I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee will be held on:

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 9 September 2021

10.00am

This meeting will be held remotely and can be viewed on the Auckland Council website:  https://councillive.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

 

Kōmiti Whakarite Pārae, Mahi Toi, Hapori, Kaupapa

Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

MEMBERSHIP

Chairperson

Cr Alf Filipaina

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

 

Members

Cr Josephine Bartley

IMSB Member Mr Terrence Hohneck

 

Deputy Mayor Cr Bill Cashmore

Cr Tracy Mulholland

 

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Cr Pippa Coom

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Angela Dalton

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Chris Darby

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

Cr John Watson

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

Cr Paul Young

 

Cr Shane Henderson

IMSB Member Mr Glenn Wilcox

 

Cr Richard Hills

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

Maea Petherick

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

 

6 September 2021

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 890 8136

Email: maea.petherick@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


 

Terms of Reference

 

Responsibilities

 

This committee deals with the development and monitoring of strategy, policy and action plans associated with community, social and cultural activities. The committee will establish an annual work programme outlining key focus areas in line with its key responsibilities, which include:

 

·       The Southern Initiative and The Western Initiative

·       sports and recreation, including parks and reserves

·       community facilities and community services

·       acquisition of property relating to the committee’s responsibilities and in accordance with the LTP

·       grants for regional events, arts and cultural and heritage organisations, indoor sports and leisure and for the regional community development programme

·       economic development

·       arts and culture

·       community safety

·       community engagement

·       community development

·       homelessness

·       working with the six demographic advisory panels to give visibility to the issues important to their communities and help effect change

·       working with the Auckland Domain Committee to give visibility to the issues important to the Domain and to help effect change.

 

Powers

 

(i)         All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities, including:

(a)        approval of a submission to an external body

(b)        establishment of working parties or steering groups.

(ii)        The committee has the powers to perform the responsibilities of another committee, where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee.

(iii)       If a policy or project relates primarily to the responsibilities of the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee, but aspects require additional decisions by the Planning Committee and/or the Environment and Climate Change Committee, then the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee has the powers to make associated decisions on behalf of those other committee(s). For the avoidance of doubt, this means that matters do not need to be taken to more than one of these committees for decisions.

(iv)       The committee does not have:

(a)        the power to establish subcommittees

(b)        powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2).

 

Code of conduct

 

For information relating to Auckland Council’s elected members code of conduct, please refer to this link on the Auckland Council website - https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/elected-members-remuneration-declarations-interest/Pages/elected-members-code-conduct.aspx

 

 

Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·         Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·         Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·         Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·         In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·         The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·         However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·         All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·         Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·         Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·         All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·         Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·         Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·         Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                 7

2          Declaration of Interest                                          7

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         7

4          Petitions                                                                 7  

5          Public Input                                                           7

6          Local Board Input                                                 7

7          Extraordinary Business                                       8

8          Summary of Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee Information - updates, memos and briefings - 9 September 2021         9

9          Summary of Confidential Decisions and related information released into the Open     11

10        Review of the Forward Work Programme - Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee                                                                              13

11        Reserve Revocation - Part 331 Great North Road, Henderson                                                27

12        Progress update on implementation of Auahi Kore Hapori Whānui as part of the Implementation Plan of the Council's Smokefree Policy                                                41

13        I Am Auckland Implementation and Evaluation Annual Update 2021                                           63

14        Toi Whītiki current state report and recommendations                                             125

15        Proposed variation of agreement to facilitate transfer of land at 50 Tihi Street, Stonefields (Covering report)                                              313

16        Regional Event Fund Grants Allocation 2021/2022                                                           315

17        Regional Arts and Culture grant allocation: round one 2021/2022                                        417

18        Future management of motorised vehicles driving on Muriwai Beach                                435

19        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 8 July 2021, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public input had been received.

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 


 

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 

Summary of Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee Information - updates, memos and briefings - 9 September 2021

File No.: CP2021/06458

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a public record of memos, workshops or briefing papers that have been distributed for the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee’s (PACE) information since 8 July 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This is regular information-only report which aims to provide public visibility of information circulated to committee members via memo or other means, where no decisions are required.

3.       The following papers/memos were circulated to members:

Date

Subject

13/7/2021

Memorandum - Revised timeline for delivery of the draft Regional Parks Management Plan

27/7/2021

Memorandum – Update on Te Onekiritea Point (Bomb Point) acquisition CONFIDENTIAL

3/8/2021

Memorandum – 1167 Beach Road, Long Bay acquisition for integration into the Long Bay Regional Park

5/8/2021

Confidential Memorandum – Joint Finance and Performance / Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committees – Significance and Engagement Policy

5/8/2021

Email – Media: Auckland Cemeteries, Manukau Memorial Gardens

27/8/2021

Memorandum - Removal of Overdue Library Fines

 

4.       The following workshops/briefings have taken place:

Date

Workshop/briefing

4/8/2021

CONFIDENTIAL WORKSHOP: Finance and Performance Committee/PACE Committee (Significance and Engagement Policy)

18/8/2021

Te Kete Rukuruku Māori Naming Programme – Inclusion of Regional Parks

25/8/2021

CONFIDENTIAL WORKSHOP: Future Management of motorised vehicles on Muriwai Beach

 

 


 

 

5.       These documents can be found on the Auckland Council website, at the following link: http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

·   at the top of the left page, select meeting “Park, Arts, Community and Events Committee” from the drop-down tab and click ‘view’;

·   under ‘attachments’, select either the HTML or PDF version of the document entitled ‘extra attachments’.

6.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary. Committee members should direct any questions to the authors.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      receive the summary of the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee report – 9 September 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memorandum - Revised timeline for delivery of the draft Regional Parks Management Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Memorandum - Update on Te Onekiritea Point (Bomb Point) acquisition CONFIDENTIAL and not included

 

c

Memorandum - 1167 Beach Road, Long Bay acquisition for integration into the Long Bay Regional Park (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Email – Media: Auckland Cemeteries, Manukau Memorial Gardens (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Memorandum - Removal of Overdue Library Fines (Under Separate Cover)

 

f

Workshop - Te Kete Rukuruku Māori Naming Programme – Inclusion of Regional Parks (Under Separate Cover)

 

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maea Petherick - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 

Summary of Confidential Decisions and related information released into the Open

File No.: CP2021/13112

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note confidential decisions and related information released into the public domain.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This is a regular information-only report which aims to provide greater visibility of confidential decisions made that can now be released into the public domain.

3.       The following decisions/documents are now publicly available:

Date of Decision

Subject

10/12/2020

Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund September 2020/2021 funding round allocation decision

 

4.       These documents can be found on the Auckland Council website, at the following link: http://infocouncil.auckland.govt.nz

·    at the top left of the page, select meeting ”Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee from the drop-down tab and click “View”;

·    under ‘Attachments’, select either the HTML or PDF version of the document entitled ‘Extra Attachments

5.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the item referred to in this summary.  Parks, Arts, Community and Event Committee members should direct any questions to the authors of the original item.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      note the report and attachments will remain confidential the confidential decision is now publicly available:

i)       Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund September 2020/2021 funding round allocation

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund September 2020/2021 funding round allocation decision (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maea Petherick - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 

Review of the Forward Work Programme - Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

File No.: CP2021/13181

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To review and note progress on the 2021 Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee forward work programme appended as Attachment A.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The forward work programme for the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee was adopted by the committee at its meeting held on 20 August 2020.  It was agreed that the forward work programme would be reported for information and reviewed on a six-monthly basis.

3.       Due to the uncertainty of the meeting schedule during 2020, and the adoption of an Emergency Budget, the committee forward work programmes have not had a full review since originally being approved.

4.       The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee work programme was reviewed in February 2021.

5.       The Governing Body has now adopted the Recovery Budget (10-year Budget 2021-2031) and committee forward work programmes should reflect those decisions.

6.       All committees need to review their forward work programme, by the end of September, following the adoption of the budget each year. A further review needs to be carried out by the end of March each year.

7.       Following approval, all committee forward work programmes will be reported to the Governing Body in October and April each year, for oversight as per the Terms of Reference.

8.       To expedite the above process, it has been agreed to report the committee forward work programmes to the Governing Body at its meeting on 23 September 2021.

9.       The current forward work programme for the Parks, Arts, Community and Events is appended as Attachment A.

10.     Specific amendments have been made [since the last review in February 2021 or since initial approval], as follows;

i)       reporting on the Long-term plan and adopted policies have been moved to the “completed” section of the document.

ii)       any new additions will be highlighted in red text

iii)      any deletions will be shown in strikethrough.

11.     Following the approval of the forward work programme, it will be reported to the Governing Body in October and April each year, for oversight as per the Terms of Reference.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      Review and note progress on the 2021 Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee forward work programme.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Parks, Arts, Community and Events 2021 Forward Work Programme Update

15

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maea Petherick - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 

 

Kōmiti Whakarite Parae, Mahi Toi, Hapori, Kaupapa / Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee
Forward Work Programme 2021

This committee deals with the development and monitoring of strategic policies and action plans associated with regional parks, libraries, arts, communities and events.

The full terms of reference can be found here: Auckland Council Governing Body Terms of Reference

This committee meets bi-monthly commencing in March 2021

 

Area of work and Lead Department

Reason for work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Expected timeframes

Highlight the month(s) this is expected to come to committee in 2021

 

no meeting

Mar

No meeting

May

No meeting

Jul

No meeting

Sept

No meeting

Nov

No meeting

2022

 

Regional Sport and Recreation Facilities Operational Grant

Allocate $1,023,000 1,063,053 per annum (allowed for in the LTP) following community Access Scheme being repurposed to a contestable grant.

$1,063,053 is available in the new contestable operations grant budget. This is inclusive of both the Community Access Scheme budget and $40,053 that has been transferred from the Regional Transitional Rates Grants, which comes to an end in June 2021.

Decision: funding allocation approval for 2021/2022

 

Progress to date:

To allocate the 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 Regional Sport and Recreation Facilities Operating Grant

8 July 2021 - link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

ü

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan and Parks and Open Spaces Strategic Action Plan

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Status report on implementation plan

Update: implementation and progress update, joint report with the Parks and Open Spaces Strategic Action Plan update

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aktive and the Auckland Regional Sports Trusts

 

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Approval of $552,000 strategic partnership grant to Aktive Auckland & Sport to deliver on agreed priority initiatives.

 

 

Decision: allocation of strategic partnership grant funding

 

Progress to date:

to approve an approach for investment for 2021/2022 of $552,00 allcoated for sport and recreation outcomes, budgeted for in the Long-term plan 2021-2031

8 July 2021 - link to decision

 

 

 

July

 

ü

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Sport and Recreation grants programme

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Review of previous grants allocation and recommendation for next round

Decision: funding allocation approval for 2021/2022

Progress to date:

To allocate funding from the Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme 2021/2022 and to approve the Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme 2022/2023 opening and closing dates and funding budget of $508,000

8 July 2021 – link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

ü

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Sport & Recreation Facility Investment Fund

 

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Purpose of the fund is the allocate $120 million over ten years to support the development of regional and sub-regional sport and recreation facilities across Auckland.

Decision: funding allocation approval for 2021/2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November

 

 

 

 

 

Golf Investment Plan

 

Community and Social Policy

Council’s strategic approach to outcomes, priorities and investment in golf.

Decision: approval to consult publicly on  a draft investment plan

Workshop next steps

 

 

 

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Options to expand revenue streams for sport facilities investment

 

 

Community and Social Policy

Provide strategic direction to expand revenue streams to fund future sports facilities investment in the draft Sports Facilities Investment Plan

Decision or Update Direction to expand revenue streams to fund future sports facilities investment in the draft Sports Facilities Investment Plan  

 

Elected members referred this to the LTP/Annual Plan process

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Active Recreation Investment and Visitor Experience

 

Community and Social Policy

Councils strategic approach to outcome, priorities and investment for active walking, cycling, waterways and visitor experience on open space, parks, and regional parks

Decision: on scope and phasing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Takaro – Investing in play discussion document

 

 

Community and Social Policy

Development of a play investment plan

Decision: consider and approve for public release - timing to be confirmed

 

 

No approval to start

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Parks Management Plan Review

 

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships

Reserve Act Classification update for Regional Parks

 

Decision:  Reserves Act classifications

 

Duplicate will be removed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Parks Management Plan Review

 

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships

Statutory review of the omnibus regional parks’ management plan

Reports:

·      Regional Parks Management Plan - approval to notify intent to prepare new plan

Decision: consider and approve scope, phasing and engagement approach

 

Progress to date:

Public notification of discussion paper for consultation 20 August 2020 - link to decision

 

Information Memorandum – Regional Parks Management Plan

15 October 2020 - link to memo

 

Information Memorandum – Regional Parks Management Plan

11 March 2021 - link to memo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November

 

 

 

 

 

Auckland Paths

 

Parks, Sports and Recreation

 

Report on implementation plan

 

Nothing to update

Inform: note progress (workshop or memo) - Timing to be confirmed

 

No update / this work is on going

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One Local Initiatives (OLIs)

One Local Initiatives

 

Community and Social Policy, as well as Community Facilities

 

 

Status update on non-transport “One Local Initiatives”. 

Inform:update on progress and implementation

 

 

 

completed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Economic Development

The Southern Initiative (TSI)

Chief Planning Office

 

Provide an update on both the The Southern Initiative and The Western Initiative approach, priorities and achievements.

Inform: Strategic direction regarding both the Southern Initiative and the Western Initiative approach to social and community innovation in South Auckland and West Auckland.

 

 

 

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Social, Community, Cultural Services and Infrastructure

Cultural Initiatives Fund /

Marae Programme

Māori Outcomes

Council partners with marae in a number of ways.  A large part of the marae programme across council is in two parts - the Marae Infrastructure Programme, which seeks to deliver safe, healthy and warm marae, and the Cultural Initiatives Fund, which is a contestable grant open to marae and papakāinga.  The interim guidelines for both programmes have been adopted by PACE.  Both are due for review.  .

Reports:

·    Marae Infrastructure Programme- Funding Allocation Guideline

·    Cultural Initiative Fund

·    Te Atatū Marae – land tenure

·    Cultural Initiative Fund – 2021/2022 Grants

Decision:  adopt revised/updated guidelines for Marae Infrastructure Programme and Cultural Initiatives Fund.  Confirm the grants to be made to marae and papakāinga housing from the CIF contestable grant round for 2021/22

 

Progress to date:

Marae Infrastructure Programme – Interim Funding Guideline

13 February 2020 - link to decision

 

June deferred to August

 

Cultural Initiatives Fund grants for marae pakāinga/ Māori housing 2020/2021

20 August 2020 - link to decision

 

Revise out of date resolutions in relation to the development of a marae on Te Atatū Peninsula

15 October 2020 - link to decision

 

To review and approve the Cultural Initiatives Funding grant for marae development and papakāinga/Maori housing for the 2021/2022 financial year.

8 July 2021 – link to decision

 

 

 

 

July

 

ü

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Māori Outcomes Framework

Nga Matarae

Development of the Māori Outcomes Framework to guide Council’s evolved approach to achieving outcomes for Māori

Decision: July report on the final measures for ‘Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau – a Māori performance measurement framework

November – quarter 1 report on measures

Progress to date:

Māori outcomes framework - Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau 

20 August 2020 - link to decision

 

To seek approval of Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau - Māori outcomes Performance Measurement Framework

8 July 2021 – link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

ü

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Facility Partnerships Policy Implementation

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

Update and approval of facility partnership opportunities progressed through the application of the Facility Partnerships Policy

Consider:

 

 

 

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Graffiti Prevention Action Plan

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

(Arts Community & Events)

A regional, integrated approach to preventing graffiti vandalism was confirmed through the 2012 Auckland Graffiti Vandalism Prevention Plan.

This approach has been reviewed and updated in 2019, in the context of a refreshed approach to prevention and enforcement and an acknowledgment of the significant success of the rapid removal methodology.

Decision: on the strategic direction

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Homelessness

 

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

 

(Arts, Community & Events)

& Community & Social Policy

 

Implementing position and role on homelessness

Reports:

·    Implementing a cross-sectoral approach to homelessness

 

Decision:on council commitment and implementation action.

Progress to date:

June 2020 – deferred to August

 

Endorsement of the Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa (Auckland’s regional cross-sectoral homelessness plan) Strategic Framework

20 August 2020 - link to decision

 

Information Memorandum: Update on COVID19 and post-COVID19 support for people who are homeless

20 August 2020 - link to memo

 

Information Memorandum: A Night Shelter in Auckland

15 October 2020 - link to memo

 

Information Memorandum: Snapshot Homelessnes Statistics

13 May 2021 - link to memo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Safe Communities

 

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

(Arts Community & Events) 

In February 2019 the Community Development and Safety Committee endorsed the draft application (COM/2019/2), and Auckland became and accredited Safe Community in May 2019. This is now in operation through the Safety Collective Tamaki Makaurau I Auckland of which Auckland Council is a member.

Decision: On strategic direction. The committee will be asked to consider and endorse the work of the Safety Collective since Safe Communities Accreditation was achieved in mid-2019.

Consider: Committee-police regular engagement via this committee.

 

Progress to date:

20 August 2020 deferred to October 2020

 

Information Memorandum: The Safety Collective

20 August 2020 - link to memo

 

Public Input from the Safety Collective Tamaki Makaurau

15 October 2020 - link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Event Fund Grants Allocation

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

(Arts, Community & Events)

 

Regional Events grants

2019/20 Round 2 - 2020/21 Round 1

Two rounds per year

The two annual funding rounds held in recent years have been combined into one round for the 2020/2021 year

Reports:

·    Regional Event Fund Grants Allocation 2019/2020 - Round Two, Strategic Priorities

·      Regional Event Fund Grants Allocation 2020/2021

Decision: Funding allocations for the regional event fund 2019/2020 round two and 2020/2021 round one for approval.

 

Progress to date:

Grant allocations for 2019/2020 Regional Event Fund round two

13 February 2020 - link to decision

 

Report June 2020 – deferred to August

 

Grant allocations for the 2020/2021 Regional Event Grant Programme

20 August 2020 - link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

September

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Arts & Culture Grants

 

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships (Arts, Community & Events)

 

Regional Arts & Culture grants

2019/20 Round 2

2020/21 Round 1

Two round per year

Reports:

·    Regional Arts and Culture grant allocation: Round two 2019/2020

·    ACE regional contestable grants priorities FY 20/21

·    Regional Arts and Culture grant allocation 2020/2021

 

 

Decision: Funding allocations for the regional arts and culture fund 2019/2020 round two and 2020/2021 round one for approval.

 

Progress to date:

2019/2020 Regional Arts and Culture grants programme

20 August 2020 -  link to decision

 

2020/2021 Regional Arts and Culture grants programme

10 December 2020 - link to decision

 

Information Memorandum – to provide and update on the outcomes achieved by the Regional Arts and Culture grants programme 2019/2020

13 May 2021 – link to memo

 

Presentation: an overview on outcomes of funding received through the Regional Arts and Culture grants programme round two 2019/2020.

13 May 2021 – link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Community Development Grants

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

(Arts, Community & Events)

 

Regional Community Development grants

2019/2020 – one round per year

Reports:

·    Regional Community Development grants 2019/2020

·    Regional Community Development grants 2020/2021

 

Decision: Funding allocations for the regional community development fund for approval.

 

Progress to date:

Allocations for the Regional Community Development grants 2019/2020

13 February 2020 - link to decision

 

Allocations for the Regional Community Development grants 2020/2021

10 December 2020 - link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arts & Culture Work Programme FY22

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

To present the Arts & Culture work programme for approval for FY22.

This will include public art outside the city centre.

Note:public art within the city centre will be considered by the Planning Committee.

Decision: approval of Arts & Culture Work Programme

 

Progress to date

Seek approval of the 2021/2022 Arts and Culture Regional Work Programme

8 July 2021 – link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

ü

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Events Work Programme FY22

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

 

To present the regional events work programme for FY22

July 2021

Regional Events Work Programme FY22

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

 

 

 

 

 

sept

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Implementation of improvements resulting from the review of the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012

Community & Social Policy

The committee resolved that staff report back on the implementation of approved improvementsresulting from the  review of the Community Occupancy Guideline 2012.

Decision: current state review and agree next steps

 

 

 

sept

 

 

 

Nov

 

 

 

 

 

Intercultural Cities Network

 

Community & Social Policy

Consideration of a proposal to join the Intercultural Cities Network to support implementation and monitoring of progress on ‘Inclusive Auckland’ actions.

Decision: Consider and decide whether Auckland should be a member of the network

No scope approved

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Investing in Aucklanders (Age Friendly City)

 

Community & Social Policy

Identify issues and opportunities for an inclusive friendly city

The pilots will be designed and implemented over the next 18 months. Regular progress updates will be provided to this Committee.

Direction: on the approach to a friendly, inclusive, diverse city.

A draft Auckland Age-friendly Action Plan will be presented to PACE for approved consultation in early 2021. A final Action Plan is expected to come to PACE for endorsement in late 2021.

Incorporated into WHO Age Friendly programme

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHO Age Friendly City

 

Community & Social Policy

To develop an Age-friendly plan for Auckland and join the WHO Age-Friendly Cities and Communities Network

Decision: on the Age-friendly plan to join the WHO Age-Friendly Cities and Communities Network

Progress to date:

Update on the Age-friendly Auckland Project, Tāmaki tuawhi kaumatua

15 October 2020 - link to memo

 

 

 

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thriving Communities Plan Refresh

 

Community & Social Policy

To implement the improvements identified in the 2018 Thriving Communities Status report including a refresh of the Thriving Communities Plan

Direction approve draft plan for public consultation

Progress to date:

Update elected members on key findings from community engagement we have undertaken to inform the refresh of the Thriving Communities Plan

8 July 2021 - link to memo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am Auckland Implementation and Evaluation Plan monitoring

 

Community & Social Policy

Annual implementation and evaluation report

Direction: approve three year status review

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grant Policy Monitoring

Community & Social Policy

Audit of the application of the Grants Policy

Decision:  on audit results

2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Toi Whitiki / Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan Strategy?

Community and Social Policy

Review of progress made on Toi Whitiki strategy. What has been achieved, what isworking well and what needs to change to improve investment and outcomes.

Decision: approve current state review and agree next steps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mt Albert Pool Indicative Business Case

Community and Social Policy

Indicitive Business Case approved for preparation.

Decision: approve preferred option

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

november

 

 

 

 

 

Smokefree Update Report

Community and Social Policy

Smokefree report back is due

Decision: approve priorities for 2021/2022

 

 

 

July

 

Sept

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Libraries and Information Services  Connected Communities

Fines and Charges

Libraries and Information

Connected Communities

 

Case developed for removing overdue fines from Auckland Libraries

Decision: to move case forward for consideration

Progress to date:

Information Memorandum – Proposal to remove Library Overdue Fines

11 March 2021 – link to memo

Information Memorandum – Library Fines Removal Update

8 July 20021 – link to memo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Libraries

Connected Communities

 

Work around the integration with customer services

Decision: on matters relating to regional aspects of the proposed integration (local boards will decide on local outcomes)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Investment and 10-Year Budget work programme

Community Facilities Network Plan priorities for Long-term Plan consideration

Service Strategy and Integration

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnership

Indicative business cases for CFNP priority actions to consider as part of the 2021-2031 Auckland Council Long-term Plan

Decision: on indicative business cases relating to CFNP priorities.

 

LTP – have a separate process

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strategic acquisition issues and opportunities

Community and Social Policy

Community Facilities

Understanding current acquisition issues and options.

Inform:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Growth programme

Community Facilities Regional Work Programmes

Community and Social Policy

Community Facilities

Update on proposed growth funding allocation for 2021-2022

Decision: on growth funding allocation

 

Progress to date:

To approve the 2021/2024 Community Facilities Regional Capital Work Programmes

8 July 2021 – link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

ü

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OTHER

Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women.

In early 2019, council affirmed its commitment to advancing the goals of the Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW).

Inform:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community Engagement

Democracy Services & Communication and Engagement

Community engagement, advance participatory democracy

Inform: progress and issues associated with enhancing community engagement and participation  (Significance and Engagement Policy)

(workshop): Joint workshop with Finance and Performance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Completed

Lead Department

Area of work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Decision

Youth Centres Review

 

Review councils assistance to youth centres

Decision: on review findings

council’s support to youth centres and non-council youth services 

11 June 2020 - link to decison

Regional Sport and Recreation grants programme 2018/2020

 

Review of previous grants allocation and recommendation for next round

Decision: on sport and recreation grants programme objectives and approach

 

allocation of funding 2020/2021 and approve funding budget of $508,000.

20 August 2020 link to decision

 

Community Facilities Network Plan and Action Plan

 

Update on progress of delivery.

Priority actions will be reflected in 2019/2020 work programmes and draft 2020/2021 work programmes subject to available resources

Consider: Annual update on progress of the Community Facilities Network Plan Delivery.

 

Report progress on implementation of the Community Facilities Network Action Plan (2019)

15 October 2020 - link to decision

Public Art Policy

 

Community and Social Policy

Review of the Public Arts Policy: what’s working what’s not.

Decision:

 

To seek approval of the 2020/2021 Public Art Regional Work Programme from the PACE (Parks, Arts, Community and Events) Committee.

15 October 2020link to decision

Citizens Advice Bureaux Services

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

(Arts, Community & Events)

Review of the Citizens Advice Bureaux Services

Staff to negotiate new funding and strategic relationship agreements with Auckland Citizens Advice Bureaux Services (ACABx) for the 2019-2021 period. This will also include working with ACABx to develop a regional network service provision framework to be completed by 30 September 2020.

 

Decision:on review

 

Form Citizens Advice Bureaux Service Framework Political Advisory Group

13 February 2020 – link to decision

 

Update about development of the Citizens Advice Bureaux (CAB) regional service provision framework and CAB insights report

15 October 2020 - link to decision

 

Community Access Scheme

 

Review of the Community Access Scheme.

Decision:approve the extension of the current Community Access Scheme funding agreements for one year, from 1 July to 30 June 2021, while a review of the scheme continues.

Extension of the current Community Access Scheme funding agreements for one year 20 August 2020 - link to decision

Approve repurposing the existing Community Access Scheme to a contestable operational grant

10 December 2020 - link to decision

Investigation in North-west Community Provision

Community and Social Policy

Investigation to identify andy current gaps in services or facilities or in the future

 

Decision: on investigation findings

 

Business case for a destination aquatic facility with leisure components

10 December 2020 - link to decision

Community Facilities Network Plan Sub Action: Central library strategic review

Libraries and Information and Community Social Policy

A strategic review of the Central Library has been commissioned to understand how the current building can meet future need and demand for services, assess the Central Library’s current and potential future role in the region, and guide decision making about future investment and development opportunities

 

Decision: consider the strategic review and decide on the direction of the plan, as well as receive the strategic review

 

 

Approval to develop a indicative business case for the central library / Tāmaki Pātaka Kōreo

10 December 2020 - link to decision

 

Governance of Colin Dale Park

Community and Social Policy

To decide on the governance arrangements for Colin Dale Park. The loical board has asked that the committee consider regional governance for the park.

Decision: Agree whether or not Colin Dale Park should be regionally governed.

 

Approve that the decision-making of the 44.3-hectare motorsport precinct (SEC 1 SO 422986) at Colin Dale Park be allocated to the governing body according with section 17(2) of the Local Government Auckland Council Act and be added to Schedule 1 of the Auckland Council Long-term Plan.

11 March 2021 - link to decision

The Demographic 

Advisory Panels

The six demographic panels will engage and report to the committee on a regular basis.

Decision: Endorsement of panel strategic work programmes. Expecting this to be split across two meetings.  Co-chairs to present where possible.

Demograpic Advisory Panels work programme

13 May 2021 - Link to decision

Alcohol Strategy three yearly review

Community and Social Policy

Three year review is due

 

Decision: approve refreshed alcohol strategy

 

seek approval to improve the Auckland council whānau approach to minimising alcohol related harm in Auckland communities

13 May 2021 - Link to decision

 

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 

Reserve Revocation - Part 331 Great North Road, Henderson

File No.: CP2021/12849

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To report on the results of the notification of the proposal to revoke the reserve status under s24 Reserves Act 1977 of part of 331 Great North Road, Henderson and to seek approval to submit a request to the Minister of Conservation to uplift the reserve status.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       331 Great North Road, Henderson is an esplanade reserve covering 1,902m2. Approximately 267m2 of the property is encroached upon by the adjacent Alderman Drive car park.

3.       The Finance and Performance Committee approved the encroached portion of 331 Great North Road for disposal on 22 April 2021 (FIN/2021/25), subject to the satisfactory conclusion of any required statutory processes.

4.       Eke Panuku Development Auckland has undertaken iwi and public notification under s24 Reserve Act 1977 on this property. No objections or submissions have been received.

5.       Eke Panuku Development Auckland now seeks a formal resolution from the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to approve the recommendation to request to the Minister of Conservation that the reserve status over this property be uplifted.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee (PACE):

a)   approve the submission of a request to the Minister of Conversation to uplift the reserve status of approximately 267m² of 331 Great North Road, Henderson comprised of an estate in fee simple being part Lot 1A DP 7645 contained in certificate of title NA70A/209.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       331 Great North Road is an esplanade reserve (Neweys Reserve) that extends to 1,902m2. The former owner bequeathed 331 Great North Road to the former Henderson Borough Council in 1987 for development as a park.  A small part of the property was used for road widening purposes and a residential building was relocated off the site in 1988. Images of the property are contained in Attachment A to this report.

7.       There is an encroachment at the northern end of the property, where the adjoining Alderman car park occupies approximately 267 m2 of the site. The encroachment is formed as an at grade car park with a retaining wall separating the encroachment from the rest of the property.

8.       Eke Panuku is seeking to legalise the encroachment by uplifting the reserve status of the encroached portion and amalgamating it with the adjoining car park. This will enable the car park to be disposed of for urban renewal purposes as part of Eke Panuku’s Unlock Henderson Programme.

9.       The adjacent Alderman Drive car park at 4-10 Edmonton Road has been approved for sale as part of Unlock Henderson and is intended to be redeveloped for urban renewal purposes. The Alderman Drive car park is located at the heart of the Oratia (Eco) precinct and is central to the ‘Urban Eco Centre’ vision for Henderson. The site was sponsored by the Mayoral office as Auckland’s entry into the C40 Reinventing Cities competition, a global initiative inviting innovative low carbon design. A development agreement was subsequently signed with the preferred party identified through this process.

10.     Through negotiations with the developer an opportunity to include the 267m2 parcel of 331 Great North Road into the proposed low carbon development was identified. This will enhance the development potential of the site without resulting in a loss of open space amenity as the land is currently formed as carpark. It will also allow additional public realm projects to be progressed and provided as part of Unlock Henderson as sales proceeds from the 267m2 parcel will be utilised for projects with public good outcomes including proposed upgrades on the balance of the reserve.

11.     The Finance and Performance Committee approved the encroached portion of 331 Great North Road for disposal on 22 April 2021 (FIN/2021/25), subject to the satisfactory conclusion of any required statutory processes.

12.     The current zoning of the property is Open Space – Conservation Zone and a plan change for the parcel of land to the adjacent Business – Metropolitan Centre Zone will be completed in due course.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     The reserve revocation process commenced on 22 June 2021, with iwi being notified of the proposal and a public notice was placed in the Western Leader. The notice was also placed on the Council’s website and letters were sent to the three adjoining owners (Attachment B).

14.     No submissions were received.

15.     Eke Panuku requests that the PACE Committee approves the request to the Minister of Conservation to uplift the reserve status of this property on the basis that it is not required for reserve purposes. The revocation of reserve status is required if the encroachment is to be legalised and the disposal process is to be completed.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     The proposed sale of this parcel will lead to land use changes. It is acknowledged that any form of construction and development can increase carbon emissions. The proposal to utilise the parcel as part of the medium density low carbon C40 development will have a minimal increase on emissions associated with development and construction given the innovative low carbon design associated with the development.

17.     Key features of the design include high density development (68 residential units); a low ratio of car parks to units; on-site photovoltaic energy systems; low carbon construction materials; and on-site stormwater management.

18.     In addition, Eke Panuku is recommending that a 12-metre esplanade strip be retained for the length of the adjacent former Alderman Drive car park site to minimise any potential risks from stream erosion.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     Council's Parks, Sports and Recreation department has confirmed the subject 267m2 parcel has limited recreation value due to its location and configuration as car parking and support the proposed disposal.  Panuku consulted all relevant council departments and CCOs on the proposed disposal. No substantive feedback was received in response.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     Eke Panuku attended Henderson-Massey Local Board workshops in February and November 2020.  Board members also attended a site meeting with Eke Panuku staff in July 2020.

21.     At its 8 December 2020 business meeting, the Henderson-Massey Local Board endorsed the recommendation to revoke the reserve status and dispose of the approximately 267m2 parcel of 331 Great North Road for urban renewal purposes (HM/2020/194).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     The following Mana Whenua iwi authorities were consulted over the proposed revocation of the reserve status:

a)   Ngāti Wai

An initial email sent to Iwi on 3 March 2020 regarding the proposal to redraw the boundary of the reserve, and another email was sent on 22 June 2021 regarding the proposed reserve revocation. No response was received regarding this property.

b)   Ngāti Manuhiri

An initial email sent to Iwi on 3 March 2020 regarding the proposal to redraw the boundary of the reserve, and another email was sent on 22 June 2021 regarding the proposed reserve revocation. No response was received regarding this property.

c)   Ngāti Rehua

An initial email sent to Iwi on 3 March 2020 regarding the proposal to redraw the boundary of the reserve, and another email was sent on 22 June 2021 regarding the proposed reserve revocation. No response was received regarding this property.

d)   Te Runanga o Ngāti Whātua

An initial email sent to Iwi on 3 March 2020 regarding the proposal to redraw the boundary of the reserve, and another email was sent on 22 June 2021 regarding the proposed reserve revocation. No response was received regarding this property.

e)   Te Uri o Hau

An initial email sent to Iwi on 3 March 2020 regarding the proposal to redraw the boundary of the reserve, and another email was sent on 22 June 2021 regarding the proposed reserve revocation. No response was received regarding this property.

f)    Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

An initial email sent to Iwi on 3 March 2020 regarding the proposal to redraw the boundary of the reserve, and another email was sent on 22 June 2021 regarding the proposed reserve revocation. No response was received regarding this property.

g)   Ngāti Whatua Orakei

An initial email sent to Iwi on 3 March 2020 regarding the proposal to redraw the boundary of the reserve, and another email was sent on 22 June 2021 regarding the proposed reserve revocation. No response was received regarding this property.

h)   Te Kawerau ā Maki

An initial email sent to Iwi on 3 March 2020 regarding the proposal to redraw the boundary of the reserve, and another email was sent on 22 June 2021 regarding the proposed reserve revocation. No response was received regarding this property.

 


 

i)    Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

An initial email sent to Iwi on 3 March 2020 regarding the proposal to redraw the boundary of the reserve, and another email was sent on 22 June 2021 regarding the proposed reserve revocation. No response was received regarding this property.

j)    Ngāti Tamaoho

An initial email sent to Iwi on 3 March 2020 regarding the proposal to redraw the boundary of the reserve, and another email was sent on 22 June 2021 regarding the proposed reserve revocation. No response was received regarding this property.

k)   Te Ākitai – Waiohua

An initial email sent to Iwi on 3 March 2020 regarding the proposal to redraw the boundary of the reserve, and another email was sent on 22 June 2021 regarding the proposed reserve revocation. Apart from an email requesting clarification, no further correspondence was received regarding this property.

l)    Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

An initial email sent to Iwi on 3 March 2020 regarding the proposal to redraw the boundary of the reserve, and another email was sent on 22 June 2021 regarding the proposed reserve revocation. No response was received regarding this property.

m)  Te Ahiwaru

An initial email sent to Iwi on 3 March 2020 regarding the proposal to redraw the boundary of the reserve, and another email was sent on 22 June 2021 regarding the proposed reserve revocation. No response was received regarding this property.

n)   Ngāti Paoa

An initial email sent to Iwi on 3 March 2020 regarding the proposal to redraw the boundary of the reserve, and another email was sent on 22 June 2021 regarding the proposed reserve revocation. No response was received regarding this property.

o)   Ngaati Whanaunga

An initial email sent to Iwi on 3 March 2020 regarding the proposal to redraw the boundary of the reserve, and another email was sent on 22 June 2021 regarding the proposed reserve revocation. No response was received regarding this property.

p)   Ngāti Maru

An initial email sent to Iwi on 3 March 2020 regarding the proposal to redraw the boundary of the reserve, and another email was sent on 22 June 2021 regarding the proposed reserve revocation. No response was received regarding this property.

q)   Ngāti Tamatera

An initial email sent to Iwi on 3 March 2020 regarding the proposal to redraw the boundary of the reserve, and another email was sent on 22 June 2021 regarding the proposed reserve revocation. No response was received regarding this property.

r)   Patukirikiri

An initial email sent to Iwi on 3 March 2020 regarding the proposal to redraw the boundary of the reserve, and another email was sent on 22 June 2021 regarding the proposed reserve revocation. No response was received regarding this property.

23.       A copy of the iwi notification email is set out in Attachment C of this report.

 


 

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The overall C40 development will not be materially impacted if the reserve revocation is not approved and the disposal is unable to be progressed. The planned Oratia cycleway/walkway link through the reserve will still proceed, but may not include landscaping of the existing retaining wall. The subject 267m2 area would likely remain in its current form, concrete and asphalt isolated from the rest of the reserve by the retaining wall and elevation. The C40 development will have other entrances.

25.     Any sales proceeds from the subject 267m2 area would be minimal given its size and configuration but would still be a contribution to the Transform and Unlock sales proceeds budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     The subject parcel is separated from the rest of the reserve by a change in elevation and a wooden retaining wall (see Figure 3 in Attachment A). It has been identified that the retaining wall has a limited lifespan. Retaining the 267m2 parcel in council ownership will result in any risk associated with the retaining wall and ongoing operational costs remaining with council.

27.     The proposed disposal of the 267m2 parcel will remove this risk to council. Mitigation of the risks associated with the wooden retaining wall are included in the scope of the Oratia cycleway/walkway link and could include a landscaped interface between the C40 development and the remainder of the reserve. An artist's impression of a possible landscaped outcome is included as Figure 4 in attachment A.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     If the committee resolves to recommend proceeding with the application to revoke the reserve status of the property, staff will forward the resolution to the Department of Conservation. 

29.     If the Minster approves the request, a notice will be published in the New Zealand Gazette authorising the revocation, and this will be submitted to Land Information New Zealand for issue of titles.

30.     Eke Panuku will also seek to change the zoning from open space to the adjacent Business – Metropolitan Centre Zone. Eke Panuku will work with the developer to determine the best timeframe for the completion of the disposal process for this property.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Images

33

b

Public notice

37

c

Iwi notification

39

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moira Faumui - Portfolio Research Analyst, Eke Panuku Development Auckland

Authorisers

Letitia Edwards - Head of Strategic Asset Optimisation, Eke Panuku Development Auckland

John Carter – Priority Location Director – West Auckland, Eke Panuku Development Auckland

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 

Progress update on implementation of Auahi Kore Hapori Whānui as part of the Implementation Plan of the Council's Smokefree Policy

File No.: CP2021/13110

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a progress update on the implementation of Auahi Kore Hapori Whānui as part of the Implementation Plan of the Council’s Smokefree Policy 2017 – 2025 and seek approval of the 2021/22 priorities.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In March 2011, the Government set a goal for New Zealand to be Smokefree by 2025. Specifically, this goal requires fewer than 5 per cent of New Zealanders to be smokers in 2025. Auckland Council also committed to a smokefree region by 2025. Our key strategies to achieve this are Auahi Kore Hapori Whānui: action for smokefree communities, and the Implementation Plan of the Council’s Smokefree Policy 2017 – 2025.

3.       To reach the national smokefree 2025 goal, 7,000 to 8,000 Māori and Pacific peoples in Tāmaki Makaurau would need to stop smoking each year over the next four years.

4.       We have successfully implemented a range of activities in target communities during 2020/21.  Actions focused on activating smokefree public places, de-normalising smoking and motivating people in high smoking communities to begin/continue their quit journey.

5.       Partnering to activate smoke free places and disseminate ‘switch to quit’ messages is a key approach for the council’s auahi kore work. Staff have partnered with Hāpai te Hauora, a Māori public health provider, to plan and deliver our activities. Working in partnership with Hāpai has:

·          enhanced our collective reach with communities and health providers

·          ensured strong links to the broader health sector

·          provided access to data, research and evidence to guide our activities.

6.       A smokefree campaign is identified as a priority action under the Implementation Plan of the Council’s Smokefree Policy 2017 – 2025. Council focused the campaign in eight target locations with the highest smoking prevalence for Māori and Pacific peoples. The regional QuitStrong campaign delivered an additional 78,000 visits to Quitstrong.nz.

7.       Our 2021/22 priority actions continue to focus on activating smokefree activities and places that support wāhine Māori and Pacific men aged 22 to 45 years. We will also target locations and expand the reach of our auahi kore kaupapa for the groups and places that we have not yet reached.

8.       If we are unable to identify appropriate partners for delivery of programmes then there is a risk that it will not be possible to deliver some activities or they will be delivered less effectively. This risk will be mitigated by leveraging existing partnerships, focussing activities on a limited number of priority locations and using an adaptive management approach.

9.       We will report to the Committee on our 2021/22 actions and proposed 2022/23 actions in mid-2022.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      approve the 2021/2022 smokefree priority actions to support our target communities and populations: Māngere, Ōtāhuhu, Manurewa and Papakura, focusing on wāhine Māori and Pacific men aged 22-45 years and rangatahi/talavou youth aged 15-22 years.

 

Horopaki

Context

Auahi Kore Hapori Whānui - action for smokefree Tāmaki Makaurau communities

10.     In March 2011, the Government set a goal for New Zealand to be smokefree by 2025. Specifically, this goal requires fewer than 5 per cent of New Zealanders to be smokers in 2025.

11.     Auckland Council also committed to a smokefree region by 2025. The council made a public smokefree commitment so Aucklanders can enjoy a healthy, clean environment and public spaces without exposure to tobacco smoke and cigarette litter.

12.     The Implementation Plan of the Council’s Smokefree Policy 2017 – 2025 charts a path for achieving the smokefree goal in Tāmaki Makaurau [ENV/2017/142 refers].

13.     To further activate this commitment the council developed Auahi Kore Hapori Whānui: action for smokefree communities [ENV/2019/46 refers]. Auahi Kore Hapori Whānui sets out how Auckland Council will support, invest, and empower high smoking prevalence communities in Tāmaki Makaurau (see Figure 1).

14.     Smoking is a driver of health inequities. Eliminating smoking among target communities, age groups and rangatahi/talavou will help address health inequities. And increase whānau/fanau wellbeing.

Research indicates that the impact of smoking on Māori health inequities is significant. 
Lung cancer is the leading cause of death for wāhine Māori and the second leading cause for Māori men. 
Source: Ministry of Health. (2015). Tatau Kahukura: Māori Health Chart Book 2015. Retrieved from https://www.health.govt.nz/publication/tatau-kahukura-maori-health-chart-book-2015-3rd-edition [29/08/21].
 

 

 

 


The proportion of Māori and Pacific peoples in Tāmaki Makaurau who smoke is declining

15.     Based on 2018 census data, the proportion of Māori who smoke has dropped by five per cent and the proportion of Pacific peoples who smoke has dropped by two per cent.  Māori and Pacific peoples still have the highest smoking prevalence (see Figure 2).

16.     In Tāmaki Makaurau, there are more wāhine Māori smokers than male Māori smokers across all age groups and District Health Board areas. For Pacific peoples, there are more Pacific male smokers than Pacific female smokers across all age groups and District Health Board areas.

17.     To reach the National smokefree 2025 goal, 7,000 to 8,000 Māori and Pacific peoples in Tāmaki Makaurau would need to stop smoking each year over the next four years. The number of new Māori and Pacific smokers would also need to reduce to zero.

 

 

 

 

Figure 1. Auahi Kore Hapori Whānui roadmap

Figure 2. Infographic on high smoking prevalence (2018)

 

 

 

 

 

2020/2021 smokefree activities were delayed in response to COVID-19

 

18.     Council’s focus in 2020/21 was to deliver activities in high smoking prevalence target areas.

19.     Preparation for delivery of smokefree activities during the first two quarters of 2020 were disrupted by COVID-19.  At Alert levels 4 and 3 staff were able to continue some activities and engagements that could be facilitated online. However, it did impact on the face-to-face programme of work. Activities that were planned to be implemented in our target locations between June and December 2020, were instead delivered between January and June 2021.  Activities were also focussed on two target locations, Glen Innes and Point England. This was a reduction in planned activity in four target locations: Henderson, Massey, Manurewa and Ōtara.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Partnership, de-normalisation and empowerment a key focus for auahi kore action

20.     We have successfully implemented a range of activities in target communities during 2020/21 (see Table 1).  Actions focus on activating smokefree public places, de-normalising smoking and motivating people in high smoking communities to begin/continue their quit journey. Seven smokefree case studies are provided in Attachment 2.

 

Hāpai te Hauora partnership key to activating smokefree places and switch to quit

21.     Partnering to activate smoke free places and disseminate ‘switch to quit’ messages is a key approach for council’s auahi kore work.

22.     Staff have partnered with Hāpai te Hauora (Hāpai), a Māori public health provider, to plan and deliver our activities. Working in partnership with Hāpai has:

·      enhanced our collective reach with communities and health providers

·      ensured strong links to the broader health sector

·      provided access to data, research and evidence to guide our activities.

23.     Korero about the auahi kore kaupapa from Māori and Pacific hapori indicated that they needed to be involved in planning activities, there needed to be more activities that were fun, popular and community led. People wanted an approach that was positive without judgment towards smokers.

Involve us in planning smokefree spaces through events that are fun, family-focussed and raise awareness. 

,Me whakamahere i ngā wāhi auahi
kore mō ngā kaupapa, ngā kaupapa
pārekareka, ngā kaupapa whānau me
te whakaara i te mōhiotanga.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Table 1. Smokefree tu’u le ulaula tapa’a - progress highlights: 202/2021

24.     Partnering with community networks across arts, sports and cultural activities was a key vehicle to deliver auahi kore activities that met Māori and Pacific peoples’ needs. Te Kotuku Cultural Festival, Tāmaki Touched Rugby and the Smokefree Play were fun, popular and community led. Each event:

·     activated smokefree public places

·     de-normalised smoking

·     motivated individual and their whānau to begin or continue their quit journey.

Te Kaupapa ā-Rohe QuitStrong - Regional QuitStrong Campaign

25.     A smokefree campaign is identified as a priority action under the Implementation Plan of the Council’s Smokefree Policy 2017 – 2025.

26.     The council commenced the first pulse of a regional campaign with Te Hiringa Hauora (formerly known as the Health Promotion Agency) from April to May 2021.

27.     Council focused the campaign in eight target locations with the highest smoking prevalence for Māori and Pacific peoples. The Regional QuitStrong campaign timing aligned with the national campaign and used the same messages and imagery particularly about ‘switch to quit’.

28.     The regional QuitStrong campaign delivered an additional 78,000 visits to Quitstrong.nz.

29.     Intentions for people after leaving the website were:

·     25 per cent get a quit coach

·     31 per cent explore vaping

·     21 per cent get nicotine gum or medications

·     19 per cent to talk to someone about wanting to quit smoking.

30.     It is difficult to quantify the impact of Te Kaupapa ā-Rohe QuitStrong on smoking cessation. However, if the Quitstrong results are similar to those for Quitline the impact would be 1250 to 1630 people who will have stopped smoking after 12 months.[1]

Cost has been identified as a motivation for attempts to quit smoking for some groups, particularly Pacific peoples.
Over 12 months, the smoker would have spent a total of $9,819 while a vaper would spend only $788.
Source: Centre for Tobacco Control Research. 2010. A qualitative study of what motivates Māori, Pacific Island and low socio-economic peoples in Aotearoa/New Zealand to stop smoking. Retrieved from https://www.fmhs.auckland.ac.nz/assets/fmhs/soph/sch/atc/docs/WhyKwit%20Report.pdf [26/08/21].
 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ā mātou mahi whakaarotau mō te tau 2021 me te tau 2022 - Our 2021/22 priorities

31.     Through 2020/21 staff achieved good reach into the areas of Glen Innes/Point England and Henderson-Massey. Through our activities we have reached wāhine Māori more than any other auahi kore target group.

32.     The 2021/22 priority actions continue to focus on activating smokefree activities and places that support wāhine Māori and Pacific men aged 22 to 45 years. We will also start to target locations and expand the reach of our auahi kore kaupapa for the groups and places that we have not yet reached.

33.     Auahi Kore Hapori Whānui priority actions for 2021/22 are:

·     continue to support community-led projects, co-design and activate smokefree places as well as maintaining our commitment to the Switch to Quit programme. The Switch to Quit programme will be intensified this year to promote and increase awareness of stop smoking services in all eight target locations

·     work with high schools in target location to deliver smokefree awareness raising event and activities

·     deliver Pacific men’s kava groups in collaboration with The Fono (stop smoking service)

·     continue to support Mana Wāhine auahi kore activities and activate groups in other target populations and locations

·     start ‘By Us for Us’ community engagement activities and focus groups to design and deliver auahi kore activities and events in Manurewa, Ōtāhuhu, Māngere and Papakura. These areas have the highest smoking prevalence of Māori and Pacific regular smokers.

34.     Implementation Plan of the Council’s Smokefree Policy 2017 – 2025 priority actions for 2021/22 are:

·     partner with Te Hiringa Hauora to complete more pulses of the Regional Quitstrong campaign in Tāmaki Makaurau

·     review and complete signage installation on beaches and maunga in target locations.

35.     The methodology we will use to deliver the auahi kore kaupapa will continue to be based on a holistic, cost-effective intervention approach. We will promote and assist community-based stop smoking services and online/telephone support as an effective means of promoting tobacco cessation.[2]

 

The Ministry of Health has estimated that to be effective, a smoking cessation initiative needs to cost less than $30,000 per successful quit attempt. 
Source: Ministry of Health. (2016). Report back on New Zealand’s Tobacco Control Programme. Retrieved from https://www.health.govt.nz/system/files/documents/pages/cabinet-paper-8-april-2016.pdf [26/08/21]
 

 

 

 

 


36.     Staff will increase efforts to measure the impact of our activities and gather data to enable us to evaluate and adjust our approach.

37.     The impact of the current lockdown will depend on the length of time until Tāmaki Makaura reaches level 2. At Alert levels 4 and 3 staff re continuing activities and engagements that can be facilitated online. In the event that there is another COVID-19 lockdown in future, staff will mitigate the risk of non-delivery of projects through an alternative plan of implementation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

38.     The council group including Auckland Transport and Auckland Unlimited continue to deliver activities in the Implementation Plan of the Smokefree Policy 2017-2025.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

39.     Local board feedback was incorporated into the Implementation Plan of the Smokefree Policy 2017-2025. Most local boards supported the proactive promotion of smokefree public places and direct community engagement on local initiatives.

40.     Interventions designed to de-normalise smoking will be delivered in Ōtāhuhu, Mangere, Manurewa, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, Henderson-Massey and Glen Innes-Point England.

41.     In areas where targeted smokefree activities are proposed, local boards will be offered an opportunity to support community-led and designed local activities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

42.     Since 2013, the proportion of Māori smokers has dropped by 5 per cent, meaning Māori are no longer the largest cohort smoking group in Tāmaki Makaurau.

43.     Council will continue to support auahi kore kaupapa towards wāhine Māori regular smokers for the next financial year. We can achieve this by continuing our partnership with Hāpai Te Hauora and guidance from the Ministry of Health. We will support community-led and designed smokefree activities to appeal to wāhine Māori regular smokers in each target location.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

44.     The 2018-2028 Long-term Plan allocated $2m to fund smokefree initiatives. This funding will be used for the planned 2021/22 and 2022/23 activities.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

45.     If we are unable to identify appropriate partners for delivery of programmes, then there is a risk that it will not be possible to deliver some activities, or they will be delivered less effectively.

46.     This risk will be mitigated by leveraging existing partnerships, focussing activities on a limited number of priority locations and using an adaptive management approach.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

47.     We will report to the Committee on our 2021/22 actions and proposed 2022/23 actions in mid-2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auahi Kore Highlights

49

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tara Leota-Seiuli - Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Ben Brooks - Team Leader Community Policy

Kataraina Maki – General Manager - Community & Social Policy

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 

I Am Auckland Implementation and Evaluation Annual Update 2021

File No.: CP2021/10011

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update  and start the three yearly review of child and youth activity across the Auckland Council group, in accordance with the I Am Auckland implementation plan and evaluation framework.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       I Am Auckland is Auckland Council’s strategic plan to support the wellbeing of children and young people in Auckland. It has seven key goals aligned to Auckland Plan outcomes.

3.       In 2020/21 the Auckland Council whānau delivered over 230 initiatives for children and young people. This is a noticeable increase from the 171 initiatives captured in 2019/20 and is in part due to improved data capture.

4.       Programming is primarily targeted towards Goal 2 – Belonging and Goal 6 – Opportunity, suggesting a focus on bringing young Aucklanders together and participation in recreation, arts, and sports activities.

5.       Overall, all goals have seen increased numbers since 2019/20, but Goal 3 – Health and Wellbeing and Goal 7 – Whakapuawai have seen declines in the number of initiatives reporting them as their primary goal, or main focus. Staff will continue to monitor these areas over the next year, to better understand why this has occurred.

6.       There has been mixed progress towards the outcome indicators established in the 2020 Annual Update (PAC/2020/34). While positive steps have been made towards education, affordability and quality of life, young people are experiencing higher unemployment, poorer health and less sense of community than they were.

7.       Evaluation remains an area for improvement across the council whānau, especially in environments with stretched resources. Staff have put effort in to developing tools to support evaluation going forward, and support will be provided for evaluations over the next year.

8.       Staff will continue to monitor progress each year. A full three-year review of I Am Auckland will be undertaken in 2022 and reported to the committee by early 2023.

9.       A summary of indicators and implementation, including case studies, can be found in Attachment A. A more detailed implementation update can be found in Attachment B.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      endorse the information contained in this report

b)      request that staff, as delegated through the chief executive, undertake a three-year review in 2021/2022.

Horopaki

Context

10.     I Am Auckland is Auckland Council’s Child and Youth Strategic Action Plan. Adopted in 2013, it reflects the council’s commitments to create a city that supports the wellbeing of Auckland’s children and young people.

11.     It has seven goals and related action areas, described in Figure 1 below. This provides direction to the council and council-controlled organisations (the council whānau) about support for Auckland’s children and young people.

Figure 1: The seven I Am Auckland goals for children and young people

Diagram

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

 

12.     In 2017 the council published the first I Am Auckland Status Report, which reviewed how the council whānau has delivered on the plan. The key recommendations were:

i)    improve coordination, implementation monitoring and evaluation impact;

ii)   increase delivery on Goal 7: Whakapuawai: Rangatahi tu Rangatira/All rangatahi will thrive;

iii)  monitoring implementation; and

iv)  evaluating the impact we are making.

13.     In December 2018 the council agreed an implementation plan and evaluation framework (ENV/2018/171).

14.     This is the second annual update as specified by the I Am Auckland Implementation Plan and Evaluation Framework. The committee received the first annual update in August 2020 (PAC/2020/34).

Council staff are sharing learnings and growing capability within a community of practice

15.     Quarterly sessions are organised for the council whānau to share the work that they do in the child and youth space.

16.     Staff have had the chance to share their work and hear from the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, the Child Poverty Action Group and the Human Rights Commission.

17.     These sessions provide a useful avenue for staff to build relationships, share learning and identify opportunities for collaboration. They have also enabled better connections across the organisation to help ensure that our reporting is accurate. Staff have also had the chance to input into early thinking for the next three-year review.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Council delivers hundreds of initiatives for children and young people

18.     Following budget constraints post-COVID, staff across the council have ensured programming for communities most in need, which includes children and young people. 

19.     Attachment A includes five case studies of initiatives across council. Attachment B provides a more detailed implementation update.

20.     Staff have recorded the delivery of 235 initiatives for children and young people against the I Am Auckland goals. This captures a greater number of initiatives than in 2019/20, where 171 were included.

21.     While some of these initiatives are new, the increase in recorded delivery is primarily due to improving the level of data capture. For example, a significant amount of work for this update has gone into including initiatives on local board work programmes.

22.     Last year there was concern that the Emergency Budget might result in cuts to the delivery of child and youth initiatives. The reported activity (while including the capture of new data) also suggests that cuts to delivery have not occurred in a significant way. Council teams continue to prioritise children and young people, a reflection of the overall council commitment to the tamariki and rangatahi of Tāmaki Makaurau.  

23.     Figure Two shows the differences in delivery across the two years, including both primary and secondary goals.

Figure 2: Progress on delivery of initiatives towards the I Am Auckland goals

24.     All goals have larger numbers of combined primary and secondary goals than in 2019/20.

25.     The most notable changes from 2019/20 are large increases towards Goal 1- Voice, from a combined 21 last year to 71 this year, and Goal 2 – Belonging from 32 last year to 124 this year.

26.     Following a year where many young people felt disconnected, it is clear that council has delivered programming to make young people feel like they are part of, valued and can enjoy their city and communities.

Delivery is very strong towards some goals but could be strengthened towards others.

27.     Figure Three shows the breakdowns within goals of the primary goal, and any supporting goals an initiative may contribute to.

28.     Many initiatives contribute to multiple goals, particularly for the largest two goals, Goal 2 – Belonging and Goal 6 – Opportunity.

29.     Goal 4 – Fair Go has the largest number of initiatives with it as the primary goal.

Figure 3: Delivery of initiatives towards the I Am Auckland goals 2020/21

 

30.     Goal 3 – Health and Wellbeing and Goal 7 – Whakapuawai have a slightly smaller number of initiatives where they are the primary goal than 2019.

31.     For Goal 3, this is likely explained by significant effort that went into the Cannabis Referendum last year not being included for this update.

We will continue monitor progress on supporting Māori tamariki and rangatahi  

32.     Since we identified Goal 7 – Whakapuawai as an area for improvement in the 2017 status review, we have seen good progress in this goal each year with a significant increase in activity from only five initiatives in 2017 to 28 in 2020 and 40 in 2021.

33.     Although the overall number of initiatives for Goal 7 – Whakapuawai has increased, it is unclear why there has been a slight decrease in the number of primary goal initiatives this year.

34.     Comparably lower numbers of initiatives under Goal 7 compared to other goal areas could be influenced by the specific scope of what sits under this goal, such as emphasis on Māori youth leadership.

35.     Many initiatives identified link to other goals areas which will also be delivering to Māori tamariki and rangatahi and contributing towards broader identity, development and wellbeing goals.

36.     Staff will continue to monitor Goal 7 closely over the next year, as well as work on improving data capture to be able to identify initiatives across all goals that are targeting or benefiting Māori.

We will continue to improve data capture to better monitor progress 

37.     Given the wide range of child and youth activities undertaken across council, not all will have been included in the implementation plan.

38.     Staff are looking at ways to continue to improve the breadth and depth of data capture and ensure systems are in place for this.

39.     Where gaps exist or improvement areas are identified we are using the I Am Auckland Managerial Group and Community of Practice to look at addressing these, particularly in time for the next three-year review.

Indicators show mixed progress towards the I Am Auckland goals

 

40.     Indicators of progress towards the I Am Auckland goals were established for the 2020 Annual Update. The measures, captured in the Table 1 below, are drawn from the Auckland Plan, Quality of Life data and the Child and Youth Wellbeing Strategy (CYWS). Data is primarily from council research or government sources.

41.     These indicators provide a high-level snapshot. They are helpful for gauging trends over time. They contribute to an overall understanding of tamariki and rangatahi experience, and areas that may need more concentrated effort.

42.     The indicators do not provide the qualitative understanding of why the trends are occurring or why young people are feeling a certain way. The intention is to capture the more in-depth information when staff engage with children and young people as part of the three-year review of I Am Auckland.

43.     Where the indicator is blank in Table 1, it is because data is not currently available. This includes the measures drawn from the ‘What About Me?’ survey conducted as part of the CYWS, which was delayed by COVID-19, and should be available at the end of this year. It also includes data that is on a three-year reporting cycle, or where data collection was disrupted in the last year due to COVID-19.

44.     Across the measures there has been mixed progress for tamariki and rangatahi over the last year. Part of this picture is dependent on what part of the 2020 data was able to be collected and updated.

45.     There are some positive upwards trends to note, especially around educational attainment and affordability. Educational attainment may have been influenced by additional credits that students, especially in Auckland, were granted in 2020.

46.     There are, however, concerning trends in the data. Young people are reporting that they feel disconnected from their communities. For example, there has been a decline in the WHO 5 Wellbeing Index scores,[3] suggesting that they are struggling with their mental wellbeing. This likely combines with the decreased sense of belonging and safety that was reported.

47.     Data often lags delivery, so it will be important to pay attention to these measures in future updates, given the significant council investment in delivery towards areas like belonging.

48.     Employment remains a concern, and young people are likely to require more support to (re)enter the workforce. Given the implications of employment on other goals, such as belonging or health and wellbeing, it is positive to see the effort of the council towards supporting young people into employment.

49.     The decline in public transport use is unsurprising, given the rise of working and studying from home. There is also likely some underlying hesitancy to catch public transport, due to the risk of COVID-19, and concern around being in crowded and enclosed spaces.

50.     There is some lag in the publication of child poverty rates, so the full impact of COVID-19 is likely not reflected in the material hardship rate above.

Evaluation remains an area for improvement

51.     Over 2020/21 much of the work on evaluation has been in developing our evaluation practice. Staff have developed tools and templates that can be used in future evaluations, both internally and with partners. An example of this can be found in Attachment A, with the youth evaluation tool that has been developed with community partners.

52.     The reason for the development of tools is largely that, with stretched resources, many staff have not been able to conduct formal evaluations for their activities and initiatives. Focus has been on delivery rather than measuring impact.

53.     Over the next year a priority focus will be continuing to encourage evaluation and providing support to ensure that there are adequate initiative evaluations included in the three-year review, from across the council whānau.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

54.     This is an update report with no climate impacts. However, there are many activities that have an environmental focus or deliver positive climate outcomes as part of I Am Auckland.

55.     An example of work that has climate impacts is the Youth Advisory Panel, where members are participating in and co-chairing a cross panel working group on climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

56.     The implementation update includes child and youth activities from across the Auckland Council whānau. Our Community of Practice includes members from across the council, as well as Eke Panuku and Auckland Unlimited.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

57.     All 21 local board plans specifically mention children and young people. This is an increase from the 2017 local board plans, where 18 plans mentioned children and young people. The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan includes a specific reference to I Am Auckland.

58.     For this update, a greater emphasis has been on including local board activity in the child and youth space, and as a result more local initiatives have been captured.

59.     Local boards deliver actions for children and youth outcomes through their discretionary funding and grants.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

60.     Māori represent 14 per cent of Auckland’s children and young people.

61.     I Am Auckland has a Māori outcomes goal, Goal 7: Whakapuawai, which has seen increased initiatives and delivery since the 2017 review. A total of 40 initiatives have a primary or secondary focus on this goal. This will remain an area of attention for staff throughout the next year. 

62.     I Am Auckland goals also aligns with the Māori Plan and Issues of Significance, with tamariki and rangatahi identity, wellbeing and development identified in the plan.

63.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, Auckland Council’s organisational Māori outcomes framework, aligns with the public facing I Am Auckland, particularly Kia Ora te Whānau (Whānau and Tamariki Wellbeing) and Kia Ora te Rangatahi (Realising Rangatahi Potential).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

64.     This is an update report with no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

65.     We have identified three key risks for the delivery of the I Am Auckland Evaluation Framework and Implementation Plan, as described in the table below.

66.     These remain the key risks, but we have already seen stretched resources, staff changes and turnover impacting on evaluation and our ability to obtain data and implementation updates.  Addressing these will be priority areas for improvement over the next year.

Risk

Impact

Mitigation

Stretched resources across council.

Delivery of programmes evaluations are under pressure and timelines are extended.

Maintain and/or priorities staff support and resources.

Turnover in key staff.

Reduced coordination, implementation, monitoring and evaluation, harder to acquire updates.

Community of Practice and Managerial Reference Groups to strengthen relationships and number of contacts.

Changes in budget impact on programme delivery for children and young people.

We are less able to deliver against I Am Auckland goals, leading to potential for poorer outcomes for children and young people.

Ensure resources are focussed on innovation and programme delivery for children and young people with the greatest need in the region.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

67.     The three-yearly review of I Am Auckland was due to be completed in the 2020/21 financial year. Due to capacity and staffing constraints, this work has been delayed to 2021/2022.

68.     Staff will work with the Youth Advisory Panel to deliver the review to reinforce the shared ownership of I Am Auckland.

69.     The three-year review will be reported to the committee in 2022/ 2023.

70.     Over the next year, in addition to the 3-year review, staff will continue to prioritise:

• improving the depth and breadth of data collection

• focusing on ongoing delivery of Goal 7: Whakapuawai  

• supporting improved evaluation practices.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary Slides and Case Studies

73

b

Implementation Plan Updates

101

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Joanna Maskell - Principal Policy Advisor

Liz Civil - Manager Community Policy

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki – General Manager - Community & Social Policy

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 




























Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 

Toi Whītiki current state report and recommendations

File No.: CP2021/11156

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the findings of a current state analysis of Toi Whītiki, Auckland’s Arts and Culture Strategic Plan and seek approval to the redevelopment of Toi Whītiki as new collective impact framework for the creative sector.  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Toi Whītiki, Auckland’s arts and culture strategic plan was adopted by Auckland Council’s governing body in 2015. Since then, the landscape has changed. Council has a new Auckland Plan 2050 and the arts and culture sector has been significantly impacted by COVID-19.

3.       Staff undertook a current state review to understand if Toi Whītiki is still fit for purpose.

4.       There has been some good progress against delivering actions in Toi Whītiki, particularly by the council family.

5.       There is also general agreement that the plan’s aspirations are good and many still relevant.

6.       However, Toi Whītiki was envisioned as a “whole of sector” plan not just a strategy for council, and this has not been fully realised.

7.       The review has identified a range of issues and challenges facing the sector, including:

·    the need for leadership and collaboration across council, government, and the sector

·    greater equity and support of diversity in the ecosystem

·    the need for greater reflection of Te Tiriti principles and te ao Māori

·    a strong call for strategy to be linked to council investment and activity.

8.       At a fundamental level Toi Whītiki has lacked some of the core components that are needed to successfully drive collective impact around a common purpose, including: 

·    adequate ongoing resourcing to bring the sector together 

·    visible and active leadership to drive and champion it

·    investment tools and mechanisms to create alignment and accountability.

9.       This review concludes that Toi Whītiki in its current form is no longer fit for purpose

10.     A fresh approach is required to address the current challenges and issues facing the sector, to create equity in the creative ecosystem, and deliver greater public value to Aucklanders.

11.     It is proposed that the collective impact approach will deliver a strategic framework for the creative ecosystem with multiple, reinforcing components, including:

·    common purpose - the shared vision and outcomes, focused on creating public value 

·    key shifts - the big changes needed to address key issues and deliver systemic change

·    investment tools (investment maps, performance indicators) - to connect investment to outcomes, priorities, and public value creation

·    programmes that deliver the inputs and outputs linked to outcomes and indicators.

12.     We see there are 3 key shifts that need to be addressed in the next phase of work:

·    creating public value and impact, linked to investment and accountability

·    embedding Te Tiriti principles and te ao Māori more visibly

·    achieving greater fairness, equity, and diversity within the ecosystem.

13.     The key risks are achieving sector engagement and balancing competing interests. These will be mitigated by working with key sector leaders using collaborative co-design processes.    

14.     If approved, staff will scope the project and sector engagement process and report back to the committee with an update in early 2022.   

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      approve the development of a new Toi Whītiki, as a collective impact framework that unites the creative sector towards a shared vision and common purpose of delivering public value for Aucklanders.   

b)      approve the associated actions steps to produce a new Toi Whītiki as set out in the table at paragraph 79 of this report.  

 

Horopaki

Context

15.     Toi Whītiki, Auckland’s arts and culture strategic plan was developed in collaboration with Tāmaki Makaurau’s arts and culture sector, mana whenua and mataawaka. It was envisaged as a “whole of sector plan” and was adopted by Auckland Council’s governing body in 2015.

16.     It sets out the strategic goals, objectives, and actions that Auckland Council and others in the sector committed to, to deliver the vision of a culturally rich and creative Auckland, where the “arts are part of our everyday lives”.

17.     Since 2015, the landscape has changed. Council has a new Auckland Plan 2050 which provides the high-level strategic outcomes and direction for council’s activity and investment. More recently, the arts and culture sector has been significantly impacted by COVID-19.

18.     A review was undertaken in light of these issues to understand if Toi Whītiki is still fit for purpose to support the social, cultural, and economic wellbeing of Aucklanders, and foster a thriving, resilient arts and culture sector.

19.     A full summary of the findings of the current state report including case studies about the progress of implementation of Toi Whītiki across council can be found in Attachment A.

20.     The review sought to understand what is working well within the council and the arts and culture sector and what needs improvement.

21.     To achieve this, we investigated the council’s investment into arts and culture, how this was impacted by COVID-19 and the emergency budget; and what outcomes are being sought for the investment.

22.     We also considered what has been achieved in the last six years and where best practice is being modelled regarding implementation of Toi Whītiki.

23.     We collaborated with Te Taumata-Toi-a-Iwi (Arts Regional Trust) to map the wider creative investment ecosystem for Tāmaki Makaurau, tracking who the major investors are, where the investment is going and what outcomes are being sought.

24.     We also sought to understand the arts and culture sector’s views about the current issues, challenges and opportunities facing the sector and what can be improved. To do this we undertook targeted sector engagement in February 2021 and key informant interviews from April – June 2021.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Tāmaki Makaurau’s creative sector is a complex ecosystem, integral to the city’s prosperity

25.     Tāmaki Makaurau’s creative sector is a complex, interdependent ecosystem. The ecosystem includes:

·        independent creatives, a flexible infrastructure of people and companies who come together for projects and programmes,

·        funded artistic and cultural institutions,

·        funders including Auckland Council and CCOs,

·        mana whenua iwi and the communities of Tāmaki Makaurau.

26.     In 2019, the creative sector generated $3.9 billion for Tāmaki Makaurau’s economy and employed 32,000 people or 4% of the city’s workforce.

27.     Forty-nine percent (49%) of people employed in Aotearoa’s creative sector reside in Tāmaki Makaurau. Design, digital media, film, video production, visual and performing arts have all shown growth in employment between 2014-2019.


Employment growth of Auckland’s creative sub-sectors: 2009, 2014, 2019.

 

COVID-19 has significantly impacted the creative sector, exposing fragility and inequities

28.     COVID-19 has had a significant impact on the creative sector in Tāmaki Makaurau with a number of events being cancelled in 2020 and 2021 due to lockdowns.

29.     Te Taumata Toi-a-Iwi’s two surveys of the creative sector in 2020 showed that 83% of respondents in May 2020 reported having to cancel an event, hui, project, or service. Fifty eight percent of survey respondents reported needing to cancel events in September 2020.

30.     A range of financial losses were reported from 0 to $200,000. Creative organisations reported losses between $1,000 to $900,000.

31.     In addition to this, there were also major, as yet unquantified or unknown, financial losses stemming from cancellation of major events and festivals at large venues in 2020 and 2021.

32.     Revenue from large scale, more commercial events is used to subsidise local works so the knock-on effect from these losses may be felt for some time.

33.     Aucklanders’ participation and engagement in arts and cultural activity dropped 5% between 2017-2020, reflecting the cancellation of major events and festivals in 2020.

34.     COVID-19 has exposed the existing fragility of the funding models in the creative sector, highlighting their short-term nature, and how they favour major cultural institutions and creative organisations rather than individual creatives.

35.     Māori and Pacific artists are particularly disadvantaged by current funding models.


COVID-19: Impact on the Creative Sector in Tāmaki Makaurau, Sept 2020, Te Taumata Toi-a-Iwi

Auckland Council is the region’s single largest investor in arts and culture

36.     Auckland Council is the largest investor into Tāmaki Makaurau’s creative sector. In the 2018/19 financial year council invested $180.8 million through council departments, grants, local boards, the cultural institutions, ARAFA funded arts amenities, libraries, and CCOs.

37.     By way of comparison Creative New Zealand and the Ministry of Culture and Heritage invested $19.8 million and $33 million respectively that year. 

38.     Council’s investment in arts and cultural activity includes venues and infrastructure, festivals, programming, public art, Māori design, marae, and investment in the creative economy.

 

Bulk of council investment going to major cultural organisations with little connection to Toi Whītiki or clarity on expected outcomes

39.     The most significant ratepayer investment outside of libraries and CCO’s goes to the major cultural institutions. Most notably Auckland War Memorial Museum, MOTAT and the Auckland Regional Amenities Funding Board, who invest in Auckland Arts Festival, Auckland Theatre Company, Auckland Philharmonia and NZ Opera.

40.     These entities play a vital role in the cultural, and economic life of the region. However, current governance and funding arrangements mean there is limited visibility back to council on who is directly benefitting from this ratepayer investment. 

41.     Given the scale of investment, council could work with these entities to have mechanisms in place to understand how this is benefitting the diversity of Auckland communities and how it aligns with council’s strategic objectives and priorities. 

Investors in Tāmaki Makaurau’s creative sector seek common outcomes but there is opportunity for more collaboration and strategic co-investment 

42.    There are a range of other organisations who invest into the creative sector in Tāmaki Makaurau including:

·        central government and Crown agencies

·        philanthropic funders including family foundations, community trusts, community foundations and trustee companies; as well as individual private doners

·        corporates through foundations or sponsorship

·        Iwi.

43.    Many of these organisations invest to support similar outcomes to the council around participation, cultural identity, and economic development.  There are opportunities to strengthen investment in the creative ecosystem in Tāmaki Makaurau, including:

·        placing greater emphasis on monitoring and evaluation of the impact of investment

·        developing a regional investment strategy responding to regional priorities and maximising impact across shared outcome areas of interest

·        make strategic and collaborative efforts to address funding gaps and inequity of access to funding.

Key findings - Stakeholder engagement

Creative practitioners want disruption of traditional funding models, greater equity and inclusion, diverse knowledge to be valued, and the voice of artists’ to be central

 

44.     Engagement with diverse creative practitioners and thought leaders in February 2021 revealed that to achieve a shared vision for the creative sector would require:

·        leadership – the need for focused collective leadership across the sector (including government)

·        mandate – government to mandate the value of culture, creativity and the arts

·        Te ao Māori and Tangata Whenua – te ao Māori worldview at the centre of strategy and policy, and tangata whenua at the decision-making table

·        knowledge – build diverse knowledge, world views reflective of our communities

·        wellbeing – the importance of creativity to wellbeing

·        collaboration – the need for sector wide collaboration to build and strengthen relationships

·        artists voice – position artists as advisors to central and local government to facilitate strategic priorities and outcomes

·        disruption – of traditional funding and investment models and institutionalised perceptions of the sector

·        change – how arts and culture is valued and funded

·        activation – the need to bring Toi Whītiki to life, create shared sector ownership.


 

Auckland’s cultural institutions, amenities and funders seek stronger leadership, vision, and collaboration

45.     Similar themes emerged through key informant interviews with the region’s major cultural institutions, ARAFA arts amenities, funders, and internal experts, including a desire for:

·        stronger leadership from council, central government and from within the sector

·        sustainable funding

·        the importance of reflecting and meeting the needs of Auckland’s diverse communities

·        stronger collaboration and coordination across the sector

·        better infrastructure to meet audience needs.

Common aspirations included:

·        Te ao Māori at the centre of arts and culture in Tāmaki Makaurau

·        Tāmaki Makaurau being promoted and valued as a cultural destination

·        delivering to wellbeing outcomes

·        a healthy, sustainable creative ecosystem

·        government mandating and promoting the value of arts and culture

·        building sector capacity and capability

·        delivering to the diverse communities of Tāmaki Makaurau.

46.     There was a recognition by some of these stakeholders that the current models of funding and governance have created tension and been a barrier to arts and culture organisations collaborating behind a unified vision for Tāmaki Makaurau

A key challenge is addressing issues of equity and inclusion in the creative sector

47.     While there are many shared ideas and themes across the sector, the needs of smaller, independent groups and diverse practitioners and communities are not the same as those of the major arts and cultural organisations.

48.     A key challenge will be determining how to achieve greater equity and inclusion in the ecosystem in a way that balances the needs of all parts of the system. 

49.     The aspirations of smaller and less well-resourced groups, diverse practitioners and communities will need to be addressed to achieve greater equity. This will mean looking at their demand for disruption and decolonisation of the current system.

50.     A better understanding of who benefits from public investment (the downstream benefits and impacts) and the gaps are a critical step in this.

Mana whenua call for greater reflection of Te Tiriti o Waitangi in arts and cultural activity

51.     Mana whenua groups have advised council through submissions and engagement that they want to see council reflecting Te Tiriti o Waitangi principles in strategies and working collaboratively with mana whenua as partners. This feedback has been echoed (as above) through our engagement with the creative and cultural heritage sectors.

Public recognition of the value of arts and culture to wellbeing, identity, and social cohesion

52.     Aucklanders recognise the value of the arts in getting them through COVID-19, with 20% feeling more positive about the arts for this reason.

53.     Sixty one percent (61%) of Aucklanders surveyed agreed that arts and culture make an important contribution to community resilience and wellbeing. Young people recognise that participation in the arts is good for their wellbeing.

54.     Nearly 70% of Aucklanders surveyed agreed they learnt about different cultures through the arts, with young people, Māori, Pacific, and Asian New Zealanders agreeing that arts are an important way to connect to their culture.

55.     There is also increasing support by the public for council funding of arts and culture from 53% in 2017 to 60% in 2020 overall.  Support for council investing in the arts has risen also from 48% in 2017 to 53% in 2020.


Key findings - Toi Whītiki improvements

56.     As part of the review, we asked both internal stakeholders and creative sector stakeholders what they thought was working with Toi Whītiki and what need to be improved to make it fit for purpose for the future.

Recognition of the value of the plan and progress in specific areas

57.     There is agreement within Auckland Council about the importance of Toi Whītiki. It has been used to drive work programmes and has had a tangible impact on funding and programming.

58.     A stock take of council investment and activity highlighted a range of work driven by and aligned to Toi Whītiki’s goals. Examples include alignment of regional and local board funding to Toi Whītiki, an expanded Matariki festival, the annual Tāmaki Herenga Waka Festival, opening of the Waterfront Theatre and the funding of the Toi Tū, Toi Ora exhibition at Auckland Art Gallery.

Arts and culture activity is not always directly influenced by Toi Whītiki

59.     Interviews across council, CCOs, cultural institutions and with arts organisations revealed that delivery often aligns to Toi Whītiki goals but is not always driven or influenced by it.

Lack of leadership, awareness, and alignment to the Toi Whītiki strategic plan

60.     Familiarity with Toi Whītiki varied across the council family, CCOs and the creative sector. There was some confusion about how Toi Whītiki fits with the Auckland Plan 2050.

61.     Many in the sector felt council has not done enough to keep Toi Whītiki alive and relevant.

62.     The need for regular hui where council and the sector build relationships and collaborate around a shared vision and purpose was also a commonly expressed view.

63.     A consistent theme was that the council needed to provide greater leadership in demonstrating that Toi Whītiki’s goals are driving council decisions and investment.

64.     Currently council does not require CCOs via their letters of expectation to report against Toi Whītiki. The ARAFA Board similarly does not have Toi Whītiki in its funding principles, so ARAFA funded arts amenities are not required to report against Toi Whītiki either.  

65.     The findings of the CCO review called for clear, implementable strategy for CCOs and the need to work with CCOs to achieve this.

Te Ao Māori needs to be central to Toi Whītiki

66.     There was consensus through our engagements that a te ao Māori worldview needs to be central to Toi Whītiki, and that the Te Tiriti of Waitangi partnership needs to be demonstrated in the governance and operations of ratepayer funded arts organisations and cultural institutions.

A range of new and emerging issues need to be included in the plan

67.     There were a several emerging issues highlighted during our hui with the creative sector that are not covered by the current goals of Toi Whītiki:

·        digitalisation – the importance of building capability within the creative sector to leverage digitisation and emerging AI technology, in light of COVID-19’s continued impact on audiences’ ability to attend at venues for performance.

·        wellbeing outcomes – many in the sector wanted a stronger articulation about how arts and culture contribute to broader wellbeing outcomes, and to align with central government agencies such as the Ministries of Health and Education.

·        diverse communities – there was acknowledgement that arts and culture programming does not reflect the diverse communities of Auckland. It was also noted by some that there is not enough diversity reflected in the staffing of operations and governance of Tāmaki Makaurau’s cultural and artistic organisations.

·        funding model inequities – there was widespread concern at the short-term nature of funding, which did not allow artists or organisations to plan multi-year programmes of work. COVID-19 has exacerbated existing inequity for Māori and Moana Pacifica artists, which is further entrenched by contestable funding models.

Plan needs to be linked to and drive investment

68.     There was consensus by council staff and the creative sector that for Toi Whītiki to be a meaningful strategy it must link to investment.

69.     There was a strong call for council’s own investment decisions such as spending in the long-term plan to clearly link to the goals of Toi Whītiki. Frustration was expressed, particularly by CCOs that this is not currently evident.

70.     Funders expressed interest in the development of a regional investment plan where eventually there could be shared investment in creative projects in the region.

The plan requires a monitoring and evaluation framework to demonstrate public value

71.     There is no established monitoring and evaluation system for measuring the success of work in support of Toi Whītiki across Auckland Council and CCOs. As a result, it is hard to track the progress of strategic implementation across the council family.

What are the opportunities going forward?

72.     There is agreement amongst stakeholders of the ongoing importance of a shared vision and common purpose that unites the creative ecosystem in Tāmaki Makaurau.


 

73.     There is significant opportunity to learn from what has not worked and do better in terms of:

·        communicating the value proposition

·        creating strong and intentional links to investment

·        improving how we evaluate and measure the impact we are making

·        engaging a range of diverse leaders (from the sector and community) who can champion the sector’s value and contribution.

 

Reimagining a fresh new approach and future

74.     The current state analysis has identified a range of issues, challenges and opportunities that could be addressed in a refreshed approach.

75.     At a fundamental level Toi Whitiki has lacked some of the core components that are needed to successfully drive collective impact around a common purpose, including: 

·        adequate ongoing resourcing to bring the sector together 

·        visible and active leadership to drive and champion it

·        investment tools and mechanisms to create alignment and accountability.

76.     This review concludes that Toi Whītiki in its current form is no longer fit for purpose. 

77.     A fresh approach is required to address the current challenges and issues facing the sector, to create equity in the creative ecosystem, and deliver greater public value to Aucklanders.

78.     This report recommends Toi Whītiki is re-imagined as a collective impact framework to move from the current state to the desirable future state.

79.     It is proposed that the collective impact approach will shift from strategy as a “document” to a living and broader strategic framework for the creative ecosystem including:

·        common purpose - the shared vision and outcomes, focused on creating public value 

·        key shifts - the big changes needed to address key issues and deliver systemic change

·        investment tools (investment maps, performance indicators) - to connect investment to outcomes, priorities and public value creation

·        programmes that deliver inputs and outputs linked to outcomes and indicators.

80.     Staff advise that there are 3 key shifts that need to be addressed in the next phase of work:

·        creating public value and impact, linked to investment and accountability

·        embedding Te Tiriti principles and te ao Māori more visibly

·        achieving greater fairness, equity and diversity within the ecosystem.

81.     The actions steps required to give effect to the redevelopment of Toi Whītiki will include:

1.   Ensuring the diversity of sector voices are heard by engaging and co-creating a new framework with the breadth of the creative ecosystem including:

·     mana whenua and mataawaka

·     Māori and Moana Oceania artists

·     diverse independent practitioners and companies

·     major cultural institutions and amenities and

·     funders and investors

2.   Creating a shared vision and common purpose that reflects common aspirations and addresses key shifts and the issues, challenges and opportunities facing the sector.

3.   Linking the reimagined Toi Whītiki directly to the high-level outcomes in the Auckland Plan, and wellbeing outcomes such as participation and belonging, intercultural connections and social cohesion.

4.   Creating a strategic framework that will enable council to set expectations and give clear direction about how ratepayer investment in arts and culture supports its desired strategic outcomes in the Auckland Plan, such as Participation and Belonging, and Māori Identity and Wellbeing.

5.   Working with CCOs and other major cultural institutions to ensure the reimagined Toi Whītiki provides strategic direction and clarity for their purposes.

6.   Working with mana whenua and the creative sector to embed te ao Māori and Treaty of Waitangi principles into a reimagined Toi Whītiki.

7.   Providing clear recommendations about how the framework can link to council investment in the creative sector, including through appropriate strategic investment tools and mechanisms such as:

·     investment logic maps (ILMs)

·     agreeing and setting outcome KPIs for council funding

·     including relevant outcomes and objectives in CCO letters of expectation

·     amending the ARAFA funding principles to include Toi Whītiki goals and objectives

8.   Exploring opportunities for greater collaboration and more strategic and joined up approaches between funders around investment in Tāmaki Makaurau’s creative sector.

9.   More clearly articulating Te Tiriti and a te ao Māori world view in Toi Whītiki; and exploring how council can ensure Treaty principles are reflected in the governance and operations of ratepayer funded cultural and artistic organisations.

10. Working with the creative sector to explore how new and emerging issues and themes can be reflected in the strategy, such as building greater digital capacity and capability, new and alternative funding models.

11. Creating a monitoring and evaluation plan to underpin the collective impact framework so that we can track and report progress against the outcomes and objectives and monitor the collective impact we are making and the public value being delivered to Aucklanders.

12. Using co-design processes and developing an appropriate governance structure to underpin a collective impact approach, that includes essential “backbone” leadership and support.

13. Identifying and enrolling diverse sector champions to promote the value and contribution of the creative sector; and help unite the sector behind the common purpose.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

82.     Travel for sector engagement is a potential impact, mitigated in part by on-line engagement and council staff use of electric vehicles

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

83.     Staff and teams from across council have provided data and advice to inform this review.

84.     Eke Panuku were involved the internal interviews and provided financial data and insights about their alignment to Toi Whītiki.

85.     Auckland Unlimited has been closely involved in the review of Toi Whītiki.

86.     Leaders from ATEED, RFA and Auckland Live were involved in key informant interviews and provided us with financial data prior to their merger into Auckland Unlimited.

87.     Since Auckland Unlimited was formed their General Manager (now Director) for Māori outcomes and the CEO have been interviewed and provided feedback.

88.     Leaders from Auckland Unlimited also provided advice and feedback as part of an internal experts’ group during the review of Toi Whītiki.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

89.     Local boards have been briefed about the review of Toi Whītiki. Our current state analysis included mapping investment in arts and culture through local board grants and funding.

90.     We interviewed arts brokers for Albert-Eden, Whau and Franklin to understand the impact of Toi Whītiki on local decisions regarding arts and culture.

91.     We will engage with local boards to gain their input into the redevelopment of Toi Whītiki later in 2021/2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

92.     Toi Whītiki has relevance to Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau who provide cultural kaitiakitanga to the region. The recommendation to redevelop Toi Whītiki will align with two key focus areas for the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s Māori Plan:

·    Wairuatanga (promoting distinctive identity), in relation to valuing and protecting Māori heritage and Taonga Māori

·    Kaitiakitanga (ensuring sustainable futures), in relation to Māori cultural wellbeing being future proofed.

93.     The recommendation also supports the Board’s Schedule of Issues of Significance 2021-2025 by highlights specific actions for council under Wairuatanga about Māori culture and identity.

94.     Mana whenua groups have provided feedback (Auckland Plan 2050 and other engagement) to the council that they want to see council reflecting the Te Tiriti o Waitangi in strategies and working collaboratively with mana whenua as partners.

95.     This feedback has been echoed through our engagement with Māori creative practitioners and experts during the engagement process for the review of Toi Whītiki.

96.     There is an opportunity to more clearly articulate Te Tiriti principles and te ao Māori world view in Toi Whītiki. A refresh of Toi Whītiki would allow exploration of how council can ensure the Te Tiriti partnership principle is reflected in the governance and operations of ratepayer funded cultural and artistic organisations.

97.     Auckland Council’s Long-term plan 2021-2031 aligns investment to the Auckland Plan 2050 goal Māori Identity and Wellbeing through Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau which sets 10 strategic priorities for three years, including Māori identity and culture, Kia ora te Aurea.

98.     A refresh of Toi Whītiki provides an opportunity to align the goals and actions with the Auckland Plan 2050 and actions under Kia ora te Aurea.

99.     The Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum were briefed about the review of Toi Whītiki and indicated they would like to be involved in the next phase of refreshing the plan.

100.   Mana whenua and mataawaka will have an opportunity to provide input during an engagement and design process to redevelop Toi Whītiki.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

101.   There are no financial implications, as the redevelopment of Toi Whītiki will be met within existing staff resources and budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

102.   We have identified three key risks for the redevelopment of Toi Whītiki, as described in the table below.

Risk

Impact

Mitigation

Stretched resources across council.

Delivery of the new collective framework is under pressure and timelines are extended.

Maintain and/or prioritise staff support and resources.

Lack of engagement and buy-in by the creative sector and cultural institutions in the process.

Delivery of a new collective framework is under pressure and timelines are extended.

Framework does not achieve collective impact intended.

Utilisation of internal and external experts and stakeholder networks to drive engagement with the process.

Ongoing competing needs and differences in the sector

Undermines sector collaboration

Difficult to develop agreement on shared vision and priorities  

Framework does not achieve collective impact intended.

Identify and enrol sector champions

Build around common ground and principles

Look to balance needs and grow value for all.    

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

103.   If the recommendation to redevelop Toi Whītiki is approved, staff will scope the project and process for sector engagement and report back to committee with an update in early 2022.

104.   The process will include the actions steps set out in the table in paragraph 79 of this report.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Toi Whītiki current state report

137

b

Ecosystem catagorisation

215

c

Ecosystem Investment report

221

d

Sector engagement hui report

289

e

Final Engagement findings report

299

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Joanna Maskell - Principal Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki – General Manager - Community & Social Policy

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 

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09 September 2021

 

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09 September 2021

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 














Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 

Proposed variation of agreement to facilitate transfer of land at 50 Tihi Street, Stonefields (Covering report)

File No.: CP2021/13560

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to not proceed with a land exchange under the Reserves Act 1977, and to instead achieve the land exchange by varying an agreement with a third party so that the land located at 50 Tihi Street in Stonefields is transferred to Auckland Council in substitution for part 25 Barbarich Drive, Stonefields.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.          This is a late covering report for the above item. The comprehensive agenda report was not available when the agenda went to print and will be provided prior to the 9 September 2021 Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee meeting.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

The recommendations will be provided in the comprehensive agenda report.

 

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 

Regional Event Fund Grants Allocation 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/08543

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve grant allocations for the 2021/2022 Regional Event Grants Programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2021/2022 Regional Event Grants Programme has a budget allocation of $600,000.

3.       The first grant funding round was open for applications during April and May 2021.

4.       We received 42 applications totalling $1,059,596 and assessed them using the criteria in the Events Policy 2013.

5.       Staff recommend allocating grants to 27 of the applications totalling $356,000.

6.       The lower number of applications received reflects the ongoing uncertainty for events because of Covid-19 and the restrictions that apply under alert levels.

7.       The move to alert level 4 restrictions in August 2021 is likely to impact events planned during September and potentially October 2021. Engagement will be required with these recipients to confirm whether these events can be postponed to alternate dates once restrictions end.

8.       Anticipating recovery from the current situation it is proposed that the second grant funding round is planned to enable further applications to be considered in February 2022.  The timing of this could be reviewed should the pandemic situation change.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      approve the following funding allocations for the 2021/2022 Regional Events Grant Programme:

Applicant

Event

Recommended funding allocation

Dominion Rd Business Association Inc

Dominion Road Moon Festival

10,000

Westlake Boys High School

Te Ahurea Tino Rangatiratanga

25,000

Auckland Region Outrigger Canoe Association Inc.

2021 AROCA Regional Sprint Championships

9,000

The Korean Society of Auckland Inc.

2021 Korean day

10,000

Domain Concerts Trust

Coca-Cola Christmas in the Park

40,000

Auckland Children's Christmas Parade Trust

Farmers Santa Parade

15,000

Mahurangi Action Incorporated

Mahurangi Regatta

5,000

Athletics New Zealand (Incorporated)

2022 Sir Graeme Douglas International Track Challenge

5,000

Quantum Events

Swim the Shore

6,000

Crackerjack Events

 

Auckland International Buskers Festival

35,000

The Preparatory Committee of NZ Taiwan Day Trust

 

NZ Taiwan Day 2021

10,000

Eventing Auckland Inc

Puhinui International Horse Trials

15,000

Total Sport Limited

The Coastal Challenge

7,500

Interacting

InterACT 2022!

14,000

Auckland Pride Festival Inc

Auckland Pride Month

25,000

Total Sport

The DUAL

7,500

New Zealand AIDS Foundation

Ending HIV Big Gay Out 2022

15,000

New Zealand Eid Day Trust

NZ Eid Day - Eid Al Fitr 2022

10,000

Te Pou Theatre

 

Whānau Day - Kōanga Festival 2021

8,000

Show Jumping Waitemata

Show Jumping Waitemata World Cup Festival

10,000

Total Sport

XTERRA Auckland Trail Run / Walk Series

7,500

Auckland Anniversary Regatta Incorporated

Auckland Anniversary Day Regatta

15,000

Royal NZ Pipe Bands' Association - Auckland Centre

2022 New Zealand Pipe Band Championships

10,000

Waiheke Jazz Festival

Waiheke Jazz Festival 2022

7,500

Aktive - Sport and Recreation Auckland

Mauri Toa Wānanga 2021

4,000

Aktive - Sport and Recreation Auckland

Iwi of Origin

20,000

Japanese Society of Auckland Inc.

Japan Day 2022

10,000

Total

$356,000

b)      note that a second funding round be scheduled with decisions in February 2022 to consider distribution of the remaining unallocated budget balance of $244,000.

Horopaki

Context

9.       The 2021/2022 budget includes an allocation of $600,000 for the contestable regional event grants programme.  This represents a restoration of the budget to 2019/2020 levels following the reduction to $400,000 last year under the Emergency Budget.

10.     Applications opened on 1 April 2021 and closed 31 May 2021.

11.     Staff received 42 applications (detailed in Attachment A) for this round totalling $1,059,596. This compares with 36 applications for $871,976 in 2020/2021 where COVID-19 had a significant impact, and 46 applications for $1,201,449 in 2019/2020 (excluding one application for $1,300,000).

12.     The impacts of COVID-19 and related restrictions for events has had an impact on the number of applications received for grant funding.  The continuing uncertainty for events has resulted in some organisations suspending planning for delivery of annual events.

13.     Following the recent identification of community cases of COVID-19 and the activation of level 4 restrictions there is uncertainty about when Auckland will return to level 1, when events are able to be held for more than 100 people. This includes some applications which are recommended for funding in this grant round. 

14.     The main impact is expected to be on events scheduled during September and October 2021. The events recommended for funding occurring in these months are identified in Table 1 and mitigation is detailed in paragraphs 55 and 56. The recommendations assume that these events may still proceed at a later date if alert level restrictions are in place for the original scheduled date.

15.     Events deliver on a range of outcomes, and benefit communities through building and maintaining a sense of place and connection which is fundamental to wellbeing and supports recovery.  The return of regular annual events is also a sign of positive change as communities return to a sense of normality and use events to build resilience.

16.     Maintaining funding to events assists with the economic recovery of businesses in the events and associated sectors, many of which have been facing a major downturn in activity.

17.     In 2019/2020, the Community Development and Safety Committee approved $40,000 per annum for multi-year regional event funding for Coca-Cola Christmas in the Park COM/2019/47), which includes an allocation from this funding round for 2021/2022 as part of the funding agreement. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     Staff assessed each application against regional event funding criteria outlined in the Events Policy 2013 (refer Attachment B).

19.     Each application has been assigned an overall score to inform recommendations (refer to Attachment C).

20.     The assessment reflects how well the events align with the following criteria, with percentages indicating the weighting applied to each area:

Criteria

Weighting (%)

Supports key priorities

12

Delivers desired impacts

12

Expands the variety or range of events on offer

12

Level of positive community benefits generated

12

Amount of community support, involvement and/or active partnerships

12

How effectively the event was run in the past or how well planned

12

Other considerations as outlined in the policy

12

Alignment with Māori priority

8

Alignment with youth priority

8

TOTAL

100%

 

21.     Staff also considered additional factors such as the event budget, plans, organiser experience, accessibility, previous event outcomes, and alignment with key Auckland dates, such as Matariki, or Auckland Anniversary weekend to determine the amount of funding recommended. Whether the applicant had received significant funding from other areas of council for the same event was also factored into the assessment process.

22.     In the current year, grant programmes will continue to be informed by Our Strategy 2022: Kia Manawaroa Tātou -Together we can rise to the challenge. Grants specifically support the goal:

Focus on communities that need us most:

- Use our resources wisely to better serve our communities that need us most

- Back communities, Māori, and other providers to deliver what is needed

23.     The events recommended for funding:

·    include many that are free/low cost to attend

·    deliver to a range of Auckland’s diverse communities

·    are distributed across the region

·    support a range of sporting, arts and cultural themes.

24.     Of the 27 events recommended for funding, 11 are sports related and 16 relate to arts and culture.

25.     The geographic spread of applications recommended for funding is shown below:

26.     The recommended funding allocations are based on the assessment scores against policy criteria and consideration of the additional factors outlined in paragraph 18.

Applications recommended for funding

27.     Staff recommend 27 events to be approved for funding and 15 to be declined.

28.     Some applications align with the criteria for event funding as well as other council grant funds such as arts and culture and sport and recreation.

29.     Staff considered overlaps to ensure a coordinated approach is taken to the overall provision of council funding to these events. In some situations, grants will be provided from one grant fund, and in others the total funding may be shared between two or more grant funds.

30.     The allocation proposed for the Farmers Santa Parade of $15,000 supplements $46,402 which is a non-contestable budget in the Long-term Plan. The $15,000 grant is consistent with the amount of contestable funding provided in from 2018/2019 to 2020/2021 and is recommended for funding again this year. 

 

 

31.     Table 1 outlines the events that are recommended to be approved, including funding amount and their alignment with key priorities as outlined in the funding criteria.

32.     The recommended funding amount is intended as a contribution to the total event cost, recognising that council is not the main funding provider.

Table 1: Events recommended for funding and strategic alignment

Event

Alignment with key priorities

Requested funding

Recommended funding

Potential COVID impact due to planned date

Dominion Road Moon Festival

Cultural festival

20,000

10,000

Yes

Whānau Day - Kōanga Festival 2021

Māori, families and children

15,600

8,000

Yes

2021 Korean day

Cultural festival

20,000

10,000

Yes

Mauri Toa Wānanga 2021

Māori, youth

10,000

4,000

Yes

Iwi of Origin

Māori, youth, low season, sport

20,000

20,000

Yes

Te Ahurea Tino Rangatiratanga

Māori, youth, celebration of excellence

25,000

25,000

Yes

2021 AROCA Regional Sprint Championships

Māori, Pasifika, youth, sport, celebration of excellence

10,000

9,000

 

Coca-Cola Christmas in the Park

Christmas, families and children

75,000

40,000

 

Farmers Santa Parade

Christmas, families and children

85,000

15,000

 

Mahurangi Regatta

Anniversary weekend

6,000

5,000

 

2022 Sir Graeme Douglas International Track Challenge

Sport, celebration of excellence

20,000

5,000

 

Swim the Shore

Sport, distinctive event

10,000

6,000

 

Auckland International Buskers Festival

Anniversary weekend

40,000

35,000

 

NZ Taiwan Day 2021

Cultural festival

20,000

10,000

 

Puhinui International Horse Trials

Sport, celebration of excellence

20,000

15,000

 

The Coastal Challenge

Sport, distinctive event

12,000

7,500

 

InterACT 2022!

Youth, Diverse Communities

20,000

14,000

 

Auckland Pride Month

Diverse Communities

50,000

25,000

 

The DUAL

Sport, distinctive event

25,000

7,500

 

Ending HIV Big Gay Out 2022

Diverse Communities

25,000

15,000

 

NZ Eid Day - Eid Al Fitr 2022

Cultural event

12,000

10,000

 

Show Jumping Waitemata World Cup Festival

Sport, celebration of excellence

15,000

10,000

 

XTERRA Auckland Trail Run / Walk Series

Sport, distinctive event

12,000

7,500

 

Auckland Anniversary Day Regatta

Anniversary weekend

17,000

15,000

 

2022 New Zealand Pipe Band Championships

City of Music, celebration of excellence, one off National Championship

20,000

10,000

 

Waiheke Jazz Festival 2022

Arts, City of Music

15,000

7,500

 

Japan Day 2022

Cultural festival

20,000

10,000

 

Total

 

$639,600

$356,000

 

 

Applications recommended for decline

33.     The most common reasons for declining applications are:

·    the activity is not within the scope of the grant programme

·    the activity is not considered to be of a regional scale

·    the activity does not align sufficiently with grant programme priorities

·    similar activities are already funded

34.     In some cases, an application may not meet the criteria but may offer potential for a future successful application. Staff will offer to work with these applicants to assist in presenting a more fully developed event concept plan that demonstrates alignment with funding priorities.

35.     Table 2 shows the applications that staff recommend be declined, with the key reasons.

Table 2 – Events recommended to be declined

Event

Reason for Decline

UTSNZ National Tertiary Netball Championship

 

Small scale event, limited alignment with priorities.

UTSNZ National Tertiary 5x5 Championship

Small scale event, limited alignment with priorities.

Waitangi@Waititi 2022 - Comeback from Covid

Support for current Waitangi Day events is provided through a non-contestable funding budget which forms part of a regional approach to celebrating the day that also includes local board funding and a council delivered event. It is recommended that any additional funding requests for community delivered events continue to be considered within this approach.

(application in 2019/2020 previously declined)

Generation Homes East Coaster

Delivers on similar outcomes to other funded walk/run events.  Level of grants budget does not support additional funding in this area.

Bean Rock Swim

Delivers on similar outcomes as the Swim the Shore event. Level of grants budget does not support additional funding in this area.

Auckland Youth Piano and Strings Concerts

Activity not within scope of regional event funding priorities - music performance associated with tuition.

The Great Auckland Duck Race 2021

Event budgeted to run at a surplus excluding sponsorship. Moderate alignment with funding priorities.

(application in 2016/2017 previously declined)

GNZCC Oktoberfest 2021

Nature and scale of event not within scope of regional event funding priorities.

NZ Rugby League National District 9s Tournament

Delivers on similar outcomes to funded National Secondary Schools tournament.

Earth Beat Festival 2022

Ticketed Arts and Music Festival - out of scope for regional event funding

Artweek Auckland

Event not within areas of focus for regional event funding.

The West Coaster

Delivers on similar outcomes as Coastal Challenge, XTERRA series, and The DUAL. Level of grants budget does not support additional funding in this area.

Northern Mystics Home Season (ANZ Premiership)

No longer an area of focus for regional event funding

(last funded in 2017/2018)

Khuado Festival

Small scale event with format having limited alignment with priorities

Let's Go Garba-2021

Insufficient detail to support funding application within event timeframe. Will work with organiser to develop future application.   

Event Evaluation

36.     Staff evaluate the delivery of funded events through post event reports prepared by organisers, information from the event facilitation/permitting team, attendance on the day, media and online coverage of the event, along with attendee feedback, including elected members.

37.     Evaluation assesses whether:

·    the event is delivered largely in the manner described in the funding application

·    the event is well supported and enjoyed by participants, audiences, and the wider community; and

·    the event aligns with council policy priorities.

38.     Staff attend funded events to obtain insights on the event delivery and to inform feedback provided to organisers on what is working well and areas that may be improved.

39.     This evaluation process then informs future funding application assessments and recommendations.  

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

40.     The main climate impacts of most regional events are with waste management and transportation to or from an event.

41.     The event permitting process and grant funding agreements promote and encourage a range of transport options and zero waste.

42.     The impact of climate change may progressively affect events through increased weather variability and severity.  This may result in an increasing number of event cancellations, greater costs to mitigate weather impact, and impact on availability of certain sites for events.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

43.     Some applications include events taking place in council venues, on council land or receive council funding for other aspects of their work. In these cases, staff consult relevant departments that may have an interest in the events and take this information into account when presenting recommendations for funding.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

44.     Local boards provided formal feedback to inform the development of the Events Policy 2013.  The administrative process associated with the assessment and allocation of the regional event fund applies principles and criteria outlined within the policy.

45.     Regional event funding occurs in parallel with, and is complementary to, local event funding rounds operated by local boards.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

46.     The Events Policy recognises a responsibility to engage and build relationships with Māori in designing, planning and delivering regional events of mutual interest.

47.     The Events Action Plan in the policy places a particular focus on support for Māori events in the context of a diverse, balanced region-wide programme. This priority is indicated in application information and guides to encourage applications for Māori events.

48.     Table 4 shows comparative analysis of grants provided to events with a Māori focus including having significant Māori content, participation and/or audience.

Table 4 – Regional funding provided to events with a Māori focus

Funded regional events with a Māori focus

2021/2022
(proposed)

2020/2021

2019/2020

2018/2019

Number

5 out of 27

7 out of 36

8 out of 41

9 out of 44

Total value

$66,000

$103,000

$136,000

$143,000

Percentage of total round value

18.5%

25.8%

22.7%

23.8%

49.     The five events considered to have a Māori focus in this 2021/2022 round are:

·    Te Ahurea Tino Rangatiratanga

·    2021 AROCA Regional Sprint Championships

·    Whānau Day - Kōanga Festival 2021

·    Mauri Toa Wānanga 2021

·    Iwi of Origin

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

50.     Staff recommend confirming grants totalling $356,000 as the proposed allocation for the first round from the total 2021/2022 contestable regional event grants budget of $600,000.

51.     Funding for any events which do not proceed due to COVID impacts or other reasons, will be returned to the regional grants budget and be available for re-allocation.

52.     It is proposed that the second funding round is planned for consideration in February 2022.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

53.     There is a risk that events will not be successfully delivered in accordance with event plans submitted in grant applications. Staff mitigate this risk through the assessment process, considering the experience of event organisers, prior experience of holding the event and by attendance at events.

54.     In many cases, council is one of several funders of an event and the ability of event organisers to raise funding from multiple sources increases confidence in the event proposal, based on the independent assessment of other funders.

55.     The risk of events not going ahead has significantly increased with the recent move to COVID alert level 4. The status of events will be monitored closely, and payment of grants will be made only where there is a reasonable likelihood that events will be able to proceed based on the alert level and the ability to postpone the event to an alternate date.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

56.     Following approval from the PACE Committee, funding agreements will be prepared, including conditions for payment of funding subject to appropriate event planning proceeding and appropriate alert level conditions.

57.     A second funding round for the year will see grant recommendations put to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events committee in February 2022.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Application Summaries

325

b

Prioritisation Criteria

413

c

Summary Schedule

415

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

David McIntosh - Senior Business Advisor

Authorisers

Philippa Geere-Watson - Manager Advisory

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

09 September 2021

 

Regional Arts and Culture Round 1 September Parks, Arts, Community and Events - Final

File No.: CP2021/11337

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve grants to regional arts organisations and artists through round one of the 2021/2022 Regional Arts and Culture grants programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Regional Arts and Culture grants programme is designed to enable organisations, communities and artists to deliver arts and culture projects and activities across the Auckland region. Grants delivered through this programme support the implementation of Toi Whītiki, Auckland’s Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan and align with the Community Grants Policy.

3.       The contestable programme has a budget of $1,211,978 for 2021/2022. The scheme allocates grants through two funding rounds each year.

4.       In the 2019/2020 and 2020/2021 financial years, 11 multiyear strategic relationship grants were approved. The commitment for these grants in 2021/2022 is $410,000.

5.       This leaves a balance of $801,978 for new grants in 2021/2022.

6.       Fifty-three applications were received requesting a total of $1,071,824.

7.       Informed by an external assessment panel, staff recommend approving a total of $481,394 (Attachment A):

- $235,716 to 21 audience development and programming grants

- $95,678 to seven business and capacity project grants

- $150,000 to three returning and two new strategic relationship grants

8.       COVID-19 has continued to have a significant impact on the arts sector. Recommendations from Creative New Zealand to local government indicated that in a time of crisis and recovery, local government’s role around promoting the social and cultural wellbeing of its communities, as required by the Local Government Act 2002, becomes even more critical.

9.       Specific recommendations from Creative New Zealand in the 2020 COVID-19 lockdown included maintaining existing levels of funding for arts and culture organisations. The recommendations for this meeting were informed by this advice.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)   approve the following allocations of funding to arts organisations for the Regional Arts and Culture grants programme 2021/2022 round one:

 

Organisation

Activity

Funding Allocation

Audience development and programming

Action Education

Word the Front Line 2022

 

$20,000.00

Te Pou Theatre Trust

Kōpū – a new Māori kaupapa wor

$16,500.00

Panacea Arts Charitable Trust

Creative Outreach to Disadvantaged People within the Greater Auckland Community

 

$15,000.00

Little Green Man Productions

Matariki Glow Show 2022

$10,000.00

Objectspace

Queer objects: queering contemporary material culture in Aotearoa

 

$7,500.00

Auckland Writers and Readers Festival Charitable Trust

Auckland Writers Festival Waituhi o Tāmaki

 

$20,000.00

Artweek Auckland

Artweek Auckland - Tours and Trails

 

$10,000.00

Crescendo Trust of Aotearoa

Crescendo youth mentoring programme

 

$12,500.00

Tuatara Collective

HAU [te Hī me te Hā] FESTIVAL - Ignite | Activate | Illuminate | Resonate

$15,000.00

Girls Rock! Camp Aotearoa Incorporated

To the Front Tāmaki Makaurau 2022

$5,000.00

The Lake House Trust

Tipua (New Growth): The Lake House Arts Wood Sculpture Road Show 2022

 

$12,500.00

The Operating Theatre Trust

Auckland regional tour of 'The Twits' by Roald Dahl

 

$12,000.00

JK Productions Ltd

Po' Boys n Oysters Theatre Production by BCA (Black Creatives Aotearoa)

 

$15,000.00

Red Leap Theatre Charitable Trust Board

Owls Do Cry return season

 

$4,500.00

Choirs Aotearoa New Zealand

National Choirs in Auckland 2021/2022

 

$12,000.00

Nightsong