I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waiheke Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 25 August 2021

5.15pm

Local Board Office
10 Belgium Street
Ostend
Waiheke

 

Waiheke Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cath Handley

 

Deputy Chairperson

Kylee Matthews

 

Members

Robin Tucker

 

 

Bob Upchurch

 

 

Paul Walden

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Dileeka Senewiratne

Democracy Advisor

 

20 August 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 840 914

Email: dileeka.senewiratne@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Councillor's Update                                                                                                       7

12        Chairperson's report                                                                                                   19

13        Auckland Transport Report - August 2021                                                               33

14        Minutes of the Waiheke Transport Forum 4 August 2021                                      47

15        Review of Waiheke agrichemical dispensation                                                       55

16        Adoption of the Ngahere Analysis Report 2021                                                       75

17        Proposal to make a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw                           131

18        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Waiheke Local Board for March to June 2021                                                                                                                             241

19        Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021                                                                    279

20        Community Forum record of proceedings                                                             283

21        Waiheke Local Board Workshop record of proceedings                                      325

22        List of resource consent applications - 5 July to 31 July 2021                            335

23        Local board governance forward work calendar - Sepember 2021 update        341

24        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

25        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               345

18        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Waiheke Local Board for March to June 2021

b.      Financial section                                                                                              345

19        Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021

a.      Draft Waiheke Local Board Annual Report (2020/2021)                              345


1          Welcome

 

Kua uru mai a hau kaha, a hau maia, a hau ora, a hau nui,

Ki runga, ki raro, ki roto, ki waho

Rire, rire hau…pai marire

 

Translation (non-literal) - Rama Ormsby

Let the winds bring us inspiration from beyond,

Invigorate us with determination and courage to achieve our aspirations for abundance and sustainability

Bring the calm, bring all things good, bring peace… good peace.

 

2          Apologies

 

an apology has been received from Board Member Robin Tucker.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 21 July 2021, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waiheke Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

Councillor's Update

File No.: CP2021/11071

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Waitemata and Gulf Ward Councillor Pippa Coom with an opportunity to update the Waiheke Local Board on Governing Body issues.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         receive Waitemata and Gulf Ward Councillor, Pippa Coom’s update.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Councillor's Update - August 2021

9

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

Chairperson's report

File No.: CP2021/11072

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Chairperson Cath Handley with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues she has been involved with and to draw the board’s attention to any other matters of interest.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive the Chairperson, Cath Handley’s report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairpersons report - August 2021

21

b

Letter from NZ Police

27

c

NZ Herald Article

29

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

Auckland Transport Report - August 2021

File No.: CP2021/11073

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Waiheke Local Board on transport related matters in their area including the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF), and Community Safety Fund (CSF).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

This report covers:

2.       A general summary of operational projects and activities of interest to the board.

3.       An update on Auckland Transport projects identified in the Waiheke 10 Year Transport Plan.

4.       An update on the board’s Transport Capital Fund and Community Safety Fund.

5.       An opportunity for local board feedback to the current City Centre Bus Plan consultation

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport August 2021 update report

b)      provides any feedback on the City Centre Bus Plan consultation.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. We report monthly to local boards, as set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan. This reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within the governance of Auckland on behalf of their local communities. 

7.       This report updates the Waiheke Local Board on Auckland Transport (“AT”) projects and operations in the local board area, it updates the local board on their advocacy and consultations and includes information on the status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (“LBTCF”) and Community Safety Fund (“CSF”).

8.       This report provides an opportunity for the local board to resolve feedback on the on the Auckland Transport City Centre Bus Plan consultation that is currently open until 19 September 2021.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

City Centre Bus Plan consultation

9.       The proposed City Centre Bus Plan sets out the approach Auckland Transport aims to take in planning for buses in Auckland’s city centre to help deliver the outcomes of the City Centre Masterplan (CCMP) which prioritise the city centre as a place for people, so Aucklanders and visitors can all enjoy a safe, healthy and well-connected city.

10.     The objective of the City Centre Bus Plan is to make the buses, the transport system and the city centre better for all Aucklanders and visitors. Once finalised it will be delivered in the next 5-10 years. This plan has a three-step approach outlining dedicated bus corridors, off street bus facilities, and changing city centre bus routes.

11.     This plan is about the movement of buses in the city centre and the Waiheke Local Board has previously noted its interest as it will connectivity and accessibility for people who travel to and from the city centre, and beyond, via the Downtown Ferry terminus to Waiheke.

12.     Auckland Transport is seeking feedback on this plan now from members of the public. The Waiheke Local Board is invited to give feedback up until 19 September.

13.     More information is available online at AT.govt.nz/CityCentreBusPlan .

Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

14.     The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of AT’s work programme.

15.     The emergency budget allocation for the financial year 2020/2021 was $97,061. The board approved the use of funds from their LBTCF for installation and supply of two bus shelters at the taxi rank platform in the Matiatia carpark. These were installed in December 2020.

16.     The current amount of funding proposed in the Regional Land Transport Plan is $400,000 per annum.

17.     The unspent budget of $71,493.50 from 2020/2021 can be carried forward for the board to allocate as they see fit providing a total fund available for 2021/2022 of $471,493.50. Auckland Transport will work with the local board to discuss and advise on the best use of the budget.

Community Safety Fund (CSF)

18.     The CSF is a capital budget established by Auckland Transport for use by local boards to fund local road safety initiatives. The purpose of this fund is to allow elected members to address long-standing local road safety issues that are not regional priorities and are therefore not being addressed by the Auckland Transport programme.

19.     The CSF is funded from Auckland Transport’s safety budget, and funding for the design and construction for the Causeway project has been confirmed for 2021/2022.

Update on Auckland Transport operations:

20.     The table below has a general summary of projects and activities of interest to the local board with their status. Please note that:

·    All timings are indicative and are subject to change.

·    The Waiheke Operations Manager will update the local board in the event of any amendments or changes to the summaries provided for below.

Activity

Update

EV chargers

A request from Vector for installation and supply of EV charging facilities at 107 Donald Bruce Rd, Surfdale (Kennedy Point upper carpark) is due with the Transport Control Committee (TCC) in August for authorization of a parking resolution.

Vector will then commence with the installation to create two EV car parking bays. The application is being made on behalf of local organization Electric Island Waiheke.

 

AT is waiting on legal advice regarding other on-street applications at 26 Anzac Rd, Orapiu, and 1 Third Ave, Onetangi.

Wharves

Matiatia Wharf (main)

The contract has been awarded to Heron Construction who have partnered with Lighthouse Naval Architects (steel pontoon engineering) and Manson Engineering (detailed design and gangway fabrication).

Phase one - to replace the old gangways, pontoon and hydraulic lifting system at the southern (main) berth.

Works are provisionally planned to commence in November 2021 with completion in early 2022, subject to final confirmation from the project team. The replacement infrastructure is due to be manufactured off site, and timing will depend on the availability of materials. 

Phase two – to replace the northern berth.

Expected to take place within 12-18 months.

Options for use of the Old Wharf are also being prepared for when ferry users will be required to relocate to this facility.

These include the operational requirements, HOP machine location, shelter options, pedestrian flow, terminal businesses and overall user experience.

Matiatia Wharf (old)

Project objective: To enable commuter vessels to berth at this wharf in the event of emergency or as back up to works taking place on the main berths

Contractor is working on site during August to complete improvement items identified during sea trials.

Waiheke Coastguard

The Waiheke Coastguard currently occupy a permanent berthing position alongside the main wharf and have expressed a desire to relocate permanently to the old wharf.

AT have met with Coastguard to discuss relocation options for

1.   Short term – cover eight weeks whilst work is being undertaken on the new wharf (southern berth).

2.   Long term – where crews can access their rescue vessel from a pontoon, and installation of an Air Berth.

AT is currently reviewing the short and long-term options proposed, including consent requirements.

Road Maintenance

Programmed works

August works includes water tabling and other routine cyclic maintenance of signs, drains and potholes.

Drainage Repair

·      Waimangu Rd.

Road maintenance

·      Te Makiri Rd.

·      Moa Ave

·      The Espanade

·      Te Toki Rd

Metro Ferry Services

Ferry Services

Patronage for the month continues to increase month on month. Overall, numbers for May were 94% of 2019 numbers which has been a slightly better response rate than most other services and in line with expectations.

 

It should be noted that whilst patronage recovery to the island is encouraging, as a % of 2019 figures this is expected to decrease as we head into summer.

 

 

Update on Auckland Transport operations:

21.     This list is initially an update on the projects outlined in the “Waiheke 10 Year Transport Plan: Project Lists draft for consultation June 2019”.

22.     The Waiheke Operations Manager will update the local board in the event of any amendments or changes to the summaries provided for below.

 

 

Activity

Summary

Update

Te Huruhi School

New pedestrian crossing outside Te Huruhi School, Donald Bruce Rd.

The proposal is for a new pedestrian crossing to be constructed outside the school.

 

Internal consultation with various AT stakeholders has been completed.

AT met with the school’s principal and Board members on 12 August to discuss the proposal and concerns that they have raised. Because of this meeting, further changes will be made to the scheme plan.

In summary, the location of the proposed raised crossing will be retained, and it will be supported with changes to the school car park and changes to the management of on-street parking.

The revised scheme plan will be submitted to the Board for their information and feedback.

The Transport Forum have also provided input to the proposed design.

 

Matiatia landside transport improvements

Development of a strategic business case for the master redevelopment of the Matiatia precinct, including carparking, footpaths, surrounding streets and modal access arrangements

$25.6m has been confirmed in the 2021-2031 Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) for this project.

Next steps:

1)   Engagement discussions in progress with the Iwi Mana whenua of the area.

Preparation for collaboration workshops with the community on concept design.

New bus network infrastructure

Provision of infrastructure to support the new Waiheke bus network, which will require new bus stops and the removal of redundant bus stops

Donald Bruce Road, Surfdale. Seven stops are due to be installed.

Two stops with shelters at this stage are corner of Esslin Rd and Donald Bruce Rd, and outside the School – both on the Matiatia bound side of the road will be completed first.

Traffic Management Plans (TMPs) are currently being processed for the outstanding installations.

Regulated parking – Belgium St

Modification and upgrade of the bus stops, pedestrian crossings and footpaths on Belgium Street, as well as implementation of regulated parking

 

Design work for future bus stop improvements is progressing.

 

Bus infrastructure is being assessed at the bus stop outside #13 Belgium St to improve visibility issues at the nearby vehicle entrance/exit.

 

Crossing improvement - Sea View Rd

Upgrade of the crossing on Sea View Road to high friction surfacing

Considered for upgrade in new financial year.

 

 

Intersection upgrade - Moa Road / Oceanview Rd

Upgrade of the Moa Road / Oceanview Road intersection to improve road safety and allow for pedestrian access to Little Oneroa.

 

This intersection was investigated by Traffic Engineering in 2017. The main concern being investigated was providing a safer crossing point across both Ocean View Road and Moa Ave. However, a pedestrian count undertaken at that time found a minimum number of pedestrians, which could not justify providing a formal pedestrian crossing at this location. The geometric alignment of the roads also did not allow a crossing facility to be provided that would meet the safety and design standards.

Another option of upgrading the intersection into a roundabout was also briefly considered and assessed.  However, there were a few constraints on site, including a retaining wall on the south-west corner of the intersection, a bank dropping off on the northern side of the road, and a power pole and transformer close to the road, which would all make a roundabout physically unsuitable for the existing site condition, or would require significant cost and potentially land acquisition.

The Road Safety team is currently reviewing speed limits on Waiheke Island as part of their speed management programme.  This has provided an opportunity for us to revisit the intersection, particularly regarding pedestrian safety.  As a first step, we will arrange for a new traffic and pedestrian survey to be undertaken to assist us understand the current operation of the intersection.

AT will discuss a recommended date and time for the survey with the Local Board so that the most useful data can be captured for analysis.

 

Community Safety Fund

23.     The CSF is funded from AT’S safety budget and is dependent on the level of funding AT receives from Auckland Council.

24.     The local board resolved for Auckland Transport to construct an improved and dedicated pedestrian and cycle facility along Causeway Road (coastal side).

This is project 13 from the Waiheke 10 Year Transport Plan.

 

Project

Approved funding

Update

The Causeway – from Shelley Beach Rd to the Boating Club

Community Safety Fund (CSF)

Draft Design is complete.

AT is procuring a consultant to complete the structural design and detailed design, and prepare and submit a resource consent for

(a) tree/vegetation pruning/removal,

(b) Working within the marine coastal area. 

CSF funding for this project is available for design/construction this financial year. 

Depending on the outcome from the resource consent phase construction could begin in the new year.

 

Unsealed Roads Improvement Framework

25.     Auckland has a road network of 7,300km, of which 795km is unsealed. The unsealed road network is largely located in five local board areas: Rodney, Franklin, Waiheke Island, Aotea/Great Barrier and Waitakere. Auckland Transport has a programme to progressively upgrade the unsealed road network. AT has reviewed the approach to prioritising and upgrading the unsealed road network to allow AT to deliver more improvements to benefit more people.

26.     The new prioritisation approach involves assessing roads against data proxies and qualitative information using the following criteria: strategic fit, safety, public health, cost, climate change and natural environment. This ensures the prioritisation process is simple, robust and repeatable, and aligns with AT strategic objectives.

27.     The new approach also allows for a broad range of treatment options, rather than defaulting to a full seal, including surface strengthening, road widening, safety improvements, pothole, corrugation and drainage improvements, dust mitigation, and full seal. 

28.     The budget allocation is also adjusted to fund the highest priorities across each treatment type, resulting in more kilometres of road being treated each year with the same budget, while also having the treatment align to customer needs and ensuring that sealing is still implemented.

29.     AT ran workshops with all the affected local boards and received their feedback. Overall, there was strong support from all the local boards for the new prioritisation process and treatment options.

30.     AT has now accessed the roads and applied the new prioritisation approach to develop the future programme. The below table outlines the programme for 2021/22 under the new methodology:

2021/22 Programme

Road

Start

End

Treatment Description

Local Board

MAN O WAR BAY ROAD (NORTH)

204

4335

Localised Improvement Works

Waiheke

OLD KAIPARA ROAD (Warkworth)

0

5630

Localised Improvement Works

Rodney

WILSON ROAD (WARKWORTH)

490

1350

Localised Improvement Works

Rodney

PURIRI BAY ROAD

1187

1983

Maintenance Seal

Aotea Great Barrier

PURIRI BAY ROAD

474

1187

Maintenance Seal

Aotea Great Barrier

PURIRI BAY ROAD

1983

2291

Maintenance Seal

Aotea Great Barrier

AWAAWAROA ROAD

954

1370

Maintenance Seal

Waiheke

BROOK ROAD (Waiuku)

2174

2414

Maintenance Seal

Franklin

AHUROA ROAD (Warkworth)

5393

7837

Seal Extension

Rodney

AHUROA ROAD (Warkworth)

4935

5393

Seal Extension

Rodney

MCLACHLAN ROAD (KUMEU)

548

4425

Widening/Drainage/Strengthening

Rodney

31.     For comparison, under the old methodology the programme for 2020/21 was as follows:

 

2020/21 Programme

Road

Start

End

Local Board

WELLSFORD VALLEY ROAD (STAGE ONE)

1270

4111

Rodney

RODNEY ROAD

64

634

Rodney

NGAREWA ROAD

50

589

Rodney

WELLSFORD VALLEY ROAD (STAGE TWO)

4661

5460

Rodney

AHUROA ROAD (STAGE ONE)

7837

9152

Rodney

 

32.     Delivery of the new programme will begin in the next financial year.

33.     Following the development of the 2021/22 programme our intention is to have three years of the programme developed and publicised. We will update the board when we have this information and prior to public release.

Bus Stop Names

34.     Auckland Transport is updating bus stop names on its digital platforms to create more memorable and useful stop descriptions for customers to navigate their journeys. This will also create greater consistency between the names on the physical bus stops and their names online i.e. the AT mobile app and Journey Planner on the web.

35.     We will be gradually introducing audio announcements on buses from late 2021. Memorable, concise and easy to understand stop names are needed for this. As part of this wider work Auckland Transport has developed a Bus Stop Naming Policy to help provide guidance now and into the future.

36.     Research has suggested that landmarks are easier to remember than street addresses. This means updating the digital names to be the same as the names on the physical bus stops in most cases. This follows international best practice, for example as used in Transport for London, Paris, and Melbourne. This has been supported by findings from AT customer testing late 2020, including the blind and low vision community.

37.     This will ensure that:

·        There is consistency between physical bus stop names and bus stop names used by our digital platforms.

·        Stops are easier to remember

·        Stop names are more useful for customers

38.     In 85% of scenarios, the bus stop name will stay the same as the physical infrastructure. Approximately 15% of stop names have been identified as having more useful names applied using the Naming Policy based on international best practice.

39.     The new naming system is structured following a list from Priority One to Five. A stop name will follow Priority One in the first instance, if that does not apply, it will move to the next Priority level until a suitable Priority level is applied.

·        Transport Interchanges

·        Landmarks

·        Major Intersection

·        Side Road

·        Street Address / Other

40.     If you would like more information an explanatory video is available which goes through why the changes are being made and how they will be made.

Response to resolutions 

41.     In response to resolution number WHK/2021/56 – the local board provided feedback on the 2021-31 Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP).

42.     All 21 local boards resolved official feedback on the RLTP with over 740 points for consideration. This feedback was reviewed by the RLTP team, was presented to the Regional Transport Committee, Auckland Council’s Planning Committee and the Auckland Transport Board to help inform their decision making.

43.     In terms of responding to local board feedback it is our intention to come back, formally, on all the points. However, given the volume of feedback, this will have to be done in stages, based on whether we have an immediate response to the feedback or if it requires further investigation from the wider organisation. All comments that do not directly relate to the RLTP have been forwarded to the relevant part of Auckland Transport for their information.

44.     Please see below for a table outlining the local board feedback and Auckland Transport’s response.

 

Advocacy

Response (from SME)

The local board acknowledges and supports the allocation by Auckland Transport of $10m in the draft Auckland Regional Transport Plan 2021-2031 to start to support the delivery of the Waiheke Transport Plan.

Thank you for this comment supporting the Waiheke Ten-Year Transport Plan.

The local board acknowledges the four transport challenges identified by Auckland Transport in the draft Auckland Regional Transport Plan 2021-2031 of climate change and the environment, travel options, safety, and access and connectivity as being significant challenges for Auckland as a region that are also relevant for Waiheke.

The local board supports a focus on mitigating and responding to climate change through:

i.    increased investment and integrated design of active travel, in particular investment of standalone and integrated cycle infrastructure that increases the safety and sense of security of cyclists whilst supporting direct route connections.

ii.    increased investment in public transport and providing fair priced accessible integrated public transport across ferry, bus and train services.

iii.   increased investment in infrastructure and programmes that reduces negative environmental impacts and increases restoration and regeneration of the environment.

iv.  endorsing the focus on low carbon into the future in line with Council’s and the local boards’ own low carbon action plans.

v.   continued investigation and investment into non-fossil fuel alternate energy sources to power ferry and bus fleets.

Thank you for this comment supporting the RLTP's objective of addressing climate change. The comments and recommendations have been noted.

Through its MOU with Auckland Transport, and because of the shared commitment to the local initiative, Electric Island Waiheke, the Waiheke local board area was the first to roll out electric buses; this has seen a change in energy source with the associated reduction in use of imported fuel products and renewable energy supplied through the local grid. The associated reduction in climate change emissions is also matched with cleaner air along with a reduction in noise pollution. Complementing the electric buses, Waiheke Island is rapidly moving towards achieving a 10% uptake of electric vehicles. The new future-focused waste services contract has seen a rollout of electric rubbish trucks.

Thank you for this feedback. We have noted this comment.

Waiheke residents have a strong and united focus on managing and reducing their environmental impacts and seek a healthy thriving ecosystem from land to sea. This is enshrined in the current Local Board Plan. On Waiheke, Auckland Transport has been working in partnership with Auckland Council’s Healthy Waters unit which is giving advice on roading drainage and culvert upgrades with significant improvements in water and ecological outcomes slowing erosive storm waters and filtering pollutants before reaching the marine environment.

Thank you for this feedback. We have noted this comment.

The local board supports a focus on expanding travel options through:

i.    assistance to lower income residents to increase their use of public transport.

ii.    Increased investment in the Footpath Programme

iii.   investigation, and effective monitoring and regulation of clean energy, low environmental impact, micro mobility modes of transport.

iv.  Auckland Council with Auckland Transport advocating alongside of the Waiheke Local Board in having public transport ferry services to and from Waiheke included in the regional transport network within the Public Transport Operating Model.

Thank you for this comment supporting the RLTP's objective of providing travel choice. The comments and recommendations have been noted.

The local board supports the principles behind the proposals to implement “Community Connect” giving a 50% discount on public transport fares for Community Services Card holders, increasing discounts for interpeak fares on eligible bus, train and ferry services and continuing to offer the ‘Child Fare Free Weekend’ initiative on eligible bus, train and ferry services. However, all three of these initiatives are examples that will further increase the gaps between benefits that eligible residents get on mainland Auckland and what comparable Waiheke Islander Aucklanders can access. These gaps are due predominantly to the exempt status of the commercial ferry operations under central governments Public Transport Operating Model (PTOM).

Thank you for this comment supporting Community Connect. We note the comment regarding exempt services and their effect on Waiheke.

PTOM exemption of Waiheke ferry services means that passengers using the Waiheke ferry services do not access a fare subsidy that other public transport users in the Auckland region receive. This has flow-on impacts: as public transport travel either side of a ferry journey for the majority of ticket types is not integrated. Hence, they cost more compared to a subsidised integrated fare. For example, a person journeying on a non-Waiheke ferry who then travels by bus having no additional cost for any within zone travel.

Thank you for this feedback. We have noted this comment.

The Waiheke Local Board has a history of advocating to have the current PTOM-exemptions for Waiheke ferry services removed to restore equity and fairness for local users. The Local Board Chair and a local board transport lead met with the Minister of Transport recently in Wellington to discuss the matter, as PTOM is currently under review by Government.

Thank you for this feedback. We have noted this comment.

The local board supports a focus on increased safety through:

i.    safety infrastructure to support a Vision Zero goal of no fatality or serious injuries contributed to through Auckland Transport’s management of its network and operations

ii.    increased roll out of low speed environments

iii.   enhanced responsiveness to community requests to support shared road corridors and pedestrian and cyclist safe environments.

iv.  a lift in the funding of the Roading Sealing Prioritisation Programme along with a greater ability to manage budget across unsealed road renewals, which supports more nuanced local responses working across related budget areas.

Thank you for this comment supporting Vision Zero and addressing safety. The comments and recommendations have been noted.

The local board supports the importance of Waiheke as a low-speed environment to preserve road safety for all users on Waiheke and has been advocating for the same for several years.

Thank you for this comment supporting safe speed treatments.

The local board appreciates the opportunity to participate in the second tranche of Auckland Transport’s speed bylaw review scheduled for later this year.

Thank you for this comment supporting safe speed treatments.

The local board supports a focus on access and connectivity through:

i.    Investment in bus, ferry and multimodal improvements that will improve the reliability, capacity and attractiveness of these bus and ferry networks.

ii.    the allocation of $26m for improvements to the landside transport infrastructure and associated works at Matiatia Wharf on Waiheke Island, one of Auckland’s busiest but most constrained transport hubs.

Thank you for this comment supporting the RLTP's objective of providing access and connectivity, and the improvements at Matiatia Wharf.

As noted in the draft plan consultation document the majority of passenger boarding’s are on the frequent, connector and local bus and ferry networks. For Waiheke the primary arrival and departure points for most residents and visitors are the Downtown Ferry terminal and the Matiatia Wharf.

Thank you for this feedback. We have noted this comment.

With respect to the Downtown Ferry terminal, Auckland Transport needs to better consider the impact of movement of Waiheke commuters and travellers through this critical arrival and departure node. Accessible and easy transfers to other modes from the ferries are vital, particularly the consideration that these ports are points of transition for persons who may be less mobile due to physical impairments, sight, and age, or wellness. The links and transfer between modes and destinations need to be considered and designed from a customer-centric perspective.

Thank you for this feedback. We have noted this comment.

Significant projects such as the proposed Downtown Crossover Bus Facilities, bus priority improvements along Customs Street and potential new bus facilities for connections across the city to destinations such as hospitals, the airport, or even significant Council venues such as Aotea Square, art gallery, museum or the zoo all need to be fully considered. How will Auckland Transport through its services add value to people’s lives rather than posing barriers? The local board has advocated for several years for the needs of those who are ill, frail or disabled to be able to access their local hospital (Auckland Hospital) directly from the ferry terminal. To date no plans have addressed this essential need.

Thank you for this feedback. AT has created a 5 to 10-year plan for buses in the city centre. Feedback on this plan is out now until 19 September 2021.

Local Initiatives Fund - Local Board Capital Transport Fund

The local board supports the resumption of funding for capital projects – the Local Initiatives Fund (previously called the Local Board Capital Transport Fund) to pre Covid levels to enable all local boards to prioritise local projects and improvements to achieve better outcomes in their local road network for its communities.

Thank you for this comment supporting the Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

Outstanding AT responses to local board requests or queries

45.     WHK/2020/63. Provide details of the process for closing The Esplanade to all motor vehicles except those used for emergency purposes.

Budget constraints from 2020/2021 have delayed the process of progressing the consultative process for designating The Esplanade as a Pedestrian Mall.

 

Budget is now confirmed for 2021/2022, and engagement of a suitably experienced and qualified consulting company is underway.

 

Below is a summary of the process and documentation required –

 

Statement of Proposal 

·    To declare a section of road a Pedestrian Mall, we are required to prepare and adopt a statement of proposal (SOP). The SOP sets out the background to the proposal, details of and reasons for the proposal, how the public can view and obtain copies of documents relevant to the proposal, and how submissions on the proposal can be made.

 

Resolution Report to the Transport Control Committee (TCC)

·    A resolution report is to be prepared and presented to the TCC members meeting. This enables TCC members to consider on reasonable grounds whether the proposal necessitates public understanding of the proposal. The information contained in the memorandum is the background for the proposal, the statement of proposal (SOP), rationale behind the selection of the final option, and Local board or community views on the proposal and next steps on moving the proposal forward.

 

Special consultation procedure

·    AT are legally responsible for consulting on any proposal for a road to be a pedestrian mall. This will be a special consultation. AT will coordinate the material, involving the memorandum of understanding, statement of proposal, design drawings of the proposal and its location and any other relevant information.

·    We will invite people to make submissions within a one-month notification period, including face-to-face objection submissions required under the special consultation procedure. (No less than one month from the date the statement is issued and publicly available).

·    Should the proposal be favourable, then within one month of the declaration being made, the public have a right of appeal to the Environment Court. The public must be notified of this right of appeal during the consultation. The declaration does not take effect until either the one-month appeal period has lapsed, or any appeals have been determined by the Court.

 

Right of appeal

·    Section 336(3) allows any person the right to appeal a declaration to make a pedestrian mall to the Environment Court.

·    They will need to fund this option. It also means the process is halted.

·    The Environment Court (EC) may affirm or quash the declaration or may affirm it with modification. The decision of the EC is final with no right of appeal to the High Court or Auckland Council.

·    However, this does not mean AT cannot start from scratch again.

 

Final Resolution report to the Transport Control Committee (TCC)

·    With no appeals to the Environment Court, a final resolution report is required to be prepared and submitted to the Transport Control Committee for approval.

·    This ensures the pedestrian mall proposal is legal and can be enforced.

 

Operational manual or guidelines

·    An operational manual or guidelines should be prepared with appropriate stakeholders. This ensures that roles and responsibilities are clear and defined with those involved with the pedestrian mall operation.

·    Responsibilities for the appropriate assets will need to be defined

·    There are current enforcement issues with pedestrian malls, so the design component is vital in minimising the need for consistent enforcement.

 

Once we have confirmation of engagement from the consultant, the local board will be provided with a further update, including timeline estimations.

 

46.     WHK/2020/10. Provide clarity around Auckland Transport’s position on managing apparent anti-completive practices at Matiatia (and Downtown) ferry terminals, and surrounds.

Report due to Local Board in August 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

47.     Auckland Transport engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

48.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

49.     The impact of the information in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the Council group. Any engagement with other parts of the Council group will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

50.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no local, sub-regional or regional impacts.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

51.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

52.     There are no financial implications of receiving this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

53.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks. Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for all their projects.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

54.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board at their next business meeting in September 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Richard La Ville – Operations Manager – Waiheke and Gulf Islands Airfields – Auckland Transport

Authorisers

John Strawbridge – Group Manager Parking Services and Compliance – Auckland Transport

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

Minutes of the Waiheke Transport Forum 4 August 2021

File No.: CP2021/12226

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present an update and minutes to the Waiheke Local Board from the business meeting of the Waiheke Transport Forum (the forum) held on 4 August 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The business meeting of the Waiheke Transport Forum was held on 4 August 2021 and minutes are included as Attachment A.

3.       The following items were discussed:

i)             Proposed Coastguard Berth update.

ii)            Review of 10-year Transport Plan.

iii)      Agreed to workshop on Wednesday 18 August at 5pm to capture collective feedback.

iv)      Safe Speed Review Tranche 2A update.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the minutes of the Waiheke Transport Forum business meeting dated 4 

         August 2021.

b)      consider the Transport Forum request to Waiheke Local Board seek further information with regards consultation and consideration of continuing to meet the needs of existing activities as part of the Matiatia Wharf north pier renewal as outlined in the member report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Transport Forum Minutes - 4 August 2021

49

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Inglis - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

Review of Waiheke agrichemical dispensation

File No.: CP2021/11178

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To submit a revised agrichemical dispensation for Waiheke Local Board consideration.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Effective management of environmental pest plants on Local Parks requires balancing risks from unmanaged pest plants with risks of agrichemical use. There is high public interest in both issues.

3.       The Waiheke agrichemical dispensations (2013 and 2017) enable effective control of high impact environmental weeds. Due to changes since the Local Board approved them (legislative and ecological), both require review. During a workshop in March, staff recommended, and Elected Members requested, joint review and merging of the two dispensations.

4.       Staff advise use of agrichemicals is still required to enable effective management of environmental weeds, including achieving compliance with the operative Auckland Regional Pest Management Plan.

5.       Following a workshop in March, staff have reviewed both the current agrichemical dispensations and prepared a merged, revised Waiheke Island agrichemical dispensation application for Local Board consideration. This proposed agrichemical dispensation (Attachment A) includes:

a.       standard methodologies for managing species from both previous dispensations, plus additional species that require more management compared to when the 2013 and 2017 dispensations were developed (Attachment B)

b.       ability to address new and site-specific issues within defined parameters

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      approve the proposed agrichemical dispensation as per Attachment A.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Waiheke Island contains areas of high ecological value. Invasive pest plant species (environmental weeds) are one of the biggest threats to the high ecological values of Waiheke Island, including delivering objectives of the Auckland Biodiversity Strategy. For some species, management is required under the operative Auckland Regional Pest Management Plan, which Auckland Council has implemented in accordance with functions delegated to Regional Authorities under the Biosecurity Act.

7.       Target environmental weeds include species such as moth plant, woolly nightshade, climbing asparagus, ginger and rhamnus. Impacts of these species includes replacement of native species by mechanisms such as smothering and preventing regeneration. Factors influencing management options include:

·    The nature of these species (e.g., presence of underground tubers, ability to resprout / coppice) means many high impact environmental weeds are not able to be managed effectively without use of agrichemicals.

·    A “no management” option is not considered tenable as it would result in collapse of the native ecosystems in these areas.

·    Use of agrichemicals creates potential risks to human and environmental health.

8.       The Waiheke community has a strong interest in both environmental protection and potential risks from agrichemical use, with a range of views being held and expressed.

9.       Waiheke Island Local Board previously granted two agrichemical dispensations to enable effective delivery of weed control, including compliance with relevant plans:

·    The 2013 dispensation covered all areas of specified Local Parks (report found 19 September 2013 Resolution number WHK/2013/305)

·    The 2017 dispensation was specifically developed to enable delivery of the ERC contract within eco polygons on Local Parks (report found 28 September 2017 Resolution number WHK/2017/150)

10.     The 2013 and 2017 dispensations are now outdated as new species are required to be controlled under the currently operative Regional Pest Management Plan. In addition:

·    some invasive species that were not previously widespread on Waiheke are either in the early stages of establishing or are becoming more widespread (e.g., Japanese honeysuckle and mile-a-minute)

·    the previous dispensations do not allow effective planting preparation in some areas

·    there has been increasing interest from community groups wishing to both see and be involved in ecological restoration activities.

11.     Following Local Board workshop feedback, staff have prepared a proposed ‘joint’ agrichemical dispensation for control of environmental pest plants on Waiheke Island Local Parks that captures more recent developments in this area.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Staff have prepared a proposed agrichemical dispensation that addresses more recent developments in agrichemical use for management of environmental pest plants (see Appendix A, attached).

13.     Key features of the proposed dispensation include:

·    having a single agrichemical dispensation, instead of separate ones for different management areas within the Local Parks network

·    more clarity around requirements for all agrichemical use on Waiheke Island Local Parks, including compliance requirements, permitted active ingredients, requirements for agrichemical formulations, permitted methodologies, and reporting

·    retaining prescriptive specifications, which would be embedded into any relevant contracts or volunteer agreements, for use unless otherwise specified

·    flexibility to enable site managers to respond effectively to situations where usual specifications are not appropriate (e.g., establishment of a new species on a site, planting preparation and maintenance, managing a post-fire site) within defined parameters.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     Impacts of the proposed dispensation are considered an insignificant change from the current 2013 and 2017 dispensations.

15.     Compared to manual control of invasive species, the proposed dispensation will have a positive effect as improved effectiveness means less travel to site will be required to achieve the same level of control and a healthier ecosystem (that is expected to sequester more carbon) can be achieved.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     Staff in Community Facilities, Environmental Services and Parks, Sports and Recreation departments have assessed agrichemicals as a tool they require to effectively deliver their work programmes in a manner that achieves the objectives of Council plans and policies, including the Auckland Biodiversity Plan and the operative Auckland Regional Pest Management Plan. Staff have also assessed agrichemicals as a tool requiring appropriate management.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     The Waiheke Island community continues to have a strong interest in both ecological restoration and conservation issues, as well as use of agrichemicals as a management tool.

18.     Previous agrichemical dispensations were workshopped and approved by Elected Members. Public consultation was undertaken at the same time.

19.     The current revision was workshopped with elected members in March 2021. This report delivers further work requested by the local board at this workshop.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     While mana whenua consistently promote environmental protection, there is currently no unified view on agrichemical use and management. The proposed dispensation is broadly consistent with methodologies approved by the Tūpuna Maunga Authority for use on Tūpuna Maunga.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     While specific management advice around a few species has changed and the recommendations enable early response to new infestations in particular, recommendations of this report are largely a continuation of current practice and have insignificant financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

22.     The Waiheke Island community have a strong interest in both ecological management to retain the special values of Waiheke Island, as well as potential risks from use of agrichemicals as a management tool. Balancing these potentially conflicting interests was previously addressed by the 2013 and 2017 agrichemical dispensations.

23.     The 2013 and 2017 dispensations are no longer fit for purpose. It is proposed this risk is addressed by the proposed dispensation. Risk of not reviewing the existing methodologies includes:

·    inability to comply with the operative Auckland Regional Pest Management Plan

·    inability to manage sites in a manner consistent with the Auckland Biodiversity Strategy

·    inability to manage some species on archaeologically significantly sites

·    it being impractical to maintain the same standard of ecological asset management on Waiheke Island as is possible on mainland Auckland sites

·    frustration from community groups being unable to contribute to effective ecological management in their local reserve(s).

Risks and mitigations

24.     This proposed dispensation continues to avoid use of agrichemicals in areas such as playgrounds and hard surfaces, and also continues to provide a “lowest impact” methodology for main target species.

25.     A key change is that the proposed agrichemical dispensation makes provision for development and application of bespoke methodologies in situations where a site-specific response is required. This would include situations where early control of a low incident pest plant would prevent spread and reduce potential agrichemical use long term. Risk of this provision is addressed by providing a clear framework that any bespoke methodologies must comply with. This includes meeting relevant legislation, standards and low-impact practices, as well as requiring technical specialists based on Waiheke Island to review proposed bespoke methodologies.

26.     Further engagement is likely to be required. It may, however, not be possible to achieve a result that is supported by all members of the Waiheke community and that also enables delivery of a high standard of asset management within the Local Parks, delivery of objectives of the Auckland Biodiversity Strategy, compliance with the operative Auckland Regional Pest Management Plan, and meaningful support of local community volunteer groups wishing to improve ecological values of their local park(s).

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Waiheke Island Local Board to advise staff whether they:

·    decline the proposed agrichemical dispensation OR

·    request changes to the proposed agrichemical dispensation OR

·    request further consultation OR

·    approve the proposed agrichemical dispensation.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Proposed Local Parks 2021 agrechem dispensation

61

b

Standard lowest impact methodology

67

     

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sarah Gibbs - Ecological Specialist Team, Community Facilities

Authorisers

Shane Hogg – Area Operations Manager, Community Facilities

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

Agrichemical dispensation for control of invasive ecological pest plants within Local Parks on Waiheke Island

 

1.   No herbicide areas on hard areas within Local Parks

Under direction of the Waiheke Local Board, agrichemicals are not used for maintenance of hard assets in Local Parks and road corridors on Waiheke Island. This includes children’s playgrounds, roads, footpaths, and other hard surfaces.

2.   Requirements for all herbicide use

It is recognised that herbicides:

·    Present an efficient and effective method of pest plant control and, for some species or in some situations, may be the only available option to achieve effective control

·    Reduce risks of spreading pathogens (e.g., kauri dieback, myrtle rust) via transport of contaminated vegetation material out of control areas by enabling in situ control and disposal of plant material

·    On sites where high archaeological values preclude digging and other soil disturbance are the only option for effective control of some pest plant species

·    May reduce carbon emissions (e.g., less petrol than control using mechanised tools, lower management requirements resulting in less site disturbance and less travel to site, enables management of functional native bush that has improved carbon sequestration properties[1])

·    Where used for asset maintenance, enables effective management of assets in a manner that reduces ratepayer budgets by increasing asset longevity.

Use of agrichemicals, however, also creates potential cultural, human health and environmental risks.

Use of agrichemicals must be carried out in a manner that balances risks and benefits, including by adopting methodology that minimises potential risks.

The following requirements apply to all herbicide use on Local Parks:

1.   With the exception of label rates, agrichemical users must comply with the operative Auckland Air, Land and Water Plan, Auckland Unitary Plan[2], The New Zealand Standard NZS8409:2004 Management of Agrichemicals[3], and any other relevant legislative requirements.

NB: Label rates are exempted as these are usually developed for high-volume applications to control agricultural weeds and are not always available or appropriate for all ecological weeds in all situations. Methodologies are available from reputable sources such as Auckland Council plant search[4] and Weedbusters[5]. In some cases, site-specific methodologies may need to be developed.

2.   Agrichemicals permitted are glyphosate, metsulfuron, triclopyr, haloyxyfop, clopyralid and picloram.

3.   Glyphosate formulations shall[6]:

·    be fully Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996 (HSNO) assessed[7] (i.e., not contain proprietary surfactants and additives that are unable to be HSNO assessed for commercial reasons)

·    not contain POEA (polyethoxylated tallow amine - a range of non-ionic surfactants derived from animal fats that are toxic to human cells and act as endocrine disrupters)

·    not trigger any category 6 or 8 HSNO classifications[8]

·    trigger a maximum of 9.1B[9] (no glyphosate formulations triggering 9.1A are to be used)

4.   To minimise risk to vineyards, triclopyr and clopyralid foliar applications shall only occur in April and May.

5.   Up to 0.6% picloram applied in small quantities in gel formulation or from a hand bottle is permitted only for direct non-foliar application (i.e., drill and fill, ring barking and frilling, or treating freshly cut stumps) of woody weeds away from water during fine weather.

6.   Marker dyes shall be used to identify areas where herbicides have been recently applied. Marker dyes shall:

be fully Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996 (HSNO) assessed (i.e., not contain proprietary surfactants and additives that are unable to be HSNO assessed for commercial reasons)

not contain POEA (polyethoxylated tallow amine)

·    not trigger any HSNO classifications

7.   Surfactants shall:

be fully Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996 (HSNO) assessed (i.e., not contain proprietary surfactants and additives that are unable to be HSNO assessed for commercial reasons)

trigger a maximum of 6.1D

trigger a maximum of 9.1B (no surfactants triggering 9.1A shall be used), with 9.1D being preferred where possible

8.   Approved agrichemical applications methods are by direct non-foliar application (e.g., stump treatment), foliar application using hand-held sprayers, and vials where there is low risk of spillage and access to the vials by the public. No herbicide application by mechanised sprayers is to take place on Local Parks or for management of ecological pest plant species on roadside reserves unless with the specific permission of the Auckland Council contract manager.

9.   Agrichemical records must be supplied to the Auckland Council contract manager in the standard Auckland Council format.

 

3.   Standard lowest-impact methodologies

Standard lowest-impact methodologies (Attachment B) shall be used for invasive pest plant species that are routinely controlled to achieve compliance with relevant plans or to protect ecological, cultural, or recreational assets. Please note, permitted standard methodologies may differ for Suppliers and volunteer groups.

For clarity, where works are being carried out by Suppliers or volunteer groups, the standard methodologies shall be included in relevant contracts or volunteer agreements / restoration plans.

For volunteer groups to utilise the standard methodologies, people using herbicides must be under on-site supervision by someone who is Growsafe trained or appropriate equivalent and works must be approved by an Auckland Council Community Ranger or other relevant Council staff member.

4.   Site-specific methodologies

On some occasions, standard methodologies may be inappropriate. For example:

·    A new or low incident species that is not usually managed, but that has potential to become invasive and damaging

·    Potential high weed germination rates following a fire

·    Vulnerable non-target species that would be affected by herbicides contained in the standard methodologies, meaning they are not the lowest impact option on that site

·    Different methodologies being required in or near waterways, wetlands, or areas with a variable water table where herbicides could become seasonally mobilised[10]

·    Location on a cliff, archaeological or cultural site, or erosion-prone land meaning manual control involving digging or other soil disturbance is not appropriate.

 

In these situations, Auckland Council may approve a site-specific methodology. Site-specific methodologies will be developed and approved by the relevant Council staff member. For example:

·    Methodology used by Suppliers will be approved by Community Facilities (CF) Regional Arboriculture and Ecological staff or CF (within eco polygons) or Full Facilities (FF) staff (outside eco polygons)

·    Methodology used by Volunteers working on parks will be approved by the Community Rangers team or another staff member working with the relevant community group.

Prior to approving methodology outside prescriptive specifications for use by Suppliers or volunteer groups, contract managers must seek review by senior staff in the Auckland Council Waiheke-based Natural Environment Delivery (formerly Biosecurity) Islands team.

 

5.   Dispensation review period

This dispensation shall be reviewed during the 2024-2025 financial year, or sooner if part of or all the dispensation is rendered inappropriate due to further information becoming available or other relevant events.

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

Adoption of the Ngahere Analysis Report 2021

File No.: CP2021/12048

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Waiheke Urban Ngahere (Forest) Analysis Report 2021 as per Attachment A to this report.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The regional Te Rautaki Ngahere ā-Tāone o Tāmaki Makaurau (strategy) responds to changes in ngahere canopy cover and potential climate change impacts.

3.       The strategy’s target is to increase tree canopy cover across all local board areas in Tāmaki Makaurau to 30 per cent by 2050.

4.       The Waiheke Local Board provided funding in 2020/2021 to undertake the ‘Knowing’ phase of the Urban Ngahere (Forest) programme.  An outline of the Ngahere Analysis Report was workshopped with the local board in April 2020. The completed canopy coverage analysis report using the 2016/2018 Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data is provided as Attachment A to this report. 

5.       The ‘Knowing’ phase of the Ngahere Programme has involved detailed analysis of the urban tree cover using a variety of data sources from the council, Statistics NZ, and other local government sources.

6.       Importantly, this is the first opportunity to report on the ngahere canopy coverages for the Hauraki Gulf Island’s using the LiDAR data capture technology. The Islands were not covered by the LiDAR survey work undertaken in 2013.

7.       The extent of tree canopy cover across the island has been determined using the LiDAR analysis technique. The results have been developed to construct a detailed view to display the extent of tree cover across the Island in 2016/ 2018 alongside population statistics from the 2018 Census, land use activities and planning controls to establish a baseline on tree canopy cover for future comparison work. 

8.       The report has established average tree canopy coverage across Waiheke Island is approximately 40 per cent of the overall land area in 2016/2018. 

9.       The total tree canopy coverage is excellent when compared to the averages across the region. Ongoing work is necessary to preserve and retain tree canopy cover in the long term and to respond to areas of low coverage. A concerted effort will be required to plant new trees every year

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      adopt the Waiheke Urban Ngahere (Forest) Analysis Report 2021 as per Attachment A to this report.

b)      delegate authority to the Local Area Manager and the General Manager, Parks, Sport and Recreation, to make minor changes and amendments to the text and design of the Waiheke Local Board Urban Ngahere (Forest) Analysis Report 2021 that are required before public release.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The regional Te Rautaki Ngahere ā-Tāone o Tāmaki Makaurau / Urban Ngahere (Forest) Strategy, was adopted by the Environment and Community Committee in February 2018 (ENV/2018/12).

11.     The strategy was developed to address concerns around tree cover changes resulting from: development pressures, disease threats, climate change, and changes to tree protection rules.

12.     Workshops and consultation with elected members, mana whenua, and internal stakeholders was included as part of the development of the strategy.

13.     Currently the Auckland region has an average tree canopy cover of 18.4 per cent.

14.     The strategy sets targets that encourages all local boards to have a minimum tree canopy cover of at least 15 per cent, and on a regional scale the target is set at 30 per cent by 2050, in line with the Auckland Plan.

15.     The strategy recommends implementation and analysis of the tree cover at the local level to determine the scale and extent of local tree cover which can help inform decision making on where effort is necessary to respond to changes.

16.     Local boards were offered the opportunity to invest in area specific Urban Ngahere programme of work through the LDI programme in 2017-2018.

17.     The Waiheke Local Board provided funding in the 2020/2021 financial year to undertake the ‘Knowing’ phase of the Urban Ngahere (Forest) programme (resolution number WHK/2020/128).  

18.     The local board Urban Ngahere programme has three phases:

·        The ‘Knowing’ phase – involves establishing an accurate current state analysis report with recommendations for future actions. Using this data and analysis work to inform the development of a long-term action plan to direct planting efforts

·        The ‘Growing’ phase – involves several activities including survey and preparation of annual planting plans to enable an effective annual tree planting program to address areas of low tree cover, working with local island-based nurseries and the community to help supply native plants for annual planting program, work with schools to establish an educational program to collect seed

·        The ‘Protecting’ phase – involves several activities including raising the public awareness of the values and benefits of the urban ngahere, exploring the options for tools to better protect trees on private land, development of information packs on tree care and preservation, increase incentives for landowners to retain and maintain large mature trees, a labelling program of Notable trees in the local board area.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

19.     The final Waiheke Urban Ngahere (Forest) Analysis Report 2021 is provided as attachment A to this report. The report shows in 2016/2018 the overall tree canopy coverage was 40 per cent for the Waiheke Local Board area.

20.     The report provides a number of key statistics for the Waiheke Local Board area:

·    The tree canopy cover for Waiheke is approximately 40 per cent of the islands land area

·    33.5 per cent of the road corridor has tree canopy cover

·    55.8 per cent of the land area in public parks has tree canopy cover

·    41.3 per cent of the tree canopy is located on privately owner land.

·    Detailed analysis of the Dominant Land use across the island has revealed that the lowest tree canopy cover percentages are on land zoned for Community Services, Commercial and Industrial Land uses

·    The Statistical Areas of Gulf Island and Ostend had the lowest percentage tree canopy cover at 33 per cent and the Statistical Area Waiheke East had the highest percentage of tree canopy cover at 45 per cent

·    Nearly three quarters of the total tree canopy cover of the Island is located on privately owned land.

21.     Section 7 of the analysis report sets out key focus areas for increasing public awareness of the importance of tree canopy coverage across the local board area. These are intended to help provide long-term lasting benefits for local communities. A short summary of some of these includes:

·    Considering prioritisation of those reserves with little or no tree cover for assessment as part of the process that will inform the development the Ngahere Action plan.

·    Prioritising new plantings in reserves with playgrounds and around seating areas to respond to the need for more summer shade. The playground study highlights a number of reserves where tree cover is low, and this detail can help direct the development of the Ngahere Action Plan to guide and direct future tree planting efforts.

·    Looking at the quality and maturity of trees in the reserves across the local board area and undertake planning work to help with the future management of some of the ageing stands of exotic trees within the local board area.

·    Considering initiating a training and education program for native seed collection to work with the local nurseries to help build the supply of native plants on the island.

·    Working with the wider stakeholder group and mana whenua to consider an assessment of the vegetation quality and management of exotic weeds on public park land. E.g., Onetangi Sports Park and the large areas of gorse that need to be planted back into native forest.

·    Raising awareness of the biosecurity threats to amenity trees in the Waiheke Local Board area specifically Myrtle Rust and Kauri Die Back as diseases that are going to have an increasing impact on these species.

·    Undertaking connectivity analysis of tree canopy cover to identify gaps between areas of forest, and how these could be improved with targeted planting.

22.     Funding for a multi-year programme of tree planting on public land in parks, open space areas and within the road corridor is necessary to help increase overall tree numbers in the local board area. A commitment to fund the programme will enable new tree plantings, which will in the long-term help to increase overall tree canopy coverage.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     Implementation of the strategy is an example of an integrated approach to help sequester emissions, build resilience longer term and enable adaptation to the impacts of climate change to meet council’s climate goals.

24.     The strategy is identified as a key action in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri - Auckland’s Climate Plan 2020.

25.     Increasing stock of trees and vegetation in Tāmaki Makaurau will increase carbon sequestration and contribute towards reducing net greenhouse gas emissions.

26.     Increasing trees and vegetation also provides various natural functions that assist with adaptation to the climate change impacts for humans and other species, such as:

·        providing a shading and cooling effect to counter rising temperatures

·        slowing and reducing stormwater runoff to assist in managing increased rainfall events

·        improve air quality by trapping particulates and filtering vehicle pollutants

·        providing additional habitat for indigenous species to occupy, enhancing their resilience to climate change impacts.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     Parks, Sport and Recreation (PSR) has collaborated with Community Facilities to help inform where the current maintenance and renewal programme for trees can help to improve the overall health, diversity and extent of the tree canopy cover.

28.     PSR will help inform the Community Facilities renewals programme to ensure an ongoing programme of tree renewal occurs to replace poor and ailing stock and to replant where dead, dying, or diseased trees are removed. 

29.     PSR and Community Facilities will collaboratively manage the delivery of the new tree plantings in the 2022/2023 planting seasons. Any further long-term efforts will be subject to an annual funding allocation from the local board.

30.     PSR will investigate the opportunities for a wider collaborative approach across the council family to grow more trees in the local communities and schools for local use.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.     The Waiheke Local Board Plan 2020 supports the strategy:

Outcome Three: Waiheke’s environment is protected, restored and enhanced. We want to protect, maintain and enhance our unique island’s land, coastline, bush, wetland and marine environments for future generations

Objective: Restore, enhance and protect our natural environment in partnership with our community

Objective: Respond to the challenge of climate change

32.     The local board has provided direction and support for the development of the ngahere analysis work at a workshop in April 2021. Feedback received at the workshop has helped to direct the final report development.

33.     New tree plantings will benefit the Waiheke community by providing increased opportunities for access to nature and providing shade in the local park and street network.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     The urban ngahere is important to mana whenua and the use of native trees will take place as the first choice in alignment with the strategy.

35.     mana whenua will be engaged to support tree planting preparation and provide a cultural narrative in the choice of species for the local areas.

36.     Incorporating mana whenua principles in the design of new areas along with planting native vegetation will better enable the restoration of the mauri of the urban ngahere. Improving urban ngahere cover will help to align with the holistic nature of hauora (Maori Well-being), with improvements in taha wairua (spiritual health), taha hinengaro (mental health), and taha tinana (physical health).

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.     In 2020/2021, the local board allocated $15,000 of operational Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) funding through the local board work programme for the ‘Knowing’ phase (resolution number WHK/2020/128).

38.     The local board allocated $10,000 of operational LDI funding in the 2021/2022 financial year for the ‘Growing’ phase which includes development of the Waiheke Island Ngahere 10-Year Action Plan (resolution number WHK/2021/112). This plan will provide long term direction on future new tree planting efforts.

39.     The local board allocated $10,000 of capital LDI funding in the 2021/2022 financial year through the Community Facilities work programme to implement delivery of new tree planting (resolution number WHK/2021/112). The planting work will be guided by the local boards ngahere action plan once development is completed

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     If the board do not adopt the report and support further ngahere planning, no specific new tree planting programme will take place in neighbourhood parks and along the road berms on suburban streets.

41.     Current renewal planting will be the only mechanism for improving current tree asset numbers and the overall canopy cover will remain at current levels.

42.     The analysis report highlights a need for additional efforts retain existing tree canopy cover and plant new trees where the need has been identified to help provide increased shade and the additional social and health benefits that come with more tree cover.

43.     The planting of new trees is increasingly being recognised as a local solution to help with climate related changes that are taking place. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.     A workshop will be arranged with the local board in Quarter 2 of the 2021/2022 financial year to develop the outline of a Ngahere Action Plan for the Island. The Ngahere Analysis report provides a range of recommendations that will be used to help develop the Action Plan development.

45.     The Action Plan document is aimed at helping direct long term planting efforts over the next 10 years, along with the growing of new native trees to plant, in those areas of need and to respond to the boards objective of increasing their efforts to plant native trees.

46.     The Growing phase to plant new trees annually will be implemented in the 2022-2023 Financial year

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urban Ngahere Analysis Report 2021 for Waiheke Local Board

81

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Howell Davies - Senior Advisor - Urban Forest

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

Proposal to make a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw

File No.: CP2021/12168

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek support for the draft proposal to make a new Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Auckland Council Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022, before it is finalised for public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Staff have prepared a draft proposal for a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw to enable local boards to provide their views before it is finalised for public consultation.

3.       The draft proposal is to make a new bylaw under the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This bylaw would replace the current legacy bylaw, which expires in 2022 and contains provisions developed before the Freedom Camping Act 2011 was passed.

4.       The Freedom Camping Act 2011 allows freedom camping on all public land unless it is already prohibited under another enactment. The Act enables councils to make a bylaw to prohibit or restrict freedom camping in areas that meet statutory criteria for protection.

5.       This draft proposal replaces an earlier proposal developed in 2018 which was set aside by the Governing Body in 2019. Following decisions by the Governing Body in March and May 2021, the key changes compared with the 2018 proposal are that the new draft proposal:

·     excludes land held under the Reserves Act 1977 from scope (council would maintain the current default prohibition on camping on reserves under the Reserves Act 1977)

·     manages freedom camping only on land held under the Local Government Act 2002

·     seeks to prevent freedom camping impacts in sensitive areas, and to protect public health and safety and manage access in all areas, by:

scheduling 44 prohibited areas, where no freedom camping is allowed

scheduling 19 restricted areas, where freedom camping is allowed subject to site-specific restrictions

including general rules to manage freedom camping impacts in all other areas (campers must use certified self-contained vehicles, stay a maximum of two nights, depart by 9am and not return to the same area within two weeks).

6.       As Waiheke Island does not have a public dump station for campers to dispose of their waste responsibly, staff propose that the whole island counts as a single area with a maximum stay of two nights. Freedom campers would need to leave the island to dump their waste or find alternative serviced accommodation if they wish to stay longer. 

7.       The proposed prohibited and restricted areas are those areas which the Bylaw Panel recommended should be prohibited and restricted in 2019, and which are held under the Local Government Act 2002. Areas held under the Reserves Act 1977 have been removed.

8.       The Panel’s recommendations draw on previous area assessments and take into account feedback from local board engagement and public consultation conducted in 2018 and 2019.

9.       The draft proposal includes four designated prohibited areas and no designated restricted areas located in the Waiheke Local Board area. All designated areas are listed in the draft Bylaw schedules within Attachment A. All other council-managed land held under the Local Government Act 2002, including roads, is proposed to be covered by general rules.

10.     Staff recommend that the local board provide its view on the draft proposal, including the inclusion of general rules in the bylaw, the recommended settings for those rules, and the specific proposal to treat Waiheke Island as a single area with a two-night maximum stay.

11.     The key risks of the proposal are that:

·     it creates too few areas where freedom camping is allowed; this is partially mitigated by allowing freedom camping on most roads (subject to general rules), and council could decide to designate more restricted areas following consultation

·     the cumulative impact of all prohibitions under the Bylaw and other enactments is viewed as an effective ban; however staff looked closely at the requirements of the Freedom Camping Act 2011 in developing the proposal and will continue to monitor cumulative impact as bylaw development progresses.

12.     The local board’s views will be provided to the Governing Body in September with the recommendation that the finalised proposal is adopted for public consultation. Public consultation is scheduled for November, and Bylaw Panel deliberations for early 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      support the draft Statement of Proposal in Attachment A of this agenda report to make a new Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Auckland Council Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022 for public consultation.

Horopaki

Context

Freedom camping can have both positive and negative impacts

13.     For the purposes of this Bylaw, freedom camping is when someone stays overnight on council-managed land, including roadsides, in a vehicle or caravan.

14.     Freedom camping specifically refers to people staying in vehicles overnight as part of leisure travel, or because they are choosing to live in a vehicle for lifestyle reasons.

15.     Freedom camping provides a flexible and affordable way for Aucklanders and for domestic and international visitors to experience and enjoy the region. Many freedom campers will visit friends and family, attend events, and support local businesses during their stay.

16.     Freedom camping can however have negative impacts on the local environment and host communities if it is not well-managed. These impacts can be caused by:

17.     Freedom camping has become popularly associated with harmful and antisocial behaviours, but our research shows that most freedom campers visiting Auckland do camp responsibly.

18.     However, the presence of large numbers of campers – even responsible campers – is more likely to cause community concern in Auckland due to pressure on limited public space.

19.     Freedom camper numbers have been growing in Auckland and throughout the country over the last two decades. Once the current border restrictions are lifted overseas visitors are likely to return, and domestic freedom camping may continue to increase in the meantime.

20.     Auckland does not currently have enough places for freedom campers to go. This means there is often overcrowding in the places where it is allowed, or illegal camping in unsuitable areas once legal sites are full. Having more areas would reduce these supply-related issues.

21.     The council can regulate freedom camping to help prevent irresponsible camping and manage responsible freedom camping in a way that minimises its negative impacts.

Council must align its freedom camping regulation with the Freedom Camping Act 2011

22.     The Freedom Camping Act 2011 allows freedom camping on all public land unless it is prohibited under a bylaw or another enactment, such as the Reserves Act 1977.

23.     Auckland’s current Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2015 is a consolidation of pre-2010 legacy bylaw provisions developed before the Freedom Camping Act 2011 was passed. A new bylaw must be made that aligns with the national legislation before the current bylaw expires in 2022.

24.     The Freedom Camping Act 2011 is permissive by default but does allow council to make a bylaw to prohibit or restrict freedom camping in areas where certain statutory criteria are met. In particular, council must be satisfied that:

·     each area’s location can be clearly shown on a map and/or described

·     the prohibitions and restrictions in each area are necessary to:

-     protect the area (for example because it is environmentally or culturally sensitive)

-     protect the health and safety of the people who may visit the area

-     protect access to the area (for other users)

·     the cumulative impact of all prohibitions and restrictions (under the bylaw and other enactments) do not constitute an effective ban on freedom camping on council land.

A 2018 proposal to regulate freedom camping was set aside in August 2019

25.     Work to develop a freedom camping bylaw began in 2016. Staff assessed more than 1,000 areas for their suitability for freedom camping and need for protection under the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This process included extensive engagement with local boards.

26.     In late 2018 and early 2019 public feedback and formal local board views were sought on a proposal for a draft Freedom Camping in Vehicles bylaw. A Bylaw Panel deliberated on all feedback and made recommendations to the Governing Body. The Panel recommended scheduling 322 prohibited areas and 103 restricted areas, including a number of reserves.

27.     In August 2019 the Governing Body set aside the recommendations of the Bylaw Panel and instead requested advice on a new direction for bylaw development.

The Governing Body decided to exclude reserves from scope and include general rules

28.     The Governing Body considered staff advice in March 2021[11] and May 2021[12] and directed that a new proposal for a Freedom Camping Act 2011 bylaw be developed that:

·     only manages freedom camping on land held under the Local Government Act 2002, with camping on reserves continuing to be managed by the Reserves Act 1977

·     includes general rules to manage the generalised impacts of freedom camping, and ensure problems are not displaced from regulated to unregulated areas

·     relies on previous assessments (undertaken to develop the 2018 proposal) to identify land held under the Local Government Act 2002 that should be prohibited or further restricted through the bylaw.

29.     Staff have prepared a draft proposal to implement the Governing Body’s decisions (Attachment A). This proposal outlines the reasons and decisions that have led to the content of the proposed new Bylaw.

Potential changes to the Freedom Camping Act 2011 not yet confirmed

30.     In April and May 2021, the Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) publicly consulted on four proposals for change to the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This included making the use of self-contained vehicles mandatory for all freedom camping.

31.     The Governing Body approved Auckland Council’s submission, which incorporated local board views, in May 2021[13]. MBIE has not yet released any further information, and timeframes for any changes to the Act have not been confirmed.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

A new bylaw is proposed to manage freedom camping in vehicles on some council land

32.     The draft proposal would make a new Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022 that:

·     aligns with the Freedom Camping Act 2011

·     helps council to prevent freedom camping impacts in sensitive areas, and to protect public health and safety and manage access in all areas of land held under the Local Government Act 2002 (including roads controlled by Auckland Transport)

·     forms part of a wider regulatory framework of Acts, regulations and other bylaws[14].

33.     The Bylaw will be enforced by the Licensing and Regulatory Compliance unit using a graduated compliance model (information, education, enforcement).

34.     The table below summarises the main proposals:

Draft proposals

Reasons for draft proposal

To schedule 63 specific areas as follows:

Restrict freedom camping in 19 specific areas (where freedom camping is allowed subject to site-specific restrictions)

Listed in Schedule 1 of the draft Bylaw

 

To better manage areas that have been identified as needing additional regulation due to factors such as popularity, current use by others, demand for parking and the size of the parking areas.

These are the restricted areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel in 2019, with all reserves removed.

Prohibit freedom camping in 44 specific areas (where freedom camping is not allowed)

Listed in Schedule 2 of the draft Bylaw

 

To protect areas that have been identified as being environmentally or culturally sensitive, or where freedom camping would impact public health and safety and access in ways that cannot be adequately managed through restrictions.

These are the prohibited areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel in 2019, with all reserves removed.

To include general rules for all other areas as follows:

Require freedom campers to use certified self-contained vehicles

To prevent impacts from the depositing of toilet waste and wastewater into the environment, and the use of unsuitable areas for cooking

Allow freedom campers to stay a maximum of two nights in the same road or off-road parking area

To prevent impacts from the depositing of toilet waste and wastewater into the environment and ensure fair access to limited shared parking and amenities

Require freedom campers to vacate their parking space by 9am on the day of departure

To ensure fair access for shared parking and amenities for other campers and users of public space

Require freedom campers not return to stay in the same road or off-road parking area within a two-week period

To ensure fair access to limited shared parking and amenities for other campers and users of public space

35.     The draft proposal notes that the council does not intend to use the bylaw to manage:

·     issues associated with homelessness (people living in a vehicle involuntarily)

·     areas where access is already controlled or parking is reserved or charged for, for example gated carparks, land leased to other organisations and regional parks.

Proposal to treat Waiheke as single area for the purpose of maximum stay rule

36.     Waiheke Local Board has previously raised concerns about how freedom campers will safely dispose of their waste once onboard storage is full, given Waiheke Island does not have a public dump station.

37.     Staff propose that the whole island be counted as a single area for the purposes of the maximum stay rule. This means freedom campers would need to leave the island to dump their waste or find alternative serviced accommodation if they wish to stay longer than two nights.

38.     This should help to protect the environment and public health on Waiheke Island, but may have the effect of reducing the number of freedom campers travelling to Waiheke Island.

The draft proposal complies with statutory requirements

39.     The draft proposal has been prepared in accordance with statutory requirements. Staff consider the proposed draft Bylaw:

·     only prohibits or restricts freedom camping where it is necessary to protect sensitive areas, and/or to manage impacts on public health and safety and access to an area

·     uses a format and wording that are easy to read, understand and comply with

·     is authorised by statute, is not repugnant to other legislation, and is not unreasonable

·     does not give rise to any implications or inconsistencies with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990.

Staff recommend the local board consider and provide its views on the draft proposal

40.     Staff recommend that the local board consider the draft proposal in Attachment A and provide any views by resolution to the Governing Body before it is finalised for public consultation on 23 September 2021.

41.     For example, the board could support the draft proposal for public consultation, recommend changes or defer comment until after it has considered public feedback on the proposal.

42.     Staff recommend Waiheke Local Board provide specific feedback to the Governing Body on the proposal to treat the island as a single area with a maximum stay of two nights.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

43.     Staff note that this is a regulatory process to manage existing activities enabled by central government policy. It is not causing these activities to occur or affecting the likelihood that they will occur. The decision sought in this report therefore has no specific climate impact.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

44.     The draft proposal impacts the operations of several council departments and council-controlled organisations, including Licensing and Regulatory Compliance, Parks, Sport and Recreation and Auckland Transport.

45.     The Licensing and Regulatory Compliance unit are aware of the impacts of the draft proposal and their primary role in implementing and managing compliance with the Bylaw.

46.     Council’s 86 park rangers help to manage compliance with council Bylaws, the Reserves Act 1977 and the Litter Act 1974 by carrying out education and monitoring on parks and reserves. However, rangers are not currently being warranted or renewing warrants, and Licensing and Regulatory Compliance will continue to carry out any enforcement required.

Enhanced service levels for Bylaw compliance activities are not currently budgeted

47.     Concern about the council’s ability to effectively implement the Bylaw and manage compliance within existing resources was a key theme of public and local board feedback received in 2019.

48.     In March 2021 the Governing Body requested advice about costed options for increasing the service levels for compliance associated with this Bylaw. Costings are being finalised and this advice will be provided alongside the proposal in September, for consideration during future Annual Plan cycles.

49.     There are multiple options for increasing investment in Bylaw implementation and both proactive and reactive Bylaw compliance activities. These include:

·     enhancement of council’s information technology systems, to enable the implementation of the new infringement notice regime

·     use of contracted security services, to increase responsiveness to complaints (similar to the current arrangements for Noise Control), or for additional proactive monitoring at seasonal ‘hotspots’

·     purchase of mobile printers, to enable infringement notices to be affixed to vehicles in breach of the Bylaw at the time of the offence

·     signage at all prohibited and restricted areas and at other areas as needed

·     camera surveillance technology to enable remote monitoring of known or emerging hotspots, for evidence-gathering purposes and/or to support real-time enforcement.

50.     Local boards can request further advice from Licensing and Regulatory Compliance if they wish to consider allocating local budget for enhanced local compliance activities.

51.     For example, Rodney Local Board recently allocated funds from its Locally Driven Initiatives budget to employ two Compliance Wardens for a six-month trial over the 2021-2022 summer period. The wardens will address low level compliance issues, including illegal freedom camping, with follow-up support from warranted compliance staff when required.

Ongoing land classification work won’t be completed with bylaw development timeframes

52.     Following the Governing Body’s decision in March 2021 to exclude reserves from scope, land status has become more relevant for identifying areas requiring protection in the bylaw.

53.     The council does not currently hold complete land classification data to establish definitive numbers of reserves. Parks and reserves can comprise multiple land parcels which may be held under different Acts.

54.     Since reporting to the Governing Body in March, staff have completed further investigation of the land status of the prohibited and restricted areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel. This has identified additional reserves, which has reduced the proposed prohibited areas (from 55 in the March report to 44 in the draft proposal) and restricted areas (from 21 to 19).

55.     Classifications are still being confirmed as part of the development of omnibus Local Park Management Plans. Five local board areas have completed this work, and an average of 94 percent of their parks were found to be held under the Reserves Act 1977.

56.     Ongoing land classification work will support bylaw implementation. It will not finish within the timeframe for bylaw development, so the status quo issues will remain.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

57.     The proposed draft Bylaw impacts on local boards’ governance role as it affects decision making over local assets, particularly parks and other council-controlled public places. There is also high community interest in freedom camping regulation in many local board areas.

58.     The local board has an opportunity to provide its views on this draft proposal by resolution to the Governing Body. The local board will also have further opportunity to provide its views to a Bylaw Panel on any public feedback to the proposal from people in their local board area.

All proposed prohibited and restricted areas previously discussed with local boards

59.     The draft proposal includes four designated prohibited areas and no designated restricted areas located in the Waiheke Local Board area. All designated areas are listed in the draft Bylaw schedules within Attachment A. All other council-managed land held under the Local Government Act 2002, including roads, is proposed to be covered by general rules.

60.     The proposed prohibited and restricted areas are those areas which the Bylaw Panel recommended should be prohibited and restricted in 2019, and which are held under the Local Government Act 2002. Areas held under the Reserves Act 1977 have been removed.

61.     All areas proposed to be scheduled as prohibited or restricted were previously discussed with the relevant local boards in 2018.

Joint political working group provided views on general rules in May 2021

62.     Three local board representatives participated in a joint political working group on 21 May 2021 to provide views on options for including general rules in the Bylaw.

63.     The working group unanimously supported the inclusion of general rules in the Bylaw, and five out of six working group members supported the recommended settings included in the draft proposal. A summary of the working group’s views was reported to the Governing Body on 27 May 2021[15].

The new draft proposal responds to feedback provided on the 2018 proposal

64.     Local boards provided formal feedback on the 2018 draft proposal to the Bylaw Panel in 2019, following on from their early feedback given during engagement in 2017, and site-specific feedback provided in 2018.

65.     The table below details typical concerns expressed by local boards in their formal feedback and how the new draft proposal responds to these concerns:

Key local board concern (from 2019)

Draft proposal’s response to concern

The loss of protection in the legacy bylaws for most reserves and roadsides

·   Excludes reserves from the bylaw and continues to use the Reserves Act 1977 to manage all camping at reserves

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw, including roadsides

·   Notes individual roads can be scheduled as prohibited or restricted areas if problems arise in future

The provision for unrestricted freedom camping in the local board area

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw

Freedom camping at reserves and enforcement tools under the Reserves Act

·   The Reserves Act 1977 will be used to manage all camping at reserves, which means the status quo (prohibition) will continue

·   Notes that following changes in September 2019 to the Reserves Act 1977, $800 infringement notices can now be issued for breaches of this Act

Freedom camping in inner-city areas, unsafe areas and areas near sports fields, residential homes and campgrounds

·   Bylaw schedules designate individual sites that have been identified and assessed as unsuitable for freedom camping (prohibited areas), or where additional restrictions are needed to manage impacts (restricted areas)

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw

The potential effect on people experiencing homelessness

·   Clarifies that the bylaw will not be used to manage issues associated with homelessness and confirms the council’s commitment to a compassionate enforcement approach to protect vulnerable Aucklanders

Council’s ability to enforce bylaws and the cost of enforcement and monitoring

·   Although not contained in the proposal itself, advice will be provided to the Governing Body on options for increasing investment in bylaw implementation

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

66.     The Bylaw has relevance to Māori as kaitiaki of Papatūānuku. The proposal supports two key directions in the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau:

·     wairuatanga (promoting distinctive identity), in relation to valuing and protecting Māori heritage and Taonga Māori

·     kaitiakitanga (ensuring sustainable futures), in relation to environmental protection.

67.     The proposal also supports the Board’s Schedule of Issues of Significance by ensuring that sites of significance to Māori are identified and protected from freedom camping harms.

68.     Mana whenua and mataawaka were invited to provide feedback during the development of the 2018 proposal via dedicated hui and again through the public consultation process.

69.     Feedback received on specific prohibited and restricted areas identified in the 2018 proposal was incorporated into the deliberations. This included the identification of sites of significance to Māori, such as wahi tapu areas.

70.     General matters raised by Māori during engagement included the need to ensure:

·     the ability to add further sites of significance to the bylaw as these are designated

·     provision for temporary bans on freedom camping, e.g. in areas under a rahui

·     a compassionate approach to people experiencing homelessness

·     provision of sufficient dump stations to avoid environmental pollution

·     clear communication of the rules in the bylaw and at freedom camping sites.

71.     The draft proposal addresses these matters by proposing to prohibit freedom camping at sites of significance to Māori (such as Maraetai Foreshore and Onetangi Cemetery), provision in the Bylaw for temporary bans, and confirming council’s commitment to a compassionate enforcement approach to people experiencing homelessness.

72.     Mana whenua and mataawaka will have an opportunity to provide further feedback during public consultation on the proposal.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

73.     There are no financial implications to the local board for any decisions to support the draft proposal for public consultation. The Governing Body will consider any financial implications associated with public notification in September 2021.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

74.     Legal risks were discussed as part of the provision of legally privileged advice to interested local board members at a confidential workshop held in June 2021.

75.     The other key risks and possible mitigations are summarised in the table below:

If...

Then...

Mitigation (partial)

The bylaw proposal does not create enough areas where freedom camping is allowed

 

Council may need to manage an increase in overcrowding, non-compliance, and harms over time.

The proposed bylaw would enable freedom campers to stay for up to two nights on most roads, subject to general rules.

Council could consider increasing the number of designated restricted areas following consultation, or if problems arise in future.

The cumulative impact of prohibitions and restrictions in the Bylaw and other enactments is viewed as an ‘effective ban’ on freedom camping in Auckland

The risk of legal challenge could increase.

Staff looked closely at the requirements of the Freedom Camping Act 2011 in developing the proposal, and cumulative impact will continue to be monitored.

Council can’t meet public expectation of increased enforcement

There may be a loss of social license for freedom camping and reputational risk for council.

Responsible Camping Ambassadors will assist compliance staff during the peak season, although future funding is not guaranteed.

The Governing Body or local boards could allocate additional funding to increase service levels for compliance activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

76.     Staff will present local board views and a finalised proposal to the Governing Body on 23 September 2021. The next steps for bylaw development are shown in the diagram below.

Diagram

Description automatically generated

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Freedom Camping in Vehicles Statement of Proposal and Draft Bylaw August 2021

141

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rebekah Forman - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Waiheke Local Board for March to June 2021

File No.: CP2021/11526

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Waiheke Local Board with an integrated performance report for March to June 2021, and the overall performance for the financial year against the approved 2020/2021 local board work programmes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an integrated view of performance for the Waiheke Local Board and includes financial performance and delivery against work programmes for the 2020/2021 financial year.

3.       Seventy-three activities within the agreed work programmes were delivered which includes multi-year projects that have progressed as expected. Ten activities were undelivered, cancelled, put on hold or deferred and six multi-year projects/activities have not progressed as expected during 2020/2021.

4.       Key activity achievements from the 2020/2021 work programme include:

·   Tawaipareira Reserve - replacement of skate park, play space, bike track, new flying fox: Skatepark construction is complete and a karakia opening was held on 24 April. The skatepark is a great success and well used by the local skating community. 

·   Waiheke Low Carbon Action Plan: A draft Climate Action Plan has been drafted following an online hui and interviews with key stakeholders. Consultation on the draft will commence shortly.

·   Ngahere (Urban Forest) - Knowing phase: The canopy cover analysis report has been drafted and the approval report is included on this agenda.

·   Bike Hub:  The bike hub is now installed next to the Sustainability Centre in Alison Park. The container will be fitted out by Cycle Action Waiheke and a suitable person with bike repair skills will operate the hub.

5.       The following key activities that have not progressed as expected:

·    Matiatia Masterplan (non-transport elements) (Red status): Status is red as budget is tagged to non-transport related projects which cannot progress until the transport aspects are finalised. However, masterplan drafting is now progressing following Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) funding approval. Public consultation on transport elements is anticipated to commence in late 2021.

·    Feasibility study for swimming pool (Red status):  Delivery of the project plan by the Waiheke Pool Society has been delayed. The remaining budget of $304,500 is signaled as a carry forward to 2021/2022.

·    Waiheke Local Parks Management Plan (Amber status): Delay in receiving advice on equestrian provision for Waiheke has delayed this project reaching the next decision point (draft plan for notification). A workshop to update the board on the equestrian service assessment and options for Te Huruhi Reserve is scheduled for August.

·    Rangihoua Onetangi Park Management Plan (Amber status): Work prioritisation across the local parks management plans programme has delayed this project. Site visits with mana whenua were held in July and there are two local board committee meetings booked for August to discuss changes to vision and principles, draft policies and actions, and classification options. Draft plan to be prepared by consultant for approval to notify in quarter two 2021/22.

6.       Qualifying budgets of unfinished activities will be carried forward into 2020/2021 work programmes.

7.       The financial performance report is attached but is excluded from the public. This is due to restrictions on releasing annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – on or about 30 September.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for March to June 2021.

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group results for 2020/2021 are released to the New Zealand’s Exchange (NZX) which are expected to be made public on or about 30 September 2021.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Emergency Budget was adopted on 30 July. The Waiheke Local Board approved 2020/2021 work programmes for the following operating departments at their August 2020 business meeting:

·        Arts, Community and Events;

·        Parks, Sport and Recreation;

·        Libraries and Information;

·        Community Services: Service, Strategy and Integration; (Now part of Connected Communities department)

·        Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew;

·        Community Leases;

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services;

·        Plans and Places;

9.       As the work programmes were adopted two months later than normal due to effects of COVID-19, there has been a reduced timeframe to deliver these work programmes (10 months).

10.     Since the work programmes were approved the Customer and Communities Services directorate has been restructured. Two new departments were created - Connected Communities and Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships, and the Southern Initiative and Western Initiative moved into the directorate as a new department - Community and Social Innovation. Units from the previous departments Arts, Community and Events; Libraries and Information; and Service, Strategy and Integration were incorporated into the three new departments. The table below shows the distribution

 

 

 

Table 1: Changes to Departments in Customer and Communities Services directorate

Previous Department - Unit

Current Department - Unit

Arts, Community and Events - Community Places

Connected Communities – Community Places

Arts, Community and Events - Community Empowerment

Connected Communities – Community Empowerment

Arts, Community and Events - Community Empowerment (Youth)

Community and Social Innovation – Youth Empowerment

Arts, Community and Events - Arts & Culture

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Arts & Culture

Arts, Community and Events - Events

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Events

Service, Strategy and Integration

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Service and Asset Planning

Libraries

Connected Communities – Libraries

The Southern Initiative

Community and Social Innovation – The Southern Initiative

The Western Initiative

Community and Social Innovation – The Western Initiative

 

11.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: work programme activities by outcome

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

12.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that have been delivered as expected or multi-year activities which have progressed as planned (green), activities that are in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that are undelivered or have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work Programme by RAG status

 

13.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each departments the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: work programme activity by activity status and department

 

 

Key activity achievements from the 2020/2021 work programme

Local Board Plan Outcome 1: Inclusive planning and placemaking

14.     Waiheke Area Plan (ID 3626):  The draft plan has been finalised and direct consultation will commence shortly with the three iwi groups which have been involved in the process to date. Consultation with the iwi groups is anticipated in July to September 2021 and consideration of any feedback by the working party in September should enable adoption of the Area Plan in Mid October 2021.

15.     Dark Skies Park (ID2303): The Lighting Management Plan application for a Dark Sky Park for Eastern Waiheke has been drafted. The board presented to the Planning Committee in July in support of this application. Staff will now provide an assessment of implications for report back to the committee (if required).

Local Board Plan Outcome 2: A sustainable economy and positive visitor experience

16.     Waiheke Community Art Gallery (ID 562):  During this quarter there were 33 programmes attracting 21,795 participants. Highlights included a dawn blessing for the Matariki exhibition, a winter arts appreciation programme and multiple artists talks. The Wonderful Waiheke House in March was a success and major fundraiser for the gallery. The gallery is finalising the street banners celebrating 25 years of the gallery to be displayed in the town centre.

17.     Artworks Theatre (ID 565):  Artworks Theatre provided 67 programmes during this quarter with 3055 participants.  Highlights included two Auckland Arts Festival performances and Tū Rongo, a kids music concert, bringing over 70 children to the theatre to enjoy local music and dance. Korero Kids continues with parent and their kids coming to learn Te Reo Maori through waiata and stories. Other highlights included, the Motu Matariki Festival, bringing a huge amount of learning and insight for the Waiheke community. The three-day festival included post-show music by local Pacific Island and Māori musicians

Local Board Plan Outcome 3: Waiheke's environment is treasured

18.     Sustainable Schools – Waiheke Marine Education (ID 1593): A total of 155 students were involved in experiential days and activities through this programme. Fossil Bay School undertook stream monitoring, planting, and studying the local history of Owhanake and Island Bay areas. Waiheke Primary School students experienced a marine issues day in the ngāhere, stream, wetland, and transfer station area leading from their school to Pūtiki Bay and have identified fifteen action plans to improve this environment. Te Huruhi school are collecting seeds and growing native trees to plant in the wetland, their school, or homes. Waiheke High School's experience day was postponed due to COVID-19 alert level changes and adverse weather but will be held in term four. They are collaborating with the Waiheke Marine Project, Sea Stewardship and Waiheke Dive and Snorkel to express student voices in a mural which will be painted on the Dive Shop in Oneroa.

 

 

 

19.     Waiheke Ecological Volunteers and Environmental programme (ID 145): This programme is delivered alongside, the Natural Environment Targeted Rate (NETR) funding from the Environmental Services unit also supports 30 privately owned land groups with pest animal control areas. There are 654 volunteers as part of the combined programme, up from 615 last year. The Ratbusters programme is aligning with Te Koro Wai o Waiheke to have a seamless link with their programme pest animal control areas. Volunteers were unable to enter reserves in the early part of July and August 2020 but the Relative Abundance in rat numbers was down to 2.5% at the December 2020 report which is an historic low predator prevalence not seen before. This went up as expected in Autumn to 13%. Additional reserve sites added in the last four months are Matenga Point, Alison Park and Hill to Crescent Rd East loop track. Currently, there are 57 bait lines and 554 bait stations.

20.     Ecological restoration community partnership (ID 201): Due to Covid-19 alert levels, volunteer training was unable to go ahead. This meant an underspend of $20,000 which resulted in a red RAG however this is signaled as a carry forward to complete in 2021/2022. In this quarter there have been 863 volunteer hours planting 4,300 trees. The Waiheke Resources Trust was able to continue to deliver a work programme for its “Love Our Wetland Waiheke” (LOWW) contract with its own staff due to the reduction in volunteer groups coming to the Island. Tree planting and weed control in wetland areas and reserves continued but on a slightly lower rate for volunteers but increased with new WRT staff on the government work programme (now 30 restoration staff). GrowSafe course was attended by 15 people, First Aid Course attended by eight people.

21.     Bike Hub (ID 1568):  The painted shipping container has been placed on a site adjacent to the Sustainability Centre in Alison Park. The container will be fitted out by Cycle Action Waiheke and an event is planned for quarter one of the 2021/2022 financial year to celebrate the opening of the Bike Hub. A suitable person with bike repair skills has been found to operate the hub.

 

 

22.     Waiheke Low Carbon Action Plan (ID 1575): A draft Climate Action Plan has been completed following an online hui and interviews with key stakeholders. The draft plan was workshopped with the local board in July 2021 and will be out for consultation shortly.

23.     Ngahere (Urban Forest) - Knowing phase (ID 2014): The canopy cover analysis report was presented to the local board for direction in March 2021. Approval of the final report is included on this agenda.

Local Board Plan Outcome 4: Thriving, strong and engaged communities

24.     Community-led housing initiatives (ID 1055):  During this quarter Waiheke Healthy Homes successfully delivered 30x winter warmer packs plus 32 additional blankets to Waiheke homes. Five homes on Waiheke have been supplied with double lined made-to measure curtains and rails, with five more installations in progress. The second home repair has been completed with Habitat for Humanity, including a new roof, bathroom renovation and supplying hot water to the home.

25.     Youth Hub placemaking (ID 1141): The Waiheke Youth Centre provided a number of youth focused events and workshops during this period. The Rock had 800 attendances and continues to provide an essential service to the young people that they support.

26.     Māori responsiveness (ID 1143): Kotahi Aroha Matariki Āhuareka, the Waiheke Community of Learning Matariki celebration, was held on 4 July at Waiheke High School after being postponed due to COVID-19 in 2020. Eight schools and ECEs participated in the event, which was attended by over 600 people. All kura performed kapa haka and karakia with a rotating full house in the school hall. The event included market stalls, hangi and demonstrations of taonga puoro and whakairo.

27.     Volunteer Week (ID1153):  Community Networks Waiheke completed the short film "Tautoko Waiheke" which featured the important contribution of volunteers and mahi aroha in the Waiheke community. Five volunteer organisations were profiled: Piritahi Māra (community garden), Friends of the Street, Waiheke CAB, Kai Conscious Waiheke and Waiheke Volunteer Fire Brigade. The film was released in June to coincide with Volunteer Week 2021.

28.     Community and Social Economic Development (ID 1054): Utilising board funding of $2,000 an island-wide Community Resilience Hui was held on 13 June organized by Community Networks Waiheke (CNW). The hui reflected on lessons from the COVID experience on Waiheke and how that could be used to increase future resilience.

29.     Love Oneroa has continued with the placemaking project in Oneroa Village. The group worked with the Waiheke Community Art Gallery to install flags on street lights and with artist Gwen Rutter to wrap the power box. The access between the car park and shops was improved with a working bee and welcoming directional signage. The group has worked with Community Facilities to ensure the seating was painted and gardens at Pendragon Mall were tidied. They employed a young designer to set up social media and have a weekly page in the Waiheke Weekender, which over 20 businesses contribute to.

30.     Waiheke Library Whai Pūmanawa Literacy - we support communities to thrive (ID 1345): The April school holidays had the theme of "Grossology" with a range of fun, science inspired events including a collaboration with the Waste Resources Trust. The Robotics club pilot was a great success and an ongoing programme for older children will commence shortly.

Local Board Plan Outcome 5: Vibrant places for people

31.     Tawaipareira Reserve - replacement of skate park, play space, bike track, new flying fox (ID 2756): Skatepark construction is complete and a karakia opening was held on 24 April. A skatepark competition was to be held on 20 June however this was rescheduled due to inclement weather hand will now be held in December. The skatepark is a great success and well used by the local skating community.  Phase two of the masterplan will commence in 2021/2022 which will include the playground and flying fox.

 

 

32.     Waiheke Island strategic response fund (ID2346) (Red status): Resource constraints have resulted in delays to the Onetangi Beach service assessment and the Kayak removal pilot. However, the 'Have Your Say' Public engagement for the service assessment is now open and the Kayak pilot is also scheduled to commence in August.

33.     Onetangi Sports Park pavilion - renew - roof fastenings (ID 2862):  The steel manufacturing is complete and partial roof replacement is underway, ensuring a weather tight building for the sports clubs.

 

34.     Full facilities maintenance contract (ID 262): Key areas of focus during this quarter include repairs to park furniture and track and beach access maintenance, together with vegetation management. Audit results remain consistently in the high 90% range and any maintenance quality issues are addressed with the Full Facilities Contractors on a weekly basis to ensure specifications are met.

35.     Renewal of furniture, fixings, equipment and signage (ID 2914): The Community Facilities team have been busy over this quarter with a number of renewal projects. This includes new recycling and rubbish bins and relocation of the shower and water fountain at Surfdale Reserve.

 

 

 

 

36.     Island Bay track remediate slip (ID2612): Resource consent has been granted and the project will be out for tender shortly.

37.     Tracks and pathways renewal (ID2924): Physical works contracts for the following reserves are being priced: Newton Reserve, Onetangi Sports park to tennis club and Albert Crescent to Wharf reserve. Sandy Bay to Hekerua Beach physical works are completed and Newton Reserve also is 90% completed. The Mitchell Road stair relocation is underway.

 

 

Local Board Plan Outcome 6:  Transport and Infrastructure

38.     Matiatia Gateway Masterplan (ID 147): Status is red due to this budget line being focus on non-transport elements. The transport elements of the draft masterplan are progressing well following Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) funding approval. A Waiheke hikoi was held on 22 June with Ngāti Pāoa kaumatua. Staff and the Ngati Pāoa Iwi Trust are engaging on details of the Mātiatia Plan for consideration by the Waiheke Local Board in August 2021. Public consultation on the transport elements is anticipated in late 2021.

Overview of work programme performance

Arts, Community and Events work programme

39.     In the Arts, Community and Events work programme, there are 20 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green). There are no activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and no activities that have been cancelled and deferred (grey) in the period March to June 2021.

Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

40.     In the Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme, there are four activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green), one activity that is in progress but are delayed (amber), four activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and no activities that have been cancelled and deferred (grey) in in the period March to June 2021.

41.     It is noted the Matiatia and Swimming Pool projects sit within the Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme however are project managed via the Waiheke Island Pilot programme.

42.     Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 2: Parks, Sport and Recreation activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Matiatia parks: Initiating a parks related Matiatia Gateway Masterplan (ID147)

Red

In progress

In June 2021 a Waiheke hikoi was held with the Ngāti Pāoa kaumatua. Staff and the Ngati Pāoa Iwi Trust are engaging on details of the Mātiatia Plan, for consideration by the Waiheke Local Board in August 2021. Public consultation is anticipated in late 2021.

WHK: Ecological restoration community partnership (ID201)

Red

In progress

Due to Covid-19 alert levels, volunteer training was unable to go ahead. This meant an underspend of $20,000 which is signaled as a carry forward to complete in 2021/2022. Total budget for the project is $150,000 and the remaining project scope has been delivered. Refer to key activity achievements above.

Swimming pool development fund (ID205)

Red

In progress

Funding of $100,000 has been signaled as a carry forward to 2021/2022 whilst the feasibility study is completed (ID2259)

Feasibility study for swimming pool (ID2259)

Red

In progress

Waiheke Pool Society have engaged with MPM to deliver a project plan at a cost of $8,500 from the original grant. This will work as a live document, in which upon completion with updated cost estimates. The remaining budget of $204,500 is signaled as a carry forward to 2021/2022.

Waiheke Island strategic response fund (ID2346)

Red

In progress

The 'Have Your Say' Public engagement for the service assessment for Onetangi Beach has been rescheduled to occur during August 2021. Refer to key activity achievements above.

Ngahere (Urban Forest) - Knowing phase (ID2014)

Amber

In progress

The final analysis report will be presented to the board in August 2021. There is underspend due to COVID-19 delays, which is signaled as a carry forward to complete this phase in 2021/2022.

 

Libraries work programme

43.     In the Libraries work programme, there are eight activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green). There are no activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) or activities that have been cancelled and deferred (grey) in in the period March to June 2021.

Service Strategy and Integration work programme

44.     In the Service Strategy and Integration work programme, there are two activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber) in the period March to June 2021. Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 4: Service Strategy and Integration activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Waiheke Local Parks Management Plan (ID 1665)

Amber

In progress

This project has been delayed due to awaiting advice on equestrian provision. Staff will provide an update to the board on the equestrian service assessment and options for Te Huruhi Reserve in August 2021. Timelines for notification of the draft plan will be clearer following these workshops.

 

Rangihoua Onetangi Park Management Plan (ID 1667)

Amber

In progress

Work prioritisation across the local parks management plans programme has delayed this project. Site visits with mana whenua were held in July. There are two local board committee meetings booked for August to discuss changes to vision and principles, draft policies and actions, and classification options. Draft plan to be prepared by consultant for approval to notify in Quarter two 2021/22.

 

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

45.     In the Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme, there are 29 activities that were completed by the end of the year or are in progress (green), three activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), one activity that is significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and three activities that have been cancelled and deferred in in the period March to June 2021 (grey).  Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 5: Community Facilities activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

530 Orapiu Rd, Waiheke - install track (ID 2503)

Red

On Hold

Project is on hold. Section of track includes Kauri and so has been referred to the Kauri Die Back Management team. Next steps: Await information from Kauri Die Back Management team around recommendations for progressing this project.

Albert Crescent to Wharf Road - renew walkway and retaining wall (ID 2565)

Amber

In Progress

The site has been assessed by a contractor that specialises in land stabilisation. They have offered a solution that uses ground pins and mats, which will mean that little to no modifications are required to the existing track. This solution has been agreed by council's geotechnical engineer. Design will now be reviewed by Geotech and arborist specialists and tree consents obtained if required.

Hekerua Bay Reserve - renew path and install retaining wall (ID 2680)

Amber

In Progress

A survey has been carried out to identify the boundary between the publicly owned land and 92 Great Barrier Road. This will confirm if the owners of 92 Great Barrier Road has encroached onto the public reserve, and if so a process will be commenced to remove structures from public reserve areas.

Rakino Hall relocation (ID 2741)

Amber

In Progress

Options for the hall were presented to the local board on 21 April 2021. It was agreed that the board will make a select a preferred option once the Rakino community have presented their proposal to the board.

Onetangi Sports Park - install lighting & upgrade to sand carpet on field 3 (ID 2460)

Grey

Deferred

Concept design is complete and design is being revised to align water consumption with bore capacity. Growth funding has been deferred into future years and therefore the project has been deferred.

Te Whau Esplanade Reserve - renew Hitapa track

Grey

On Hold

An existing design for the upgrade is being reviewed and costed following confirmation that limited slip repair work is required.

This track renewal will be bundled with the track renewal programme, enabling a renewal of the walking track in its entirety. The project remains on hold until remainder of the track is ready for renewal. 

Wharetana Bay Planting Plan – implementation (ID 3227)

Grey

On Hold

The board had resolved to put the project is on hold during financial year 2020/2021, the project budget has been deferred to 2021/2022. Next steps: Continue to work through and resolve stakeholder issues to enable further discussions with the Local Board.

 

Community Leases work programme

46.     In the Community Leases work programme, there are six activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green). There were no activities delayed (amber), on hold or not delivered (red) or cancelled / deferred (grey) in in the period March to June 2021.

Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme

47.     In the Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme, there are six activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green). There are no activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) or that have been cancelled / deferred (grey) in in the period March to June 2021. 

 Plans and Places work programme

48.     In the Plans and Places work programme, there is one activity that is in progress but delayed (amber), as below:

Table 9: Plans and Places activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Area plan for Waiheke (ID3626)

Amber

In progress

Workshops with the working party have continued and a draft plan has been finalised for direct consultation with mana whenua.

Consultation with the iwi groups is anticipated in July to September 2021 and consideration of any feedback by the working party in September should enable adoption of the Area Plan in mid October 2021.

 

Deferred activities

49.     The Lead Financial Advisors are identifying projects from the local board’s 2020/2021 Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operational budget which meet the criteria to be carried forward. These will be added to the work programme to be delivered in 2021/2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement guidance

50.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

51.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

52.     This report informs the Waiheke Local Board of the performance for the in the period March to June 2021 and the performance for the 2020/2021 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

53.     The Matiatia planning project aims to prepare a strategic plan for Matiatia which reflects the aspirations of the Waiheke community and respects the interests and rights of mana whenua for the future use of that land. Ngāti Paoa has representation on the project working group and are working to identify their aspirations for the site. 

54.     Korero with Ngāti Paoa representatives continue regarding Tawaipareira Reserve and Mātiatia Reserve. During this period a hui was held on site at Rangihoua / Onetangi Sports Park with iwi representatives and they will continue to be involved during reserve management plan development.

55.     The funding support for a Kaiwhakahaere Marae (Marae Manager) at Piritahi Marae continues to progress projects in line with the marae's goals. The Kotahi Aroha Matariki Āhuareka, the Waiheke Community of Learning Matariki celebration, was held at the Waiheke High School also. Eight schools and ECEs participated in the event, which was attended by over 600 people. All kura performed kapa haka and karakia with a rotating full house in the school hall. The event included market stalls, hangi and demonstrations of taonga puoro and whakairo.

56.     The Waiheke Library continues to coordinate a variety of programmes which provide opportunities to engagement with local iwi and mana whenua and collaborate on initiatives such as Te Tiriti o Waitangi, Matariki and Te Wiki o te Reo Māori. During this quarter the Artworks Theatre also hosted programmes for learning of te reo.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

57.     This report is provided to enable the Waiheke Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2020/2021 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial performance

58.     Auckland Council (Council) currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – on or about 30 September. Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to this report is excluded from the public. 

59.     Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is under confidential cover.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

60.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Overview of work programme performance by department’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

61.     Work programmes for 2021/2022 were approved at the board’s business meeting in June 2020.

62.     Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2021/2022 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Performance Report March to June 2021

257

b

Financial section - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Janine Geddes - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021

File No.: CP2021/11229

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2020/2021 Annual Report for the Waiheke Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 27 September 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2020/2021 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 27 September 2021. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market maintained by NZX Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA), local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      adopt the draft 2020/2021 Waiheke Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A (Confidential until 28 September 2021) to the agenda report.

b)      note that any proposed changes after the adoption will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body on 27 September 2021.

c)      note that the draft 2020/2021 Waiheke Local Board Annual Report, as set out in Attachment A to the agenda report, will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2020/2021 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which are expected to be made public by 28 September 2021.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities and the overall funding impact statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       The annual report contains the following sections:

 

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi is an introduction specific to each local board area and is presented in Te Reo Māori and English.

About this report

An overview of what is covered in this document.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved. Includes the activity highlights and challenges.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Funding impact statement

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

7.       The council’s climate change disclosures are covered in volume four of the annual report and sections within the summary annual report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

10.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

11.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2020/2021 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during July and August 2021

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 27 September 2021

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 28 September 2021

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2021.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Waiheke Local Board Annual Report (2020/2021) (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jestine Joseph - Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Mark Purdie - Lead Financial Advisor

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

Community Forum record of proceedings

File No.: CP2021/11074

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Providing a record of proceedings from the Community Forum session held 11 August 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Community forums are held monthly on the second Wednesday of the month. They provide opportunity for the public to raise and discuss local issues with board members.

3.       The forum also provides an opportunity to provide feedback on workshop agenda items.

4.       Further information and copies of presentations can be found at the link below:

https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/local-boards/all-local-boards/waiheke-local-board/Pages/waiheke-local-board-public-and-business-meetings.aspx

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the Community Forum record of proceedings dated 11 August 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Community Forum - record of proceedings - 11 August 2021

285

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

Waiheke Local Board Workshop record of proceedings

File No.: CP2021/11075

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Waiheke Local Board proceedings taken at the workshops held on 21 and 28 July and 4 and 11 August 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under section 12.1 of the current Standing Orders of the Waiheke Local Board, workshops convened by the local board shall be closed to the public. However, the proceedings of every workshop shall record the names of members attending and a statement summarising the nature of the information received, and nature of matters discussed.

3.       The purpose of the local board’s workshops is for the provision of information and local board members discussion.  No resolutions or formal decisions are made during the local board’s workshops.

4.       The record of proceedings for the local board’s workshops held on 21 and 28 July and 4 and 11 August 2021 are appended to the report.

5.       These can also be viewed, together with workshop agendas, at this link https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/local-boards/all-local-boards/waiheke-local-board/Pages/waiheke-local-board-public-and-business-meetings.aspx

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the record of proceedings for the local board workshops held on 21 and 28 July and 4 and 11 August 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop proceedings - 21 July 2021

327

b

Workshop proceedings - 28 July 2021

329

c

Workshop proceedings - 4 August 2021

331

d

Workshop proceedings - 11 August 2021

333

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

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25 August 2021

 

 

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25 August 2021

 

 

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25 August 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

List of resource consent applications - 5 July to 31 July 2021

File No.: CP2021/11077

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Attached is the list of resource consent applications related to Waiheke Island received from 5 July to 31 July 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the list of resource consents applications related to Waiheke Island 5 July to 31 July 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Resource consent application report

337

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

Local board governance forward work calendar - Sepember 2021 update

File No.: CP2021/11079

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Waiheke Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waiheke Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar 2019 - 2022 is appended to the report as Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff for reference and information only.

3.       The governance forward work calendars are part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·        ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·        clarifying what advice is expected and when

·        clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive its Governance Forward Work Calendar dated September 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar

343

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 August 2021

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Waiheke Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

18        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Waiheke Local Board for March to June 2021 - Attachment b - Financial section

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report contains detailed financial information that have an impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 31 June 2021 that require release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

19        Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021 - Attachment a - Draft Waiheke Local Board Annual Report (2020/2021)

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial adjustments, assumptions and judgements that could give an individual access to this information prior to public release, gaining an improper advantage over others..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 



[1] Steinkamp, K et al. 2017. Atmospheric CO2 observations and models suggest strong carbon uptake by forests in New Zealand. Atmospheric Chemistry & Physics 17(47-76).

[2] https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/plans-projects-policies-reports-bylaws/our-plans-strategies/district-and-regional-plans/regional-plans/regional-plan-air-land-water/Pages/default.aspx

[3] https://www.growsafe.co.nz/StandardManual/The_Law/NZS8409/StandardManual/TheL/NZS8409.aspx?hkey=09c6e7dc-23b6-43b5-8951-bcc090ebce75

[4] http://pestplants.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/plant-search/

[5] https://www.weedbusters.org.nz/weed-information/controlling-weeds/

[6] These requirements are consistent with recommendations in the 2017 Auckland Council review of glyphosate use carried out by Dr Cathy Bebelman. An updated assessment of formulations meeting these requirements is currently underway.

[7] Information on hazardous substances assessments can be found here: https://www.epa.govt.nz/industry-areas/hazardous-substances/rules-for-hazardous-substances/hazardous-substances-classification-codes/

[8] A summary of classification code types can be found here: https://worksafe.govt.nz/topic-and-industry/hazardous-substances/about-hazardous-substances/

[9] Hazardous substance classification codes can be found here: https://www.epa.govt.nz/industry-areas/hazardous-substances/rules-for-hazardous-substances/hazardous-substances-classification-codes/

[10] NB: Where the standard methodology is not already compliant for use around waterways, it is because the standard methodology is considered significantly more effective and / or uses substantially less total herbicide volume. For example, control of blackberry with 4% 360 glyphosate foliar is sometimes undertaken around waterways instead of metsulfuron cutNpaste or foliar, but this method usually takes several years longer and requires more intensive follow up to ensure successful control within the site.

[11] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/03/GB_20210325_AGN_10148_AT_WEB.htm (Item 9, GB/2021/19)

[12] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_AGN_10145_AT_WEB.htm (Item 10, GB/2021/49)

[13] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_AGN_10145_AT_WEB.htm (Item 9, GB/2021/48)

[14] Freedom Camping Act; Litter Act; Resource Management Act; Fire and Emergency NZ Act; Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw; Auckland Council Traffic Bylaw; Auckland Transport Traffic Bylaw; Alcohol Control Bylaw; Dog Management Bylaw

[15] https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_MAT_10145_WEB.htm