I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Kaipātiki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 15 September 2021

10.00am

This meeting will proceed via Skype for Business
Either a recording or written summary will be uploaded to the Auckland Council website

 

Kaipātiki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

John Gillon

 

Deputy Chairperson

Danielle Grant, JP

 

Members

Paula Gillon

 

 

Ann Hartley

 

 

Melanie Kenrick

 

 

Cindy Schmidt

 

 

Andrew Shaw

 

 

Adrian Tyler

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Jacinda Short

Democracy Advisor

 

9 September 2021

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 484 6236

Email: jacinda.short@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 September 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                   5

2          Apologies                                                                                 5

3          Declaration of Interest                                          5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                    5

6          Acknowledgements                                              6

7          Petitions                                                                 6

8          Deputations                                                           6

9          Public Forum                                                                            6

10        Extraordinary Business                                       6

11        Notices of Motion                                                  7

12        Notice of Motion - Managed Isolation and Quarantine (MIQ) Facilities                                  9

13        Changes to the Kaipātiki Local Board 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services work programme                                                          13

14        Northcote Community Needs Assessment Research Report                                                 25

15        Approve the location of the new multi-purpose community hub building in Northcote town centre                                                                 157

16        Te Kete Rukuruku programme - adoption of te reo Māori names, addition of five sites for naming in tranche one and installation of bilingual signs at Shepherds Park                 197

17        Kaipātiki Local Grants, Transitional Rates Grants, and Multiboard Grants Round One 2021/2022 grant allocations                             207

18        Draft Business Improvement District Policy (2021) Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi                                                                            377

19        Tāmaki Tauawhi Kaumātua - Age-friendly Auckland Action Plan                                       427

20        Public feedback on proposal to make a new Public Trading, Events and Filming Bylaw 2022                                                                            483

21        Public feedback on proposal to amend the Animal Management Bylaw 2015                    547

22        Public feedback on proposal to amend the Water Supply and Wastewater Network Bylaw 2015                                                                    617

23        Local board feedback on the kerbside refuse charging mechanism policy                            635

24        Kaipātiki Local Board feedback on the Three Waters Reform proposal                                  653

25        Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson's Report 671

26        Members' Reports                                            673

27        Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board Members' Update                 675

28        Governance Forward Work Calendar             677

29        Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board - August 2021                                                       683

30        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome / Karakia

 

Text

Description automatically generated

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the Code) requires elected members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy.  The policy covers two classes of conflict of interest:

i)        A financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member; and

ii)       A non-financial conflict of interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component.  It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968.  The guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail, and provide elected members with practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of interest.

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request. 

Any questions relating to the Code or the guidelines may be directed to the Local Area Manager in the first instance.

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 18 August 2021, as true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.


 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Kaipātiki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

Under Standing Order 2.5.1 (LBS 3.11.1) a Notice of Motion has been received from Member Paula Gillon for consideration under item 12.

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 September 2021

 

 

Notice of Motion - Managed Isolation and Quarantine (MIQ) Facilities

File No.: CP2021/13482

 

  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       Member Paula Gillon has given notice of motion that they wish to propose.

2.       The notice has been signed by Member Paula Gillon and Deputy Chairperson Danielle Grant as seconder.

3.       Supporting information is appended in Attachment A.

 

Motion

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      request that Auckland Council advocate to the New Zealand Government to move Managed Isolation and Quarantine Facilities out of the Auckland Region.

b)      request that the resolution and Notice of Motion is circulated to the Governing Body and all Local Boards.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

15 September 2021 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Notice of Motion MIQ Facilities

9

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 September 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 September 2021

 

 

Changes to the Kaipātiki Local Board 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services work programme

File No.: CP2021/13211

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of changes to the Kaipātiki Local Board 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Kaipātiki Local Board approved the 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services work programme on 16 June 2021 (resolution number KT/2021/86).

3.       As projects progress through the design and delivery process the specific work required and the cost of delivery can change, impacting the approved budget. As a result, variations may be required to the work programme to accommodate updated timeframes and final costs for some projects. 

4.       Staff have identified changes required to the approved work programme to ensure delivery of approved projects:

i)     Two new projects are recommended to be added to the work programme in financial year 2021/2022:

·    Beach Haven Sports Centre - renew roof fan and flooring. The roof fan is in very poor condition. The timber floor on the ground level has rotten and become very spongy in some places. The project requires Asset Based Services (ABS): Capex - Renewals budget of $30,000 in 2021/2022.

·    Shepherds Park – renew sports field lighting. Staff have identified the need to renew the sports field lightings with LED fittings. The project requires Asset Based Services (ABS): Capex - Renewals budget of $30,000 in 2021/2022.

ii)    Birkdale Community Hall - rebuild facility (ID17516) has been identified for budget variation. This is due to the cost of community engagement being less than the approved budget. The excess budget of $30,000 from this project can be reallocated to the proposed roof fan renewal and flooring investigation project at the Beach Haven Sports Centre in 2021/2022.      

iii)   McFetridge Park - renew sports field lighting (ID30672) has been identified for cancellation. This renewal was delivered in the previous financial year as part of the Kaipātiki minor sports field asset renewals project (ID28811). Staff recommend cancelling this project and reallocating the budget of $30,000 in 2021/2022 and the approved in principle budget in 2023-2024 to the proposed renewal of sports field lighting at Shepherds Park.

iv)   Four projects are proposed to be included in the Risk Adjusted Programme to enable early delivery in 2021/2022:

·     Spinella Reserve - renew playspace (ID27806)

·     Stanaway Reserve - renew playspace (ID27795)

·     Totaravale Reserve - upgrade playground and park amenities (ID23819)

·     Shepherds Park - renew sports field lighting (new project)

v)    Community Houses - investigate and deliver renewal work needed at all community houses (ID 30142) has been identified for a minor name change to reflect changes in the scope for this project. The new proposed name for the project is ‘Community Houses - investigate renewal work needed at all community houses and deliver minor capex works’. The name change has no budget or delivery implications.

5.       The proposed variations are within the local board 2021/2022 financial year budget envelope and will not substantially impact the approved projects or the overall work programme.

6.       Staff recommend that the Kaipātiki Local Board approve the variations to the 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services work programme.

7.       Subject to local board’s decision, staff will update the work programme and progress updates will be provided to the local board as part of the quarterly reports.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the inclusion of two new projects in the 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services work programme:

i)       Beach Haven Sports Centre - renew roof fan and flooring, Asset Based Services (ABS): Capex - Renewals budget of $30,000 is required in 2021/2022.

ii)       Shepherds Park - renew sports field lighting, Asset Based Services (ABS): Capex - Renewals budget of $30,000 is required in 2021/2022.

b)      approve the reallocation of $30,000 of Asset Based Services (ABS): Capex - Renewals from Birkdale Community Hall - rebuild facility project (ID17516) to the Beach Haven Sports Centre - renew roof fan and flooring in financial year 2021/2022.

c)       approve the cancellation of the McFetridge Park - renew sports field lighting project (ID30672).

d)      approve the reallocation of $30,000 in 2021/2022 and the approved in principle budget of $20,000 in 2022/2023 and $80,000 in 2023/2024 of Asset Based Services (ABS): Capex - Renewals from McFetridge Park - renew sports field lighting (ID30672) to the Shepherds Park - renew sports field lighting project.

e)      approve the inclusion of four projects in the Risk Adjusted Programme in the 2021-2024 work programme:

i)       Spinella Reserve - renew playspace (ID27806)

ii)       Stanaway Reserve - renew playspace (ID27795)

iii)      Totaravale Reserve - upgrade playground and park amenities (ID23819)

iv)      Shepherds Park - renew sports field lighting (new project)

f)       approve the minor project name change for project ID 30142 from ‘Community Houses - investigate and deliver renewal work needed at all community houses’ to ‘Community Houses - investigate renewal work needed at all community houses and deliver minor capex works’.

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Kaipātiki Local Board approved the Customer and Community Services work programme for financial year 2021/2022 on 16 June 2021. The local board also approved the financial years 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programmes in principle (resolution number KT/2021/86).

9.       The budget allocated for all projects in the work programme are best estimates and are subject to change and refinements. As a project progresses, the specific work required, and the cost of delivery could either exceed the original estimated budget or the anticipated delivery cost could be less than the approved budget. As a result, variations maybe required to the work programme to accommodate final project costs.

10.     The delivery timeline of a project may change following the completion of the investigation and design phase. This may also require a variation to the programme.

11.     Staff have identified required changes to the approved work programme to ensure delivery of approved projects and to maintain condition of assets. The proposed variations are outlined within this report.

New projects 

12.     Staff have identified two new projects to be added to the work programme in financial year 2021/2022:

·     Beach Haven Sports Centre - renew roof fan and flooring. The project will deliver urgent renewals works required to keep the building safe and operative. The comprehensive renewal of this facility has been identified for delivery in future years. 

·     Shepherds Park - renewal sports field lighting. The renewal of lighting to LED fittings will support the potential to host competitive night games at the park.

Budget variation 

13.     Staff have identified one project (Birkdale Community Hall – rebuild facility ID17516) where the cost for community engagement is less than the approved budget in financial year 2021/2022. The excess funding is available for reallocation. Additional funding will be added to Birkdale Hall rebuild in later years to maintain the overall project budget.      

14.     Another project in the work programme (McFetridge Park – renew sports field lighting ID30672) was delivered in the last financial year as part of the Kaipātiki minor sports field asset renewals project (ID28811). The entire funding from this project is also available for reallocation. 

Project name change

15.     Staff are proposing to change the name of an approved project from Community Houses - investigate and deliver renewal work needed at all community houses (ID30142), to Community Houses - investigate renewal work needed at all community houses and deliver minor capex works. This is required to reflect the expanded scope of work for the project.

Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP)

16.     Four projects have been identified for inclusion in the Risk Adjusted Programme to enable potential delivery in financial year 2021/2022.

·     Spinella Reserve - renew playspace (ID27806)

·     Stanaway Reserve - renew playspace (ID27795)

·     Totaravale Reserve - upgrade playground and park amenities (ID23819)

·     Shepherds Park - sports field lighting renewal (new project).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

17.     Staff recommend variations to the 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services work programme for financial year 2021/2022 as shown in Attachment A and outlined in Table 1 below:

Table 1: Variation to the work programme for financial year 2021/2022

Project ID

Project Name

Variations 2021/2022

Description

17516

Birkdale Community Hall - rebuild facility

Approved ABS: Capex renewal budget in 2021/2022: $50,000

Revised ABS: Capex renewal budget in 2021/2022: $20,000

 

Staff have determined the cost for community consultation to be less than the approved $50,000 budget in 2021/2022.

It is recommended that $30,000 is reallocated to the proposed renewal of the roof fan and flooring investigation at the Beach Haven Sports Centre.

New project

Beach Haven Sports Centre - renew roof fan and flooring

New project

ABS: Capex renewal budget required in 2021/2022: $30,000

The existing fan at the sports centre roof is in very poor condition and needs to be renewed. The timber floor on the ground floor passage leading to the squash courts is rotten and has become very spongy in places. 

The proposal is to create a project and use the excess budget of $30,000 from the Birkdale Community Hall - rebuild facility project to renew the roof fan and investigate the underfloor to establish the amount of work needed.  

Funding for physical works will be included in the future work programme as part of work programme development.

30672

McFetridge Park - renew sports field lighting

Cancel the project

Approved ABS: Capex renewal budget in 2021/2022: $30,000

2022/2023 $20,000

2023/2024 $80,000

The McFetridge Park sports lighting renewal was completed in the last financial year as part of the Kaipātiki minor sports field asset renewals project (ID28811).

The $30,000 budget for 2021/2022 is no longer required. Additionally, the budget for 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 is also available for reallocation.

The proposal is to cancel the McFetridge Park project and transfer the approved budget for 2021/2022 and the approved in principle budget for 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 to the propose Shepherds Park - renew sports field lighting project. 

New project

Shepherds Park - renew sports field lighting

New project

ABS: Capex renewal budget required in 2021/2022: $30,000

2022/2023 $20,000

2023/2024 $80,000

Staff have identified the need to renew the sports field lighting at Shepherds Park. The renewal to a higher standard level could facilitate competitive night games at the park.

It is recommended that the budget approved in 2021/2022 and approved in principle for future years for the McFetridge Park - renew sports field lighting be reallocated to this new project.

The proposed new project is recommended for inclusion in the Risk Adjusted Programme to enable early delivery.    

30142

Community Houses - investigate and deliver renewal work needed at all community houses

Propose name change: Community Houses - investigate renewal work needed at all community houses and deliver minor capex works

 

Staff have identified the need to widen the scope of the project to include the delivery of some minor capex works.

The name change has no budget or delivery implications.

27806

 

 

Spinella Reserve - renew playspace

 

 

 

Add the project to the Risk Adjusted Programme

The project has been identified for inclusion in the Risk Adjusted Programme to enable early delivery.

27795

 

Stanaway Reserve - renew playspace

Add the project to the Risk Adjusted Programme

The project has been identified for inclusion in the Risk Adjusted Programme to enable early delivery.

23819

Totaravale Reserve - playground and park amenities upgrade

Add the project to the Risk Adjusted Programme

The project has been identified for inclusion in the Risk Adjusted Programme to enable early delivery.

 

18.     The proposed variations are within the local board’s financial year 2021/2022 budget envelope and will not substantially impact the approved projects or the overall work programme.

19.     Staff recommend that the Kaipātiki Local Board approve the proposed variations to the 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services work programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     In June 2019, council declared a climate emergency and in response to this, council adopted the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan in July 2020.

21.     Each activity in the work programme is assessed to identify whether it will have a positive, negative, or neutral impact on greenhouse gas emissions and impact on resilience to climate change.

22.     The propose new projects and budget variations have no direct effect on climate change.  Each project will be considered individually to assess the impacts of climate change and the appropriate approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The sorts of impacts to be considered include:

·     maximum upcycling and recycling of old material 

·     installation of energy efficiency measures

·     building design to ensure the maximum lifetime and efficiency of the building is obtained 

·     lifecycle impacts of construction materials (embodied emissions) 

·     exposure of building location to climate change hazards (sea level rise, flooding (floodplains), drought, heat island effect)

·     anticipated increase in carbon emissions from construction, including contractor emissions

·     lifecycle impacts of construction materials.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     The decision sought for this report has no direct impact on other parts of the council group. The overall 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in an integrated team.

24.     Collaboration with staff will be ongoing throughout the life of the projects to ensure integration into the operational maintenance and asset management systems.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     Community facilities and open spaces provide important community services to the people of the local board area. They contribute to building strong, healthy and vibrant communities by providing spaces where Aucklanders can participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art and recreational activities. These activities improve lifestyles and a sense of belonging and pride amongst residents.

26.     The activities in the work programme align with the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes:

Outcome  

Objective  

Outcome 3: Places and spaces 

Our built environment is high quality, vibrant, well-maintained, reflects the culture and heritage of Kaipātiki, and meets our people’s needs.

Outcome 4: Transport and connections

Our people have many transport options and can easily and safely move around and find their way.

27.     Some of the proposed variations as detailed in this report were provided for the local board’s consideration in a memorandum and discussed at a workshop in August 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     Consideration is given to how the provision of services, facilities and open spaces can support the aspirations of Māori, promote community relationships, connect to the natural environment, and foster holistic wellbeing of whānau, hapu and iwi Māori.

29.     The approved work programme includes activities that will have an impact on a service, facility, location of significance to Māori. In these situations, appropriate and meaningful engagement and consultation will be undertaken, including to meet our obligations under Te Tiriti o Waitangi – Treaty of Waitangi.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     The proposed variations are within the local board’s budget envelopes for each year and will not substantially impact the approved projects or the overall work programme.

31.     The proposed budget changes can be achieved by realignment of budget within the work programme as outlined in Table 2 below:

Table 2: Variations required for financial year 2021/2022

Project ID

Project Name

Approved ABS: Capex renewal budget 2021/2022

Budget Variation

Revised ABS: Capex renewal budget 2021/2022

17516

Birkdale Community Hall - rebuild facility

$50,000

$30,000 (decrease)

$20,000

New project

Beach Haven Sports Centre - renew roof fan and flooring

$0

$30,000 (addition)

$30,000

30672

McFetridge Park - renew sports field lighting

$30,000

$30,000 (decrease)

$0

New project

Shepherds Park - renew sports field lighting

$0

$30,000 (addition)

$30,000

 

32.     The recommended changes in this report have been agreed with the local board’s Lead Financial Advisor.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     The COVID-19 pandemic could have a further negative impact on the delivery of the work programme if the COVID-19 alert level changes. 

34.     If the proposed variations to the work programme are not approved, there is a risk that the projects identified may not be delivered within financial year 2021/2022.

35.     If assets are not renewed in a timely way, they may deteriorate further and need to be closed or removed. Staff will continue to monitor the condition of the assets and consider action to be taken in the future.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.     Subject to local board’s decision, the Kaipātiki Local Board 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services work programme will be amended to reflect the decision.

37.     Progress and updates on the work programme will be reported to the local board as part of the quarterly reports to the local board. 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

15 September 2021 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Proposed amendment to 2021-2024 work programme

21

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Roma Leota - Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Riya Seth - Elected Member Advice Specialist

Julie Pickering - Area Manager Operational Management & Maintenance

Taryn Crewe - Acting General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

15 September 2021

 

 

Attachment A – Proposed amendments to 2021 - 2024 Community Facilities work programme

Birkdale Community Hall - rebuild facility ID17516. Budget variation to work programme line for approval.

 

Activity Name

Activity Description

Activity Benefits

Further Decision Points for LB

LB Plan Outcomes

Lead Dept/Unit or CCO

Estimate completion date

Budget Source

FY2020/2021 or prior budget

FY2021/2022

FY2022/2023

FY2023/2024

FY2024/2025+

Total Cost

Birkdale Community Hall - rebuild facility

Rebuild Birkdale Community Hall facility to ensure the design is fit for purpose and future proofed for community requirements.

FY17/18 and FY21/22 - investigation and design

FY23/24 and FY24/25 - physical works

Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) project

This activity

contributes to the ‘Five Ways to

Wellbeing’ action: Be

active

Improved service

levels for the local

community users.

Concept design to be approved by the local board

Places and

Spaces – Our

built environment is

high quality, vibrant, well-maintained,

reflects the

culture and

heritage of

Kaipātiki, and

meets our

people's needs

CF: Project Delivery

Estimated project completion date June 2025

ABS: Capex Local Renewal

$124,040

$50,000

 

$20,000

$100,000

$500,000

 

 

$800,000

$1,544,040

 

McFetridge Park - renew sports field lightings ID30672. Cancellation of work programme line for approval.

 

Activity Name

Activity Description

Activity Benefits

Further Decision Points for LB

LB Plan Outcomes

Lead Dept/Unit or CCO

Estimate completion date

Budget Source

FY2020/2021 or prior budget

FY2021/2022

FY2022/2023

FY2023/2024

FY2024/2025+

Total Cost

McFetridge Park - renew sports field lightings

Renew sportsfield lighting at McFetridge Park, upgrade upper fitting to LED, add poles to the central area beside cricket wicket, add new controller to manage field usage.

FY21/22 - investigation and design

FY22/23 - FY23/24 physical works

Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) project

This activity

contributes to the ‘Five Ways to

Wellbeing’ action: Be

active

Maintaining current

Services.

No further decisions are anticipated

Places and

Spaces – Our

built environment is

high quality, vibrant, well-maintained,

reflects the

culture and

heritage of

Kaipātiki, and

meets our

people's needs

CF: Project Delivery

Estimated project completion date June 2025

ABS: Capex Local Renewal

$0

$30,000

 

$0

$20,000

 

$0

$80,000

$0

$0

$130,000

 

$0

 


 

Community Houses - investigate renewal work needed at all community houses ID30142. Name change of work programme line for approval.

 

Activity Name

Activity Description

Activity Benefits

Further Decision Points for LB

LB Plan Outcomes

Lead Dept/Unit or CCO

Estimate completion date

Budget Source

FY2020/2021 or prior budget

FY2021/2022

FY2022/2023

FY2023/2024

FY2024/2025+

Total Cost

Community Houses - investigate and deliver renewal work needed at all

community houses

 

Community Houses - investigate renewal work needed at all community houses and deliver minor capex works

Investigate renewal work needed at all Community Houses in Kaipātiki e.g.

Bayview Community Centre,

Beach Haven Community House, Birkdale Community House and Highbury Community House.

FY21/22 - investigation and design

FY22/23 - FY23/24 - physical works

Proposed RAP project

This activity contributes to the ‘Five Ways to Wellbeing’ action: Connect Maintain current service levels

Workshop concept design options with local board to seek direction.

Places and

Spaces – Our

built environment is

high quality, vibrant, well-maintained,

reflects the

culture and

heritage of

Kaipātiki, and

meets our

people's needs

CF: Project Delivery

Estimated project completion date June 2024

ABS: Capex Local Renewal

$0

$80,000

$130,000

$500,000

$0

$710,000

 

New Projects – For addition in 2021-2024 work programme

 

Activity Name

Activity Description

Activity Benefits

Further Decision Points for LB

LB Plan Outcomes

Lead Dept/Unit or CCO

Estimate completion date

Budget Source

FY2020/2021 or prior budget

FY2021/2022

FY2022/2023

FY2023/2024

FY2024/2025+

Total Cost

Beach Haven Sports Centre - renew roof fan and flooring

Renew the roof fan and investigate the underfloor to assess the work needed.

FY21/22 - investigation and design

FY22/23 - physical works

 

 

This activity

contributes to the ‘Five Ways to

Wellbeing’ action: Be

active

Maintaining current

Services.

No further decisions are anticipated

Places and

Spaces – Our

built environment is

high quality, vibrant, well-maintained,

reflects the

culture and

heritage of

Kaipātiki, and

meets our

people's needs

CF: Project Delivery

Estimated project completion date June 2024

ABS: Capex Local Renewal

$0

$30,000

$0

$0

$0

$30,000

Shepherds Park - renew sports field lighting

Renew sports field lighting at Shepherds Park with LED lighting.

FY21/22 - investigation and design

FY22/23 - physical works

Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) project

 

This activity

contributes to the ‘Five Ways to

Wellbeing’ action: Be

active

Maintaining current

Services.

No further decisions are anticipated

Places and

Spaces – Our

built environment is

high quality, vibrant, well-maintained,

reflects the

culture and

heritage of

Kaipātiki, and

meets our

people's needs

CF: Project Delivery

Estimated project completion date June 2024

ABS: Capex Local Renewal

$0

$30,000

$20,000

$80,000

$0

$130,000

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 September 2021

 

 

Northcote Community Needs Assessment Research Report

File No.: CP2021/13787

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

To receive the Unlock Northcote - Town Centre Redevelopment Programme, Community Needs Assessment Research Report (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The community needs assessment is in support of Eke Panuku’s Unlock Northcote - Town Centre Redevelopment Programme success criteria to provide a new multi-purpose community hub building.

3.       The needs assessment took a mixed methods approach which included desk top research, in-depth interviews and focus groups with key stakeholders, informal intercept / engagement interviews with members of the public, a public survey provided in Mandarin, English and Traditional Chinese, and a special project with Northcote Intermediate School youth. This approach ensured input was received from participants representative of the catchment demographic.

4.       The need for council community services is expected to increase as more housing is developed around the town centre of Northcote. Although current community service provision levels are generally meeting the needs of Northcote residents, there is an opportunity to realise value from integrated service provision and flexibility for customer responsiveness from non-asset-based service approaches.

5.       Based on the attached research and to respond to the findings from community engagement, staff recommend that:

·     further investigation is undertaken with older (non-Asian) people, Māori and Pasifika residents to gain further insights into how best to fill the current gaps in service provision

·     the multi-purpose community hub provides a walk-in information service with navigation support to address customers’ immediate community service needs

·     current information and community service providers share operating space in the new multi-purpose community hub to deliver innovative, comprehensive and ‘non-asset-based’ services

·     the new multi-purpose community hub offers the following services and spaces:

−    low impact group fitness / wellbeing classes (e.g. yoga, tai chi)

−    eco-learning activities, including access to gardens or other green space

−    indoor-outdoor-flow from the building to an outdoor public open space

−    a foyer with comfortable seating that encourages informal social interaction

−    a large flexible space that can accommodate 100 people for performances

−    computer services / technology space

−    a casual, drop-in social activity space for older people (mornings and early afternoon) and for youth outside school hours.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the Unlock Northcote - Town Centre Redevelopment Programme, Community Needs Assessment Research Report (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report).

b)      note that the local board have decision-making responsibility for the specific location, design, build, and fit-out of new local community facilities within budget parameters agreed with the Governing Body.    

Horopaki

Context

6.       In association with the Unlock Northcote - Town Centre Redevelopment Programme, the community needs assessment is an item on the Kaipātiki Local Board 2020/2021 work programme (resolution number KT/2019/41). 

7.       There are three main drivers for this work:

·     Eke Panuku’s Unlock Northcote - Town Centre Redevelopment Programme which identifies a new multi-purpose community hub building as critical to the successful redevelopment of Northcote Town Centre.

·     The Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan (2019) priority action #60 to ‘Investigate need and demand for library, community, arts and culture services in Northcote recognising current providers and anticipated growth.’

·     The Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2020 statement in Outcome three, Places and Spaces ‘… access to relevant community services are delivered from high-quality, fit-for-purpose facilities that meet the growing needs of Northcote and draws people to the town centre.’

The methodology and approach

8.       Versity Limited were engaged as a contractor for components of the needs assessment to ensure a safe environment for the stakeholders being interviewed, and to provide an independent research perspective.

9.       The needs assessment took a mixed-methods approach to ensure input was received from participants representative of the catchment demographic (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report), including:

·     desktop review of relevant plans, policies and secondary data sources

·     analysis of demographics, population projections and growth forecasts to create a profile of the community

·     in-depth interviews and focus groups with 41 key stakeholder individuals representing 26 organisations

·     informal intercept / engagement interviews with members of the public at various locations in Northcote Town Centre and at local events

·     a public survey available in English, Mandarin and Traditional Chinese (both in hard copy and online) – 718 completed responses were received 

·     a special project with 90 students from the Northcote Intermediate School.

The purpose

10.     The community needs assessment sought to understand:

·     the current and future community service provision needs of the Northcote community

·     how these needs are being responded to by council and other providers

·     ways to improve the delivery of future community services as part of the Northcote town centre redevelopment.

11.     The purpose of this research is to identify high-level recommendations for the optimal delivery of community services, in contribution to Eke Panuku’s Unlock Northcote - Town Centre Redevelopment Programme.  

The community facilities in scope

12.     The community facilities in scope for this research are the Norman King Building, the Northcote Library / Mitchell Building and the Northcote Community Hall.  These facilities are located on the north-east side of the Northcote Town Centre between Lake Road, College Road and Cadness Street.

13.     The Norman King Building is a two-story council facility approximately 979m2 in size that is leased to the following occupants:

·     Hearts & Minds NZ Inc a community development / social service agency focused on community wellbeing who occupy the top floor and sublease space to The Fono, a Pasifka health and social service agency

·     NorthArt who occupy approximately 625m2 of the ground floor and have five gallery spaces for exhibitions by emerging and established, local and national artists

·     Laundry Express, a laundromat occupying part of the ground floor under a commercial lease with council.

14.     The Northcote Library / Mitchell Building is one level and approximately 711m2. The annex to the Mitchell Building provides public toilets, a Plunket clinic room and office space for the Northcote Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB).

15.     The Northcote Community Hall is a venue for hire facility, owned by Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust (KCFT), with a ground lease from council.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Northcote will continue to have a high Asian and NZ European population

16.     For the purposes of the community needs assessment investigation, the Northcote catchment study area is defined as the following NZ Census 2018 Statistical Area units of Northcote Tuff Crater, Northcote Point, Northcote South, Northcote Central, Hillcrest East, Hillcrest North, and Akoranga.

17.     Based on NZ Census 2018 data, the population in the Northcote catchment study area is around 18,789 with a somewhat higher representation of NZ European and Asian ethnicities and fewer Māori and Pasifika by comparison to Auckland overall.

18.     Approximately 43 per cent of Northcote residents in the study catchment area were born overseas with one quarter of these born in an Asian country. There are a slightly higher number of people age 65 or older in the Northcote catchment study area compared to proportionally in the Auckland region.

 

Northcote catchment

study area % of population

Auckland region % of population

Age group

 

 

0 – 14

17%

20%

15 – 39

24%

23%

40 – 64

44%

45%

65 +

15%

12%

Ethnicity

 

 

NZ European

58%

54%

Māori

8%

12%

Pasifika

6%

16%

Asian

33%

28%

* note that % represents ability to choose more than one ethnicity in census data source

19.     Many Northcote locals are well educated and work as a professional (31 per cent) or a manager (19 per cent) with 22 per cent of people earning more than $70,000 per year compared to the 20 per cent in the Auckland region.

20.     From census data, demographic trends forecast to 2038 across the Northcote catchment study area predict:

·     There will be a nine per cent increase in the Asian population in Northcote, which is higher than the Auckland average of seven per cent projected increase.

·     Over the next twenty years, the percentage of Pakeha population in the Northcote catchment study area will decrease by seven per cent, compared to a decrease of six per cent in Pakeha population in the Auckland region’s overall population.

·     The highest sub-ethnicity increase over the next twenty years is expected to be Chinese at four per cent.

·     Young families and older people will become the highest represented age groups in the community, which reflects similar trends in age groups in the Auckland region over the next twenty years.

 

Growth forecasts for the catchment study area are higher than for Auckland overall

21.     Population growth in the Northcote catchment study area is anticipated to increase by approximately 20 per cent from 2021 to 2051, bringing the total predicted population to approximately 22,546. This growth projection is 20 per cent lower than the Auckland average over the same period and much higher than the overall Kaipātiki Local Board area:

22.    

23.     which is expected to increase by eight per cent.

 

 

 

 

 

Chart, waterfall chart

Description automatically generated
 


24.     The map of the Northcote catchment study area below shows where high population growth is expected;

Northcote study catchment area population growth and distribution 2021 - 2051 

Population will increase significantly as housing increases in the area

25.     The demographic predictions and population growth forecasts do not include the planned housing developments in the immediate area by Kāinga Ora. The predictions also do not consider additional homes which could be accommodated in the town centre development or expected private sector response to Northcote’s urban renewal.

26.     Kāinga Ora’s plan in the Northcote area is to replace 310 existing housing units with approximately 1,600 new homes by 2025. These homes will consist of mixed housing types and ownership models.

27.     Housing developments, both public and private, are anticipated to increase the central Northcote area from 3,000 houses to around 7,700. 

28.     As a result of the increase of housing, the Northcote population is expected to increase more than what is forecasted through the latest NZ Census demographic data. 

There is a need to provide community services differently 

29.     The current provision of community services in Northcote is fragmented, with providers operating from a number of single-purpose spaces in the town centre. These spaces are in council-owned buildings and/or land that will be utilised for the new town centre. 

30.     Plans for the redevelopment of the Northcote Town Centre, which include removing the Norman King Building and providing a new multi-purpose community hub building, have been in place since 2016.  

31.     As identified in the public communication for the Long-term Plan 10-year Budget 2021 -2031, council’s historical asset-based investment practice for the delivery of community services is no longer sustainable.

Key findings from community engagement   

32.     As presented to the local board in workshops on 28 April 2021 and on 25 August 2021, eight key findings have been identified from the community needs assessment research:

Reference  #

Key finding description 

1

There are mixed views on how well the current Northcote community services are meeting community needs. 

2

Northcote has a strong community service / not-for-profit provider network, with evidence of some effective collaborations in place.

3

The Northcote Library is the most widely known and highly thought of community service and is acting as a multi-purpose community hub.

4

There are gaps in community services for youth, older people, Māori and Pasifika in Northcote.

5

The new community hub building’s success is seen to be dependent on its accessibility and relevance to other town centre amenities (such as shops and food outlets).

6

People are more likely to participate in indoor recreation activities, and classes or programmes to learn something new, than to use social support services in Northcote.

7

It is important that the town centre and the new community hub building promote inclusion and reflect the cultural and ethnic diversity of Northcote.

8

The following spaces were identified as priorities for the new community hub building:

•     a drop-in space for youth and older people

•     recreation space for group activities 

•     a large hall with a stage for performances (e.g. holding up to 100 people)

•     a computer services / technology space.

Recommendations for improved (future) community services delivery    

33.     Based on the research and to respond to the findings from the community engagement, the following are suggested recommendations regarding optimal council provision of future community services within Northcote:

·    Recommendation A: Further investigate the need of older (non-Asian) people, Māori and Pasifika residents to gain further insights into how best to fill the current gaps in service provision to ensure these gaps don’t continue in the future when the Northcote town centre is redeveloped.

·    Recommendation B: In addition to the provision of library services, a core function of the multi-purpose community hub building is to provide a walk-in comprehensive information service with navigation support to address a customer’s immediate community services need.

·    Recommendation C: Current information and community social service providers share operating space and align for innovative, comprehensive and ‘non-asset-based’ customer service delivery.

·    Recommendation D: In conjunction with the provision of library services, the focus of the hub’s design and function be around the following priorities (identified through the community needs engagement):

−    low impact group fitness / wellbeing classes (e.g. yoga, tai chi)

−    eco-learning activities, including access to gardens or other green space

−    indoor-outdoor-flow from the building to an outdoor public open space

−    a foyer with comfortable seating that encourages informal social interaction

−    a large flexible space that can accommodate 100 people for performances

−    a computer services / technology space

−    a casual, drop-in social activity space for older people (mornings and early afternoon) and for youth outside school hours.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

34.     This research report has no climate impact, but the findings are intended to inform the design and development of a proposed new multi-purpose community hub building that will increase greenhouse gas emissions. The new hub building however will replace the aging energy-inefficient Norman King Building currently used for distinctly separate purposes. The new hub has potential to minimise long-term climate impact through innovative energy efficient design features.

35.     Climate impacts will be assessed in any future work that may arise as a result of further investigations in alignment with council’s Climate Action Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.     The community needs assessment research and analysis required input and specialist advice across the council family including Eke Panuku; Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships; Connected Communities; Community Facilities; Heritage; Financial and Business Performance; and Local Board Services.

37.     It is expected that representatives from Eke Panuku and the same council departments will contribute to the next phase of the multi-purpose community hub project.  

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Lessees of council’s current facilities will be impacted

38.     The redevelopment of the Northcote Town Centre offers an opportunity for improved, joined-up information and support services provided by community organisations which are currently fragmented and difficult for customers to navigate. 

39.     Approved by the local board and as part of Eke Panuku’s Northcote Town Centre Benchmark Masterplan 2019, the Norman King Building and the annex to the Mitchell Building will be removed to enable redevelopment outcomes and improvements to the town centre. 

40.     This means the following lessees of these buildings who are currently providing not-for-profit community services will be displaced:

·     Hearts & Minds NZ Incorporated

·     NorthArt

·     Citizens Advice Bureau

·     Plunket.  

Shared operating space in hub offered to current lessees of council’s facilities

41.     Based on the findings from the community needs assessment research, it is important to retain the current arts and culture and community services currently located in council’s facilities in the new redeveloped town centre. 

42.     As such, shared operating space will be made available in the new multi-purpose community hub building, for each of the four organisations currently leasing council facilities who will be displaced through the town centre development.

43.     Replacement of the current operating space for these organisations in the new hub facility (e.g. comparable square meterage of what they currently lease) is unlikely due to budgetary limitations.

44.     Per the local board’s endorsement at the April 2021 workshop, staff met with the Citizens Advice Bureau, Hearts & Minds and NorthArt to inform them of the community needs assessment research preliminary findings and to start discussions regarding future operating space in the new hub.  

NorthArt requests comparable gallery space in the redeveloped town centre

45.     Per council’s future provision strategy outlined in the Community Facilities Network Plan (CFNP) the new multi-purpose community hub building will provide space for local community arts activity (such as community drama, dance, art classes and presentations) and a space for an arts and culture service provider to operate from.

46.     Staff have had two face-to-face meetings with NorthArt’s board of trustees and staff to discuss future options. The options include leasing commercial space (at their own cost) in the town centre where NorthArt’s special requirements for art gallery space can be incorporated into the brief to developers, and/or being the provider of local community arts and culture activities / services from the new hub (as outlined in council’s CFNP).

Ensuring continued community services for Northcote residents

47.     Council and Eke Panuku staff will continue to work with organisations displaced during construction of the new town centre, to ensure there is continued community services provision until relocation in the new multi-purpose community hub facility. 

48.     Opportunities will be available for displaced organisations who plan on relocating into the new hub and key stakeholders to contribute towards the design and layout of the new facility (refer Next Steps section).    

Local board views 

49.     Three workshops were held with Kaipātiki Local Board to discuss the scope and engagement plan for this project in August 2019, March 2020, and November 2020.

50.     The emerging key findings from the community needs assessment were presented to the local board at workshops in April 2021, July 2021 and August 2021. These workshops were conducted in collaboration with Eke Panuku staff who reported on the options analysis in determining a recommended location for the new multi-purpose community hub building. 

51.     At the 28 July 2021 local board workshop, a request was made for assurance that the views of residents in the Kāinga Ora housing developments were included in the community needs assessment research. Although many respondents to the public survey would be residents in Kāinga Ora’s housing developments, this cannot be verified. Staff suggested that a focus group of Kāinga Ora residents could be considered in the next phase of this project.

52.     At the 25 August 2021 local board workshop, a concern was raised regarding two census area units used in the community needs assessment research. Staff have responded to this feedback by removing the census area units of Westlake and Takapuna West and rerunning the data so that the community profile demographic information of the community needs assessment research incorporates this modification. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

53.     Community and library services contribute to outcomes under three directions in the Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau (2017). The plan, published by the Independent Māori Statutory Board, provides a framework and the following directions for council to implement desired cultural, economic, environmental, and social outcomes for Māori:

·    Direction – Whanaungatanga: social outcome, Māori communities are connected and safe; action, wellbeing of tamariki through provision of facilities and services such as libraries, community centres, swimming pools

·    Direction – Manaakitanga: social outcome, Māori enjoy a high quality of life

·    Direction – Wairuatanga: social outcome, Māori social institutions and networks thrive

54.     The Kaipātiki Local Board area has a Māori population of approximately 8.7 per cent compared to 11.5 per cent for the Auckland region.

55.     Eke Panuku has been working in partnership with mana whenua from the outset of the Unlock Northcote Programme. The principles underpinning the masterplan comprise of celebrating Māori communities, with Te Aranga values and principles embedded through the design process and engagement for the town centre redevelopment.

56.     Eke Panuku and council will continue to work with mana whenua throughout the delivery of the new multi-purpose community hub to ensure that the project produces outcomes that better reflect local Māori and the cultural narrative that exists for Northcote.

57.     In the Northcote catchment study area, the Māori population is approximately seven per cent. The ethnic breakdown of respondents to this project’s public survey shows three per cent of respondents were Māori. Due to this lack of representation, staff undertook qualitative engagement practices to identify the future community service needs of Māori in Northcote building on relationships from the Eke Panuku Kaitiaki Working Group. This work will continue through the next development phase of the new multi-purpose community hub project to ensure mana whenua concerns and aspirations are acknowledged and integrated into high-level concept design and principles.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

58.     There are no financial implications associated with the recommendation of this report (e.g. to receive the Community Needs Assessment Research Report). 

59.     Funding for the new multi-purpose community hub building of $17.3m has been secured through Eke Panuku’s Long-term Plan budget allocation based on an estimated floor area of 1,500m2.  The detailed business case will confirm spatial requirements and identify any subsequent funding shortfall and options.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

60.     Identified risks, impacts and mitigations associated with the community needs assessment in the context of next steps for this project are outlined in the table below.

Risk

Impact

Mitigation

High - Providers of community services are resistant to the service delivery changes required for operating within the new hub facility

A decline in community services provided for the residents of Northcote

Specialist staff working directly with the current service providers most affected by the town centre redevelopment to support the adaptation and integration of services into the new hub facility so there is no loss in provision to the community

High - Insufficient budget available for development of new multi-purpose community hub facility per the requirements to meet community need

Provision of a facility that doesn’t meet the full needs of the community

Appropriate management through design and delivery with options to mitigate shortfall investigated through detailed business case

Med - Community concern about any change in service delivery and/or public perception of loss of service (understanding what an ‘integrated facility’ is)

Lack of public support for an integrated service model creating a negative public discourse around the new facility

Development of a communications and engagement plan with the local board to support stakeholder, mana whenua and community understanding and engagement

Med - Expectation in the community that the new hub facility can be of a size and type that provides spaces and services to meet each request raised through the public consultation and/or feedback

Public dissatisfaction with the facility that is provided

Clear public communication regarding council’s role in community services provision and the financial restrictions regarding the building of new or through renovating council facilities

 

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

61.     Subject to local board receiving the Northcote Community Needs Assessment Research Report, it will be made available via a link on the council’s Have Your Say website as part of best practice in public engagement communications.

Continue working with the community 

62.     The next phase of the Northcote multi-purpose community hub project can commence once the Community Needs Assessment Research Report is received by the local board. Staff will continue investigation of the community service needs of older (non-Asian) people, Pasifika and Māori who live in Northcote to gain further insights on how to fill the current gaps in service provision and to ensure these gaps don’t continue in the future. 

63.     Staff will continue to meet and discuss options with key stakeholders whose services will be integrated into the new hub to better understand their requirements and to ensure that there is a continuity of community services provision for Northcote residents throughout the town centre redevelopment.

Steps in the next phase of the new multi-purpose community hub project

64.    

As identified with the local board at the 25 August 2021 workshop, the diagram below provides a visual representation of what is expected to be the steps in the next phase of this project. Local board decision points and opportunities for key stakeholders’ input are identified.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

15 September 2021 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Unlock Northcote - Town Centre Redevelopment Programme,   Community Needs Assessment Research Report

35

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kimberly Rees - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 September 2021

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

15 September 2021

 

 

Approve the location of the new multi-purpose community hub building in Northcote town centre

File No.: CP2021/12977

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

To approve the location of the new multi-purpose community hub building as part of the programme of urban renewal for Northcote Town Centre. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The development of a multi-purpose community hub building is a key strategic move of the urban renewal of the Northcote Town Centre.

3.       A proposed location for a multi-purpose community hub building was identified in the 2019 Eke Panuku Northcote Town Centre Benchmark Masterplan. Since 2019, the current library building (Mitchell Building) has been classified with heritage status and a community needs assessment has been undertaken by council’s Customer & Community Services team. Both of these factors led to reassessing the options for the location of the new multi-purpose community hub building.

4.       Following comprehensive options analysis, the option to refurbish the Mitchell Building and build an extension in the area to its north-west has been identified as the optimal location for the new multi-purpose community hub building.

5.       The option to refurbish and extend the Mitchell Building is preferred because:

·     it builds a strong community centre for Northcote, enhanced by the proximity to Cadness Reserve, Te Ara Awataha and Ernie Mays Street (the main and slow traffic street prioritised for pedestrians and part of a key bus route).

·     opportunity for community engagement in the design and refurbishment of the Mitchell Building to create social cohesion and community ownership/pride of a local public facility.

·     community use of the Mitchell Building closely aligns with its heritage status and with the land’s reserve status.

·     constructing a new multi-purpose community hub building in this location, incorporating the re-use of the Mitchell Building, is the lower cost option.

·     a shorter delivery timeframe is expected for this option as next steps can be initiated following location approval.

·     more homes and retail space can be developed in the town centre through this option than the other options considered. 

6.       Following approval of the location for the multi-purpose community hub, the next steps will be to:

·     establish a wider project team

·     engage with key stakeholders and the local board to develop a design brief

·     local board approval of the design brief

·     procure an architect and design team to develop a concept design

·     concept design development

·     local board approval of the concept design.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the location of the new Northcote multi-purpose community hub building to be a refurbishment and extension (to the north-west) of the current Mitchell Building.

Horopaki

Context

Unlock Northcote and a new multi-purpose community hub building

7.       Northcote represents a major urban renewal opportunity for Auckland, and residents have a long-held desire to see the town centre revitalised. Building on a history of planning and initiatives, Northcote was one of a number of town centres selected by council as a priority development (unlock) location in 2015.

8.       Unlock Northcote is focused on the town centre but is integrally linked to Kāinga Ora’s programme to improve and increase housing in the area (approximately 1,600 additional homes by 2025).

9.       Strategic development objectives for Northcote are identified and set out in Eke Panuku’s Unlock Northcote High Level Project Plan 2016 (HLPP), and further distilled through the Unlock Northcote Framework Plan 2016 (Framework Plan).

10.     A process undertaken by Eke Panuku to deliver on the vision, goals, key moves and objectives within the HLPP and Framework Plan concluded that this would be best achieved by the holistic and transformational redevelopment of the town centre.

11.     In 2019, Eke Panuku developed the Northcote Town Centre Benchmark Masterplan 2019 (benchmark masterplan) endorsed by the Kaipātiki Local Board in resolution KT/2019/41. The benchmark masterplan is comprised of three key components:

·     criteria for the town centre’s successful regeneration

·     overarching principles

·     a preliminary spatial plan showing how the principles and criteria could be achieved

Northcote Town Centre Benchmark Masterplan 2019 – preliminary spatial plan

 

12.     The development of a multi-purpose community hub building is identified as one of the ten criteria for success in the benchmark masterplan.

Principles and success criteria for the Northcote Town Centre Benchmark Masterplan 2019

Current community facilities

 

13.     Community services are currently provided across three separate buildings in the eastern part of Northcote’s town centre: the Norman King Building, the Northcote Library and Community Centre (the Mitchell Building), and the Northcote Community Hall.

14.     The benchmark masterplan identifies that the Norman King Building and the annex to the Mitchell Building will be removed to enable redevelopment outcomes and improvements to the town centre. 

15.     The Mitchell Building (designed by David Mitchell, the 2019 Auckland Architecture Award Winner for the Enduring Architecture Category) has heritage status which requires protection of the main part of the building, with its glass frontage and high trusses.  

16.     The future status of the Northcote Community Hall will be negotiated with the building owner, Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust.  

Northcote Town Centre Community Needs Assessment

17.     The proposal to develop a multi-purpose community hub building as part of Unlock Northcote provided the opportunity to assess the current community facilities and services in the town centre.

18.     A community needs assessment was undertaken by council’s Customer & Community Services directorate to understand: 

·     the current and future community service provision needs of the Northcote community

·     how these needs are being responded to by council and other providers

·     ways for improved future community service delivery as part of the Northcote town centre redevelopment.

19.     Preliminary findings from the community needs assessment research have been incorporated into criteria used to assess the potential locations for the new multi-purpose community hub building

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options analysis for the location of the new multi-purpose community hub building

20.     A potential location for the new multi-purpose community hub building (community hub) was noted in the benchmark masterplan’s preliminary spatial plan to be alongside Lake Road. This, however, was prior to the identification of the Mitchell Building having heritage status with a requirement that the framework and aesthetic structure of this building be retained. 

21.     For Eke Panuku to commence negotiations with potential development partners, components of the masterplan need to be determined which includes the location of the new community hub.

22.     Staff of Eke Panuku and council’s Customer & Community Services undertook analysis to review all location options for the new community hub to recommend a preferred location for local board decision-making.

23.     Full details of the analysis are in Attachment A: Northcote Multi-Purpose Community Hub Building: options report.

24.     Criteria for assessing the location options for the new community hub were derived from and/or informed by the following:

·     strategic provision requirements and aspirations in council’s Community Facilities Network Plan

·     preliminary findings of the community needs assessment research

·     components of the benchmark masterplan, particularly the criteria for success of the multi-purpose community hub building

·     financial, deliverability, and opportunity impact considerations.

25.     The identification and analysis of location options was informed by factors including that:

·     the benchmark masterplan spatial component would form the basis for the options

·     the community hub would be located within the Unlock Northcote HLPP area

·     the community hub could be comprised of developing a new facility, or optimising and upgrading existing facilities, or a combination of both

·     the site could fit a building footprint of 2,000-2,250m2 (e.g., an indicative size arising from the community needs assessment research)

26.     The option analysis was iterative and involved a three phased workshop process, as outlined in the following paragraphs.

Location options analysis phase 1: the long list

27.     The initial phase of analysing the options for the new community hub building involved reviewing a total of 17 potential locations.

Phase 1 location options illustrated against the spatial plan of the Northcote Town Centre Benchmark Masterplan

28.     Each of the 17 location options were assessed against nine criteria on a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ basis. Those that were rated as a ‘yes’ for all nine criteria were subject to further review.

29.     Six location options were identified to be further assessed in phase 2.  

Location options analysis phase 2: the short-list

30.     The second phase of the location options analysis comprised of a detailed review of the six potential locations for the new community hub. As numbered on the following map, they are:  

Option 1:    retain existing Mitchell Building and build a new extension to the north-west (65 Pearn Crescent)

Option 2:    retain existing Mitchell Building and expand/develop the hub in the area to the north-east (Cadness Reserve)

Option 3:            construct a new stand-alone hub building in the Whā block on Lake Road

Option 4:            incorporation of the new hub within the mixed-use development of the Toru block

Option 5:    incorporation of the new hub within the larger commercial space (potential supermarket) of Ono block

Option 6:    incorporation of the new hub within a larger mixed-use development of a block encompassing both Whā and Rima on Lake Road.

Phase 2 location options illustrated against the spatial plan of the Northcote Town Centre Benchmark Masterplan

31.     Each of the six location options were assessed against additional and expanded success criteria from the phase 1 assessment and ranked from strongly negative to strongly positive in meeting that criteria. The chart below shows the numerical outcome of this assessment with the best locations ranked with the highest scores.

Criteria and ranking of the six short-listed location options

32.     The phase 2 scores of the six location options were relatively close. However, three higher scoring and better-quality location options were identified and subject to further assessment in phase 3. 

Location options analysis phase 3: detailed review 

33.     The third phase of analysis on the potential location for the new community hub involved undertaking a more detailed review of the top three ranked location options of:

Location Option 1: refurbish Mitchell Building and build a new extension to the north-west

Location Option 2: construct a new stand-alone building in the Whā block on Lake Road

Location Option 3: own or lease a space on the ground floor of the wider mixed-use development of the Whā and Rima blocks.

 

Phase 3 location options illustrated against the spatial plan of the Northcote Town Centre Benchmark Masterplan

34.     Phase 3 expanded on the criteria used in the previous phases particularly regarding community outcomes, as well as undertaking an in-depth analysis on the financial, the deliverability and the opportunity impact considerations of each of the top three location options.

Summary of the Phase 3 analysis results of the top three location options

The preferred location for the new multi-purpose community hub building

35.     The outcome of the three phased location option analysis process identified Location Option 1: refurbish the Mitchell Building and build a new extension to the north-west, as the optimal location for the new multi-purpose community hub building.

Preferred location for the new multi-purpose community hub building

36.     Location Option 1 was identified as optimal for the following reasons:

Community Outcomes: It retains a heritage building for community purposes with the potential to contribute towards enhancing the history and culture of Northcote (which was demonstrated to be of high value to Northcote residents in the community needs assessment research).  The adaption and reuse of an existing building to make it new and functional has greater potential for community engagement in contributing towards the design and development of the building, creating social cohesion and community ownership/pride of a local public building.  

Urban renewal: The hub element of the community hub in this location will be enhanced by the proximity to the Cadness Reserve, Te Ara Awataha, and Ernie Mays Street. It will enhance the activation and safety of Cadness Reserve and Te Ara Awataha. It is proposed that Ernie Mays Street will be a low speed, pedestrian friendly environment with several crossings to facilitate safe and easy access between amenities within the town centre – including a crossing between Pearn Place and the current library building. Accessibility to the community hub will be improved by use of Ernie Mays Street as a bus route and new bus stops along the thoroughfare.  

Financial:  Constructing the community hub at this location is likely to cost less than the other two options because of the utilisation and incorporation of the existing library building into the community hub. Current estimates indicate that the cost per m2 of refurbishing and/or redesigning the library building is half the estimated cost per m2 of a new stand-alone building.

Delivery:  This option can be delivered within a shorter timeframe. The extension of Ernie Mays Street and the removal of the Norman King Building is part of the initial phase of works proposed as part of the redevelopment of the town centre. Initiation of the process to develop the community hub in this location could be commenced following local board endorsement of this option.

Opportunity Costs: The community hub in this location will allow the Lake Road area to be developed and:

·    an additional 100 homes to be delivered in the new town centre

·    an additional 2,500m2 of prime retail space to be delivered in the town centre. The area fronting on to both Lake Road and the town square is considered the most attractive and valuable retail land within the town centre, particularly for food and beverage activities. The presence of cafes, restaurants, or other eateries in this location provides a significant opportunity to enhance the vibrancy and activation of the town centre and its economic vitality. 

·    $4.8m recouped though the sale of Lake Road site and the subsequent incorporation of these funds into the redevelopment and regeneration of the town centre. This will result in a lower cost to the ratepayer for the total town centre regeneration programme

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

37.     Sustainability and climate change is a cross cutting theme at Eke Panuku. Eke Panuku’s Climate Change Strategy states that action will be taken to ensure new communities in priority locations are designed and developed to be low carbon and climate resilient.

38.     Climate change is likely to impact Northcote with flooding already a problem for the town centre. ‘Green & Sustainable’ is one of the ten criteria for success identified in the benchmark masterplan which underpins the urban renewal of the town centre.

39.     Construction of the new build element of the community hub will add to greenhouse gas emissions, as will the demolition of the Norman King Building. However, in the long-term, operational greenhouse gas emissions resulting from the new community hub building will be minimised through design decisions for the new build. Greenhouse gas emissions resulting from the adaptive re-use of the Mitchell Building will be minimal and is positive from a sustainability perspective.

40.     The development of Ernie Mays Street will be an integral component of the new town centre’s public transport network, with a bus stop envisaged outside the community hub. This will increase use of public transport and contribute to a reduction in transport emissions.

41.     As detailed within the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2020, the local board is committed to quality and sustainable urban development that has a low impact on the climate.

Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2020

Outcome

Objective

Key initiatives

Outcome 3, Places and spaces: Our built environment is high quality, vibrant, well-maintained, reflects the culture and heritage of Kaipātiki, and meets our people’s needs.

Quality and sustainable urban development occurs that creates spaces that are safe, healthy, multi-functional and have a low impact on the climate

Advocate for and support the development of a quality compact, urban form that supports low carbon, resilient development, while ensuring adequate infrastructure to support it

Advocate for the uptake of sustainable design and construction that will be resilient to the impacts of climate change, including council projects, and encourage residents and businesses to use eco-design and water sensitive design practices, with an example being the renewal of the facility at 17 Lauderdale Road

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

42.     Eke Panuku and Customer & Community Services staff have worked in collaboration on the identification and recommendation for a preferred location for the multi-purpose community hub building. Further input has been provided by council staff within the Heritage and Legal Services teams. 

43.     Unlock Northcote is a council family project led by Eke Panuku and analysis has been informed by ongoing discussions with respective groups within council, particularly with Auckland Transport in relation to roading and public transport.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

44.     As detailed within the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2020, the local board want the redevelopment of the Northcote Town Centre to be an exemplar of urban regeneration. The following items listed in the table below relate to this project.

Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2020

Outcome

Objective

Key initiatives

Outcome 3: Places and spaces. Our built environment is high quality, vibrant, well-maintained, reflects the culture and heritage of Kaipātiki, and meets our people’s needs.

Our aquatic, recreational, art and community facilities are enhanced to meet the needs of our growing and changing population

Ensure our community houses, community centres, art facilities and libraries are accessible, well maintained, and are of high quality to meet the changing needs of our people

Our town centres of Birkenhead, Glenfield and Northcote are strengthened to be vibrant and safe hubs that meet the needs of our people

Work with Panuku Development Auckland, Kāinga Ora, Northcote Town Centre Association and other stakeholders to ensure the Northcote redevelopment supports a successful, integrated community now and into the future

 

45.     The Kaipātiki Local Board holds delegated authority to approve the specific location of the new multi-purpose community hub building.

46.     Workshops with the local board have been held in April 2021, June 2021, July 2021, and August 2021 to discuss and update members on the analysis and advice leading to the recommended location for Northcote’s new community hub.

47.     At the July 2021 local board workshop, staff from Eke Panuku and Customer & Community Services summarised the completed investigation results detailing the recommended location for the new multi-purpose community hub building.  Kaipātiki Local Board members indicated general support for recommended Location Option 1: refurbish Mitchell Building and build new extension to the north-west.

48.     Customer & Community Services and/or Eke Panuku staff have met and corresponded with the community organisations in the three current community buildings to provide updates on the town centre regeneration project and the development of the new community hub. We will continue to work with organisations who will be displaced during construction of the new town centre to ensure there is continued community services provision for the community.   

49.     Eke Panuku is in regular contact with stakeholders and members of the community to respond to questions and address concerns as needed. Several strategies are in place to keep the community up to date with progress, including placemaking activations, presence at key community events and activities, regular attendance at the Northcote Business Association and other key stakeholder meetings.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

50.     Eke Panuku has worked closely with mana whenua from the outset of the Unlock Northcote programme. The principles underpinning the benchmark masterplan comprise of celebrating Māori communities, with Te Aranga values and principles embedded within the masterplan through the design process and engagement, and mana whenua presence, narratives and values respected and made visible throughout the town centre redevelopment.

51.     Eke Panuku and council will continue to work with mana whenua throughout the delivery of the new multi-purpose community hub. In working together, Eke Panuku seeks to ensure that the project can produce outcomes that better reflect Māori in Auckland and the Māori cultural narrative that exists for Northcote.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

52.     Funding of $17.3m for the new multi-purpose community hub building has been secured through Eke Panuku’s Long-term Plan budget allocation based on an estimated floor area of 1500m2. The detailed business case will confirm spatial requirements and identify any subsequent funding shortfall necessitated by the need for a larger sized facility

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

53.     Identified risks and mitigations associated with the development of the community hub in the preferred location (and generally associated with the Unlock Northcote programme) are outlined in the table below.

Risk

Mitigation

Community opposition to location or design process

Preparation and implementation of joint Eke Panuku and Community Services/Community Facilities engagement and communications plan to communicate relevant details, provide updates particularly at key milestones, and respond to community input

Heritage status of library constrains design options

Continued and ongoing communications with council’s Heritage team within design stage to achieve satisfactory solutions

Insufficient budget available for development of community hub

Management through design and project delivery, with options explored through detailed business case, including through reducing the scope of the community hub building, or seeking to source additional funding

Site specific conditions are not favourable in area of new build (e.g. geotechnical constraints, contamination, etc)

Ground investigation undertaken on site once location is confirmed and opportunity for investigative work available

Challenges in logistical and design integration with other public realm projects such as, Ernie Mays Street extension, Te Ara Awataha and Cadness Reserve enhancement

Management within Unlock Northcote programme design and delivery

Challenges in the integration between Eke Panuku, Community Services and Community Facilities in achieving delivery of community hub

Agreement and implementation of MoU detailing governance and operational structure to collaboratively develop the community hub

Service delivery in Northcote is disrupted during redevelopment of town centre

Service transition strategy developed and implemented to facilitate interim relocation during redevelopment

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

54.     At a high level, it is anticipated the next step is to determine the terms and conditions of the partnership and accompanying governance between Eke Panuku and Community Facilities in the development and delivery of the new community hub. A wider project team of specialised skilled staff will be established for the next phase of this project.

55.     This will be followed by a programme of engagement with the local board and key stakeholders to develop a design brief which will set out the requirements for the new facility including size, uses, and key design features. Approval of the final design brief before it is used for procurement, will be sought from the local board. 

56.     The design brief will be used for the procurement of an architect / design team who will produce preliminary concept drawings of the new community hub facility. The local board has the delegation to approve the concept design.

57.     Project milestones for delivery of the community hub will be aligned with the town centre redevelopment milestones, with particular reference to achieving integration with related projects (such as the construction of the adjoining sections of Te Ara Awahata, the Cadness Reserve upgrade, and Ernie Mays Street roading).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

15 September 2021 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Northcote Multi-Purpose Community Hub Building: options report

167

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Gary Jackson - Portfolio Specialist

Kimberly Rees - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Authorisers

Kate Cumberpatch - Development Manager, Panuku Development Auckland

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 September 2021

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

15 September 2021

 

 

Te Kete Rukuruku programme - adoption of te reo Māori names, addition of five sites for naming in tranche one and installation of bilingual signs at Shepherds Park

File No.: CP2021/13372

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the addition of four parks, one outdoor classroom and three libraries for Māori naming as part of tranche one.

2.       To adopt dual Māori/English names for Le Roys Bush Reserve and Little Shoal Bay Reserve.

3.       To approve Shepherds Park for installation of bilingual park signage.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

4.       On 12 December 2018, Kaipātiki Local Board resolved to invite mana whenua to name 25 parks and reserves through the Te Kete Rukuruku (TKR) programme as tranche one (resolution number KT/2018/242).

5.       An additional three sites were put forward by the board for naming on 20 September 2020 (resolution number KT/2019/193) but at the time were deferred into tranche two.

6.       Five new sites being developed as part of Te Ara Awataha are proposed for inclusion in tranche one for Māori naming.

7.       Some delays have occurred during the naming process of the tranche one parks, and consequently it is now possible to add in these additional eight sites as part of the first tranche.

8.       The name Wai Manawa has been previously identified as the ancestral Māori name for the area now known as Le Roys Bush Reserve and Little Shoal Bay Reserve. The community have requested this name be used on signage planned for installation in these parks. This report recommends the immediate adoption of the name Wai Manawa as part of a dual Māori / English name for these parks.

9.       This report seeks approval to install bilingual signage in Shepherds Park once its dual name is formally adopted.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      invite mana whenua to provide a Māori name and narrative for the following parks:

·     Greenslade Reserve

·     Lenihan Reserve

·     Lindisfarne Reserve

·     School Edge

·     School Edge outdoor classroom.

b)      confirm the inclusion of three libraries into tranche one for dual naming:

·     Birkenhead Library

·     Glenfield Library

·     Northcote Library.

c)       approve the full list of sites to be named in tranche one as detailed in Attachment A to the agenda report.

d)      adopt te reo Māori names for two parks as dual names as follows:

·     Wai Manawa / Le Roys Bush Reserve

·     Wai Manawa / Little Shoal Bay Reserve.

e)      approve Shepherds Park as the preferred location for the installation of bilingual signage.

f)       acknowledge the intent for Auckland Council to enter into a mātauranga agreement that commits to upholding the correct use of Māori names and to use them only for purposes that have a community outreach or educational purpose (non-commercial use).

Horopaki

Context

Tranche one sites for Māori naming

10.     Te Kete Rukuruku is a culture and identity programme that collects and tells the unique Māori stories of Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland. It is a partnership between Auckland Council, 15 local boards, and all 19 mana whenua groups that have interests across the region, led by mana whenua.

11.     A key outcome of the programme is for te reo Māori to be seen, heard, learned, and spoken. The programme contributes to reclaiming the Māori identity which is Tāmaki Makaurau’s unique point of difference in the world.

12.     A subset of the programme involves the reintroduction of ancestral and contemporary Māori names to the city’s parks and places.

13.     The rationale and benefits of the programme, as well as the process for identifying and adopting names and narratives, was agreed by the Kaipātiki Local Board at its business meeting on 12 December 2018.

14.     Kaipātiki Local Board invited mana whenua to provide Māori names and narratives for 25 parks on 12 December 2018, resolution number KT/2018/242. This was included in the 2018/2019 work programme as Te Kete Rukuruku Māori Naming of Parks and Places (tranche one) which was carried forward into 2019/2020 for completion.

15.     On 20 September 2019, Kaipātiki Local Board requested TKR add Richardson Pocket Park, Cadness Reserve and Cadness Loop Reserve into an upcoming tranche for naming, resolution number KT/2019/193. As TKR were some way through the naming process already these were initially deferred to tranche two for naming.

16.     Māori names were received from iwi for the initial 25 sites in May 2020.

17.     Opposition to the adoption of the 25 names was received in June 2020 from Ngāti Whatua Ōrākei in relation to concerns over the naming process. The names were all placed on hold while discussions were held to resolve these concerns.

18.     Delays were also experienced regarding the naming of parks in the Te Ara Awataha project in Northcote being led by Eke Panuku.

19.     After some changes to the TKR naming process were finalised, four of the original tranche one sites and the three additional sites identified in September 2019, were agreed by mana whenua as being able to go forward through the TKR process for adoption.

20.     At a workshop in June 2021, the local board indicated support for the inclusion of the five outstanding sites in the Te Ara Awataha project in tranche one. The region-wide naming convention for Auckland Libraries was also discussed.

21.     Dual names are proposed for all Auckland Libraries to retain the English name and add a Māori name. Kaipātiki has three libraries and the names will be put forward for adoption as part of tranche one.

Wai Manawa

22.     In 2016, the development of a public space in Birkenhead was named Kaimataara ō Wai Manawa. The original name for the gully and the two parks below this public space (Le Roys Bush Reserve and Little Shoal Bay Reserve) was identified as Wai Manawa.

23.     A project has started to upgrade all the signage in these two parks and a community request was received by the local board to incorporate the ancestral name for the area on the proposed signage. The signage is unlikely to be renewed again for 10-15 years.

24.     As the name is already well known but was not formally adopted in 2016, the local board have requested the inclusion of these names in tranche one so they can be incorporated on the new signage.

Bilingual signage at Shepherds Park

25.     In tranche one the board was offered the opportunity to select one park where all signage will be fully bilingual. At a workshop on 13 May 2020, Shepherds Park was identified as the first park to receive this fully bilingual signage in the Kaipātiki Local Board area.

26.     This bilingual signage is fully funded from Long-term Plan regional funding for Māori outcomes.

27.     At the workshop on 9 June 2021, the local board confirmed support for new signage in Shepherds Park that will include:

·     dual language entrance signage stating the te reo Māori and English names

·     bilingual wayfinding, information and bylaw signage

·     a bilingual interpretative sign to tell the story behind the te reo Māori name.

 

28.     With a view to spending Aucklanders’ money wisely, existing signs will be reskinned, unless the signage is damaged or worn and needs to be replaced.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Tranche one sites for naming

29.     Twenty-eight sites have been formally identified and resolved by the local board for naming by mana whenua.

30.     An additional five sites have been requested to be incorporated into tranche one for naming. This includes the following four parks and one outdoor classroom:

·     Greenslade Reserve

·     Lenihan Reserve

·     Lindisfarne Reserve

·     School Edge

·     School Edge outdoor classroom

31.     Twenty-one of the 28 sites remain on hold owing to unresolved concerns from Ngāti Whatua Ōrākei regarding naming practices within their rohe, leaving four sites to go forward for adoption.

32.     This will mean that 17 sites in total will receive names this financial year.

·    Four original sites from the list of 25 resolved as tranche one in 2018

·    Three sites as resolved by the local board in 2019

·    Four parks and one outdoor classroom from Te Ara Awataha project

·    Three libraries

·    Le Roys Bush Reserve and Little Shoal Bay Reserve.

33.     The board has identified four of these sites should receive a sole Māori name where an English name will not be retained.

34.     The full list of sites being named is provided in Attachment A to this agenda report.

35.     It is recommended that the local board endorse the inclusion of four additional parks and one outdoor classroom and confirm the full list of tranche one sites as outlined in Attachment A of the agenda report.

Wai Manawa

36.     Three iwi were involved in the finalisation of the name Kaimataara ō Wai Manawa - Ngāti Whatua Ōrākei, Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki and Te Kawerau ā Maki. All three iwi support the formal adoption and return of the name Wai Manawa to the two parks Le Roys Bush Reserve and Little Shoal Bay Reserve.

37.     All three iwi have indicated their preference for the name to be adopted as a sole Māori name, where the English name is removed. It is felt that by sitting alongside an English name the mana of the name Wai Manawa is diluted and restoration of the mauri to the area is reduced.

38.     Discussions with the local board indicate that their preference is to adopt Wai Manawa as a dual Māori / English name to retain the complete history of the site.

39.     Iwi acknowledge dual naming is the local board’s preference but retain their position on sole naming here. They will not oppose initial adoption as a dual name, but consideration should be given to the removal of the English names in the future. Options for the retention of the colonial history and the name of the Le Roy family could be explored and captured in another way to allow the original Māori name for the site to be fully restored and stand-alone over this area as it once did.

40.     The name Wai Manawa has been identified and confirmed by iwi as the original name for Le Roys Bush Reserve and Little Shoal Bay Reserve. Consequently, it does not require any additional process in order adopt the name.

41.     It is recommended that the board adopt the name Wai Manawa as a dual name for the two sites and consider future options for the potential removal of the English names when possible.

42.     The dual names for the two sites will be entered onto the Auckland Council website immediately and then subsequently gazetted as part of tranche one once those names are also adopted.

Bilingual signage in Shepherds Park

43.     This bilingual signage is fully funded from Long-term Plan regional funding for Māori outcomes. No additional funding is required.

44.     Bilingual signage will visibly raise the profile of te reo Māori in the public domain. It will provide the opportunity to learn the story behind the Māori name as well as making it easy for the public to familiarise themselves with and use te reo Māori. 

45.     Once the site is confirmed a signage audit will confirm identification of locations and types of signage.

46.     Signage design will be completed once the Māori name has been formally adopted and visuals will be provided to the local board for comment prior to installation.

47.     If the local board do not approve the installation of bilingual signage at Shepherds Park the signage will remain in its present condition. Signage will then only be replaced either via the renewals programme or, if funded separately by the local board, as a stand-alone project from their Locally Driven Initiatives budget.

48.     For the reasons outlined above it is recommended that the local board approve the installation of bilingual signage in Shepherds Park which would commence upon the formal adoption of the Māori name.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

49.     There are no substantive climate change impacts relating to this matter.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

50.     The Te Kete Rukuruku project is a regional programme that delivers on council’s Māori Language Policy and Kia Ora Te Reo, which is a priority within Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, the organisation’s Māori Outcome Performance Management Framework.  It also delivers on Kia Ora Te Ahurea (the Māori culture and identity outcomes) as the programme helps to reclaim our Māori identity and unique point of difference in the world.

51.     The programme aligns with the aspirations of the Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB) as articulated in the Schedule of Issues of Significance 2017, Māori Plan.

52.     Te Kete Rukuruku facilitates a partnership between local boards and iwi with the naming and narratives being led by mana whenua. It seeks to bring rigour to the process of naming across the council group over time. 

53.     The programme has also triggered the development of new bilingual signage templates that may be used across the organisation in the future.

54.     Community Facilities is responsible for renewal of existing signage and will incorporate the new names as and when signage is renewed.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

55.     Through partnering with mana whenua on this project, it is envisaged that relationships between mana whenua and local boards will be strengthened.

56.     The adoption of a Māori name resulting in a dual name adds an additional name and narrative to each park, as opposed to taking anything away from the community.

57.     Māori naming and bilingual signage in parks is aligned to the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2020:

·     Outcome one: Belonging and wellbeing

·     Objective: Our heritage is protected and celebrated

·     Key initiative: Partner with mana whenua to tell the stories of Māori cultural heritage and knowledge.

58.     Dual language signage and bilingual signage help to enrich park user experience.

59.     When the names are adopted and their narratives received, Auckland Council is permitted to use them for community outreach and educational purposes (non-commercial).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

60.     TKR helps to increase Māori identity and belonging and is aligned with outcomes in the Auckland Plan.

61.     TKR contributes towards outcomes from the Te Reo Māori Action Plan 2020-2023. The action plan brings to life the Māori Language Policy (2016) and describes actions to champion a bilingual city where te reo Māori is seen, heard, spoken and learned.

62.     Adopting Māori names and showcasing narratives for parks and reserves will increase the visibility of te reo Māori in the local board area, will safeguard the stories of mana whenua and help ensure their survival.

63.     TKR has sought to establish a best practice approach to Māori naming and the collection and sharing of stories.

64.     Mātauranga agreements are being developed to ensure that names and stories are protected by the council, that we will uphold their correct use and use them only for purposes that have a community outreach or educational purpose (non-commercial use).

65.     As a partnership programme, all aspects of providing names and narratives are led by the mana whenua of Tāmaki Makaurau. This is appropriate as mana whenua are those with the mana in this area to carry the responsibility for Māori naming.

66.     There are a large number of resident mataawaka (Māori who live in Auckland and are not in a mana whenua group) who will have a great interest in these new names and narratives. This provides an opportunity for council to engage with mataawaka Māori organisations and invite them to embrace and help champion the names and narratives once the names are adopted.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

67.     Kaipātiki Local Board has set aside Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) budget for this programme and this has been carried forward into the current financial year.

68.     This funding provides a partial contribution to mana whenua for their time in supporting the process including research and ratification.

69.     The Kaipātiki Local Board allocated $29,000 for naming 25 parks as tranche one of this project. Fourteen parks will receive names within this financial year and no additional funding is required.

70.     Updated dual name signage for these parks will be delivered through Community Facilities’ existing renewals programmes.

71.     Bilingual signage for Shepherds Park is funded by Long-term Plan regional funding for Māori outcomes. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

72.     A number of risks and issues were highlighted at the outset of this programme or added as the programme has progressed including:

·     multiple mana whenua having an interest in the Kaipātiki Local Board area, with differing views on naming

·     extended delays in the adoption of Māori names continuing the predominance of English only names and missing renewal opportunities

·     potential negative public reaction to Māori names

·     costs of replacement signage.

73.     These risks are carefully managed throughout the process and mitigated in a variety of ways including: 

·     timeframes are extended when required to allow robust discussion around the names being submitted. The approach of the programme has been to focus on a quality outcome

·     splitting the tranche to allow for adoption of names as they are finalised rather than waiting for completion of the entire tranche.

·     the existing English park name can be retained with the Māori name being returned/added

·     communications once the Māori names are adopted to ensure a full understanding of the names and their meanings

·     signage will be replaced as it comes up for renewal with the only exception being the bilingual signage at Shepherds Park that will be reskinned if replacement is not warranted.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

74.     Wai Manawa will be entered into council’s website as a dual Māori / English name and the signage installation can proceed.

75.     Seven new parks, three libraries and the outdoor classroom will be added into tranche one and iwi will be invited to provide Māori names for these sites as follows:

·     Cadness Loop (sole Māori name)

·     Cadness Reserve (dual name)

·     Richardson Place Pocket Park (sole Māori name)

·     Greenslade Reserve (dual name)

·     Lenihan Reserve (dual name)

·     Lindisfarne Reserve (dual name)

·     School Edge (sole Māori name)

·     School Edge Outdoor Classroom (sole Māori name)

·     Birkenhead Library (dual name)

·     Glenfield Library (dual name)

·     Northcote Library (dual name)

76.     It is expected fifteen names, comprised of the 11 sites shown above and the four sites initially named as part of tranche one, will be ready for adoption early in 2022 subject to mana whenua capacity and agreement.

77.     Upon the Kaipātiki Local Board’s formal approval, a signage audit will be undertaken at Shepherds Park and an installation plan finalised. This will allow for signage to be installed quickly following adoption of the new dual name.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

15 September 2021 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Attachment A Kaipātiki tranche one sites for Māori naming

203

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Dawn Bardsley – Naming Lead – Kia Ora Te Reo

Authorisers

Anahera Higgins – Manager Māori Outcomes – Kia Ora Te Reo

Justine Haves – General Manager Regional Service Planning

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 September 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 September 2021

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Grants, Transitional Rates Grants, and Multiboard Grants Round One 2021/2022 grant allocations

File No.: CP2021/11776

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Kaipātiki Local Board with information on applications in Kaipātiki Transitional Rates Grants, Local Grants and Multiboard Grants Round One 2021/2022; to enable a decision to fund, part fund or decline each application.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Kaipātiki Local Grants Round One 2021/2022 (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report), Transitional Rates Grants 2021/2022 (refer to Attachment B of the agenda report), and Multiboard Grants Round One 2021/2022 (refer to Attachment C of the agenda report).

3.       The Kaipātiki Local Board adopted the Kaipātiki Local Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 21 April 2021. The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants submitted to the local board (refer to Attachment D of the agenda report).

4.       The local board has set a total of $149,456 for community grants from its Local Driven Initiatives Operational budget (LDI Opex) for the 2021/2022 financial year which covers three local grant rounds and two multi-board grant rounds.

5.       The local board has set a total of $36,312 for Transitional Rates Grants from its Asset Based Services Operational budget (ABS Opex) for the 2021/2022 financial year which covers one transitional grant round.

6.       Twenty-three applications were received for Kaipātiki Local Grants Round One requesting a total of $232,150.58. An additional eleven multi-board applications were received for Multiboard Grants Round One, requesting $56,948.96.

7.       Five Transitional Rates Grant applications were received, requesting a total of $18,656.74

8.       The total amount requested, for the three grant rounds, is $307,756.28.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in Kaipātiki Local Grants Round One 2021/2022 listed in the following table: 

Table One: Kaipātiki Local Grants Round One 2021/2022 grant applications

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2208-109

Nepalese Cultural Centre New Zealand Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the operational costs, including office rent, tutors' wages, and stationery

$8,420.00

Eligible

LG2208-111

Royal New Zealand Pipe Bands' Association (Auckland Central) Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire at Onewa Domain to facilitate the “Royal New Zealand Pipe Band” championship in March 2022

$6,000.00

Eligible

LG2208-126

The Northart Society Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards six digital screens, brackets, installation fee, design, marketing, and artist fees between December 2021 and December 2022

$28,234.00

Eligible

LG2208-105

The Men's Shed North Shore Trust

Community

Towards the two sessions of first aid training course for the Men's Shed North Shore members between October and November 2021

$2,350.00

Eligible

LG2208-102

Eyeview Ethnic Trust

Community

Towards the printing and distribution costs of five hundred magazines in the Kaipatiki local board area

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2208-104

Chinese Association of North Shore City Auckland New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards the "Moon Festival” event in September 2022, including venue hire, water, performers and volunteers' allowance, video production, and coordinator's fee

$3,900

Eligible

LG2208-107

Kaipatiki Sounds

under the umbrella of "Treehut Limited"

Community

Towards the delivery of the “Kaipatiki Sounds” music festival, including website development, brand design, production equipment hire, and donation to the show hosts

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2208-108

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards costs for clinical supervision, volunteer training, and telecommunication costs

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2208-110

North Shore Budget Service

Community

Towards the operational costs, including programme research, advertising, computer, website, materials, printing, volunteers, and coordinators wages

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2208-112

Grow North Shore Group

under the umbrella of "Grow New Zealand Incorporated"

Community

Towards venue hire and advertising costs to provide "GROW Mental Health Support" services between October 2021 and September 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG2208-115

Art Yoga Partnership

under the umbrella of the "Kaipatiki Community Facilities Trust"

Community

Towards venue hire, advertising, equipment, and facilitation costs to deliver the "Art and Tea" programmes for senior local groups in the Kaipatiki area

$2,532.50

Eligible

LG2208-119

Birkdale Beach Haven Community Project

Community

Towards the delivery of the Te Reo Maori social classes, including the facilitator, marketing, and food costs

$3,060.00

Eligible

LG2208-121

Age Concern Auckland Incorporated

Community

Towards the salary costs for the Empowering Communities Programme between October 2021 and June 2022

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2208-122

Willow Christian Trust

Community

Towards the food processor and tableware

$1,598.00

Eligible

LG2208-123

Karea Sutherland

Community

Towards the volunteers' compensation to cover the resources, wheelchair taxis, internet and meetings

$1,000.00

Ineligible - private individual

LG2208-124

Glenfield Community Centre Incorporated

Community

Towards the staff wages for the Glenfield Community Centre between October 2021 and July 2022

$26,000.00

Eligible

LG2208-129

YMCA North

Community

Towards the delivery of the North Shore Raise Up programme between October 2021 and September 2022, including the crew and programme costs

$9,000.00

Eligible

LG2208-118

Mountains to Sea Conservation Trust - Experiencing Marine Reserves

Environment

Towards the cost of the Mountain to Sea Conservation programme for Birkenhead Intermediate and bus hire fees

$18,000.00

Eligible

LG2208-114

Birkenhead City Cricket Club

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of two mobile cricket cages for the Birkenhead City Cricket Club

$14,145.00

Eligible

LG2208-117

Birkenhead Sea Scouts

Sport and recreation

Towards the materials to repair a sailing boat for the Birkenhead Sea Scouts

$5,460.00

Eligible

LG2208-120

Northcote & Birkenhead Tigers Rugby League & Sports Club

Sport and recreation

Towards the storage container for sports equipment storage

$4,000.00

Eligible

LG2208-127

Northern Rovers Football Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the club upgrade, including CCTV, videowall, scoreboard, installation fee, and painting costs

$56,451.08

Eligible

LG2208-128

Birkenhead Sports Trust

under the umbrella of “Birkenhead City Cricket and Sports Club Incorporated”

Sport and recreation

Towards the operational costs including the club's insurance, internet, utilities, television, and security bills

$5,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$232,150.58

 

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received in Transitional Grants 2021/2022, listed in Table Two:

Table Two: Transitional Rates Grants 2021/2022 grant applications

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2208-113

Beach Haven Birkdale Residents Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the support of rates in the 21/22 financial year for Birkdale Beach Haven Residents and Ratepayers Association

$2,662.45

Eligible

LG2208-116

Northcote Point Senior Citizens Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the support of rates in 21/22 financial year for Northcote Point Senior Citizens Association

$2,300.00

Eligible

LG2208-131

Birkenhead Senior Citizens Associations Incorporated

Community

Towards the support of rates in the 21/22 financial year for Birkenhead Citizens Association

$3,594.29

Eligible

LG2208-130

Birkenhead Bowling Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the support of rates in the 21/22 financial year for Birkenhead Bowling Club

$6,500.00

Eligible

LG2208-131

Judokwai NZ (1948) Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the support of rates in the 21/22 financial year for Judokwai NZ

$3,600.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$18,656.74

 

 

c)       agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received in Multiboard Grants Round One 2021/2022, listed in Table Three:

Table Three: Multiboard Grants Round One 2021/2022 grant applications

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2022-120

The Operating Theatre Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the “Gift a Seat” theatre tickets and transport costs for the low decile school and early childhood centre children between October 2021 and May 2022

$3,826.24

Eligible

MB2022-156

CNSST Foundation, formerly known as Chinese New Settlers Services Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the “Community Connection” programme at Westlake Boys High School from 30 October to 23 July 2022

$4,500.00

 Eligible

MB2022-111

Neighbourhood Support North Shore

Community

Towards the manager's salary and operating expenses between June 2021 and June 2022

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-113

Big Buddy Mentoring Trust

Community

Towards the operational costs, including staff wages, communications rent, transport, and equipment between September 2021 and September 2022

$12,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-114

North Shore Centres of Mutual Aid

Community

Towards a proportion of operational costs, excluding wages, for eight centres in the North Shore between January and December 2022

$10,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-121

The Student Volunteer Army Foundation

Community

Towards the provision of school kits and "Student Volunteer Army programme” to primary schools between October 2021 and August 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-146

North Shore Women’s Centre

Community

Towards North Shore Women’s staff wages from November 2021 to November 2022

$4,571.00

Eligible

MB2022-153

Multiples Auckland Trust

Community

Towards the staff training and equipment for Multiples Auckland from October 2021 to December 2021

$4,241.72

Eligible

MB2022-154

Yes Disability Resource Centre

Community

Towards the delivery of "Future Leaders" workshop for the young people on the North Shore with a disability, held at Shore Junction from November 2021 to September 2022

$2,500.00

Eligible

MB2022-164

Life Education Trust North Shore

Community

Towards the Life Education Trust North Shore “Child healthcare" programme, specifically workbooks, from 1 January to 1 July 2022 at various north shore schools

$2,310.00

Eligible

MB2022-128

Harbour Sport

Sport and recreation

Towards the operational costs to deliver the "Shore to Shore" 2022 event

$6,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$56,948.96

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

10.     Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

11.     The local board grants programme sets out:

·     local board priorities

·     lower priorities for funding

·     exclusions

·     grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·     any additional accountability requirements.

12.     The Kaipātiki Local Board adopted its grants programme for 2021/2022 on 21 April 2021 (refer to Attachment D of the agenda report). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

13.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

Transitional Rate Grants

14.      At the end of the 2017/2018 financial year the council removed the legacy rates remission schemes carried over from the legacy councils. These schemes provided community and sporting groups in some parts of Auckland with property rates relief.

15.     To minimise the impact on the recipients of these schemes, the Governing Body provided transitional rates grants for three years, from the 2018/2019 financial year ending on 30 June 2021. These grants were available automatically on the same terms as the original legacy remission schemes. Recipients of the grants were notified in the 2017/2018 financial year that the scheme would be limited to three years.

16.     With the transitional grants expiring 30 June 2021, the Kaipātiki local board agreed to utilise the associated budget of $36,312 and amend their 2021/2022 grants programme criteria to enable rates grants to continue (resolution number KT2021/18).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

17.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria.The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

20.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Kaipātiki Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the Kaipātiki Local Board Community Grant Programme 2021/2022.

22.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

23.     A summary of each application received through Kaipātiki Local Grants Round One 2021/2022 (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report), Transitional Rates Grant 2021/2022 (refer to Attachment B of the agenda report), and Multiboard Grants Round One 2021/2022 (to Attachment C of the agenda report) is provided.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Maori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Maori. Auckland Council’s Maori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements

26.     The local board has set a total of $149,456 for community grants from its Local Driven Initiatives Operational budget (LDI Opex) for the 2021/2022 financial year which covers three local grant rounds and two multi-board grant rounds.

27.     The local board has set a total of $36,312 for Transitional Rates Grants from its Asset Based Services Operational budget (ABS Opex) for the 2021/2022 financial year which covers one transitional grant round.

28.     Twenty-three applications were received for Kaipātiki Local Grants Round One requesting a total of $232,150.58. An additional eleven multi-board applications were received for Multiboard Grants Round One, requesting $56,948.96.

29.     Five Transitional Rates Grant applications were received, requesting a total of $18,656.74

30.     Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Following the Kaipātiki Local Board allocation of funding for Local Grants Round One 2021/2022, Transitional Rates Grant 2021/2022, and Multiboard Grants Round One 2021/2022, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

15 September 2021 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - 21/22 Kaipātiki Local Grants Round One Applications Summary

217

b

15 September 2021 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - 21/22 Kaipātiki Transitional Rates Grant Applications Summary

303

c

15 September 2021 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - 21/22 Kaipātiki Multiboard Grants Round One Applications Summary

319

d

15 September 2021 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - 21/22 Kaipātiki Local Board Grant Programme

371

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Erin Shin - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Rhonwen Heath - Head of Rates Valuations & Data Mgmt

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 September 2021

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

15 September 2021

 

 

 

2021/2022 Kaipatiki Local Grant, Round One     

LG2208-113

Beach Haven Birkdale Residents Association Incorporated

Legal status:

Incorporated Society

Activity focus:

Community

Conflicts of interest:

None identified This questionnaire seems to aligned to a project and rates is simply a bill which we have not received yet. If it’s a copy of the rates assessment that you require following its issuance, then only too happy to provide a copy of that.

Project: Supporting our Community

Location:

Beach Haven Hall

Summary:

This application is not applicable to a specific project as we are seeking a contribution towards our annual rates for our Beach Haven hall. As covered on previous pages the hall is used buy groups in our community as well as the Tongan Church.

Expertise:

As above

Dates:

01/07/2021 - 30/06/2022

Rain dates:

01/07/2021 - 30/06/2022

People reached:

50-60

% of participants from Local Board

100%

Promotion:

None Identified

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

As above

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

our people are involved in the community, socially connected to one another, and supported to be active, creative, resilient, and healthy

 

As covered on the previous page our hall is used by community groups at a very fair rental to promote wellbeing and the health of our people in our local community of Beach Haven and Birkdale. Some of the local groups that use our hall are the likes of the local Tongan Church, Thai Chi and Yoga groups, local residents for children's birthdays and significant events, amongst others. We feel this aligns with the priorities of the local Kaipatiki board.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

None Identified

 

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·             No Māori outcomes identified

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - The hall can be used by people with disabilities.

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

Healthy environment approach:

Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes, Encourage the reduction of carbon emissions or increase community resilience to the impacts of climate change*

As part of the associations work we have a local placemaking group that facilitates and maintains the garden area beside General Pulic on Rangatira Road. The active planting program in this area is contributing to to the absorption of Co2 emissions.

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$2,662.45

Requesting grant for:

We are looking for a grant to fund our rates. The above figure is our total estimated rates bill for the next twelve months as we are yet to receive the rates bill for the next twelve months. According to the ACC website rates will increase 5% for the 2021/22 year which means rates for our hall should increase to 2,662.45 (prev yr $2,535.67). Previous Inv provided.
.

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

N/A

Cost of participation:

as above

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

N/A

$0.00

$2,700.00

 

Income description

Amount

None Identified

$ 0.00

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

None Identified

$0.00

 

 

Donated materials

Amount

N/A

$0.00

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

Amount

None Identified

 

$0.00

 

Additional information to support the application:

This is only a application for a grant relative to rates. The application form does not seem to fit this format. Do let me know if something else is required. Also rates grant applications are required to be submitted by 30 July but we are yet to receive our annual rates assessments. So we have calculated the amount based on the advised incr of 5% over 2020/21.

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round – Stage

Decision

Allocation

LG1908-221

Beach Haven Village and Beach Haven Hall entry enhancement project

2018/2019 Kaipātiki Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,500.00

Applications prior to the 2018/2019 financial year have all been accounted for and omitted from this summary

 


 

2021/2022 Kaipatiki Local Grant, Round One     

LG2208-116

Northcote Point Senior Citizens Association Inc

Legal status:

Incorporated Society

Activity focus:

Community

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

Project: Transitional Rates Grant

Location:

119 Queen Street Northcote Point

Summary:

NPSCA is seeking Transitional Rates Grant funding to enable on-going community and resident activities of the NPSCA-owned villa.
The relief will support the ability to maintain the property for continued valuable community use and maintain financial viability and avoid potential liquidation.
Loss of the property would have major impact on the local community.

Expertise:

NPSCA has been providing the community facilities since 1960s at the villa and is familiar and known to the local community, local residents and organisations to make these facilities available to the local community.

Dates:

23/09/2021 - 23/09/2022

Rain dates:

23/09/2021 - 23/09/2022

People reached:

500-1000 p.a. approx

% of participants from Local Board

100%

Promotion:

Notice board signage acknowledging Kaipatiki contribution to on-going support of facilities .

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

The Association provides a valuable facility for the local community to meet and hold activities which support the well-being, health and friendship of the local community.
The 119 Queen St villa has been utilised for community activities since acquired in 1960s and will continue to support community activities and involvement through the voluntary efforts of the association and community participants.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

our people are involved in the community, socially connected to one another, and supported to be active, creative, resilient, and healthy

 

To facilitate the ongoing provision of non-commercial (non-business) recreational opportunities for residents in the Kaipātiki Local Board area and assist the organisation’s survival

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

N/A

 

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·             No Māori outcomes identified

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - The villa has been modified over time to provide disability access. e.g. front steps replaced with ramp. enlarged  toilet facilities to easily accommodate walkers and wheelchairs

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

Healthy environment approach:

Promote smoke-free messages, Include waste minimisation (zero waste) messages, Healthy options for food and drink, including water as the first choice, Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes, Encourage the reduction of carbon emissions or increase community resilience to the impacts of climate change*

Promote use of facilities as responsible local residents

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

100%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

%

%

%

%

%

%

100%

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$2,300.00

Requesting grant for:

Funding is required to provide Council Rates relief.
Funding request is 50% of approximate 2021/2022 Rates amount.

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

If we have to fund the full amount of rates,  we will be forced to use monies set aside for maintenance and up keep of this historically important old villa.  Last year was especially difficult because of the  cancellation of so many activities, many groups only just got there confidence back to continue when we experienced the March lock down which again set us back.

Cost of participation:

No

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$2,300.00

$0.00

$0.00

$2,300.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Council Rates

$2,300.00

$2,300.00

 

Income description

Amount

None Identified

$

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

None Identified

$

 

 

Donated materials

Amount

None Identified

$

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

Amount

None Identified

 

$0.00

 

Additional information to support the application:

Selected images giving historical background to NPSCA villa property are attached for background information.

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

No previous application

 


 

2021/2022 Kaipatiki Local Grant, Round One     

LG2208-133

Birkenhead Senior Citizens Association Incorporated

Legal status:

Charitable Trust

Activity focus:

Community

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

Project: Transitional Rates Grant

Location:

Birkenhead Senior Citizens' Hall, 251 Hinemoa Street, Birkenhead, Auckland 0626

Summary:

BSCA has an investment fund from which it uses to support start up and ongoing activities within the local community. It has had to use income from the investment fund to top up rental receipts to maintain the building.

Expertise:

The Birkenhead Senior Citizens' Hall has provided the facility to the local communities since 1960s and is used by the local community, local residents and organisations.

Dates:

01/07/2021 - 30/06/2022

Rain dates:

01/07/2021 - 30/06/2022

People reached:

7,000

% of participants from Local Board

100%

Promotion:

Notice board signage acknowledging Kaipatiki contribution to on-going support of facilities

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

It would help maintaining the hall, getting people active by completing the pedestrian link from Birkenhead Ave to Little Shore Bay.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

our people are involved in the community, socially connected to one another, and supported to be active, creative, resilient, and healthy

 

By providing at no cost to Council a community hall used by local groups.
It has been and is a well used community facility supporting the facility users such as two choirs, karate, judo, table tennis, Pest Free Kaipatiki(provision of storage), and other casual users.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

None Identified

 

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·             No Māori outcomes identified

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - in the main entrance

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

Healthy environment approach:

Promote smoke-free messages, Include waste minimisation (zero waste) messages, Healthy options for food and drink, including water as the first choice, Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes, Encourage the reduction of carbon emissions or increase community resilience to the impacts of climate change*

Promote use of facilities as responsible local residents

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

100%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

%

%

%

%

%

%

100%

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$3,594.29

Requesting grant for:

Funding is required to provide Council Rates relief

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

f we have to fund the full amount of rates, we will be forced to use monies set aside for maintenance and up keep of this hall. Last year was especially difficult because of the cancellation of so many activities.

Cost of participation:

No

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$3,594.29

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Council rates

$3,594.29

$3,594.29

 

Income description

Amount

None Identified

$

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

None Identified

$

 

 

Donated materials

Amount

None Identified

$

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

Amount

None Identified

 

$0.00

 

Additional information to support the application:

None Identified

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

No previous application

           


 

2021/2022 Kaipatiki Local Grant, Round One     

LG2208-130

Birkenhead Bowling Club

Legal status:

Incorporated Society

Activity focus:

Sport and recreation

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

Project: support towards Club’s rates

Location:

95 Mokoia Road Birkenhead

Summary:

Request for  financial support towards the Birkenhead Bowling Club’s rates between July 2021 and June 2022.

Expertise:

We have a very experienced Board controlling all activities and aspects of the club so that it covers everything

Dates:

01/07/2021 - 30/06/2022

Rain dates:

01/07/2021 - 30/06/2022

People reached:

1,000

% of participants from Local Board

90%

Promotion:

We will publish on the Facebook Community page, Bee Express and Clubs Facebook Page

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

If we receive the financial support with our rates it means we can keep our membership fee and participation fee to the bare minimum

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

our people are involved in the community, socially connected to one another, and supported to be active, creative, resilient, and healthy

 

We encourage interaction between our club, local schools and all the local community.  We encourage the community to use our premises when ever required.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

None

 

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·             Māori involvement in the design/concept, Māori focus - tikanga (practices), mātauranga (knowledge), reo (language), Māori participation - Māori priority group, target group, high representation or Māori staff delivering

WE have many Moari members that take part in subcommittees that help with the running of our club

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - We have wheel chair, walkers and motorized scooters access including disability bathrooms

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

Healthy environment approach:

Promote smoke-free messages, Include waste minimisation (zero waste) messages, Healthy options for food and drink, including water as the first choice, Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes, Encourage the reduction of carbon emissions or increase community resilience to the impacts of climate change*

We have a weekly news letter called the Bee Express that gets circulated to every member plus promoted on Facebook for the community to see.

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

100%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

%

%

%

%

%

%

100%

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$6,500.00

Requesting grant for:

We are requesting for the Club rates

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

Might have to start charging for hall hire age and increase membership fees

Cost of participation:

No

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$6,500.00

$0.00

$0.00

$100.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Rates

$6,500.00

$6,500.00

 

Income description

Amount

N/A

$

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

N/A

$

 

 

Donated materials

Amount

N/A

$

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

Amount

30

240

$5,076.00

 

Additional information to support the application:

No

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

No previous application

 


 

2021/2022 Kaipatiki Local Grant, Round One     

LG2208-131

Judokwai NZ (1948)

Legal status:

Incorporated Society

Activity focus:

Sport and recreation

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

Project: Transitional Rates

Location:

68f Hillside Rd, Wairau, Auckland

Summary:

Require support to pay for Auckland Council Rates

Expertise:

N/A - in the past, we have been required to pay rates

Dates:

31/08/2021 - 31/08/2022

Rain dates:

31/08/2021 - 31/08/2022

People reached:

120

% of participants from Local Board

100%

Promotion:

None Identified

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

Provide the local community with the opportunity to participate in a sport that promotes a healthy/active lifestyle. It brings people together from all ages and backgrounds. Some of our members even go on to compete at national and represent New Zealand internationally.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

our people are involved in the community, socially connected to one another, and supported to be active, creative, resilient, and healthy

 

Provide the local community with the opportunity to participate in a sport that promotes a healthy/active lifestyle. It brings people together from all ages and backgrounds. Some of our members even go on to compete at national and represent New Zealand internationally.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

None Identified

 

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·             None Identified

Accessible to people with disabilities

No -

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

Healthy environment approach:

Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes

Encourage participation into the sport of judo. Teach judo techniques and principals so that they become lifetime skills and judo becomes a way of life

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

100%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

%

%

%

%

%

%

120%

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$3,600.00

Requesting grant for:

Cost of annual rates charged by Auckland Council for 2021/2022

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

Increase membership fees

Cost of participation:

no

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$3,600.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Auckland Council Rates

$3,600.00

$3,600.00

 

Income description

Amount

None Identified

$

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

None Identified

$

 

 

Donated materials

Amount

None Identified

$

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

Amount

None Identified

 

$0.00

 

Additional information to support the application:

None Identified

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

No previous application

           

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 September 2021

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

15 September 2021

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

15 September 2021

 

 

Draft Business Improvement District Policy (2021) Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi

File No.: CP2021/13371

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on the draft Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2021) and supporting documents.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The BID Team has implemented a review of the Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi and supporting documents, as advised in the memo to local board members dated 23 April 2021. The memo can be found on the Auckland Council website.

3.       The review sought informal and formal feedback from local boards, BID-operating business associations, non-BID business associations, council-controlled organisations (CCOs), council departments and other external stakeholders.

4.       The review has focused on strengthening those parts of the policy relating to issue resolution and, following local board feedback, the financial sustainability of BID programmes.

5.       The review also focused on elected member needs and identifying any political risks and mitigations.

6.       The draft BID Policy (2021) has been before the Finance and Performance committee at a workshop on 18 August 2021. Feedback received has been incorporated into this version of the BID Policy (2021) and supporting documents.

7.       Staff are now seeking formal feedback from local boards on the draft BID Policy (2021) provided as Attachment A of the agenda report.

8.       Following formal feedback received from local boards, BID-operating business associations, non-BID business associations, CCOs, council departments and other external stakeholders, the final version of the BID Policy (2021) and support documents will be presented to the Finance and Performance Committee for adoption on 9 December 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      provide formal feedback on the draft Business Improvement District Policy (2021) and supporting documents by 1 October 2021.

Horopaki

Context

Overview of the Auckland BID programme

9.       BID-operating business associations are membership-based organisations independent of Auckland Council. The draft BID Policy (2021) supports the independent nature of the BID-operating business associations. They are responsible for the BID programme delivery, its success, and are accountable to BID members/BID affiliates.

10.     Local boards have the primary relationship with BID-operating business associations in their area:

·     Local boards and business associations have a vested interest in a particular place and share similar goals. Working collaboratively achieves greater outcomes.

·     Local boards have significant allocated decision-making responsibility for BID programme establishments, amending existing BID programmes, BID boundary changes, continuation/discontinuation and issue resolution.

11.     Auckland Council requires BID-operating business associations to fully comply with the Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (Kaupapa Hereā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report).

12.     The BID policy sets out the process for:

·     establishing, continuing/discontinuing BID programmes

·     changes to the BID programme boundary area/map

·     changes to the BID targeted rating mechanism

·     issue resolution

·     key stakeholder roles and responsibilities.

13.     The BID policy includes the engagement and reporting requirements for BID-operating business associations to ensure all BID members/BID affiliates have access to the relevant BID programme information. BID-operating business associations must use their Annual General Meeting (AGM) process to obtain formal member approval for the BID programme delivery, budget, and to confirm their BID targeted rate grant amount for the following financial year.

14.     The BID policy describes the balance between the independence of the BID-operating business association and the accountability role council has for monies collected as a public sector organisation. This balance is necessary to sustain public trust and confidence with the Auckland Council BID programme. 

The review

15.     Commencing April 2021, the review of the current policy began with communicating with local boards and all stakeholders involved in the management and operation of BID programmes across Tāmaki Makaurau, both BID-operating and non-BID business associations, council departments and interested parties. The process to date has included informal feedback and comments on the current policy.

16.     The review process focused on strengthening parts of the policy (and updating supporting documents) relating to issue resolution and, following local board feedback, financial sustainability of BID programmes.

17.     The review has also provided the opportunity to clarify the documentation between Auckland Council (collecting the BID targeted rate and the funder) and the BID-operating business association relating to the BID Programme Agreement (2016) document.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Rationale for the review

18.     The primary objective for reviewing the current 2016 policy is a focus on the issue resolution sections. Experience in this space over the last five years has illustrated gaps in the usefulness of the current policy to address and resolve issues in a timely manner.

19.     The review provided an opportunity to update parts of the policy relating to Auckland Council changes in operation, current business practices and where the advancement of technology has contributed to how business is done, for example Zoom meetings.

20.     There was also an early opportunity to capture informal feedback from local boards and BID-operating business associations.

21.     The information and informal feedback collected in May, June and July of this year has been incorporated into the draft BID Policy 2021 (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report) and supporting documents (refer to Attachments B and C of the agenda report). A summary of the BID Policy (2021) requirements is provided with this report (refer to Attachment D of the agenda report).

22.     BID programmes are operated by independent business associations, and their programmes and services are provided according to their members’ stated priorities. In recognition of their independent status, the BID policy does not prescribe standards for programme effectiveness. That is a matter for business association members to determine. Staff, therefore, cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

Participants in the review

23.     In addition to local boards, there are a range of stakeholders involved in BID programmes, both internal and external to Auckland Council. The BID team set a programme of informal engagement, outlined in Table 1 below:

Table 1 – Key engagement activity

Stakeholder

Engagement

Dates

BID-operating business associations

Business associations without BID programmes

BID communication including newsletters and emails:

Sent to 50+ BID-operating business associations and other interested parties

March, April, May, June and July 2021

Three network meetings

May, June and July 2021

An average attendance exceeded 20+ BID-operating business associations

Four special workshops - topics included: issue resolution, conflict of interest and developing a board charter

June and July 2021

An average of 23+ BID programmes were represented at each workshop.

Local boards

18 local board workshop presentations

June and July 2021

Introduction memo and BID policy review information

Three special topic workshops - topics included: issue resolution, conflict of interest and developing a board charter

June and July 2021

An average of 16 local board elected members attended each workshop

Local Board Services Division Lead team

Presentation and information feedback received

Presentation on 18 June 2021

Finance and Performance Committee

Memo on BID policy review project

April 2021

Council departments including:

·    Legal Services

·    Connected Communities

·    Ngā Mātārae

·    Risk and Assurance

·    Finance and Policy

·    Local Board Services

Regular meetings, engagement and feedback

May, June, and July 2021

Independent polling agent

 

Engagement and feedback regarding the ballot/polling process

June 2021

Finance and Performance Committee workshop

The draft BID Policy (2021) V1 and support documents were presented and feedback received

18 August 2021

24.     The process to undertake the review of the current policy (2016) takes place from February 2021 to June 2022. Progress to date is set out in Table 2 below:

Table 2 - Progress to date

Date

Progress

2021

Feb/March

·    Project planning, stakeholder communications

April to July

·    Directed consultation with local boards and stakeholders on the current BID policy and identified themes

  issue resolution

  conflicts of interest

  board charter development

May/June

·    Cross council, external engagement and feedback

June/July

·    Draft BID Policy (2021) and supporting documents created

August 18

·    Finance and Performance Committee workshop

August/September

·    Distribution of draft BID Policy (2021) for formal feedback

Informal local board feedback

25.     Discussions with local boards during workshops centred around:

·     issue resolution – how to do this fairly and in a timely manner

·     operational issues – relating to management and governance of BID-operating business associations

·     opportunities for collaboration and cost savings between BIDs

·     elected members involvement with BID-operating business associations

·     growth opportunities for BID-operating business associations

·     continued dependence on local board funding.

Seeking local board formal feedback on the draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents

26.     Local boards are now being asked to provide formal feedback on a revised draft policy (2021) and support documents (refer to Attachments A, B and C of the agenda report). Local boards are encouraged to engage with BID-operating business associations in their local board area (where relevant/possible) to help to inform this feedback process. 

27.     Any feedback from local boards will help the further development of BID Policy (2021). It would be, however, particularly useful to get local board views on proposed changes set out in Tables 3 and 4 below.

28.     Feedback from local boards, external stakeholders and any further feedback from BID-operating business associations will be reviewed by staff and this will help inform the final version of the policy. Formal feedback can be sent to bids@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents

29.     Once the BID Policy 2021 is approved, other support material will be made available on the BID Auckland Council website www.bid.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz and include:

·        BID-operating business association constitution (template 2021)

·        BID-operating executive committee board charter (template 2021)

·        individual BID programme area maps

·        BID affiliate/BID business association membership qualification diagram

·        local board BID representative position description

·        template documents, including:

o   AGM agenda

o   AGM minutes

o   BID programme income and expenditure budget (for BID grant $120,000).

Summary of changes made to the draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents

30.     The key proposed changes incorporated into the draft BID Policy (2021) are set out in Table 3:

Table 3 - Key changes made to the draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents

Key change from current policy

Description

Note

2021 section, page

Issue resolution

 

Improving the ability to resolve issues with a clear process in a timely manner

An issue is identified as non- compliance with the BID policy

3.5, Requirement 24

BID Programme Funding Agreement (2021) Attachment B

Replaced BID Programme Agreement (2016)

Clarifies the relationship between the parties

3.1, Requirement 18

Size and scale of BID programmes

Minimum BID targeted rate grant $120,000

No change from 2016

Minimum BID targeted rate grant $120,000 remains

A new requirement for legacy BID programmes (11 in total) that currently receive less than $120,000pa to increase their targeted rate up to that amount over the next five years

A variety of options are suggested to achieve this

This requirement is a result of local board feedback on concerns to continually fund non-financially sustainable BID programmes

 

1.4, Requirement 3 and 4

Exceptional or unexpected circumstances

Council may, at its discretion, depart from the requirement set out in section 2.4 (25% of total voting forms must be returned for the ballot to be valid)

Council will consider evidence of support to date, what is fair and any impact from amending the voting threshold mandate

 

3.4.2

BID operating business association constitution (template 2016)

This supporting document was included as part of the current policy and now removed from the BID Policy (2021)

This allows the business association to amend their constitution to suit their local needs, on the basis it’s not inconsistent with the BID policy

A template document is provided on the www.bid.auckland.govt.nz website

1.1, 2.3.2 Requirement 12

BID operating executive committee board charter (template 2016)

This supporting document was included as part of the current policy and now removed from the BID Policy (2021)

This allows the business association to amend their board charter to suit their local needs, on the basis it’s not inconsistent with the BID policy

A template document is provided on the www.bid.auckland.govt.nz website

1.1, 2.3.2 Requirement 12

31.     Minor changes made to the draft BID Policy (2021) are set out in Table 4 below:

Table 4 - Minor changes made to the draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents

Minor changes to current policy

Description

Note

2021 section, page

Other council funding

 

Organisational view on risk regarding BID-operating business association receiving other council funding

The draft BID policy acknowledges other council funding grants allocated to BID-operating business associations

2.3.4, Requirement 16

Local boards – other roles

 

Updated

Refer to elected member conflicts of interest policy

A link to these documents can be found here

2.5.3

BID Annual Accountability Report (2021) Attachment C

Name change from BID Annual Accountability Agreement (2016)

To include BID targeted rate grant amount and copy of AGM resolution

3.2, Requirement 22, Table 2, item 9

Audit – provision for a review audit or full audit

Recognition of increased risk and increased reporting requirement based on the amount of targeted rate received

Set as a sliding scale

BID targeted rate grants less than $200,000pa must commission a review audit

BID targeted rate grants more than $200,000pa must commission a full audit

3.2, Requirement 23, Table 2, item 4

Rating mechanism - flat rate

Lifted the maximum flat rate amount from $500 to $900 per rateable property

To provide more flexibility for BID-operating business associations when considering BID programme budgets and the impact of BID targeted rates on ratepayers

3.1.2

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

32.     The BID Policy (2021) focuses on the governance and accountability for BID-operating business associations. Individually the BID programme, through targeted rate-funding, can focus on advocacy and activities.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     Formal feedback will be sought from other council teams including CCOs and those who work and have an interested in the BID programme and business community space.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     Local boards have engaged with the review of the BID Policy (2016) and their informal feedback has been incorporated into the draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents. Table 1 outlines local board engagement to date.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     Officers are working with Auckland Council’s Ngā Mātārae Unit to ensure that the BID Policy (2021) aligns with the Auckland Council Māori Responsiveness Framework. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     There are no financial implications for local boards under the draft BID Policy (2021).

37.     Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from commercial ratepayers in the district and used by the business association for improvements within that rohe. The council’s financial role is to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the association every quarter.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     There are no direct financial risks to the local board or the council that could result from the draft BID Policy (2021) and supporting documents.

39.     The policy describes the balance between the independence of the BID-operating business association and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

40.     The draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents set out the requirements and obligations for BID-operating business associations and are intended to help minimise the potential for business associations to misuse BID targeted rate funds by requiring each BID to plan for their intended use, report on its activities to its members, and to undertake and meet all requirements set out in the policy.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     Following formal feedback received from local boards, CCOs, BID-operating business associations, non-BID business associations, council departments, other external stakeholders and those with an interest in BID programmes, a final BID Policy (2021) and support documents will be updated, and the steps outlined in Table 5 below will be completed by the BID team:

Table 5 - Progress to completion

Date

Progress

2021

August

·    Draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents updated to post Finance and Performance Committee workshop feedback

Mid-August to 1 October

·    Draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents distributed to local boards, BID-operating business associations, council departments, CCOs and other stakeholders for formal feedback

·    Update www.bid.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz website with feedback link

·    Feedback open 24 August to 1 October

October

·    Update draft BID Policy (2021) and supporting documents incorporating formal feedback

9 December

·    Presentation of final version of BID Policy (2021) and support documents to Finance and Performance Committee meeting

2022

January/February

·    Post Finance and Performance approval actions, communications with local boards, BID-operating business associations, all stakeholders, and update www.bid.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz website

March to June

·    BID Policy (2021) communication, support and advice

·    The BID team will provide assistance to the 50 BID-operating business associations to comply with the BID Policy (2021), including guidance with aligning their individual constitutions and governance documents to meet the timing of their 2022 AGM timeframes

42.     The BID Policy (2021), if approved by the Finance and Performance Committee in December 2021, would become operational on 1 July 2022. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

15 September 2021 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Draft BID Policy (2021)

385

b

15 September 2021 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - BID Funding Agreement

407

c

15 September 2021 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - BID Annual Accountability Report

419

d

15 September 2021 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Draft BID Policy requirements

421

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Claire Siddens - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

15 September 2021

 

 

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