I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Planning Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 2 September 2021

10.00am

This meeting will be held remotely and can be viewed on the Auckland Council website

https://councillive.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

 

 

Kōmiti Whakarite Mahere / Planning Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Chris Darby

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Josephine Bartley

 

Members

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

Cr Richard Hills

 

Deputy Mayor Cr Bill Cashmore

Cr Tracy Mulholland

 

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Cr Pippa Coom

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Angela Dalton

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Alf Filipaina

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

Cr John Watson

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

IMSB Member Karen Wilson

 

IMSB Member Hon Tau Henare

Cr Paul Young

 

Cr Shane Henderson

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

 

Kalinda Iswar

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

30 August 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 723 228

Email: kalinda.iswar@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


 

Terms of Reference

 

Responsibilities

 

This committee guides the physical development and growth of Auckland through a focus on land use, transport and infrastructure strategies and policies relating to planning, growth, housing and the appropriate provision of enabling infrastructure, as well as programmes and strategic projects associated with these activities. The committee will establish an annual work programme outlining key focus areas in line with its key responsibilities, which include:

 

·       relevant regional strategy and policy

·       transportation

·       infrastructure strategy and policy

·       Unitary Plan, including plan changes (but not any wholesale review of the Plan)

·       Resource Management Act and relevant urban planning legislation framework

·       oversight of Council’s involvement in central government strategies, plans or initiatives that impact on Auckland’s future land use and infrastructure

·       Auckland Plan implementation reporting on priorities and performance measures

·       structure plans and spatial plans

·       housing policy and projects

·       city centre and waterfront development

·       regeneration and redevelopment programmes

·       built and cultural heritage, including public art

·       urban design

·       acquisition of property relating to the committee’s responsibilities and in accordance with the LTP

·       working with and receiving advice from the Heritage Advisory Panel, the Rural Advisory Panel and the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board to give visibility to the issues important to the communities they represent and to help effect change.

 

Powers

 

(i)      All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities, including:

(a)     approval of a submission to an external body

(b)     establishment of working parties or steering groups.

(ii)      The committee has the powers to perform the responsibilities of another committee, where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee.

(iii)     If a policy or project relates primarily to the responsibilities of the Planning Committee, but aspects require additional decisions by the Environment and Climate Change Committee and/or the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee, then the Planning Committee has the powers to make associated decisions on behalf of those other committee(s). For the avoidance of doubt, this means that matters do not need to be taken to more than one of those committees for decisions.

(iii)     The committee does not have:

(a)     the power to establish subcommittees

(b)     powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2).

 

Code of conduct

 

For information relating to Auckland Council’s elected members code of conduct, please refer to this link on the Auckland Council website - https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/elected-members-remuneration-declarations-interest/Pages/elected-members-code-conduct.aspx

Auckland Plan Values

 

The Auckland Plan 2050 outlines a future that all Aucklanders can aspire to. The values of the Auckland Plan 2050 help us to understand what is important in that future:

 

 


 

Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·         Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·         Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·         Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·         In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·         The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·         However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·         All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·         Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·         Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·         All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·         Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·         Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·         Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 


Planning Committee

02 September 2021

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                 9

2          Declaration of Interest                                          9

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         9

4          Petitions                                                                 9  

5          Public Input                                                           9

6          Local Board Input                                                 9

7          Extraordinary Business                                     10

8          National Policy Statement on Urban Development - Removal of Carparking Minimums and Consequential Plan Changes 11

9          Summary of Planning Committee information items and briefings (including the forward work programme) – 2 September 2021            21

10        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

11        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                           35

C1       CONFIDENTIAL:  Sites of Significance to Mana Whenua - Tranche 2 Plan Change Investigation                                                                              35

C2       CONFIDENTIAL:  Auckland Light Rail update 36


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

\

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Planning Committee:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 5 August 2021, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public input had been received.

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 


 

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Planning Committee

02 September 2021

 

National Policy Statement on Urban Development - Removal of Carparking Minimums and Consequential Plan Changes

File No.: CP2021/10237

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek endorsement of a plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) (AUP) and a plan change to the Auckland District Plan (Hauraki Gulf Islands Section) (HGI Plan) to make consequential technical amendments to provide clarity and consistency within the plan and ensure that the effects of car parking (where developers choose to provide it) can still be addressed, following the removal of provisions that require or have the effect of requiring car parking minimums.

2.       To seek endorsement of an investigation into other amendments to the AUP and HGI Plan to address a range of matters that arise as a result of the removal of provisions that require or have the effect of requiring car parking minimums.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This report addresses the requirement to remove minimum car parking provisions from district plans as required by Policy 11 of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS-UD). It follows an introductory memorandum on the NPS-UD to the Planning Committee dated 10 August 2020, followed by a report on the proposed work programme to respond to the NPS-UD dated 4 February 2021. 

4.       The NPS-UD states in Policy 11 that in relation to car parking:

a)   the district plans of tier 1, 2, and 3 territorial authorities do not set minimum car parking rate requirements, other than for accessible car parks; and

b)   tier 1, 2, and 3 local authorities are strongly encouraged to manage effects associated with the supply and demand of car parking through comprehensive parking management plans.

Auckland Council is a tier 1 territorial authority.

5.       The NPS-UD requires the council to remove provisions that have the effect of requiring a minimum number of car parks from the AUP and the HGI Plan. The removals must be done by 20 February 2022, without using the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA) Schedule 1 plan change process (i.e., members of the public are not able to make submissions on the removals).

6.       As a direct result of removing minimum car parking requirements, consequential technical amendments are also needed to the AUP and the HGI Plan to provide clarity and consistency within the plan and ensure that the effects of car parking (where developers choose to provide it) can still be addressed. These consequential technical amendments require plan changes under the normal RMA Schedule 1 process.


 

7.       In addition to consequential technical amendments, council and Auckland Transport staff have identified several potential changes that could be made to the AUP to address issues that arise (or could arise) from the removal of minimum car parking requirements from the AUP and the HGI Plan. These potential changes include:

a)      requiring, in some situations, accessible parking

b)      ensuring the appropriate design of private pedestrian access where no vehicle access is proposed

c)      requiring, in some situations, on-site bicycle access and bicycle parking where no vehicle access is proposed

d)      requiring, in some situations, on-site electric vehicle charging facilities where no vehicle parking is proposed

e)      requiring, in some situations, pick-up and drop-off / loading facilities and access for emergency services where no vehicle access is proposed. 

8.       Addressing these issues may also require plan changes to the AUP and HGI Plan as they fall outside the scope of the non-Schedule 1 changes required by the NPS-UD. The report recommends that these potential changes are investigated and reported back to the Planning Committee to determine whether they form part of a plan change.  

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning Committee:

a)      note that as a result of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in part) and the Auckland Council District Plan (Hauraki Gulf Islands Section) will have car parking minimum requirements deleted by the end of February 2022.

b)      endorse the development of a plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in part) and a plan change to the Auckland District Plan (Hauraki Gulf Islands Section) to address consequential technical amendments to provide clarity and consistency within the plans and ensure that the effects of car parking (where developers choose to provide it) can still be addressed.

c)       endorse the investigation of amendments to the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in part) and/or the Auckland Council District Plan (Hauraki Gulf Islands Section) to:

i)       require, in some situations, accessible parking

ii)       ensure the appropriate design of private pedestrian access where no vehicle access is proposed

iii)      require, in some situations, on-site bicycle access and bicycle parking where no vehicle access is proposed

iv)      require, in some situations, on-site electric vehicle charging facilities where no vehicle parking is proposed

v)      require, in some situations, pick-up and drop-off/loading facilities and access for emergency services where no vehicle access is proposed. 

d)      request staff report the findings of the investigation referred to in clause c) back to the Planning Committee for further consideration.

e)      delegate to the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Planning Committee and a member of the Independent Māori Statutory Board authority to approve the consequential technical plan change for public notification if the wider investigation referred to in clause c) requires a longer timeframe than the consequential technical changes referred to in clause b).

Horopaki

Context

9.       This report follows an introductory memorandum on the NPS-UD to the Planning Committee dated 10 August 2020 and a report on the proposed work programme to respond to the NPS-UD dated 4 February 2021. In February 2021, this committee endorsed the work programme and a series of workshops and meetings to establish the council’s approach to the NPS-UD (Resolution PLA/2021/18). Eight workshops for the committee and local board chairs have been held between February and July 2021.

10.     National policy statements provide national direction for matters of national significance relevant to achieving the sustainable management purpose of the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA). They allow the Government to prescribe objectives and policies for matters of national significance.

11.     The NPS-UD has its origins in the National Policy Statement on Urban Development Capacity 2016 (NPS-UDC) which sought to enable greater development capacity for housing and business. The NPS-UDC has been replaced by the NPS-UD, which gives further policy direction in certain planning areas. The NPS-UD is part of the Government’s Urban Growth Agenda. This Agenda states that to support productive and well-functioning cities it is important that regional policy statements and regional and district plans provide adequate opportunity for land development for business and housing to meet community needs. The stated potential benefits of flexible urban policy include higher productivity and wages, shorter commute times, lower housing costs, social inclusion, and more competitive urban land markets. 

12.     This report addresses the requirement to remove minimum car parking provisions from district plans as required by Policy 11 of the NPS-UD. The purpose of Policy 11 is outlined in the Ministry for the Environment fact sheet on car parking:

“The purpose of this direction is to enable more housing and commercial developments, particularly in higher density areas where people do not necessarily need to own or use a car to access jobs, services, or amenities. It will enable urban space to be used for higher value purposes other than car parking and remove a significant cost for higher density developments. Developers may still choose to provide car parking in many areas, but the number of car parks will be driven by market demand.”

13.     While there is an emphasis on “higher density areas”, the removal of car parking minimums applies everywhere within the local authority boundary (in this case the Auckland Council area).

14.     Recent analysis commissioned by Auckland Transport looking at car ownership data from the last three Census periods shows that, on average, there are 1.9 cars per household in the Auckland urban area. Car availability per household has increased by 12.4 percent between 2006 and 2018, partially as a result of increases in household size across Auckland. Car availability is, however, lower along the rail network at 1.76 per household. Only a small number of suburbs, including the city centre, have a car availability of less than one per household. Across the Auckland urban area only 7.4 percent of households have no cars.   

15.     Clause 3.38 in Subpart 8 of the NPS-UD supports Policy 11. It states that if a district plan contains objectives, policies, rules or assessment criteria that have the effect of requiring a minimum number of car parks, those provisions must be removed without using the RMA Schedule 1 plan change process. This must be done by 20 February 2022. This does not apply to accessible car parks, and/or parking dimensions and vehicle manoeuvring standards.


 

16.     Policy 11 of the NPS-UD also encourages the use of comprehensive parking management plans to manage the effects associated with the supply and demand of car parking. Comprehensive parking management plans (CPMP) are non-statutory documents that provide guidance on how to manage parking in locations with parking demand pressures based on an analysis of local circumstances. For instance, CPMPs may recommend parking management measures, such as changes to pricing or time restrictions. Auckland Transport currently prioritises the use of CPMPs for commercial/civic centres.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Non-Schedule 1 amendments to implement Policy 11 of the NPS-UD

17.     The ability to amend the AUP to give effect to the NPS-UD without using the RMA Schedule 1 process is limited to changes specifically stated in the NPS-UD. In the context of car parking, clause 3.38(1) of the NPS-UD sets out the provisions that must be amended:

“If the district plan of a tier 1, 2, or 3 territorial authority contains objectives, policies, rules, or assessment criteria that have the effect of requiring a minimum number of car parks to be provided for a particular development, land use, or activity, the territorial authority must change its district plan to remove that effect, other than in respect of accessible car parks.”

18.     Auckland Council is a tier 1 territorial authority. A review of the AUP and the HGI Plan has identified all instances where objectives, policies, rules and assessment criteria require a minimum number of car parking spaces. These must be removed from the plans without the using the RMA Schedule 1 process. A public notice advising people of this action will be published when the provisions are removed.

Consequential technical amendments to the AUP and the HGI Plan

19.     The removal of minimum car parking requirements from the AUP and the HGI Plan will result in the need to make consequential technical amendments to both plans that fall outside the scope of non-Schedule 1 changes. Consequential technical amendments are needed to the AUP and the HGI Plan to ensure:

·   all provisions that imply a minimum number of car parking spaces but do not specify a number of spaces, are removed to give effect to the NPS-UD

·   consistency and certainty of text within the plans after the minimum car parking requirements are removed

·   amendments required to give effect to the NPS-UD are supported by the policy framework within each plan

·   the effects of car parking (where developers choose to provide it) can still be addressed, following the removal of provisions that require or have the effect of requiring car parking minimums.


 

Potential additional amendments to the AUP and the HGI Plan

20.     In addition to consequential technical amendments, council and Auckland Transport staff have identified several potential changes that could be made to the AUP to address the issues that arise (or may arise) from the removal of minimum car parking requirements from the AUP and the HGI Plan.  These potential changes include:

·    requiring, in some situations, accessible parking

·    ensuring the appropriate design of private pedestrian access where no vehicle access is proposed

·    requiring, in some situations, on-site bicycle access and bicycle parking where no vehicle access is proposed

·    requiring, in some situations, on-site electric vehicle charging facilities where no vehicle parking is proposed

·    requiring, in some situations, pick-up and drop-off / loading facilities and access for emergency services where no vehicle access is proposed.

Accessible parking

21.     Policy 11 of the NPS-UD states that the council can continue to set minimum accessible parking requirements. The AUP and the HGI Plan both refer to the Building Code for accessible parking requirements. Under the Building Code, the number of accessible parking spaces is determined using a ratio based on the number of general car parks provided. Further to this, the Building Act 2004 deems NZS 4121:2001 Design for access and mobility buildings and associated facilities to be an acceptable solution. The standard does not, however, apply to residential buildings. Table 1 provides the accessible parking requirements under NZS 4121:2001.

Table 1: Accessible parking requirements under NZS 4121:2001

Total number of car parks

Number of accessible spaces

1 – 20

Not less than 1

21 – 50

Not less than 2

For every additional 50 car parks or part of a car park

Not less than 1

 

22.     If, following the removal of the minimum car parking requirements there are no general car park spaces proposed as part of a development, there is no requirement in the AUP and the HGI Plan that enables the council to require the developer to provide accessible car parking.

23.     The NPS-UD is clear that district plans can continue to require accessible parking. The removal of minimum car parking requirements from the AUP and the HGI Plan leaves a gap in the provision of accessible parking in circumstances where no general parking is provided. It is proposed that the costs and benefits of addressing this gap by introducing accessible parking provisions into the AUP and/or HGI Plan are investigated and reported back to the Planning Committee.

Design of private pedestrian access

24.     The AUP does not require car parking to be provided within the Residential – Terrace Housing and Apartment Buildings Zone and for studios and one-bedroom dwellings within the Residential – Mixed Housing Urban Zone. Where dwellings are not provided with vehicle access or onsite parking, they usually rely on private pedestrian access.

25.     Where a land use consent is sought in a residential zone, the AUP requires pedestrian access if there is vehicle access serving 10 or more parking spaces. The existing AUP standards for pedestrian access relate to circumstances where the pedestrian access is provided alongside a much wider vehicle access. The pedestrian access is required to be one metre wide and can be located within the formed driveway[1]. Where a subdivision consent is sought in a residential zone, accessways serving six or more rear sites must provide separate pedestrian access which may be located within the formed driveway. The minimum width for the pedestrian access is one metre and it must be distinguished from the vehicle carriageway[2]. However, where no vehicle access is provided, there are currently no standards in the AUP for private pedestrian access.

26.     Evidence is emerging of residential developments with private pedestrian access routes of poor quality. The number of developments without vehicle access and onsite parking is likely to increase across all zones once minimum car parking requirements are removed from the AUP. Without specific standards in the AUP, there is an increased risk of poorly designed and unsafe private pedestrian access. This presents a number of challenges in terms of universal access, emergency services access and egress (fire, police and ambulance), personal and public safety, convenience and general amenity.

27.     It is proposed that the costs and benefits of addressing this issue by introducing new provisions for pedestrian access into the AUP and/or HGI Plan are investigated and reported back to the Planning Committee.

Provision for and design of bicycle access and on-site bicycle parking where no vehicle access is proposed

28.     The AUP does not require on-site bicycle parking until relatively high development thresholds are reached. Furthermore, there are no provisions in the AUP relating to the design of on-site bicycle access and secure, sheltered parking facilities for bicycles.

29.     It is proposed that the costs and benefits of addressing this issue by introducing new provisions for bicycle access and on-site bicycle parking into the AUP and/or HGI Plan are investigated and reported back to the Planning Committee.

Provision for electric vehicle charging

30.     New Zealand’s transition to electric vehicles is a key component of efforts to significantly reduce transport emissions. For example, Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan anticipates 40 percent of light vehicles to be electric or zero emission by 2030, and 80 percent by 2050. As charging electric vehicles typically takes a minimum of several hours, and ideally occurs at night to take advantage of off-peak power, future residential developments will need to provide spaces and charging facilities to support uptake of electric vehicles. Even if no formal car parking is provided, it is still expected that most households will own a vehicle and therefore some shared charging facilities will be required. This is particularly important as Auckland Transport staff have advised that Auckland Transport does not anticipate supporting on-street facilities.

31.     It is proposed that the costs and benefits of addressing this issue by introducing new provisions for electric vehicle charging facilities into the AUP and/or HGI Plan are investigated and reported back to the Planning Committee.


 

Property access and potential adverse effects on the transport network

32.     There are also broader issues associated with property access and the potential effects of this on the transport network. Developments or land uses that do not have vehicle access for servicing, pick up and drop off and deliveries may be reliant on roadside access. This may lead to conflicts with transport network functions (parked cars blocking the carriageway) and may have safety effects (such as visibility constraints, unsafe vehicle manoeuvres and effects on pedestrian safety).

33.     The AUP requirements for on-site loading have relatively high development thresholds and there are no requirements for on-site loading in residential developments. The current on-site car parking requirements allow some of these loading and servicing tasks to occur without specific provision being made.

34.     These issues also require further investigation.

Stakeholder views

35.     Staff attended a Universal Design Forum meeting on 30 June 2021 to discuss potential implications arising from the implementation of Policy 11 of the NPS-UD. A follow-up meeting was held with Fire and Emergency, Auckland Emergency Management, Police and St John on 6 July 2021. The key issues identified included:

·   The lack of onsite parking, including accessible parking:

o will reduce accessibility to facilities and therefore the ability for some groups to maintain their independence

o has an effect on door-to-door services such as delivery services and specialised transport pick-up/drop-offs

o will result in more cars parked on berms and obstructing footpaths.

·   Pedestrian access needs to be well-lit, free of obstructions, and of a sufficient width, gradient and surface to accommodate all users, including wheelchair users, mobility scooters and parents with prams.

·   In terms of emergency services:

o challenges in relation to narrow streets, site access and distance of sites from the road

o there is a greater risk of injuries when access is limited, surfaces are uneven creating trip or slip hazards, and are narrow or poorly lit

o increased response time to properties without vehicle access as emergency responders need to find a location to park their vehicles

o any delay in response time increases risk to people’s safety (for example if someone is suffering from a cardiac arrest, the chance of survival drops by 10-15% every minute that goes by without CPR or the use of an automated external defibrillator[3])

o pedestrian access needs to accommodate space requirements for stretchers and ladders.

36.     Staff have presented to the Seniors Advisory Panel on 19 July 2021 and the Disability Advisory Panel on 9 August 2021. Feedback received from these two Panels will be provided as part of the presentation of this report at the Planning Committee meeting. 


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

37.     Objective 8 and policy 1 of the NPS-UD set out a policy framework that signals the need for decisions under the RMA to reduce emissions and improve climate resilience.

38.     This framework is in line with the 'built environment' priority of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan, which has a goal of achieving "A low carbon, resilient built environment that promotes healthy, low impact lifestyles". The plan recognises that:

"To move to a low carbon and resilient region, climate change and hazard risks need to be integral to the planning system that shapes Auckland. Integrating land-use and transport planning is vital to reduce the need for private vehicle travel and to ensure housing and employment growth areas are connected to efficient, low carbon transport systems."

39.     The Planning Committee also passed unanimously an expectation that Auckland Council would fully utilise "the levers available to it to reduce transport emissions, including […] increasing the focus on intensification within brownfield areas, in particular along the rapid transit corridors" and “supporting and promoting urban development at a local level that encourages reduced car use and accelerates the uptake of public transport and active modes (including new forms of mobility)” (Resolution PLA/2021/15).

40.     The urban form of cities directly affects the level of emissions that they generate. It also affects the level of exposure its residents and businesses have to the effects of climate change. There are clear links between parking provision, vehicle ownership, vehicle kilometers travelled and Auckland’s urban form.

41.     Policy 11 of the NPS-UD seeks that onsite car parking minimums are removed to enable more housing and commercial development floorspace.  In many cases, developers will continue to provide car parking to meet market demand. The NPS-UD does not prevent this. However, the added flexibility provided by the removal of car parking minimums from the AUP and HGI Plan will inevitably result in fewer car parks being provided within developments than at present. Where this occurs in areas where jobs, services and amenities can be easily accessed by active modes and public transport, this will contribute to reducing greenhouse gasses.

42.     As previously discussed, New Zealand’s transition to electric vehicles is a key component of efforts to significantly reduce transport emissions. In support of this, it is recommended that the costs and benefits of introducing new provisions for electric vehicle charging facilities into the AUP and HGI Plan are investigated and reported back to the Planning Committee.

43.     The Auckland Plan and AUP outline the impacts and risks the region is facing from climate change, including flooding, heatwaves, drought and coastal erosion. Removing car parking minimums will result in more efficient use of land and therefore reduce pressure to allow Auckland’s growth in areas more susceptible to the impacts of climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

44.     All relevant council departments and Auckland Transport have been involved in the development of the recommendations contained in this report. Auckland Transport staff support the proposed amendments to the AUP and HGI recommended for investigation and will have an ongoing role in the project.


 

45.     Auckland Transport is currently reviewing its Parking Strategy, which will need to carefully consider the implications of changes required under the NPD-UD. While the Parking Strategy is still some way from completion, problems associated with on-street parking of vehicles arising from residential developments with no onsite parking are already emerging as an issue. Auckland Transport expects it will need to transition rapidly to a much more widespread and proactive management of parking in residential areas, such as through the introduction of time restricted parking zones, to minimise adverse effects on the transport network and manage competition for available spaces. This will necessarily lead to increased enforcement costs and affect the parking availability enjoyed by current residents.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

46.     Local board members have been briefed on the implications of the NPS-UD and local board chairs have been invited to the series of Planning Committee workshops run during this year. Board members have voiced a keen interest in the development of the car parking plan change following the resolution of the approach contained in this report. Staff are preparing an engagement plan that will include engagement with local boards. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

47.     Policy 9 of the NPS UD sets out the requirements for local authorities as follows:

“Local authorities, in taking account of the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti o Waitangi) in relation to urban environments, must:

a)      involve hapū and iwi in the preparation of RMA planning documents and any FDSs by undertaking effective consultation that is early, meaningful and, as far as practicable, in accordance with tikanga Māori; and

b)      when preparing RMA planning documents and FDSs, take into account the values and aspirations of hapū and iwi for urban development; and

c)      provide opportunities in appropriate circumstances for Māori involvement in decision-making on resource consents, designations, heritage orders, and water conservation orders, including in relation to sites of significance to Māori and issues of cultural significance; and

d)      operate in a way that is consistent with iwi participation legislation.”

48.     Policy 9 directs council to particularly involve iwi and hapū in the NPS-UD during the preparation of planning documents. Staff are preparing to engage with Mana Whenua on a number of matters relating to the NPS-UD, including car parking.

49.     The removal of car parking minimums will also have an impact on Mataawaka. The matters this report recommends investigating and reporting back to the Planning Committee will include an analysis of the impacts on Mana Whenua and Māori more broadly.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

50.     While implementing the NPS-UD is a large programme of work, it is expected to be resourced through existing budgets. The budget to appoint new staff (and, if necessary, consultants) to support this programme has been approved through the council’s Long-term Plan.

51.     The removal of car parking minimums from the AUP and HGI Plan will have funding implications for Auckland Transport, particularly in relation to increased residential parking management and enforcement. The implications are being assessed by Auckland Transport, and if there are unbudgeted costs, will be reported to the council at the appropriate time.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

52.     The key risks of removing minimum car parking requirements from the AUP and HGI Plan are:

·    consequential technical amendments are not addressed and the plans do not function properly creating uncertainty and delays for those undertaking development in Auckland

·    broader issues (such as those discussed in this report) are not addressed through potential changes to the AUP and HGI Plan resulting in poor development outcomes

·    problems associated with on-street parking of vehicles arising from residential developments with no onsite parking are not addressed.

53.     Considerable analysis has already been undertaken on the consequential technical amendments and a plan change to the AUP and a plan change to the HGI Plan will be ready to notify at the same time as the car parking minimums are removed in February 2022.

54.     The broader issues have been scoped and will be reported back to the Planning Committee when further work on costs and benefits has been completed.

55.     As noted under ‘Council group impacts and views’, Auckland Transport is aware of the need for its Parking Strategy to respond to the impacts of the NPS-UD, and the need to transition rapidly to a much more widespread and proactive management of parking in residential areas.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

56.     On site car parking minimum requirements are required to be removed from the AUP and the HGI Plans by the end of February 2022. The consequential technical amendments discussed in this report will be ready to include in a plan change to the AUP and plan change to the HGI Plan within this timeframe. In parallel with this, but potentially on a longer timeframe, investigations will continue into the various related matters discussed in this report. Those investigations will be reported back to the Planning Committee.

57.     Given the possibility of two different timeframes, it is proposed that approval to notify the plan changes relating to the consequential technical changes is delegated to the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Planning Committee and a Member of the Independent Māori Statutory Board. If the wider investigations can be completed in time to address in the same plan changes, this delegation will not be required.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Eryn Shields - Team Leader  Regional, North West and Islands

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Authoriser

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 


Planning Committee

02 September 2021

 

Summary of Planning Committee information items and briefings (including the forward work programme) – 2 September 2021

File No.: CP2021/12092

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A.

2.       To receive a summary and provide a public record of memos or briefing papers that have been held or been distributed to committee members.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This is a regular information-only report which aims to provide greater visibility of information circulated to committee members via memo/briefing or other means, where no decisions are required.

4.       The following workshops have taken place:

Date

Workshops

30/6/2021

CONFIDENTIAL: City Centre to Māngere Light Rail Establishment Unit

28/7/2021

CONFIDENTIAL: Decision making for the National Policy Statement Urban Development - Plan change relating to the removal of car parking minimums and intensification approach to all other locations

4/8/2021

CONFIDENTIAL: Potential judicial review proceedings relating to the management of notable trees in the Auckland Unitary Plan

18/8/2021

CONFIDENTIAL: City Centre to Māngere Light Rail Establishment Unit – feedback on project to date

25/8/2021

CONFIDENTIAL: Auckland Light Rail - discussion on business case

5.       The following briefings have taken place:

Date

Briefings

27/7/2021

CONFIDENTIAL: Waka Kotahi

6.       The following memoranda and information items have been sent:

Date

Memoranda, Correspondence, Information Item

August 2021

Auckland Monthly Housing Update – August 2021

16/7/2021

Memo: Auckland Plan 2050 Annual Monitoring Report 2021 – further information

4/8/2021

Auckland Council submission on the Natural and Built Environments Bill exposure draft

16/8/2021

Memo: Supporting Growth programme update

27/8/2021

Memo: Staff feedback provided on central government’s regulatory proposals for the Stock exclusion regulations: Proposed changes to the low slope map; and the Freshwater farm plan regulations


These documents can be found on the Auckland Council website, at the following link:

http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

at the top left of the page, select meeting/Te hui “Planning Committee” from the drop-down tab and click “View”;

under ‘Attachments’, select either the HTML or PDF version of the document entitled ‘Extra Attachments’.

7.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary.  Planning Committee members should direct any questions to the authors.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning Committee:

a)      note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A of the agenda report

b)      receive the Summary of Planning Committee information items and briefings – 2 September 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Planning Committee forward work programme

23

b

Auckland Monthly Housing Update – August 2021 (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Memo: Auckland Plan 2050 Annual Monitoring Report – further information (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Auckland Council submission on the Natural and Built Environments Bill exposure draft (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Memo: Supporting Growth programme update (Under Separate Cover)

 

f

Memo: Staff feedback provided on central government’s regulatory proposals for the Stock exclusion regulations: Proposed changes to the low slope map; and the Freshwater farm plan regulations (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kalinda Iswar - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy


Planning Committee

02 September 2021

 

 

Kōmiti Whakarite Mahere / Planning Committee

Forward Work Programme 2021

This committee guides the physical development and growth of Auckland through a focus on land use, transport and infrastructure strategies and policies relating to planning, growth, housing and the appropriate provision of enabling infrastructure, as well as programmes and strategic projects associated with these activities. The full terms of reference can be found here.

 

Area of work and Lead Department

Reason for work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Expected timeframes

Highlight the month(s) this is expected to come to committee in 2021

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

2 Sep

30 Sep

Nov

30 Nov

Unitary Plan Monitoring including Climate response (led by Plans and Places)

Auckland Unitary Plan Monitoring Report

Plans and Places

Statutory requirement under section 35 of the Resource Management Act to provide a comprehensive monitoring report five years from date the Auckland Unitary Plan became ‘operative in part’ (i.e. by November 2021). This work will consist of interim monitoring reports ahead of November 2021. Examples of monitoring topics include urban growth and form, quality built environment, historic heritage, indigenous biodiversity, Maori economic, social and cultural development, natural hazards (including flooding) and climate change. This work may result in plan changes being recommended ahead of the review of the Auckland Unitary Plan in 2026.

 

Decisions required: Interim reports seeking committee feedback and decisions on possible plan changes ahead of the review of the Auckland Unitary Plan in 2026. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enabling Rainwater Tanks Plan Change

Plans and Places

Mandating the installation of rainwater tanks in certain situations

Decisions required: committee to consider options and recommendations

 

Progress to date: Delegated authority to approve notification of the plan change PLA/2020/47

Report due October 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Auckland Plan 2050

Auckland Plan Annual Scorecard and Annual Update

APSR

To report annual progress against the 33 measures of the Auckland Plan 2050

Decision required: only on possible changes to measures (if none required, could be a memo)

 

Progress to date:

The next annual monitoring report is due in July 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resource Management Act framework reform

Resource Management system reform – Natural and Built Environment Bill (exposure draft)

Chief Planning Office

The Natural and Built Environments Act (NBA) to provide for land use and environmental regulation (this would be the primary replacement for the current RMA)

The exposure draft will provide input into the Select Committee Inquiry which will inform the final bill

 

Decision required: approval of council approach and submission

 

 

Progress to date: authority delegated to approve council submission on bill exposure draft PLA/2021/75

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resource Management system reform – Natural and Built Environment Bill

Chief Planning Office

The Natural and Built Environments Act (NBA) to provide for land use and environmental regulation (this would be the primary replacement for the current RMA)

Resource management is a core aspect of Auckland Council’s role. The size and scope of this reform means that these reforms will shape council’s strategic context for at least the next decade.

 

Decision required: approval of council approach and submission

Consultation period will be second half of 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resource Management system reform – Strategic Planning Bill

Chief Planning Office

The Strategic Planning Act (SPA) to integrate with other legislation relevant to development (such as the Local Government Act and Land Transport Management Act) and require long-term regional spatial strategies.

Resource management is a core aspect of Auckland Council’s role. The size and scope of this reform means that these reforms will shape council’s strategic context for at least the next decade.

 

Decision required: approval of council approach and submission

Consultation period will be second half of 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resource Management system reform – Managed Retreat and Climate Change Adaptation Bill

Chief Planning Office

The Managed Retreat and Climate Change Adaptation Act (CAA) to enable and address issues associated with managed retreat and funding and financing adaptation.

Resource management is a core aspect of Auckland Council’s role. The size and scope of this reform means that these reforms will shape council’s strategic context for at least the next decade.

 

Decision required: approval of council approach and submission

Consultation period likely mid-2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Policy Statements

National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 – implementation approach

Chief Planning Office

The NPS-FM was adopted by central government in September 2020. Auckland Council’s implementation approach needs to be reworked to take into account the greater expectations required of councils and other parties to give effect to Te Mana o Te Wai, preceding plan changes required before the end of 2024

Decision required: to receive an updated council implementation approach for the NPS-FM and associated instruments

Progress to date: high-level implementation plan approved, working group formed to provide political oversight PLA/2021/12

Memo update due in August 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed National Policy Statement on Highly Productive Lands

Chief Planning Office

The finalisation of the proposed NPS-HPL is due to be considered by central government in 2021. If adopted, this will have implications for land use in the Auckland region, and how highly productive lands are recognised and managed.

Decision required: to consider council’s approach to implementation of any finalised NPS-HPL in the Auckland region.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed National Policy Statement on Indigenous Biodiversity

Chief Planning Office

The finalisation of the proposed NPS-IB is due to be considered by central government in 2021. If adopted, this will have implications for how biodiversity outcomes are managed in the Auckland region, particularly through planning frameworks.

Decision required: to consider council’s approach to implementation of any finalised NPS-IB in the Auckland region.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Urban Growth and Housing

National Policy Statement on Urban Development

Chief Planning Office

The NPS UD was gazetted by the government on 20 July 2020 and comes into force on 20 August 2020 with ongoing timeframes for implementation. The purpose of the NPS UD is to require councils to plan well for growth and ensure a well-functioning urban environment for all people, communities and future generations

Decision required: consider the significant policy and implementation issues that are presented by the NPS UD, approve the detailed work programme for Phase 2

Progress to date:

Work programme endorsed PLA/2021/8 and workshops held Feb – Jul 2021.

Housing Development Capacity Assessment findings received PLA/2021/77

Approved development of a plan change to Regional Policy Statement of the Auckland Unitary Plan PLA/2021/78

Endorsed approaches to the intensification provisions relating to walkable catchments, special character areas and qualifying matters PLA/2021/80 and all other locations PLA/2021/97

Reports due in September for carparking minimums and urban design matters. These decisions will inform the forward work programme for remainder of 2021 and into 2022.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Government Policy Statement – Housing and Urban Development

Chief Planning Office

The GPS will communicate the Government’s long-term vision for the housing and urban growth system. It will provide specific direction to Kainga Ora – Homes and Communities and broad expectations on other government agencies

Decision required: approval of council’s submission and consideration regarding implementation

Progress to date:

Authority delegated to approve council submission on the discussion document PLA/2021/70

Consideration of the implementation of the Government Policy Statement following publication - anticipated in October 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Affordable Housing

Chief Planning Office

To progress the resolution (PLA /2019/17) on Auckland Council’s role and position on affordable housing in phases:

Progress report and approach to advice

Decision required: receive Affordable Housing progress update and insights

Progress to date:

Forward work programme approved and political working party formed PLA/2020/65

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advocacy Plan

Decision required: receive update on Affordable Housing Advocacy Plan and initial engagement

Progress to date:

Update memo due September 2021 advising work undertaken by the political working party on the affordable housing advocacy plan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research findings

 

Decision required: consider research and implications

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consider options

Progress to date:

Housing for older people PLA/2020/92,

Inclusionary Zoning PLA/2020/93, PLA/2020/94

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kainga Ora

Chief Planning Office

Ongoing Kainga Ora implementation issues and relationship management

Decision required: nature of any decisions to be confirmed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crown Auckland Council Joint Work Programme

Chief Planning Office

Quarterly update on the Crown and Auckland Council Joint Work Programme on Urban Growth and Housing.

Decision required: Generally none.  Receive updates by memorandum on JWP and any proposed changes to the workstreams. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transport Strategy Programme (led by Auckland Plan Strategy & Research, CPO in conjunction with others)

Auckland Transport Alignment Programme (ATAP)

As capacity allows staff from council and ATAP partner agencies will commence work on recommended indicative packages for decades two and three.

Decision required: consider indicative funding packages for decades two and three, potentially in the fourth quarter of 2021 or, more likely, 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Congestion Question

The Transport and Infrastructure Committee is conducting an inquiry into congestion pricing in Auckland.

Decision required: The Select Committee Inquiry will inform next steps on congestion pricing in Auckland. The timeframe for final recommendations from the Inquiry is yet to be confirmed.

 

Progress to date:

Authority delegated to provide direction and approve submission May 2021 PLA/2021/36 – PLA/2021/37

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Auckland Light Rail

Cabinet will be making decisions on Auckland Light Rail late 2021.  Auckland Council is represented on the Sponsor’s Group and on the Establishment Unit Board. 

Decision required: to be confirmed

 

Progress to date:

Guidance for Light Rail Establishment Unit on network integration provided June 2021 PLA/2021/53

Workshop with Establishment Unit held 30 June 2021

Confidential report due September 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Increasing mobility options & networks (walking, cycling & micro-mobility, & connecting networks)

 

Status update to be confirmed

Decision required: to be confirmed

Report due November 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Public Transport Operating Mechanism review

Following direction from the Mayor and Chair, Transport Strategy will be working with MoT and AT as part of the PTOM review process.  Transport Strategy is waiting on public release of the MoT’s PTOM review, anticipated in the near future. Following release, Transport Strategy will prepare a memorandum summarising key points from the review and relating these to advice provided previously (e.g. bus driver contract conditions and vehicle procurement).

Decision required: to be confirmed

Progress to date:

Update memo related to Ministry of Transport’s discussion paper circulated 22 July 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Auckland Transport – update to be provided by Auckland Transport

Northwest Interim Bus Improvements

AT advancing bus improvements and responding to consultation. Strong councillor interest

Receive updates

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Access for Everyone business case

AT progressing business case in line with Council’s CCMP.

Receive updates and provide feedback on draft

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Busway enhancements

AT progressing business case as early part of Additional Waitemata Harbour Connections. High profile project

Receive updates and provide feedback on draft

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional parking strategy review

 

AT has started work on updating some parts of its 2015 parking strategy.  The indicative completion date is late-2020.

Decision required: to be confirmed

 

Progress to date: Confidential workshop held June 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Infrastructure

National 30-year Infrastructure Strategy

APSR

This will replace the current national 30-year plan. It will consider how infrastructure might support environmental, social, cultural, and economic wellbeing

Decision required: to be confirmed

 

Progress to date:

Authority delegated to approve council’s submission on the Infrastructure Commission’s National Infrastructure Strategy 3 June 2021 PLA/2021/54

The draft strategy will be presented to the Minister for Infrastructure in September 2021. The final strategy will be tabled in Parliament by early 2022.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Auckland Unitary Plan oversight

Making Plan Changes Operative

Plans and Places

Statutory Resource Management Act requirement to make council and private plan changes operative once the decision on the plan change is made and any appeals are resolved.

 

Decision required: Make plan changes operative.

 

As and when required

 

 

Private Plan Changes

Plans and Places

 

Private plan change requests not dealt with under staff delegation. These will be brought to committee as and when required.

Decision required: Accept/adopt/reject/deal with the request as a resource consent application.

 

As and when required

Plan Change – Residential

Plans and Places

Monitoring of the Auckland Unitary Plan has indicated that some improvements can be made to the provisions for residential development.

Decision required: Provide direction on the scope and timing of a potential plan change.

 

Progress to date: Endorsed the preparation of a plan change for Integrated Residential Development provisions PLA/2020/115

Update memo received in July.

Workshop planned for October 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Māori Heritage Sites of Significance

Plans and Places

Second tranche of plan changes to identify Maori Heritage sites and places of significance

Decision required: To approve the plan change 

 

Progress to date: Frist tranche approved and made operative PLA/2021/6

Report on second tranche due September 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Converting Road Reserve, Unformed Legal Roads & Pedestrian Accessways to
Open Space

Plans and Places

 

Scoping report identifying opportunities to offer unutilised areas of road reserve and unformed legal roads back to Māori former landowners

Decision required: Consider recommended approach.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Auckland Housing Programme – area plans and potential plan changes

Plans and Places

Kainga Ora has prepared a spatial development strategy for the Mt Roskill and Mangere areas. These may need area plans for consultation with the community and local boards. 

Some plan changes may come out of this work for parts of these areas.

Decision required: Endorsement of draft area plans for public consultation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Panuku Priority Location Programme

Wynyard Point Masterplan & Plan Change

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

Refreshed Wynyard Point masterplan leading to council led plan change to support future regeneration delivery.

Decision required: Endorsement for the Wynyard Point Final Masterplan for public consultation. Report due February 2022

Endorsement for the Wynyard Point Plan Change for public notification. Report planned June/July 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thriving Town Centres - Town Centre Guidelines for Eke Panuku locations

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

Guidance document to support future urban regeneration delivery and engagement with stakeholders and partners. As an operational document the guidelines will be approved by the Eke Panuku Board.

Direction required: Confirmation of alignment with Council strategies and direction, and support for the guidelines.

October workshop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Onehunga Wharf Masterplan & Plan Change

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

Onehunga Wharf masterplan leading to council led plan change to support future regeneration delivery.

Direction required: Support for the Onehunga Wharf Masterplan for public consultation and feedback. February/March 2022 workshop

Endorsement for the Onehunga Wharf Masterplan for public consultation February/March 2022

Decision required: Endorsement for the Onehunga Plan Change for public notification June/ July 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Completed

Lead Department

Area of work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Decision

 

CPO

Kāinga Ora - Homes and Communities second Bill

Approval process for council’s submission

Political working group established to develop and approve submission by Planning Committee 5 December 2019

PLA/2019/92

 

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research, CPO

Submission on the Land Transport (Rail) Legislation Bill

Review and approve council’s submission

Council’s submission approved by Planning Committee 4 February 2020

PLA/2020/9

 

CPO

Submission on the Urban Development Bill

Review and approve council’s submission

Council’s submission approved by Planning Committee 4 February 2020

PLA/2020/10

 

CPO

Submission on the draft National Policy Statement Indigenous Biodiversity

Review and approve council’s submission

Council’s submission approved by Planning Committee 5 March 2020

PLA/2020/15

 

Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Auckland Plan 2050 Implementation and Monitoring

Receive an update on the Auckland Plan 2050 and the first Auckland Plan 2050 Three Yearly Progress report

Updates received by Planning Committee 5 March 2020

PLA/2020/16

 

Auckland Design Office

City Centre Masterplan Refresh adoption

Consider and adopt refreshed City Centre Masterplan

City Centre Masterplan Refresh adopted by Planning Committee 5 March 2020

PLA/2020/17, PLA/2020/18, PLA/2020/19

 

Financial Strategy and Planning

Submission on the Infrastructure Funding and Financing Bill

Review and approve council’s submission

Council’s submission approved by Planning Committee 5 March 2020

PLA/2020/20

 

DPO

Shovel-ready projects for Central Government

Agreement on list for submission to central government

Process agreed at Emergency Committee 9 April 2020

EME/2020/13

 

CPO

Submission on the Accessible Streets Regulatory Package

Review and approve council’s submission

Council’s submission approved by Emergency Committee 16 April 2020

EME/2020/23

 

CPO

Silverdale West Dairy Flat Structure Plan

Consider and approve the final structure plan

Final structure plan approved by Governing Body 30 April 2020

GB/2020/38

 

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research, CPO

NZTA Innovating Streets Fund

Approval of council approach and submission

Endorsed first round of funding and approved process for developing the second round at Emergency Committee 7 May 2020

EME/2020/55

 

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research, CPO

NZTA Innovating Streets Fund

Approval of second round funding bids to NZTA

Approved Council and AT proposed list of projects for further development and refining, and authority delegated to approve the final submission, at Planning Committee 4 June 2020

PLA/2020/30

 

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research, CPO

Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2021-2031, and draft National Rail Plan

Approve council submission on GPS and Draft national rail plan

Council’s submission approved by Emergency Committee 7 May 2020

EME/2020/56

 

Plans and Places

National Environmental Standards on Air Quality – council submission

Approve council submission

Council’s draft submission endorsed, and authority delegated to approve final submission, Planning Committee 4 June 2020

PLA/2020/31

 

CPO

Resource Management Act Framework

Fast-track consenting legislative change

Approve council’s submission

Authority delegated to approve council’s submission on the COVID-19 Recovery (Fast-track Consenting) Bill, at Planning Committee 4 June 2020

PLA/2020/32

 

Plans and Places

Strategic Land Use Frameworks for Dairy Flat and Kumeu Huapai Future Urban Areas

Approval to prepare strategic land use frameworks for Wainui Silverdale Dairy Flat and Kumeu-Huapai.

Approved preparation of spatial land use frameworks, and established a Political Working Party to approve the draft spatial land use frameworks, at Planning Committee 2 July 2020

PLA/2020/37

 

Plans and Places

Plan Change - Whenuapai

Approve next steps.

Next steps approved in confidential section of Planning Committee 2 July 2020

PLA/2020/44

 

Plans and Places

Plans Change – Events on Public Space

Enable events on public space that have obtained an event permit to be undertaken more easily.

Endorsement of proposed plan change for notification.

Notification of plan change approved at Planning Committee 3 September 2020

PLA/2020/68

 

Plans and Places

Review of Schedule 10 Notable Trees Schedule

Consider the timing of a full review of Schedule 10 – Notable Trees in the context of resourcing constraints and priorities

Options for reviewing the schedule in future considered at 5 November Planning Committee.

PLA/2020/95, PLA/2020/96, PLA/2020/97

 

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research

Additional Harbour Crossing

Consideration of finalised business case.  The business case is a joint piece of work between Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency, Auckland Transport (AT) and Auckland Council. 

Business case considered, findings noted and support given to continue council’s involvement in the project, at 5 November Planning Committee

PLA/2020/100

 

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research

Congestion Question

Consideration of findings in the Congestion Question project final report.

Noted that phase two of the project is completed, received the report findings, considered scope of phase three and requested approvals and updates to return to the committee

PLA/2020/116

 

Panuku Development Auckland, Auckland Transport and Auckland Council

Downtown Carpark development outcomes

Establish agreement on the Auckland Council group development outcome requirements for the Downtown Carpark to enable site sale through a contestable market process.

Development outcomes confirmed in confidential section of the December 2020 Planning Committee meeting PLA/2020/120 and strategic transport outcomes agreed in June 2021 PLA/2021/52

 

Auckland Transport

Auckland Cycling Programme Business Case Review

Agree committee members to participate in an Auckland Transport-led political reference group.

Members delegated to the political reference group

PLA/2021/7

 

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research

Auckland Transport Alignment Project

Agree funding package.

Approved the recommended ATAP 2021-31 indicative package

PLA/2021/15

 

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research

Auckland Plan Environment and Cultural Heritage Outcome Measure confirmation

Confirm new Environment and Cultural Heritage Outcome measures

New measures confirmed

PLA/2021/26

 

Auckland Transport

Regional Land Transport Plan 2021-2031

Agreed funding package for consideration of RLTP committee and AT board

Endorsed Regional Land Transport Plan 2021-2931 for the Auckland Transport board to adopt.  

 

APSR

Infrastructure Strategy

Provide strategic insights and direction 30 Year Infrastructure Strategy (for subsequent referral to Finance Committee)

Strategy adopted by Finance and Performance Committee in June 2021 (as part of Long-term Plan)

 

APSR

Auckland Plan 2050 implementation and monitoring

 

To note progress against the measures in the Auckland Plan 2050

 

2021 monitoring report received

PLA/2021/69

 

Chief Planning Office

Unit Titles Act

To approve council’s submission

Authority delegated to approve submission

PLA/2021/27

 

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research

Auckland Transport Alignment Programme (ATAP)

To approve the recommended Auckland Transport Alignment Project 2021-31 indicative package.

Auckland Transport Alignment Project 2021-31 indicative package approved

PLA/2021/15

 

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research

Regional Fuel Tax

To consider components and changes to current status

Regional Fuel Tax Variation Proposal adopted by the Governing Body in May 2021

GB/2021/55

 

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research

Congestion Question

To approve council’s submission to the select committee on the Inquiry into congestion pricing

Authority delegated to approve submission

PLA/2021/36 – PLA/2021/37

 

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research

National 30-year Infrastructure Strategy

To approve council’s submission

Authority delegated to approve council’s submission

PLA/2021/54

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plans and Places

Auckland Unitary Plan and Auckland District Plan (Hauraki Gulf Islands Section) – Sites and Places of Significance to Mana Whenua

To approve the plan change and make it operative

Plan Change 22 and Plan Modification 12 (Sites and Places of Significance to Mana Whenua) made operative

PLA/2021/6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Development Programme Office

Infrastructure Acceleration Fund

To approve council’s submission to the Crown’s Infrastructure Acceleration Fund

Endorsed preliminary list of programmes for the Infrastructure Acceleration Fund and authority delegated for approval of final list for submission

PLA/2021/92

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Planning Committee

02 September 2021

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Planning Committee

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

C1       CONFIDENTIAL:  Sites of Significance to Mana Whenua - Tranche 2 Plan Change Investigation

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(c)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to prejudice the supply of similar information or information from the same source and it is in the public interest that such information should continue to be supplied.

s7(2)(c)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to damage the public interest.

In particular, the report contains mana whenua mātauranga (tribal knowledge) and names particular sites of cultural significance within the Auckland region. These site names and locations have been provided by mana whenua to the council project team in confidence and the ongoing supply of similar information to council is reliant on maintaining this relationship of confidence, until such time as any proposed plan change is endorsed by mana whenua and ready to publicly notify.

The public release of the nominated sites ahead of detailed investigation could result in activities being undertaken on privately owned sites that might compromise their Māori cultural values, thereby diminishing their heritage value to the public and the relationship between Māori and their ancestral lands.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C2       CONFIDENTIAL:  Auckland Light Rail update

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(c)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to damage the public interest.

In particular, The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 



[1] Rule (T151) in Table E27.6.4.3.2, AUP Chapter E27 Transport

[2] Standard E38.8.1.2(4), AUP Chapter E38 Subdivision – Urban

[3] https://www.stjohn.org.nz/news--info/news-articles/whats-your-chance-of-surviving-a-cardiac-arrest/