I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitematā Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 17 August 2021

1.00pm

Waitematā Local Board Office
Ground Floor
52 Swanson Street
Auckland

 

Waitematā Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chair

Richard Northey, (ONZM)

 

Deputy Chair

Alexandra Bonham

 

Members

Adriana Avendano Christie

 

 

Graeme Gunthorp

 

 

Kerrin Leoni

 

 

Julie Sandilands

 

 

Sarah Trotman, (ONZM)

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Priscila Firmo

Democracy Advisor

 

10 August 2021

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 353 9654

Email: Priscila.firmo@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     Public Forum - Sue Elliott, Community String Knitting Adventures              5

9.2     Public Forum - Greg Innes, Q theatre                                                                6

9.3     Public Forum - Mark Michaels, community sports facility                              6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                           7

12        Ward Councillor's report                                                                                               9

13        Notice of Motion - Chair Richard Northey - Request for report on proposed amendments to Waitematā Local Board Standing Orders 8.1.2 (Matters recorded in minutes)                                                                                                                        21

14        Notice of Motion - Member Sarah Trotman - Investigation to the felling of Western Springs Forest                                                                                                              27

15        Service Property Optimisation of 19 Jervois Road, Ponsonby                              31

16        Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021                                                                      59

17        Auckland Council's Performance Report: Waitematā Local Board for March to June 2021                                                                                                                               63

18        Proposal to make a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw                           115

19        Feedback on Department of Internal Affairs consultation document on Māori wards                                                                                                                                     225

20        Chairperson's report                                                                                                 245

21        Board member reports                                                                                              271

22        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      307

23        Waitematā Local Board workshop records                                                            311

24        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

25        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               319

17        Auckland Council's Performance Report: Waitematā Local Board for March to June 2021

b.      Financial Appendix June 2021                                                                        319


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 20 July 2021, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waitematā Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Sue Elliott, Community String Knitting Adventures

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To introduce Community String Knitting Adventures and its project to the local board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Sue Elliot will be in attendance to introduce Community String Knitting Adventures and its project to the Waitematā Local Board.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank Sue Elliot for her presentation and attendance at the meeting.

 

 

9.2       Public Forum - Greg Innes, Q theatre

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To speak to the board about Q Theatre 10 years after opening, its post COVID-19 programme, including the impact of the new funding agreements with Auckland Council, and the development of a new Strategic Plan (funded by Creative New Zealand).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Greg Innes, Chief Executive Q Theatre will be in attendance to speak to the board about Q Theatre 10 years after opening, its post COVID-19 programme, including the impact of the new funding agreements with Auckland Council, and the development of a new Strategic Plan (funded by Creative New Zealand).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank Greg Innes for his presentation and attendance at the meeting.

 

 

9.3       Public Forum - Mark Michaels, community sports facility

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To speak about a project to create a community sports facility.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Mark Michaels will be in attendance to speak to the board about a project to create a community sports facility.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank Mark Michaels for his presentation and attendance at the meeting.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

Under Standing Order 2.5.1 a Notice of Motion has been received from Chair Richard Northey and a Notice of Motion has been received from Member Sarah Trotman for consideration under items 13 and 14 respectively.

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Ward Councillor's report

File No.: CP2021/11454

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the opportunity for Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor Pippa Coom, Ōrākei Ward Councillor Desley Simpson and Albert-Eden Roskill Ward Councillors Christine Fletcher and Cathy Casey to update the local board on regional issues that they have been involved with since the previous local board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Waitematā Local Board’s Standing Orders clauses 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provide provision in the local board meeting for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board, or on any matter the Governing Body member wishes to raise with the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the written report update from the Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor, Pippa Coom.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Councillor P Coom report August 2021

11

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Priscila Firmo - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Notice of Motion - Chair Richard Northey - Request for report on proposed amendments to Waitematā Local Board Standing Orders 8.1.2 (Matters recorded in minutes)

File No.: CP2021/11845

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       Chair Richard Northey has given notice of a motion that he wishes to propose.

2.       Supporting information is appended as Attachment A to this report.

 

Motion

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      request that staff investigate and report back to the local board’s meeting in September 2021 on options for amendments to the Waitematā Local Board Standing Orders or other options to provide for a clear and transparent process regarding the inclusion of presentations by members of the public in the minutes of local board meetings

b)      request that the report include specific consideration of the following proposal for the clarification below to be added to section 8.1.2, Matters recorded in minutes, to the Standing Orders of the Waitematā Local Board:

The published minutes may have attached to them, at the Board’s discretion, parts or all of any written presentations made by speakers to the meeting provided that:

 

i)        they conform to standing orders, including only matters that are within the scope or functions of the local board, not disrespectful or offensive, and not under quasi-judicial or judicial consideration; and

ii)       the material has been provided to the chief executive at least 24 hours before the commencement of the meeting; and

iii)      the meeting has resolved to receive the presentation and to attach the material to the minutes.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Notice of Motion - Chair Richard Northey - Request for report on proposed amendments to Waitematā Local Board Standing Orders 8.1.2 (Matters recorded in minutes)

23

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Priscila Firmo - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Notice of Motion - Member Sarah Trotman - Investigation to the felling of Western Springs Forest

File No.: CP2021/11879

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       Member Sarah Trotman has given notice of a motion that she wishes to propose.

2.       Supporting information is appended as Attachment A to this report.

 

Motion

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      ask the Council to commission and fund an independent investigation into the process and substance of the felling of the Western Springs Forest.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Nottice of Motion - Member Sarah Trotman - Investigation to the felling of Western Springs Forest

29

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Priscila Firmo - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Service Property Optimisation of 19 Jervois Road, Ponsonby

File No.: CP2021/11176

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse findings from the investigation into community service provision at 19 Jervois Road, Ponsonby, and to approve the disposal of 19 Jervois Road, Ponsonby, under the service property optimisation policy.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An investigation of the services and facilities at 19 Jervois Rd, Ponsonby, has been completed to understand if the property is a feasible option for service property optimisation, (refer Attachment A).

3.       There is an ongoing requirement for Plunket services in the Ponsonby area.

4.       The Ponsonby Community Toy Library meets current service demands.

5.       Plunket and Ponsonby Toy Library would benefit from operating from more flexible and integrated spaces.

6.       The women’s public toilets can be closed as there is adequate access to public toilets in the area.

7.       19 Jervois Road can be sold, in accordance with the service property optimisation policy, with proceeds of sale proposed for reinvestment in the restoration of Leys Institute Library and Gymnasium.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the 19 Jervois Road community service provision findings report (Attachment A)

b)      endorse the relocation of Plunket and Ponsonby Toy Library services

c)      approve the closure of the women’s public toilets located at 19 Jervois Road

d)      approve the proposed disposal of 19 Jervois Road, Ponsonby, subject to the relocation of services, in accordance with the service property optimisation policy with:

i)        proceeds of sale proposed for reinvestment as a contribution to the restoration of Leys Institute Library and Gymnasium

ii)       conditions of sale providing protection of historic heritage

iii)      terms and conditions to be approved under the appropriate Eke Panuku Development Auckland board delegation.

Horopaki

Context

Our investigation confirms 19 Jervois Road, Ponsonby, is a feasible option for service property optimisation

8.       19 Jervois Road, Ponsonby, is currently managed as a community lease to the Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust (Plunket) and as women’s public toilets. Ponsonby Toy Library have an undocumented agreement, with Plunket, to share the site.

9.       In 2016 and 2017 Eke Panuku Development Auckland (Eke Panuku) and council staff presented options, for the potential service property optimisation of 19 Jervois Road, at a local board workshop.

10.     Further assessment of the potential service property optimisation opportunity could not proceed without an understanding of the service provision requirements related to the site and how the requirements can be met.

11.     In June 2019, the service provision requirements were reassessed to inform further investigation into service property optimisation opportunities.

12.     Attachment A: 19 Jervois Road Service Provision Findings Report, outlines the findings and recommendations of the service provision review.

Funding from service property optimisation could assist to fund the restoration of Leys Institute

13.     On 15 September 2020, Waitematā Local Board endorsed the development of a detailed business case (WTM/2020/204) for the restoration, modernisation, and seismic remediation of Leys Institute based on (among other things) the inclusion of the service property optimisation policy as a source of funding.

14.     The restoration of Leys Institute was an advocacy item for Waitematā Local Board, in the 2021-2031 10-year budget. 

The service property optimisation policy is a development funding tool

15.     Under the service property optimisation policy (adopted by Finance and Performance Committee, March 2015) council owned property assets that are currently used to deliver a council service can be redeveloped or sold with sale proceeds reinvested in eligible projects to improve service delivery in the same local board area.

16.     Eligible reinvestment projects are projects contemplated in current or future years of the Long-term Plan (LTP), noted in the relevant Asset Management Plan (AMP), or are consistent with qualifying business strategies or plans formally adopted to guide council’s future service provision and to inform LTP/AMP processes (for example, Community Facilities Network Plan).

17.     On 28 September 2017, the Governing Body delegated final decision-making authority on local asset disposal and reinvestment, under the service property optimisation policy, to local boards, providing all policy criteria have been met.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Key findings of the service provision review

18.     Our investigation identified the following information and insights regarding the services delivered from 19 Jervois Road.

·    There is an ongoing requirement for Plunket services in the Ponsonby area.

·    Toy library services are meeting community demand.

·    The public toilets are infrequently used due to their location and visibility. If the toilets were closed there would still be adequate access to public toilets in the area.

·    Both Plunket and Ponsonby Toy Library would benefit from operating from more flexible and integrated spaces. Council can provide advice and limited support for the relocation of services.

19.     The investigation findings are reported in Attachment A: 19 Jervois Road Service Provision Findings Report.

Growth, demographics, and service provision in the Ponsonby area

20.     Our investigation identified that:

·    in 2021, approximately 17,490 people live in the Ponsonby area. The population is expected to grow 26 per cent to 22,112 by 2041

·    there are approximately 7168 households living in the Ponsonby area in 2021. This is expected to grow by 19 per cent to 8507 by 2041

·    the population growth is expected to be centred in the Freemans Bay and St Marys Bay areas with little growth expected in Herne Bay and Ponsonby West

·    between 2018 and 2038 the population of under 11-year-olds is expected to increase by 24.3 per cent. However, as a proportion of the local population, numbers will decrease from 11.5 per cent to 9.2 per cent.

21.     It is important to consider population change when looking at future provision. Whilst the data above shows moderate population growth is expected within the area, little population growth is expected in pre-school and primary school aged children over the next 20 years. Therefore, an increase in community service provision is not needed to meet pre-school and primary school aged population changes.

22.     Plunket and toy library services provide for tamariki, particularly in an age group that has vulnerable risk factors, to ensure that they are well supported and cared for.

23.     Further findings are outlined in Attachment A: 19 Jervois Road Service Provision Findings Report.

Provision can be made to protect the site’s heritage features

24.     Assets that hold historical heritage significance, at 19 Jervois Road, include the Plunket Rooms, Women’s Rest Rooms, and Michael Joseph Savage memorial drinking fountain.

25.     Both the buildings and the water fountain were designed by Tibor Donner, Auckland City Architect during the post-WWII period and due to the historical, social, and physical attribute heritage values meet the thresholds for scheduling as a Historic Heritage Place.

26.     19 Jervois Road, Ponsonby, is in a Special Character Area (SCA) under the Auckland Unitary Plan. The SCA rules do not protect any historic heritage values.

27.     Should the local board approve the disposal of 19 Jervois Road, conditions may be included in the development agreement to ensure heritage value is retained for future communities. For example, the conditions in the sale and purchase may include a non-objection clause relating to the future Category B heritage scheduling plan change. This will have a material impact on the proceeds of sale that can be realised. Alternatively, the property could be sold without such a clause and any future owner could participate in the statutory plan change process.

28.     It is proposed that the purchaser will be required to:

·    retain the Michael Joseph Savage fountain on the site in a publicly visible position, in perpetuity

·    consider the feasibility of incorporating the Tibor Donner-designed canopies of the Plunket Rooms and Women’s Rest Room in any proposals for site redevelopment proposals.

29.     The proposed conditions of sale will have an impact on the value of 19 Jervois Road and need to be weighed against the benefits the sale proceeds would bring towards the preservation of Leys Institute.

Assessment of optimisation opportunity and reinvestment project eligibility

30.     The findings of the service provision review and the identification of an eligible reinvestment project provides the opportunity to apply the optimisation policy to this property.

31.     19 Jervois Road can be considered for divestment, subject to the relocation of services, using the service property optimisation policy with proceeds of sale, less costs of sale, available for reinvestment in an eligible project.

32.     This property is subject to offer-back obligations, to the former owners and their immediate successors, under s40 Public Works Act 1981 and may not go to market if the former owner (or successor) wishes to purchase. Should the council be obliged to meet its obligations under s40 Public Works Act 1981, the council would not be in a position to impose heritage protection terms and conditions.  The standard statutory plan change would need to be relied upon in these circumstances.

33.     The project to restore Leys Institute Library and Gymnasium meets the criteria for eligibility and is proposed for reinvestment of optimisation proceeds.

34.     The sale of 19 Jervois Road alone will not provide sufficient proceeds to fund the entire restoration of Leys Institute. Additional funding sources will be investigated through the detailed business case.

Decision-making for service property optimisation

35.     The Waitematā Local Board has the delegated authority to approve this sale and reinvestment, providing all optimisation policy criteria have been met.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

36.     The recommendations in this report have no direct climate impacts.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.     Staff from throughout the council group have contributed to this investigation including Service and Asset Planning, Eke Panuku, Connected Communities, Finance and Business Performance, Built Heritage, and Community Facilities.

38.     If the necessary approvals are received to proceed with the proposed sale of 19 Jervois Road using the service property optimisation policy, staff from Connected Communities and Community Facilities are able to provide Plunket and Ponsonby Toy Library with advice and support for their relocation.

39.     Eke Panuku carried out an internal consultation process with council departments and Council Controlled Organisations to discover any issues or feedback relating to the proposed sale of this property. The consultation process closed on 6 November 2020. Responses are outlined below.

Group

Response

Additional information

Built Heritage

Both the Michael Joseph Savage memorial fountain and Plunket building are unscheduled but have historic heritage significance which requires further evaluation. The site is already subject to the Special Character Area Overlay rules of the AUP (OiP) which prevents demolition of the main buildings and site redevelopment without resource consent.

An evaluation was completed in December 2020. A summary of the findings can be found in Attachment A. Scheduling of historic heritage assets will impact on the value of the property, reduce the achievable sale price, and therefore the proceeds of sale available for reinvestment in the Leys Institute restoration.

Plans and Places

The property is located within the area of the Ponsonby Road Plan (2014-2024) and there are no requirements to retain the site for the purposes of this spatial plan.

 

Arts, Community and Events

Do not have any feedback or issues with the proposed disposal of this property.

The community places’ function of Arts, Community and Events is now within Connected Communities department.

Closed Landfills and Contaminated Land

There are no apparent significant land contamination issues that would preclude sale of the site based on the limited information reviewed. The buildings are underground services may contain asbestos, which if present should be recorded in an information disclosed to any prospective purchaser.

An asbestos management survey was conducted on the northern building on 16 October 2018. Community Facilities subsequently completed an asbestos management plan. No asbestos containing materials were found but are presumed to be encapsulated in the building and canopy soffits. The plan recommends reviews every two to three years.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

40.     There is strong community and local board support for the early restoration and enhanced public use of Leys Institute. If approved, the proceeds of sale from 19 Jervois Road would help fund the restoration of Leys Institute.

41.     Plunket have expressed it would prefer to operate from shared facilities, rather than remain where it is currently located.

42.     Ponsonby Toy Library have expressed it would prefer to stay where it is.

43.     There will be some local impact from the relocation of Plunket and toy library services but overall these are considered positive. Shared, flexible spaces provide opportunities for communities to participate in multiple activities without having to travel between locations. This saves time and resources while increasing community connectivity.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     Māori are seven per cent of the Ponsonby population. The population is expected to remain stable, staying at seven per cent until at least 2038.

45.     Māori are not high users of the Plunket or toy library services offered at 19 Jervois Road.

46.     Eke Panuku contacted 19 iwi regarding the proposed disposal to seek feedback on cultural interest. The iwi contacted were:

·    Ngāti Wai

·    Ngāti Manuhiri

·    Ngāti Rehua

·    Te Runanga o Ngāti Whātua

·    Te Uri o Hau

·    Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

·    Ngāti Whatua Ōrākei

·    Te Kawerau ā Maki

·    Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

·    Ngāti Tamaoho

·    Te Ākitai – Waiohua

·    Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

·    Te Ahiwaru

·    Ngāti Paoa

·    Ngaati Whanaunga

·    Ngāti Maru

·    Ngāti Tamatera

·    Patukirikiri

·    Waikato-Tainui.

47.     The closing date for feedback was 13 November 2020. No responses were received.

48.     If 19 Jervois Road is approved for disposal and the former owners do not take up the offer back in accordance with s40 Public Works Act 1981, all 19 iwi authorities will be informed of the proposed sale.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

49.     The initial building cost has been fully depreciated. The building is currently reporting a fixed asset book value of $186,000. Before the sales proceeds are assigned to the restoration of Leys Institute, the book value, at the time of sale, will need to be deducted along with any other associated sales costs.

50.     Proceeds from the proposed sale of 19 Jervois Road would provide partial funding for the restoration of Leys Institute

51.     The 10-year Budget 2021-2031 highlights the financial challenges Auckland Council is facing and includes a key theme that it is necessary for Auckland to change the way it responds to community investment. The budget proposal emphasises the need to “consider how services can be provided differently”. At the same time, it envisages tailored services that “focus on areas of greatest needs”. 

52.     The service property optimisation policy offers an alternative funding source that releases value from underperforming service assets for reinvestment in improved service outcomes with no increase in capital expenditure and no impact on rates.

53.     19 Jervois Road has a current capital value (used for 2020/2021 rates) of $2,050,000. A market valuation of 19 Jervois Road was completed in March 2021 that considered recommendations from the heritage assessment. The valuation figures have been shared with Waitematā Local Board.

54.     The Leys Institute restoration has an indicative total funding requirement of between $15.4 and $21.4 million. Funding for the seismic remediation of Leys Institute has been approved through the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 (LTP 2021-2031) with budget allocated from FY2021/2022. Confirmation of the allocation of seismic budget and required additional funding will be identified through the detailed business case being prepared by Community Facilities in FY2021/2022.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

55.     Staff have completed a risk assessment. The following table outlines the main risks and mitigations associated with the recommendations in this report.

Type of risk

Risk

Risk level

Mitigation

Financial

If market conditions are unfavourable then the potential sale price could differ from the March 2021 market valuation.

Medium

Investigate alternative funding opportunities and timeframes.

Financial

If conditions are placed on the sale and purchase agreement then optimisation will provide less funding than originally anticipated.

High

Conditions of sale will have an impact on the service property optimisation value of 19 Jervois Road and need to be weighed against the benefits sale proceeds would bring towards the preservation of Leys Institute.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

56.     If requested, provide advice and support to Plunket and Ponsonby Toy Library for their relocation.

57.     Notify public of toilet closure and close women’s toilets.

58.     Subject to approval, Eke Panuku will develop a go to market strategy which takes into account the council’s obligations under s40 Public Works Act 1984 and any proposed heritage protection conditions. Final terms and conditions of the agreement will be approved by the Eke Panuku board under the appropriate delegation.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

19 Jervois Road Service Provision Findings

39

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Hannah Alleyne - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Letitia Edwards – Head of Strategic Asset Optimisation

Authorisers

Marian Webb - GM Assets and Delivery

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2020/2021

File No.: CP2021/11242

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2020/2021 Annual Report for the Waitematā Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 27 September 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2020/2021 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 27 September 2021. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market maintained by NZX Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA), local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the tabled annual report is being presented as confidential.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      adopt the tabled draft 2020/2021 Waitematā Local Board Annual Report.

b)      note that any proposed changes after the adoption will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body on 27 September 2021.

c)      note that the tabled draft 2020/2021 Waitematā Local Board Annual Report, will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2020/2021 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which are expected to be made public by 28 September 2021.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities and the overall funding impact statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       The annual report contains the following sections:

 

 

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi is an introduction specific to each local board area and is presented in Te Reo Māori and English.

About this report

An overview of what is covered in this document.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved. Includes the activity highlights and challenges.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Funding impact statement

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

7.       The council’s climate change disclosures are covered in volume four of the annual report and sections within the summary annual report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

10.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

11.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2020/2021 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during July and August 2021

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 27 September 2021

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 28 September 2021

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2021.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Hao Chen - Senior Finance and Performance Advisor

Authorisers

Mark Purdie - Manager – Local Board Financial Advisors

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Auckland Council's Performance Report: Waitematā Local Board for March to June 2021

File No.: CP2021/11499

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Waitematā Local Board with an integrated performance report for March to June 2021, and the overall performance for the financial year against the approved 2020/2021 local board work programmes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an integrated view of performance for the Waitematā Local Board and includes financial performance and delivery against work programmes for the 2020/2021 financial year.

3.       Within the agreed work programmes, 128 activities were delivered including multi-year projects that have progressed as expected. Six activities have some risk or issues but are being managed.  Nine activities were undelivered, cancelled, put on hold or deferred, or are multi-year projects/activities that have not progressed as expected during 2020/2021.

4.       Key activity achievements from the 2020/2021 work programme include:

·    Completion of Western Springs Lakeside Park playspace renewal (ID2561)

·    Completion of new changing rooms at Grey Lynn Park (ID2461)

·    Completion of Home Reserve and play space renewal (ID2685)

·    Deliver Parnell Festival of Roses signature event (ID1432)

5.       Key activities not delivered / not progressed as expected include:

·    Parnell Library - interior renewals (ID2547) is cancelled to allow discussions with the Building Owner and wider stakeholders to look to integrate the community centre and library space in the future.

·    Tranche one of the Te Kete Rukuruku -Māori naming of parks and places (ID2264) is not delivered and is awaiting the resolution of issues raised by mana whenua.

·    Investigation of Waitematā monuments (ID1311) is on hold due to a low level of response to Council’s engagement.

·    Heard Park - renew and upgrade park assets is on hold to finalise the Heard Park Concept Plan (ID3396)

·    The Hobson Bay walkway is delayed to investigate slope stability issues which presents various health and safety risks (ID3198)

6.       Qualifying budgets of unfinished activities will be carried forward into 2021/2022 work programmes.

7.       The financial performance report is attached but is excluded from the public. This is due to restrictions on releasing annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – on or about 7 October 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for March to June 2021.

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group results for 2020/2021 are released to the New Zealand’s Exchange (NZX) which are expected to be made public on or about 7 October 2021.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Emergency Budget was adopted on 30 July. The Waitematā Local Board approved 2020/2021 work programmes for the following operating departments at their August 2020 business meeting:

·        Arts, Community and Events;

·        Parks, Sport and Recreation;

·        Libraries and Information;

·        Community Services: Service, Strategy and Integration; (Now part of Connected Communities department)

·        Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew;

·        Community Leases;

·        External Partnerships;

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services;

·        Auckland Unlimited.

9.       As the work programmes were adopted two months later than normal due to effects of COVID-19, there has been a reduced timeframe to deliver these work programmes (10 months).

10.     Since the work programmes were approved the Customer and Communities Services directorate has been restructured. Two new departments were created - Connected Communities and Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships, and the Southern Initiative and Western Initiative moved into the directorate as a new department - Community and Social Innovation. Units from the previous departments Arts, Community and Events; Libraries and Information; and Service, Strategy and Integration were incorporated into the three new departments. The table below shows the distribution.

Table 1: Changes to Departments in Customer and Communities Services directorate

Previous Department - Unit

Current Department - Unit

Arts, Community and Events - Community Places

Connected Communities – Community Places

Arts, Community and Events - Community Empowerment

Connected Communities – Community Empowerment

Arts, Community and Events - Community Empowerment (Youth)

Community and Social Innovation – Youth Empowerment

Arts, Community and Events - Arts & Culture

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Arts & Culture

Arts, Community and Events - Events

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Events

Service, Strategy and Integration

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships – Service and Asset Planning

Libraries

Connected Communities – Libraries

The Southern Initiative

Community and Social Innovation – The Southern Initiative

The Western Initiative

Community and Social Innovation – The Western Initiative

 

11.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet local board plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

12.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that have been delivered as expected or multi-year activities which have progressed as planned (green), activities that are in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that are undelivered or have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work Programme by RAG status

13.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each departments the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: work programme activity by activity status and department

Key activity achievements from the 2020/2021 work programme

14.     The key achievements in the delivery of the local board work programmes for 2020/2021 include:

·    Completion of Home Reserve and play space renewal (ID2685) Completion of the basketball court surface painting is planned for the end of July 2021.

·    Completion of Western Springs Lakeside Park playspace renewal (ID2561)

·    Completion of new changing rooms at Grey Lynn Park (ID2461)

·    Delivery of Parnell Festival of Roses signature event (ID1432)

·    Comprehensive renewal of 192 Parnell Road building interior and exterior (ID3134)

·    Comprehensive renewal of Studio One Artstation (ID2752)

·    Comprehensive renewal of Pt Erin Pool (ID2549)

·    Partnerships with Festival Italiano, Artweek, Grey Lynn Park Festival, Farmers Santa Parade (ID1429)

·    Delivery of agrichemical free parks in Albert Park, Myers Park, Victoria Park (amenity areas only) and Western Park (ID3002)

·    Renewal pathways at Western Park (ID3529)

·    Establishment of a no mow pilot in Grey Lynn Park (ID3540)

Overview of work programme performance

Arts, Community and Events work programme

15.     In the Arts, Community and Events work programme, there are 25 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green) and one activity is on hold (red). Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 1: Arts, Community and Events activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

ID1311 Arts and culture regional work programme information and updates

Red

On hold

Part of this work programme includes $26,000 LDI funding towards consulting with Mana whenua to investigate existing monuments in the local board area that commemorate historic events or figures such as Governor Grey and provide options to remove, re-site or providing interpretation.

14 iwi with customary rights within the Waitematā Local Board area were contacted but this engagement received a low response rate. 

The current level of response to Council’s engagement would suggest that discussion of monuments is not a priority for mana whenua at this time. The Monuments Working Group recommends that the local board carry over the $26,000 allocated for hui as a contingency should mana whenua wish to address monuments and objects in 2022.

 

 

Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

16.     In the Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme, there are 11 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green) two activities are significantly delayed or not delivered (red). Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 2: Parks, Sport and Recreation activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

ID2264 CARRY FORWARD WTM: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) tranche one

Red

Not delivered

Concerns raised by mana whenua regarding overlapping interests have impacted on timelines. The project cannot be completed until a resolution is reached between mana whenua.

ID2323 Victoria Park commuter parking restrictions

Red

 

In progress

This project is pending the completion of the pathway renewal in Victoria Park which includes creating a shared space adjacent to the car park.  The renewal is scheduled to be completed in October 2021.

The investigation of proposed parking restrictions will commence in 2021/2022.

 

Libraries work programme

17.     In the Libraries work programme, there are 10 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green). 

Service Strategy and Integration work programme

18.     In the Service Strategy and Integration work programme, there are three activities that were completed by the end of the year or progressing as expected (green).

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

19.     In the Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme, there are 66 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green), four activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber) and two activities were cancelled and deferred in in the period March to June 2021 (grey).  Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 5: Community Facilities activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

ID2789 (OLI) Ponsonby Park - develop civic park space

Grey

Deferred

A formal report seeking approval for the additional $5.5 million funding required to deliver the project was planned for the Finance and Performance Committee's agenda 19 March 2020 but this was deferred. Due to the emergency budget funding has been deferred.

The project will recommence when funding has been confirmed for FY2025 and beyond.

ID2544 Outhwaite Park - renew playspace and adjacent carpark

Amber

In progress

Local board requested a redesign in Q1 to reduce loss of carparking and trees along reserve boundary. 

The project is now progressing and is expected to be completed by September 2021.

ID2547 Parnell Library - interior renewals

Grey

Cancelled

The renewal works have been put on hold whist discussions are held with the Building Owner and wider stakeholders to look to integrate the community centre and library space in the future.

Project is now to be cancelled and savings returned back to the local board for reallocation as per the guidelines.

ID2821 Central Library - replace level 3 toilet

Amber

In progress

The scope of works is being re assessed in line with the budget availability and the tenders received.

Physical works to be completed in FY2021/2022.

ID3396 Heard Park - renew and upgrade park assets

Amber

In progress

Local Board gave direction to not commence any works onsite until the concept planning work has been completed.  The concept plan development is currently in the consultation phase.

ID3198 Hobson Bay Walkway (Thomas Bloodworth Reserve to Pt Resolution) - renew mudcrete walkway

Amber

In progress

The project manager working with Community Facilities and Technical Services to confirm the extent of works required for the renewal of the tracks. Besides for the generally poor condition of the mudcrete tracks, there are numerous slope stability issues which presents various health and safety risks. There are other issues such as access for renewal and future maintenance of the tracks which need to be addressed.

Recommendations will be presented to the local board after July 2021.

 

Community Leases work programme

20.     In the Community Leases work programme, there are three activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green) and four activities that have been deferred in in the period March to June 2021 (grey).  Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 6: Community Leases activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

ID485 Victoria Park- Victoria Park Sports & Cultural Trust

Grey

Deferred

Applicant has requested to include toilet and change rooms, and car park into the lease area.

Staff will discuss options with the local board in quarter one FY21/22.

 

ID487 2 Ayr Street, Parnell- Kinder House Society Inc

Grey

Deferred

Application received and streamline renewal memo will be presented to the local board in FY21/22.

ID2152 124 Wellington Street- New lease Auckland Playcentres Association Inc (Franklin Road)

Grey

Deferred

Application received and site visit to be schedule to review building repair issues.

A report will be presented to the local board in quarter one FY21/22.

ID2157 55 West End Road, Herne Bay-The Scout Association of New Zealand - Hawke Sea Scouts

Grey

Deferred

A report will be presented to the board in quarter one FY2021/2022.

And staff are progressing discussions with iwi groups on concerns raised with new lease applications.

 

 

Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme

21.     In the Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme, there are 10 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green), two activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber).  Activities with significant impact are discussed below:

Table 7: Infrastructure and Environment Services activities with significant impact

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

ID1632 Te Wai Ōrea Lake and Wetland Restoration

Amber

In progress

The contractor completed site preparation for the terrestrial planting during the period of March to June 2021. A community planting day was held on 12 June 2021.

The planting of emergent plants in the lake itself will now take place in August and September 2021 due to a change of matting methods for pre grown plants.

ID1639 Waipapa Stream Restoration Programme - Parnell

Amber

In progress

A community planting day was planned for 19 June 2021 but was postponed due to the weather. A new planting date will be set in quarter one and 175 native plants will be planted.

 

Auckland Unlimited work programme

22.     In the Auckland Unlimited work programme, there are two activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green).

External Partnerships work programme

23.     In the External Partnerships work programme, there is one activity that was completed by the end of the year or will be by end of June 2021 (green).

Deferred activities

24.     The Lead Financial Advisors are identifying projects from the local board’s 2020/2021 Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operational budget which meet the criteria to be carried forward. These will be added to the 2021/2022 work programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

26.     The following activities have a direct focus or contributes towards climate change outcomes:

·    ID1343 Placemaking: Waitematā gardens, food and sustainability

·    ID1360 Build Capacity: Community disaster resilience

·    ID2410 Cox's Bay to Wharf Rd Greenway - renew bridge and pathway

·    ID3005 Waitematā - urban forest restoration

·    ID3143 Ngahere (Urban Forest) Strategy - Waitematā Action Plan Delivery 2019/2020

·    ID1551 Low Carbon Lifestyles – Waitematā

·    ID1694 Low Carbon Network – Waitematā

·    ID1696 CARRY FORWARD: Low Carbon Multi-Unit Dwellings – Waitematā

·    ID1697 Low Carbon Activator – Waitematā

·    ID1698 Regenerative Urban Farm and Low Carbon Diet Engagement programme

·    ID1359 Taonga tuku iho - Legacy - we preserve our past, ensure our future. (Environment) – Waitematā

·    ID191 WTM local parks:  Ecological volunteers and environmental programme FY21

·    ID2221 CARRY FORWARD WTM: Ngahere (Urban Forest) Strategy Waitematā Action Plan Delivery FY20

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     This report informs the Waitematā Local Board of the performance for the in the period March to June 2021 and the performance for the 2020/2021 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     The following activities have a direct Māori outcome focus or contributes towards specific Māori outcomes in the local board plan:

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

March to June 2021 update

ID1362 Māori Responsiveness: Local Māori aspirations in Waitematā

Green

Complete

Staff worked with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei on the community engagement plan for Te Tōangaroa area. Māori Wardens in the city centre area around homelessness, antisocial behaviour and community safety initiatives. Māori organisations regarding Neighbours Day Aotearoa and Youth Week.

Local board services and Engagement teams on planning Māori engagement for the Long Term Plan

Awhina Mai Tatau Katoa and Mahi Tahi Karangahape Road on capacity building for these two Māori social enterprises.

A stocktake report and recommendation will be presented to the local board in April 2021

ID1353 Whakatipu i te reo Māori - we grow the Māori language Celebrating te ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori - Waitematā

Green

Complete

Waitematā community library teams are continuing to champion and embed te reo Māori in everyday communication through daily karakia, mihi, greetings and by incorporating the language into programmes and events. For example, preschool literacy sessions include songs in te reo as well as bilingual stories and instructions. Kapa Kōrero, Grey Lynn Library’s Māori conversation group, regularly brings learners of the language together to practice their reo in a supportive environment. Lifting the use and visibility of te reo Māori is also achieved through bilingual signage and social media posts. This will develop further as confidence with pronunciation and vocabulary increases.

ID2264 CARRY FORWARD WTM: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) tranche one

Red

Not delivered

Concerns raised by mana whenua regarding overlapping interests have impacted on timelines. The project cannot be completed until a resolution is reached between mana whenua.

ID1311 Arts and culture regional work programme information and updates

Red

On hold

Part of this work programme includes $26,000 LDI funding towards consulting with Mana whenua to investigate existing monuments in the local board area that commemorate historic events or figures such as Governor Grey and provide options to remove, re-site or providing interpretation.

14 iwi with customary rights within the Waitematā Local Board area were contacted but this engagement received a low response rate. 

The current level of response to Council’s engagement would suggest that discussion of monuments is not a priority for mana whenua at this time. The Monuments Working Group recommends that the local board carry over the $26,000 allocated for hui as a contingency should mana whenua wish to address monuments and objects in 2022.

 

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     This report is provided to enable the Waitematā Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2020/2021 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial performance

31.     Auckland Council (Council) currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – on or about 7 October 2021. Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to this report is excluded from the public. 

32.     Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is under confidential cover.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Overview of work programme performance by department’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Work programmes for 2021/2022 were approved at the board’s business meeting in June 2020.

35.     Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2021/2022 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Work Programme Update - March to June 2021

73

b

Financial Appendix June 2021 - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Caroline Teh - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Proposal to make a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw

File No.: CP2021/11535

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek support for the draft proposal to make a new Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Auckland Council Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022, before it is finalised for public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Staff have prepared a draft proposal for a new Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw to enable local boards to provide their views before it is finalised for public consultation.

3.       The draft proposal is to make a new bylaw under the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This bylaw would replace the current legacy bylaw, which expires in 2022 and contains provisions developed before the Freedom Camping Act 2011 was passed.

4.       The Freedom Camping Act 2011 allows freedom camping on all public land unless it is already prohibited under another enactment. The Act enables councils to make a bylaw to prohibit or restrict freedom camping in areas that meet statutory criteria for protection.

5.       This draft proposal replaces an earlier proposal developed in 2018 which was set aside by the Governing Body in 2019. Following decisions by the Governing Body in March and May 2021, the key changes compared with the 2018 proposal are that the new draft proposal:

·     excludes land held under the Reserves Act 1977 from scope (council would maintain the current default prohibition on camping on reserves under the Reserves Act 1977)

·     manages freedom camping only on land held under the Local Government Act 2002

·     seeks to prevent freedom camping impacts in sensitive areas, and to protect public health and safety and manage access in all areas, by:

scheduling 44 prohibited areas, where no freedom camping is allowed

scheduling 19 restricted areas, where freedom camping is allowed subject to site-specific restrictions

including general rules to manage freedom camping impacts in all other areas (campers must use certified self-contained vehicles, stay a maximum of two nights, depart by 9am and not return to the same area within two weeks).

6.       The proposed prohibited and restricted areas are those areas which the Bylaw Panel recommended should be prohibited and restricted in 2019, and which are held under the Local Government Act 2002. Areas held under the Reserves Act 1977 have been removed.

7.       The Panel’s recommendations draw on previous area assessments and take into account feedback from local board engagement and public consultation conducted in 2018 and 2019.

8.       The draft proposal includes six designated prohibited areas and two designated restricted areas located in the Waitematā Local Board area. All designated areas are listed in the draft Bylaw schedules within Attachment A. All other council-managed land held under the Local Government Act 2002, including roads, is proposed to be covered by general rules.

9.       Staff recommend that the local board provide its view on the draft proposal, including the inclusion of general rules in the bylaw and the recommended settings for those rules.

10.     The key risks of the proposal are that:

·     it creates too few areas where freedom camping is allowed; this is partially mitigated by allowing freedom camping on most roads (subject to general rules), and council could decide to designate more restricted areas following consultation

·     the cumulative impact of all prohibitions under the Bylaw and other enactments is viewed as an effective ban; however staff looked closely at the requirements of the Freedom Camping Act 2011 in developing the proposal and will continue to monitor cumulative impact as bylaw development progresses.

11.     The local board’s views will be provided to the Governing Body in September with the recommendation that the finalised proposal is adopted for public consultation. Public consultation is scheduled for November, and Bylaw Panel deliberations for early 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      support the draft Statement of Proposal in Attachment A of this agenda report to make a new Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Te Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Auckland Council Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022 for public consultation.

Horopaki

Context

Freedom camping can have both positive and negative impacts

12.     For the purposes of this Bylaw, freedom camping is when someone stays overnight on council-managed land, including roadsides, in a vehicle or caravan.

13.     Freedom camping specifically refers to people staying in vehicles overnight as part of leisure travel, or because they are choosing to live in a vehicle for lifestyle reasons.

14.     Freedom camping provides a flexible and affordable way for Aucklanders and for domestic and international visitors to experience and enjoy the region. Many freedom campers will visit friends and family, attend events, and support local businesses during their stay.

15.     Freedom camping can however have negative impacts on the local environment and host communities if it is not well-managed. These impacts can be caused by:

16.     Freedom camping has become popularly associated with harmful and antisocial behaviours, but our research shows that most freedom campers visiting Auckland do camp responsibly.

17.     However, the presence of large numbers of campers – even responsible campers – is more likely to cause community concern in Auckland due to pressure on limited public space.

18.     Freedom camper numbers have been growing in Auckland and throughout the country over the last two decades. Once the current border restrictions are lifted overseas visitors are likely to return, and domestic freedom camping may continue to increase in the meantime.

19.     Auckland does not currently have enough places for freedom campers to go. This means there is often overcrowding in the places where it is allowed, or illegal camping in unsuitable areas once legal sites are full. Having more areas would reduce these supply-related issues.

20.     The council can regulate freedom camping to help prevent irresponsible camping and manage responsible freedom camping in a way that minimises its negative impacts.

Council must align its freedom camping regulation with the Freedom Camping Act 2011

21.     The Freedom Camping Act 2011 allows freedom camping on all public land unless it is prohibited under a bylaw or another enactment, such as the Reserves Act 1977.

22.     Auckland’s current Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2015 is a consolidation of pre-2010 legacy bylaw provisions developed before the Freedom Camping Act 2011 was passed. A new bylaw must be made that aligns with the national legislation before the current bylaw expires in 2022.

23.     The Freedom Camping Act 2011 is permissive by default but does allow council to make a bylaw to prohibit or restrict freedom camping in areas where certain statutory criteria are met. In particular, council must be satisfied that:

·     each area’s location can be clearly shown on a map and/or described

·     the prohibitions and restrictions in each area are necessary to:

-     protect the area (for example because it is environmentally or culturally sensitive)

-     protect the health and safety of the people who may visit the area

-     protect access to the area (for other users)

·     the cumulative impact of all prohibitions and restrictions (under the bylaw and other enactments) do not constitute an effective ban on freedom camping on council land.

A 2018 proposal to regulate freedom camping was set aside in August 2019

24.     Work to develop a freedom camping bylaw began in 2016. Staff assessed more than 1,000 areas for their suitability for freedom camping and need for protection under the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This process included extensive engagement with local boards.

25.     In late 2018 and early 2019 public feedback and formal local board views were sought on a proposal for a draft Freedom Camping in Vehicles bylaw. A Bylaw Panel deliberated on all feedback and made recommendations to the Governing Body. The Panel recommended scheduling 322 prohibited areas and 103 restricted areas, including a number of reserves.

26.     In August 2019 the Governing Body set aside the recommendations of the Bylaw Panel and instead requested advice on a new direction for bylaw development.

The Governing Body decided to exclude reserves from scope and include general rules

27.     The Governing Body considered staff advice in March 2021[1] and May 2021[2] and directed that a new proposal for a Freedom Camping Act 2011 bylaw be developed that:

·     only manages freedom camping on land held under the Local Government Act 2002, with camping on reserves continuing to be managed by the Reserves Act 1977

·     includes general rules to manage the generalised impacts of freedom camping, and ensure problems are not displaced from regulated to unregulated areas

·     relies on previous assessments (undertaken to develop the 2018 proposal) to identify land held under the Local Government Act 2002 that should be prohibited or further restricted through the bylaw.

28.     Staff have prepared a draft proposal to implement the Governing Body’s decisions (Attachment A). This proposal outlines the reasons and decisions that have led to the content of the proposed new Bylaw.

Potential changes to the Freedom Camping Act 2011 not yet confirmed

29.     In April and May 2021, the Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) publicly consulted on four proposals for change to the Freedom Camping Act 2011. This included making the use of self-contained vehicles mandatory for all freedom camping.

30.     The Governing Body approved Auckland Council’s submission, which incorporated local board views, in May 2021[3]. MBIE has not yet released any further information, and timeframes for any changes to the Act have not been confirmed.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

A new bylaw is proposed to manage freedom camping in vehicles on some council land

31.     The draft proposal would make a new Ture ā-Rohe Noho Puni Wātea ā-Waka 2022 / Freedom Camping in Vehicles Bylaw 2022 that:

·     aligns with the Freedom Camping Act 2011

·     helps council to prevent freedom camping impacts in sensitive areas, and to protect public health and safety and manage access in all areas of land held under the Local Government Act 2002 (including roads controlled by Auckland Transport)

·     forms part of a wider regulatory framework of Acts, regulations and other bylaws[4].

32.     The Bylaw will be enforced by the Licensing and Regulatory Compliance unit using a graduated compliance model (information, education, enforcement).

33.     The table below summarises the main proposals:

Draft proposals

Reasons for draft proposal

To schedule 63 specific areas as follows:

Restrict freedom camping in 19 specific areas (where freedom camping is allowed subject to site-specific restrictions)

Listed in Schedule 1 of the draft Bylaw

 

To better manage areas that have been identified as needing additional regulation due to factors such as popularity, current use by others, demand for parking and the size of the parking areas.

These are the restricted areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel in 2019, with all reserves removed.

Prohibit freedom camping in 44 specific areas (where freedom camping is not allowed)

Listed in Schedule 2 of the draft Bylaw

 

To protect areas that have been identified as being environmentally or culturally sensitive, or where freedom camping would impact public health and safety and access in ways that cannot be adequately managed through restrictions.

These are the prohibited areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel in 2019, with all reserves removed.

To include general rules for all other areas as follows:

Require freedom campers to use certified self-contained vehicles

To prevent impacts from the depositing of toilet waste and wastewater into the environment, and the use of unsuitable areas for cooking

Allow freedom campers to stay a maximum of two nights in the same road or off-road parking area

To prevent impacts from the depositing of toilet waste and wastewater into the environment and ensure fair access to limited shared parking and amenities

Require freedom campers to vacate their parking space by 9am on the day of departure

To ensure fair access for shared parking and amenities for other campers and users of public space

Require freedom campers not return to stay in the same road or off-road parking area within a two-week period

To ensure fair access to limited shared parking and amenities for other campers and users of public space

34.     The draft proposal notes that the council does not intend to use the bylaw to manage:

·     issues associated with homelessness (people living in a vehicle involuntarily)

·     areas where access is already controlled or parking is reserved or charged for, for example gated carparks, land leased to other organisations and regional parks.

The draft proposal complies with statutory requirements

35.     The draft proposal has been prepared in accordance with statutory requirements. Staff consider the proposed draft Bylaw:

·     only prohibits or restricts freedom camping where it is necessary to protect sensitive areas, and/or to manage impacts on public health and safety and access to an area

·     uses a format and wording that are easy to read, understand and comply with

·     is authorised by statute, is not repugnant to other legislation, and is not unreasonable

·     does not give rise to any implications or inconsistencies with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990.

Staff recommend the local board consider and provide its views on the draft proposal

36.     Staff recommend that the local board consider the draft proposal in Attachment A and provide any views by resolution to the Governing Body before it is finalised for public consultation on 23 September 2021.

37.     For example, the board could support the draft proposal for public consultation, recommend changes or defer comment until after it has considered public feedback on the proposal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     Staff note that this is a regulatory process to manage existing activities enabled by central government policy. It is not causing these activities to occur or affecting the likelihood that they will occur. The decision sought in this report therefore has no specific climate impact.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.     The draft proposal impacts the operations of several council departments and council-controlled organisations, including Licensing and Regulatory Compliance, Parks, Sport and Recreation and Auckland Transport.

40.     The Licensing and Regulatory Compliance unit are aware of the impacts of the draft proposal and their primary role in implementing and managing compliance with the Bylaw.

41.     Council’s 86 park rangers help to manage compliance with council Bylaws, the Reserves Act 1977 and the Litter Act 1974 by carrying out education and monitoring on parks and reserves. However, rangers are not currently being warranted or renewing warrants, and Licensing and Regulatory Compliance will continue to carry out any enforcement required.

Enhanced service levels for Bylaw compliance activities are not currently budgeted

42.     Concern about the council’s ability to effectively implement the Bylaw and manage compliance within existing resources was a key theme of public and local board feedback received in 2019.

43.     In March 2021 the Governing Body requested advice about costed options for increasing the service levels for compliance associated with this Bylaw. Costings are being finalised and this advice will be provided alongside the proposal in September, for consideration during future Annual Plan cycles.

44.     There are multiple options for increasing investment in Bylaw implementation and both proactive and reactive Bylaw compliance activities. These include:

·     enhancement of council’s information technology systems, to enable the implementation of the new infringement notice regime

·     use of contracted security services, to increase responsiveness to complaints (similar to the current arrangements for Noise Control), or for additional proactive monitoring at seasonal ‘hotspots’

·     purchase of mobile printers, to enable infringement notices to be affixed to vehicles in breach of the Bylaw at the time of the offence

·     signage at all prohibited and restricted areas and at other areas as needed

·     camera surveillance technology to enable remote monitoring of known or emerging hotspots, for evidence-gathering purposes and/or to support real-time enforcement.

45.     Local boards can request further advice from Licensing and Regulatory Compliance if they wish to consider allocating local budget for enhanced local compliance activities.

46.     For example, Rodney Local Board recently allocated funds from its Locally Driven Initiatives budget to employ two Compliance Wardens for a six-month trial during the 2021/2022 financial year. The wardens will address low level compliance issues, including illegal freedom camping, with follow-up support from warranted compliance staff when required.

Ongoing land classification work won’t be completed with bylaw development timeframes

47.     Following the Governing Body’s decision in March 2021 to exclude reserves from scope, land status has become more relevant for identifying areas requiring protection in the bylaw.

48.     The council does not currently hold complete land classification data to establish definitive numbers of reserves. Parks and reserves can comprise multiple land parcels which may be held under different Acts.

49.     Since reporting to the Governing Body in March, staff have completed further investigation of the land status of the prohibited and restricted areas recommended by the Bylaw Panel. This has identified additional reserves, which has reduced the proposed prohibited areas (from 55 in the March report to 44 in the draft proposal) and restricted areas (from 21 to 19).

50.     Classifications are still being confirmed as part of the development of omnibus Local Park Management Plans. Five local board areas have completed this work, and an average of 94 percent of their parks were found to be held under the Reserves Act 1977.

51.     Ongoing land classification work will support bylaw implementation. It will not finish within the timeframe for bylaw development, so the status quo issues will remain.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

52.     The proposed draft Bylaw impacts on local boards’ governance role as it affects decision making over local assets, particularly parks and other council-controlled public places. There is also high community interest in freedom camping regulation in many local board areas.

53.     The local board has an opportunity to provide its views on this draft proposal by resolution to the Governing Body. The local board will also have further opportunity to provide its views to a Bylaw Panel on any public feedback to the proposal from people in their local board area.

All proposed prohibited and restricted areas previously discussed with local boards

54.     The draft proposal includes six designated prohibited areas and two designated restricted areas located in the Waitematā Local Board area. All designated areas are listed in the draft Bylaw schedules within Attachment A. All other council-managed land held under the Local Government Act 2002, including roads, is proposed to be covered by general rules.

55.     The proposed prohibited and restricted areas are those areas which the Bylaw Panel recommended should be prohibited and restricted in 2019, and which are held under the Local Government Act 2002. Areas held under the Reserves Act 1977 have been removed.

56.     All areas proposed to be scheduled as prohibited or restricted were previously discussed with the relevant local boards in 2018.

Joint political working group provided views on general rules in May 2021

57.     Three local board representatives participated in a joint political working group on 21 May 2021 to provide views on options for including general rules in the Bylaw.

58.     The working group unanimously supported the inclusion of general rules in the Bylaw, and five out of six working group members supported the recommended settings included in the draft proposal. A summary of the working group’s views was reported to the Governing Body on 27 May 2021[5].

The new draft proposal responds to feedback provided on the 2018 proposal

59.     Local boards provided formal feedback on the 2018 draft proposal to the Bylaw Panel in 2019, following on from their early feedback given during engagement in 2017, and site-specific feedback provided in 2018.

60.     The table below details typical concerns expressed by local boards in their formal feedback and how the new draft proposal responds to these concerns:

Key local board concern (from 2019)

Draft proposal’s response to concern

The loss of protection in the legacy bylaws for most reserves and roadsides

·   Excludes reserves from the bylaw and continues to use the Reserves Act 1977 to manage all camping at reserves

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw, including roadsides

·   Notes individual roads can be scheduled as prohibited or restricted areas if problems arise in future

The provision for unrestricted freedom camping in the local board area

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw

Freedom camping at reserves and enforcement tools under the Reserves Act

·   The Reserves Act 1977 will be used to manage all camping at reserves, which means the status quo (prohibition) will continue

·   Notes that following changes in September 2019 to the Reserves Act 1977, $800 infringement notices can now be issued for breaches of this Act

Freedom camping in inner-city areas, unsafe areas and areas near sports fields, residential homes and campgrounds

·   Bylaw schedules designate individual sites that have been identified and assessed as unsuitable for freedom camping (prohibited areas), or where additional restrictions are needed to manage impacts (restricted areas)

·   Includes general rules to manage freedom camping in all areas not individually scheduled in the bylaw

The potential effect on people experiencing homelessness

·   Clarifies that the bylaw will not be used to manage issues associated with homelessness and confirms the council’s commitment to a compassionate enforcement approach to protect vulnerable Aucklanders

Council’s ability to enforce bylaws and the cost of enforcement and monitoring

·   Although not contained in the proposal itself, advice will be provided to the Governing Body on options for increasing investment in bylaw implementation

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

61.     The Bylaw has relevance to Māori as kaitiaki of Papatūānuku. The proposal supports two key directions in the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau:

·     wairuatanga (promoting distinctive identity), in relation to valuing and protecting Māori heritage and Taonga Māori

·     kaitiakitanga (ensuring sustainable futures), in relation to environmental protection.

62.     The proposal also supports the Board’s Schedule of Issues of Significance by ensuring that sites of significance to Māori are identified and protected from freedom camping harms.

63.     Mana whenua and mataawaka were invited to provide feedback during the development of the 2018 proposal via dedicated hui and again through the public consultation process.

64.     Feedback received on specific prohibited and restricted areas identified in the 2018 proposal was incorporated into the deliberations. This included the identification of sites of significance to Māori, such as wahi tapu areas.

65.     General matters raised by Māori during engagement included the need to ensure:

·     the ability to add further sites of significance to the bylaw as these are designated

·     provision for temporary bans on freedom camping, e.g. in areas under a rahui

·     a compassionate approach to people experiencing homelessness

·     provision of sufficient dump stations to avoid environmental pollution

·     clear communication of the rules in the bylaw and at freedom camping sites.

66.     The draft proposal addresses these matters by proposing to prohibit freedom camping at sites of significance to Māori (such as Maraetai Foreshore and Onetangi Cemetery), provision in the Bylaw for temporary bans, and confirming council’s commitment to a compassionate enforcement approach to people experiencing homelessness.

67.     Mana whenua and mataawaka will have an opportunity to provide further feedback during public consultation on the proposal.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

68.     There are no financial implications to the local board for any decisions to support the draft proposal for public consultation. The Governing Body will consider any financial implications associated with public notification in September 2021.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

69.     Legal risks were discussed as part of the provision of legally privileged advice to interested local board members at a confidential workshop held in June 2021.

70.     The other key risks and possible mitigations are summarised in the table below.

If...

Then...

Mitigation (partial)

The bylaw proposal does not create enough areas where freedom camping is allowed

 

Council may need to manage an increase in overcrowding, non-compliance, and harms over time.

The proposed bylaw would enable freedom campers to stay for up to two nights on most roads, subject to general rules.

Council could consider increasing the number of designated restricted areas following consultation, or if problems arise in future.

The cumulative impact of prohibitions and restrictions in the Bylaw and other enactments is viewed as an ‘effective ban’ on freedom camping in Auckland

The risk of legal challenge could increase.

Staff looked closely at the requirements of the Freedom Camping Act 2011 in developing the proposal, and cumulative impact will continue to be monitored.

Council can’t meet public expectation of increased enforcement

There may be a loss of social license for freedom camping and reputational risk for council.

Responsible Camping Ambassadors will assist compliance staff during the peak season, although future funding is not guaranteed.

The Governing Body or local boards could allocate additional funding to increase service levels for compliance activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

71.     Staff will present local board views and a finalised proposal to the Governing Body on 23 September 2021. The next steps for bylaw development are shown in the diagram below.

 Diagram

Description automatically generated

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Freedom Camping in Vehicles SOP & Draft Bylaw (combined) August 2021

125

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rebekah Forman - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Feedback on Department of Internal Affairs consultation document on Māori wards

File No.: CP2021/11706

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable the local board to provide feedback on the Department of Internal Affairs’ consultation on changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       The Department of Internal Affairs’ consultation on changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes is open for public submission with a closing date of 27 August.

2.       In 2020 the Government began a two-stage process to align Māori ward and Māori general ward processes more closely together.

3.       The first stage of the changes was completed on 1 March 2021 with the enactment of the Local Electoral (Māori Wards and Māori Constituencies) Amendment Act 2021. These changes were to:

·        remove all mechanisms from the Local Electoral Act 2001 for binding polls to be held on the establishment of Māori wards

·        provide councils with a fresh opportunity to make decisions on Māori wards in time for the 2022 local elections.

4.       The second stage of changes is intended by the Minister to provide an enduring process for councils to consider setting up Māori wards, by bringing even closer together the Māori wards process and general wards process.

5.       This consultation is not about whether councils should have Māori wards, whether there should be binding polls on Māori wards, or whether there are other ways to improve Māori participation in local government. The Government has already agreed that establishing a Māori ward is a decision for councils to make.

6.       The Government now wants to improve how these decisions are made.

7.       This is a consultation with the public by the Minister and it precedes the drafting of the bill.

8.       There is also an opportunity to have a full submission on the draft bill when it is at the select committee stage.

9.       The government has identified six key differences between the Māori wards and general wards process that are the focus of their consultation. Those differences are:

·        The requirements for councils to consider ward systems

·        The timing of decisions

·        Opportunities for public input

·        Decision-making rights and the role of the Local Government Commission

·        How and when wards can be discontinued

·        The types of polls that councils can hold.

10.     Further information and summary documents on the consultation on changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes can be found here: https://www.dia.govt.nz/maori-wards

11.     The discussion document: Changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes is included as attachment A.

12.     Local board feedback is due on 25 August 2021

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the discussion document on changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Discussion Document- changes to Māori ward and Māori constituency processes

227

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Carlos Rahman - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Chairperson's report

File No.: CP2021/11458

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the opportunity for the local board chair to provide an update on projects, meetings and other initiatives relevant to the local board’s interests.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for the Waitematā Local Board Chair to update the local board on activities he has been involved in since the last meeting.

3.       In accordance with Standing Order 2.4.7, the chair may, by way of report, bring any matter to the attention of a meeting of the local board or its committees that is within their role or function to consider.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Chair’s report for August 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair R Northey report August 2021

247

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Priscila Firmo - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Board member reports

File No.: CP2021/11574

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the local board’s elected members to update the Waitematā Local Board on matters they have been involved in following the previous month’s meeting and other matters of interest to the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for members of the Waitematā Local Board to provide a written or verbal update on their activities for the month or any other matter they wish to raise with the board.

3.       This is an information item and it is optional for board members to provide a written board member report for inclusion in the agenda.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the written report from Members A A Christie, A Bonham and Gunthorp for August 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Member A A Christie report August 2021

273

b

Member A Bonham report August 2021

287

c

Member G Gunthorp report August 2021

301

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Priscila Firmo - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2021/11651

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Waitematā Local Board with the updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Waitematā Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months.

3.       The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

4.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·   clarifying what advice is required and when

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

5.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the governance forward work calendar as at 17 August 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work calendar August 2021

309

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Priscila Firmo - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Waitematā Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2021/11670

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Waitematā Local Board to receive the records of its recent workshops held following the previous local board business meeting. Attached are copies of the proceeding records taken from the workshops held on:

·   27 July 2021

·   3 August 2021

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance to Standing Order 12.1.4, a record of the proceedings of every Waitematā Local Board workshop held over the past month, including the names of the members attending and the general nature of the matters discussed during the workshop, shall be circulated to the members of the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)   receive the Waitematā Local Board workshop records for the workshops held 27 July and 3 August 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā Local Board workshop records August 2021

313

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Priscila Firmo - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

17 August 2021

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Waitematā Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

17        Auckland Council's Performance Report: Waitematā Local Board for March to June 2021 - Attachment b - Financial Appendix June 2021

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial information that have an impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2021 that require release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 



[1] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/03/GB_20210325_AGN_10148_AT_WEB.htm (Item 9, GB/2021/19)

[2] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_AGN_10145_AT_WEB.htm (Item 10, GB/2021/49)

[3] http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_AGN_10145_AT_WEB.htm (Item 9, GB/2021/48)

[4] Freedom Camping Act; Litter Act; Resource Management Act; Fire and Emergency NZ Act; Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw; Auckland Council Traffic Bylaw; Auckland Transport Traffic Bylaw; Alcohol Control Bylaw; Dog Management Bylaw

[5] https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/05/GB_20210527_MAT_10145_WEB.htm