate alternative methods of funding for the project, such as partnership models or grants.

Advocate to the Governing Body for the project to be funded in future years.

Project cost may increase over time

Building costs have increased since the COVID-19 pandemic (although this differs by region).

This is due to the large economic stimulus packages introduced by the government to support the construction and primary industries, and low interest rates encouraging land and housing development.

The construction market will be buoyant for many years and building contractors are able to command higher margins.

Supply line disruptions have also seen imported and local building materials increase sharply in cost.

The risk can be managed by maintaining the current contingency of 15% even after some project assumptions have been investigated.

Allowing the building contractor input into the building design and flexibility during construction will also reduce the risk enabling the contractor to specify cost-effective building materials and methods for the project.

 

Funding contribution withdrawn

The Kumeū Racquets Club may choose to investigate alternative options for their club facilities. This may mean the clubs indicative contribution of $1.5m towards the indoor multi-sport facility may be withdrawn.

 

If the club choose to progress with developing their own facilities, the risk could be mitigated by reducing the size and cost of the indoor multisport facility and providing fewer or no squash courts to save on cost.

 

Timeframe

Delay to design and construction due to funding availability

The timeframe for delivering the project is unable to be determined until funding is confirmed.

Establish a timeframe for project phases that aligns with available funding.

 

 

Construction

Unstable ground conditions that require engineered design solutions

The current geotechnical report by WSP (February 2020) was a geotechnical desktop appraisal which indicated that 0-1.3m of non-engineered fill existed across the site.

A conservative allowance for earthworks therefore had to be assumed in the cost estimate.

No detailed geotechnical investigation has been carried out on the site and it is possible that the earthworks required could be less than assumed.

 

Commission a geotechnical and land contamination assessment prior to progressing the project to confirm the ground improvements needed and their anticipated costs.

Disruption to the use of the netball courts, skate park and car park

The concept design proposes re-siting the four netball courts and skate park to enable the new facility and car park to be constructed.

It is proposed to construct the new netball courts on an area of land adjacent to the indoor multi-sport facility prior to decommissioning the existing courts. The current skate pipe will be relocated.

Reputational

Project deferred or cancelled

Funding for the project through the One Local Initiative programme of work is uncertain.

There is reputational risk to council if the project is deferred or cancelled. Consultation with park users, stakeholder and community groups has raised an expectation that the project will be delivered.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

79.     The Huapai Domain Indoor Multi-sport Facility OLI project has been progressed to a stage where the project can enter a procurement phase and a Request for Proposal issued for detailed design and consent work.

80.     As the allocation of funding to progress the project is now dependent upon a phased and regionally prioritised approach, to be confirmed after year three of the current 2021-2031 LTP, potential options have been identified for the local board’s consideration. In most cases, these options would require further investigation to be carried out.

a)   Pause the project until year four of the current LTP and then seek prioritisation through the subsequent LTP planning processes.

b)   Investigate other alternative potential funding opportunities using a facility partnership approach, acknowledging that other than the Kumeū Racquets Club there are no current partners identified and no guarantees of additional funding provision.

c)   Support a community or club lead application for grants such as the Lottery Community Facility Fund.

d)   Investigate other project investors and financial contributors and consider project delivery models, where the facility is not owned by council, acknowledging that there are no current potential investors identified and no guarantees of additional funding provision.

e)   Investigate further funding opportunities from the Auckland Council Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund (SRFIF), which has been included in the 2021-2031 LTP. Applications through the SRFIF are regionally contestable, with no guarantees of funding provision, and applications are considered against criteria, including a facility’s potential contribution to serve a sub-regional catchment, equity, regional need, operational sustainability and financial contribution.

f)    Consider the introduction of a local board area targeted rate levied for the indoor multi-sport facility.

g)   Investigate asset recycling opportunities through decommissioning, selling or engaging in other commercial arrangements of underperforming local assets, and using some of the proceeds or revenue generation to fund new developments.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Huapai Domain Indoor Multisport Facility Detailed Business Case Summary

97

     

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Roscoe Webb – Senior Programme Manager

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - Acting General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Rodney Local Board for March to June 2021

File No.: CP2021/10973

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Rodney Local Board with an integrated performance report for March to June 2021, and the overall performance for the financial year against the approved 2020/2021 local board work programmes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an integrated view of performance for the Rodney Local Board and includes financial performance and delivery against work programmes for the 2020/2021 financial year.

3.       One hundred and twenty activities within the agreed work programmes were delivered including multi-year projects that have progressed as expected. Eight activities were undelivered, cancelled, put on hold or deferred and 14 multi-year projects/activities have not progressed as expected during 2020/2021.

4.       Key activity achievements from the 2020/2021 work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report) include:

·     continued investment in town centres, particularly in Warkworth and Helensville

·     renewal of key facilities, including Kumeū Library, Warkworth Wharf and Leigh Hall

·     activation work in the Huapai Hub and Wellsford Community Centre

·     approval of the concept design for the Riverhead Playspace

·     completion of site assessments in Green Road Park

·     delivering another successful year with the Rodney Healthy Harbours and Waterways Fund, which provides match-funding to enhance waterways through riparian planting and fencing

·     a successful trial of the Forestry Ambassadors Programme.

5.       Key activities not delivered / not progressed as expected include:

·     the renewal of Ti Point Wharf, which has been delayed in part due to the long lead-in times for building materials of 10-12 weeks. Physical works is planned for October 2021

·     the Restore East Rodney Programme which includes the recruitment of a Restore East Rodney Coordinator will now be delivered during 2021/2022. The community strategy developed through the Pest Free Management Plan will be completed in August 2021.

6.       Qualifying budgets of unfinished activities will be carried forward into 2021/2022 work programmes.

7.          The financial performance report is attached (Attachment B to the agenda report) but is excluded from the public. This is due to restrictions on releasing annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – on or about 30 September.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for March to June 2021.

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment B will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group results for 2020/2021 are released to the New Zealand’s Exchange (NZX) which are expected to be made public on or about 30 September 2021.

 

Horopaki

Context8.        The Emergency Budget was adopted on 30 July. The Rodney Local Board approved 2020/2021 work programmes for the following operating departments at their August 2020 business meeting:

·        Arts, Community and Events

·        Parks, Sport and Recreation

·        Libraries and Information

·        Community Services: Service, Strategy and Integration (Now part of Connected Communities department)

·        Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

·        Community Leases.

9.       As the work programmes were adopted two months later than normal due to effects of COVID-19, there has been a reduced timeframe to deliver these work programmes (10 months).

10.     Since the work programmes were approved the Customer and Communities Services directorate has been restructured. Two new departments were created - Connected Communities and Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships, and the Southern Initiative and Western Initiative moved into the directorate as a new department - Community and Social Innovation. Units from the previous departments Arts, Community and Events; Libraries and Information; and Service, Strategy and Integration were incorporated into the three new departments. The table below shows the distribution.

Table 1: Changes to Departments in Customer and Communities Services directorate

Previous Department - Unit

Current Department - Unit

Arts, Community and Events - Community Places

Connected Communities – Community Places

Arts, Community and Events - Community Empowerment

Connected Communities – Community Empowerment

Arts, Community and Events - Community Empowerment (Youth)

Community and Social Innovation – Youth Empowerment

Arts, Community and Events - Arts & Culture

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Arts & Culture

Arts, Community and Events - Events

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Events

Service, Strategy and Integration

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Service and Asset Planning

Libraries

Connected Communities – Libraries

The Southern Initiative

Community and Social Innovation – The Southern Initiative

The Western Initiative

Community and Social Innovation – The Western Initiative

 

11.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

12.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that have been delivered as expected or multi-year activities which have progressed as planned (green), activities that are in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that are undelivered or have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work Programme by RAG status

13.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each departments the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: work programme activity by activity status and department

Key activity achievements from the 2020/2021 work programme

14.     The key achievements in the delivery of the local board work programmes for 2020/2021 include:

·    continued investment in town centres, particularly in Warkworth, with the development of Te Puawai Kowhai (the shared space between the Masonic Hall and the library), and in Helensville, with improvements to street furniture and the planting of native trees along Commercial Road

·    renewal of key facilities, including Kumeū Library, Warkworth Wharf, and Leigh Hall, as well as the playgrounds in Merlot Heights and Whangateau Reserve, and the toilets, changing rooms and three sports fields at Rautawhiri Park

·    activation work in the Huapai Hub and Wellsford Community Centre, focused on developing community initiatives that bring people together, and creating spaces that are vibrant and enjoyable for residents

·    approval of the concept design for the Riverhead Playspace, enabling the project to progress to detailed design stage

·    completion of site assessments in Green Road Park which have informed priorities for the 2021/2022 work programme

·    delivering another successful year with the Rodney Healthy Harbours and Waterways Fund, which provides match-funding to enhance waterways through riparian planting and fencing

·    a successful trial of the Forestry Ambassadors Programme - a new initiative focused on reducing sediment run-off into local waterways.

Overview of work programme performance

Arts, Community and Events work programme

15.     In the Arts, Community and Events work programme, there are 11 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green), one activity that is in progress but delayed (amber), and one activity that has been cancelled and deferred in the period March to June 2021 (grey). Activities with significant impact are discussed below.

           

 

 

            Table 2: Arts, Community and Events activities not yet completed / with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Local Civic Events Rodney

Amber

In Progress

A celebration of the opening of Te Puawai Kowhai (the shared space between the Warkworth Masonic Hall and Library) was held on 18 June, with the event led by local Iwi Ngati Manuhiri. Other civic events planned for the year have been deferred until Spring, with funding requested for carry forward. The delivery of the Rodney Volunteer Recognition Awards has also been delayed and will be discussed with the local board in the new financial year.

Town Centre Rapid Activations

Grey

Cancelled

The original shopfront project did not get sufficient support from the shop owners to proceed. The budget was reallocated by the local board to another project in April 2021.

 

Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

16.     In the Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme, there are four activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green), and one activity that is in progress but delayed (amber).

            Table 3: Parks, Sport and Recreation activities not yet completed / with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Milldale growth area: parks, sport and recreation planning

Amber

In progress

A draft play provision assessment prepared for local board feedback will be presented to the local board at a workshop in August 2021 for feedback. A business report will then be prepared recommending that the Milldale play provision assessment is formally adopted to provide direction on future decisions.

 

Libraries work programme

17.     In the Libraries work programme, there are 11 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green). No activities have been delayed or deferred (amber or red status).

Service Strategy and Integration work programme

18.     In the Service Strategy and Integration work programme, there are three activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green), and two activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber). Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

            Table 4: Service Strategy and Integration activities not yet completed / with significant      impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Wellsford Centennial Park Masterplan

Amber

In progress

Prioritisation of local board work programme projects already underway has delayed this project being restarted. The project will re-commence in Q2.

Rodney Local Parks Management Plan

Amber

In progress

Work prioritisation across the local parks management plans programme has slightly delayed this project reaching the next decision point (draft plan for notification)

 

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

19.     In the Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme, there are 63 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green), nine activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), five activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and one activity that has been cancelled and deferred in in the period March to June 2021 (grey).  Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

            Table 5: Community Facilities activities with significant impact (see Attachment A for        initiatives with amber status)

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Kowhai Park – develop walkway/cycleway

Red

In progress

Project has been dependent on progress with the Community Transport Hub. CF are engaging with Auckland Transport. Next step is for CF to attend AT’s construction pre-start meeting onsite.

Riverhead – develop toilet facilities

Red

In progress

Local board has formally approved the site location at Deacon point Reserve. Next steps: project to progress after 1 July 2024 when budget is allocated for design and delivery phases.

Helensville River Walkway – renew walkway and remediate slip

Red

In progress

Geotech site survey complete. Next steps: invite contractors to an on-site meeting to discuss a proposed design and build approach for installing a prefabricated footbridge section to span the section of riverbed affected by the railway embankment slip.

Te Moau Reserve and river Esplanade, Te Moau Avenue, Parakai – renew concrete pavement

Red

On hold

The project will be delivered next year as part of the ‘Rodney – renew furniture and fixtures’ project (ID 3467)

Ti Point Wharf – investigation and renewal

Red

In progress

The physical works contract is out for tender and closes mid-July. Wharf building materials are said to have a 10 to 12 week lead-in time. Next steps: apply for building consent and plan physical works for October 2021.

 

 

Community Leases work programme

20.     In the Community Leases work programme, there are 21 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green). No activities have been delayed or deferred (amber or red status)

Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme

21.     In the Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme, there are seven activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green), one activity that is in progress but is delayed (amber), and one activity that is significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red).

            Table 6: Infrastructure and Environment Services activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Restore East Rodney

Red

Not delivered

The programme was unable to be delivered this financial year and a carry forward has been approved for this programme to be delivered in the 2021/2022 financial year.

Pest free management plans – Rodney

Amber

In progress

The pest management plans have been carried forward to 30 September 2021 to allow for further community engagement.

Changes to the local board work programme

Activities with changes

22.     The following work programmes activities have been amended to reflect minor budget change or inclusion in the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP); the implications of which are reported in the table below. The local board was informed of these minor changes and agreed the changes could be made by staff under delegation.

Table 7: Minor changes to the local board work programmes

ID/Ref

Work Programme Name

Activity Name

Change

Reason for change

Budget Implications

3109

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

Whangateau Reserve – playspace

Budget savings

The project has been completed with budget savings declared.

Budget reduction of $14,149. Savings reallocated under RD/2021/231

 

3589

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

Scotts Landing – toilet block

Budget savings

The project has been completed with budget savings declared.

Budget reduction of $13,695. Savings reallocated under RD/2021/231

 

2978

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

Te Moau Reserve – concrete pavement

Budget reduction

Budget allocated to complete the committed contract in 2020/2021, completion of this stage did not require further budget, funding proposed to deliver staged physical works in 2021/2022.

Budget reduction of $7,000. Savings reallocated under RD/2021/231

2886

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

Falls Road Esplanade – accessway

Budget savings

The project has been completed with budget savings declared.

Budget reduction of $6,205. Savings reallocated under RD/2021/231

2775

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

Whangateau Hall – building and fence

Budget savings

The project has been completed with budget savings declared.

Budget reduction of $3,334. Savings reallocated under RD/2021/231

3583

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

Birds Beach Rec. Reserve – toilet block

Budget savings

The project has been completed with budget savings declared.

Budget reduction of $1,357. Savings reallocated under RD/2021/231

2498

 

 

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

Kowhai Park – develop walkway/cycleway

Budget increase

 

The opportunity arose to provide the walkway connection between the Warkworth Showgrounds and the new Park and Ride facility as part of the construction of the transport hub. 

Auckland Transport have agreed to include the physical works under their existing contract if Council could provide the budget required to deliver the additional works. 

Additional budget of $100,000 was required. This was approved by the Growth funding delegate.

2607

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

Huapai Service Centre Riverbank - develop community space

Budget increase

A variation amount of $3,000 was sought to pay for the boundary fence renewal. 

This project has been funded by the LDI Capex budget, however this variation was sought from the ABS: Local Renewal Capex budget due to remediating an existing asset.

 

Additional budget of $3,000 was required

2839

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

Omeru Scenic Reserve - renew minor assets

 

Addition to the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP)

Agreement was sought to include this line item in the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) in the 2020/2021 financial year to allow the works to continue and not have to stop works until the 2021/2022 work programme is approved.

No additional budget sought. This was included as a RAP project.

3586

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

Pakiri Beach - refurbish toilet block and park signage

 

Addition to the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP)

Agreement was sought to include this line item in the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) in the 2020/2021 financial year to allow the works to continue and not have to stop works until the 2021/2022 work programme is approved.

No additional budget sought. This was included as a RAP project.

2551

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

Big Omaha Wharf – investigate renewal options

 

Addition to the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP)

Agreement was sought to include this line item in the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) in the 2020/2021 financial year to allow the works to continue and not have to stop works until the 2021/2022 work programme is approved.

No additional budget sought. This was included as a RAP project.

3590

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

Sinclair Park - refurbish toilet block

Budget savings

To deliver the refurbishment of the toilet block, cost estimates are approximately $50,000.  To address the renewal of the pavilion and other open space assets on site, a new project line will be proposed at a later date for a future work programme.

Budget reduction of $63,000.

Deferred activities

23.     The Lead Financial Advisors are identifying projects from the local board’s 2020/2021 Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operational budget which meet the criteria to be carried forward. These will be added to the work programme to be delivered in 2021/2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     This report informs the Rodney Local Board of the performance for the period March to June 2021 and the performance for the 2020/2021 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     The local board has signalled its commitment to building meaningful relationships with mana whenua and whanau in Rodney in its Rodney Local Board Plan 2020.

28.     All our libraries continue to incorporate te reo Māori and Ta Ao Māori across programmes and events, including in our children and youth programmes. Staff use te reo Māori greetings when welcoming customers and Mahurangi East Library continues to offer free weekly te reo Maori lessons.

29.     The development of Te Puawai Kowhai in Warkworth has been the result of a successful collaboration with Ngati Manuhiri to ensure local Māori culture has been incorporated and reflected in the design.

30.     Collaboration with Ngati Manuhiri also continues to be instrumental in developing the design of the Shoesmith Domain playspace renewal.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     This report is provided to enable the Rodney Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2019/2020 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

32.     Auckland Council currently has a number of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – on or about 30 September. Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is excluded from the public. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Overview of work programme performance by department’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Work programmes for 2021/2022 were approved at the local board’s business meeting in June 2021.

35.     Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2021/2022 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rodney Local Board work programme update Mar - Jun 2021

121

b

Rodney Local Board Quarterly Performance Report June 2021 - Financial Appendix (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Anwen Robinson – Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021

File No.: CP2021/11494

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2020/2021 Annual Report for the Rodney Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 27 September 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2020/2021 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 27 September 2021. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market maintained by NZX Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA), local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the attached annual report (Attachment A to the agenda report) is being presented as confidential.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      adopt the draft 2020/2021 Rodney Local Board Annual Report (Attachment A)

b)      note that any proposed changes after the adoption will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body on 27 September 2021

c)      note that the draft 2020/2021 Rodney Local Board Annual Report, (Attachment A) will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2020/2021 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which are expected to be made public by 28 September 2021.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its local board agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities and the overall funding impact statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       The annual report contains the following sections:

 

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi is an introduction specific to each local board area and is presented in Te Reo Māori and English.

About this report

An overview of what is covered in this document.

Message from the chairperson

A message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved. Includes the activity highlights and challenges.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Funding impact statement

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

7.       The council’s climate change disclosures are covered in volume four of the annual report and sections within the summary annual report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

10.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

11.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2020/2021 Annual Report are:

·        Audit NZ review during July and August 2021

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 27 September 2021

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 28 September 2021

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2021.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rodney Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021 (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jestine Joseph – Lead Finanial Advisor

Authorisers

Mark Purdie – Manager Local Board Advisors

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Rodney Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

21        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Rodney Local Board for March to June 2021 - Attachment b - Rodney Local Board Quarterly Performance Report June 2021 - Financial Appendix

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial information that have an impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2021 that require release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

22        Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021 - Attachment a - Rodney Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial information that have an impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2021 that require release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C1       Woodhill Sands Equestrian Centre (Covering report)

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(e) - The withholding of the information is necessary to avoid prejudice to measures that prevent or mitigate material loss to members of the public.

In particular, the report contains contains legal and financial information about the Woodhill Sands Trust / WST (Company) 2016 Ltd / Trustees that is the subject of legal proceedings.

s7(2)(g) - The withholding of the information is necessary to maintain legal professional privilege.

In particular, the report contains contains legal and financial information about the Woodhill Sands Trust / WST (Company) 2016 Ltd / Trustees that is the subject of legal proceedings.

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report contains contains legal and financial information about the Woodhill Sands Trust / WST (Company) 2016 Ltd / Trustees that is the subject of legal proceedings.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 


Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    North Shore Model Aero Club Inc presentation Page 167


Rodney Local Board

18 August 2021

 

 







[1] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/03/GB_20210325_AGN_10148_AT_WEB.htm (Item 9, GB/2021/19)

[2] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_AGN_10145_AT_WEB.htm (Item 10, GB/2021/49)

[3] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_AGN_10145_AT_WEB.htm (Item 9, GB/2021/48)

[4] Freedom Camping Act; Litter Act; Resource Management Act; Fire and Emergency NZ Act; Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw; Auckland Council Traffic Bylaw; Auckland Transport Traffic Bylaw; Alcohol Control Bylaw; Dog Management Bylaw

[5] https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_MAT_10145_WEB.htm

[6] Costs were based on the project costs estimated by The Value Practice March 2020 for the Indicative Business Case.

 

[7] Cost was reduced by $1.5 million as this sum will be contributed by the Kumeū Racquets Club.