I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Environment and Climate Change Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 14 October 2021

10.00am

This meeting will be held remotely and can be viewed on the Auckland Council website
https://councillive.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

 

 

Kōmiti Mō Te Hurihanga Āhuarangi me Te Taiao / Environment and Climate Change Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Richard Hills

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Pippa Coom

 

Members

Cr Josephine Bartley

IMSB Member Mr Terrence Hohneck

 

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

Cr Tracy Mulholland

 

Deputy Mayor Cr Bill Cashmore

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Angela Dalton

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Chris Darby

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Alf Filipaina

Cr John Watson

 

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

IMSB Member Karen Wilson

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

Cr Paul Young

 

Cr Shane Henderson

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

Suad Allie

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua /

Senior Governance Advisor

 

11 October 2021

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 977 6953

Email: suad.allie@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


 

Terms of Reference

 

Responsibilities

 

This committee deals with the development and monitoring of strategy, policy and action plans associated with environmental and climate change activities.   The committee will establish an annual work programme outlining key focus areas in line with its key responsibilities, which include:

 

·        climate change mitigation and adaptation policy, and implementation (with other committee chairs where cross over of responsibilities exists)

·        coastal renewals, slips and remediation

·        Auckland’s Climate Action Framework

·        natural heritage (including ecology, biodiversity and biosecurity matters, such as kauri dieback)

·        protection and restoration of Auckland’s ecological health

·        water, including Auckland’s Water Strategy

·        waste minimisation

·        acquisition of property relating to the committee’s responsibilities and in accordance with the LTP

·        grants for regional environmental outcomes.

 

Powers

 

(i)      All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities, including:

(a)     approval of a submission to an external body

(b)     establishment of working parties or steering groups.

(ii)     The committee has the powers to perform the responsibilities of another committee, where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee.

(iii)     If a policy or project relates primarily to the responsibilities of the Environment and Climate Change Committee, but aspects require additional decisions by the Planning Committee and/or the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee, then the Environment and Climate Change Committee has the powers to make associated decisions on behalf of those other committee(s). For the avoidance of doubt, this means that matters do not need to be taken to more than one of these committees for decisions.

(iii)    The committee does not have:

(a)     the power to establish subcommittees

(b)     powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2).

 

Code of conduct

 

For information relating to Auckland Council’s elected members code of conduct, please refer to this link on the Auckland Council website - https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/elected-members-remuneration-declarations-interest/Pages/elected-members-code-conduct.aspx

 

 

 

 


 

 

Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·          Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·          Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·          Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·          In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·          The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·          However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·          All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·          Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·          Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·          All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·          Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·          Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·          Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

14 October 2021

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                           9

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                   9

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                   9

4          Petitions                                                                                          9  

5          Public Input                                                                                     9

6          Local Board Input                                                                           9

7          Extraordinary Business                                                               10

8          Adoption of Sustainable Asset Policy for community assets.                                                                                                        11

9          End of year report for natural environment and water quality targeted rates 2020/2021                                                             25

10        National Emissions Reduction Plan Submission                     55

11        Summary of Environment and Climate Change Committee information memoranda and briefings (including forward work programme) –

14 October 2021                                                                            61

12        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)           confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 12 August 2021, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public input had been received.

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 


 

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Environment and Climate Change Committee

14 October 2021

 

Adoption of Sustainable Asset Policy for community assets.

File No.: CP2021/04047

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To adopt the Community Facilities - Sustainable Asset Policy as a regional policy for community assets.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Sustainable Asset Standard (SAS) is Community Facilities’ (CF) comprehensive response, in the built environment, to mitigate and adapt to the impacts of climate change.

3.      The SAS is a key action of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: “Accelerate the uptake of sustainable design and construction for new buildings” and supports Auckland Council’s goal to reduce operational greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 50 per cent by 2030.

4.      The SAS consists of three key deliverables through three phases:

·    Phase 1 (FY22) – adoption of a Sustainable Asset Policy (SAP) by the Environment and Climate Change Committee (ECC).

·    Phase 2 (FY22-24) – A site-specific decarbonisation plan for the top 30 highest-emitting community facilities.

·    Phase 3 (FY24) – Change management (e.g. templates, process and training) to support CF staff, contractors and suppliers to embed the Sustainable Asset Policy into CF’s whole of life asset management cycle.

5.      The adoption from ECC is for the Phase 1 – Sustainable Asset Policy only, with condensations of impacts and risks. The remaining phases will be delivered by CF internally.

6.      Adoption of the Sustainable Asset Policy (SAP) as a regional policy would commit Community Facilities to:

·    Achieve carbon neutrality in operations for new asset development.

·    Achieve a minimum 5-Star Green Star rating (or equivalent certification) on all new asset development with a budget over $10 million.

·    Incorporate decarbonisation principles into guideline documents for renewals and new asset development of all community assets.

7.      Adoption of the SAP will require Local Boards to implement the SAP in their decision making. This will support investment in climate change adaptation and mitigation that is consistent regionally and aligned with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri.

8.      The SAP is likely to reduce the whole-of-life costs of new Community Assets. Incorporating sustainability requirements, like SAP, into Community Facilities’ projects from their inception will minimise any additional up-front costs needed to mitigate Greenhouse Gas Emissions.

9.      Community Facilities assessment of the “carbon neutrality in operations” component of the SAP is that it will provide a nine per cent return on investment. This is because, investment in renewable energy will reduce operational costs and save Council money in the long-term.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      adopt the Community Facilities’ Sustainable Asset Policy (Attachment A to the agenda report) as a regional policy for community assets to give effect to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri:

i)        to achieve carbon neutrality in operations for new asset development

ii)       to achieve a minimum 5-Star Green Star rating (or equivalent certification) on all new asset development with a budget over $10 million

iii)      to incorporate decarbonisation principles into design guide documents for renewals and new asset development of all community assets

 

Horopaki

Context

10.    The built environment accounts for over 20 per cent of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in New Zealand. This includes GHG emissions embodied in construction materials (e.g., steel, concrete, aluminium), energy used for construction (i.e. vehicle fuel), waste generated during construction and operational energy use.

11.    For Auckland Council, emissions from the built environment are over 50 per cent of operational emissions.  This is largely GHG emissions from combustion of natural gas, electricity use and refrigerants. Given the difficulty in reducing agricultural emissions, emission reductions from buildings needs to be more than 65 per cent to halve the overall GHG emissions by 2030. Adding to the challenge is reducing GHG emissions against a backdrop of a growing asset portfolio.

12.    Meeting Auckland Council’s target for reducing operational GHG emissions is therefore not possible without reducing emissions from the built environment. To support GHG emission reductions from the built environment, the Sustainable Asset Standard (SAS) was included as an action (B5) in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri, which was adopted by the Environment and Climate Change Committee in 2020.

13.    In New Zealand, popular green rating schemes are Green Star from the New Zealand Green Building Council (NZGBC), the Infrastructure Sustainability Council’s rating scheme (IS) and the Living Building Challenge. 28 out of 97 C40 Cities have requirements of implementing green rating schemes and targeting net zero carbon in the built environment.

14.    The Sustainable Asset Standard has been developed by Community Facilities to address climate change in the built environment through sustainable design, construction, operation and fit-out. The Sustainable Asset Standard consists of three phases with endorsement being sought from the Environment and Climate Change Committee for Phase 1, the Sustainable Asset Policy.

15.    Local Boards have allocated decision-making responsibility for the specific design, build and fit-out of community assets. The Sustainable Asset Policy is currently an internal, operational policy within Community Facilities which Local Boards can choose to adhere to.

16.    While local boards have been responsible for developing high quality community assets, Auckland Council’s model for funding local boards creates a potential dis-incentive for Local Boards to invest in sustainability. Local boards fund the capital expenditure for community assets, but are not responsible for the ongoing operational costs of the capital investment. This creates a potential dis-incentivise to invest in sustainability measures which increase capital costs but decrease operational costs.

17.    In practice this means that when project budgets come under pressure, there may be an incentive to remove sustainability features rather than reduce service provision or project scope. By the Committee adopting the SAP, this will create a requirement that Local Boards implement the SAP when investing in Community Assets.

18.    Adoption of the Sustainable Asset Policy (SAP) would commit CF to:

·    Achieve carbon neutrality in operations for new asset development

·    Achieve a minimum 5-Star Green Star rating (or equivalent certification) on all new asset development with a budget over $10 million

·    Incorporate decarbonisation principles into guideline documents for renewals and new asset development of all community assets.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Option analysis 

19.    The Sustainable Asset Policy was developed to resolve the potential dis-incentive for local boards to invest in sustainability. By adopting the Sustainable Asset Policy for community assets, the Environment and Climate Change Committee requires its consistent implementation across the region by Local Boards and supports the implementation of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri.

20.    With above considerations, in developing options for delivering the Sustainable Asset Policy, keeping it as an internal guide to be applied at the discretion of local boards was therefore discounted. The other option explored was to follow green rating requirements but not to certify projects. The costs to certify a project (i.e., project registration and record keeping) are around one per cent of the total project cost. Theoretically this cost could be saved through not certifying.

21.    However, from recent large projects, we have found that without the requirement to certify, there is pressure not to complete some green rating requirements, thereby reducing the benefit of the rating. In addition, much of the evidence collected for the green rating is necessary for benefit documentation through Auckland Council’s Investment Decision Framework (IDF) anyway.

22.    Through the adoption of SAP, sustainability will be part of the decision making for community assets from the inception of projects. Project teams will incorporate sustainable requirements into the design at early stage to minimize changes later. This helps to reduce GHG emissions at a minimal cost premium. 

Sustainable Asset Policy scope

23.    For larger new asset development (e.g. more than $10 million), project environmental impacts like GHG emissions are typically verified through using third party green rating schemes. These schemes are generally points based. Points are achieved for actions taken to reduce the environmental impacts and GHG emissions. The points achieved, which are verified independently by third party, then correspond to the rating.

24.    For small to medium sized projects (i.e. those with costs less than $10 million), green ratings are typically not sought following discussions with industrial professionals. Many of the costs for certifying a green rating are fixed. To achieve a 5-Star Green Star rating or equivalent (representing “New Zealand Leadership”), some rating requirements are challenging for smaller projects, which would mean a relatively high overhead. As a result, the threshold for getting a green rating has been increased to $10 million.

25.    For renewals projects, the existing green ratings are only practical for major, whole-building refurbishments. The rating requirements align poorly with most renewals that focus on specific areas or technology within an asset, e.g. seismic strengthening or roof fixing. As a result, there isn’t a requirement for green rating for renewals projects in the SAP.

26.    The approach for sustainable design for small to medium sized projects for both renewals and new development is instead to be incorporated into design guidelines based on green rating tools (as per bullet point 3 of the Sustainable Asset Policy), but certification will not be pursued.

Cost premium of green ratings 

27.    A University of Auckland study (Ade & Rehm, 2013) examined the cost data for 17 Green Star buildings rated from Four to Six-Star and found there were no statistically significant cost difference between these and their conventional counterparts. This study is specific to New Zealand and is supported by the Ministry for Environment’s value case study that analysed green building cost premiums, their findings being two to six per cent cost premium. Within the latest report published by Green Building Council of Australia in 2021, the average cost premium for a 5-Star rating or higher is around 2.5 per cent.

28.    Of the green rating cost premium, around one per cent is due to the cost of certification. This includes project registration and submissions to the certification body and additional design costs. The remaining premium is the cost of the sustainability features incorporated into the construction (e.g., rainwater harvesting, energy efficient systems, solar photovoltaic (PV).

29.    Whole of life costs of green-rated buildings are lower than unrated buildings. Analysis of Green Star certified projects, by the Green Building Council of Australia, has shown average GHG emissions and potable water consumption are reduced by over 50 per cent. Community Facilities’ analysis of the “carbon neutrality in operations” under the SAP, effectively reduces operational GHG emissions to zero and provides a nine per cent return on investment.

30.    In 2020, the cost premium related to achieving Five Star Green Star or equivalent was proposed to be funded through Option two of the Climate Action Investment Package. With Option one selected, green ratings for large new facilities are now proposed to be funded through existing Community Facilities’ budgets.

31.    Achieving “carbon neutrality in operations” will mean that Auckland Council invests in enough renewable energy generation to provide for a facility’s needs on a net annual basis. In practice this is likely to be investment in solar photovoltaics (PV) as PV provides the best return on investment to Auckland Council. Achieving carbon neutrality in operations increases the cost of all new facilities (except aquatic centres) by on average, one per cent, with aquatic centre costs increasing by around seven per cent. The return on this investment is estimated at around 9%. Budget for carbon neutrality in operations was included in option one of the Climate Action Investment Package (i.e., Project Gigawatt).

Māori Responsiveness

32.    The SAP aligns with Auckland Council’s Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework - Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau. Within green ratings there are requirements or points that can be achieved through engagement with mana whenua, engagement with Māori business and incorporating Te Aranga design principles. The adoption and endorsement of the SAP will formally embed Māori outcomes as part of the sustainable design process.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

33.    The SAP aims to mitigate and adapt to the impacts of climate change in the built environment.

34.    Operational GHG emissions from assets managed by Community Facilities are to be minimised through design decisions that focus on energy conservation and energy efficiency. Carbon neutral growth in operation encourages utilising renewable energy to offset any remaining GHG emissions in operational stage.

35.    For new asset development, the GHG emissions will increase through construction activities and the use of materials. These GHG emissions (known as embodied emissions) will be calculated through lifecycle assessment (LCA). The use of high emissions materials will be minimised and/or replaced with lower emissions alternatives.

36.    The implementation of the SAP will also increase the resilience of community assets. This will be achieved through water conservation and water sensitive design strategies to reduce the vulnerability to drought. Passive design principles utilising daylighting and natural ventilation, etc, paired with renewable energy generation will also improve the buildings’ resilience during severe climate events.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.    The Sustainable Asset Policy is applicable to community assets only. It reflects the governance and funding approach for community assets (e.g. local boards are responsible for the investment cost but not ongoing operational cost). It is less applicable for CCOs and other Auckland Council departments, where investments are funded and governed regionally.

38.    Eke Panuku has announced similar policy to require new commercial buildings over 1,000m2 to meet Five-Star Green Star ratings in May 2021 to achieve sustainable development across Tāmaki Makaurau.

39.    Chief Sustainability Office has been involved from the beginning of the development of Sustainable Asset Policy and supportive for it being endorsed by ECC for decision-making in relation to community assets.

40.    The Sustainable Asset Policy and green ratings delivers benefit that support Healthy Waters, Watercare and Waste Solutions objectives. Water sensitive design requirements reduce stormwater flows which puts less pressure on infrastructure. Water conservation measures reduce requirements for potable water infrastructure and can reduce project costs through reduced infrastructure growth charges. Where reductions in construction and demolition waste and operational waste supports Auckland Council’s Zero Waste goal for 2040.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.    In October and November 2020, staff from the Community Facilities - Energy Efficiency and Sustainability team presented the Sustainable Asset Standard (SAS) and the Sustainable Asset Policy (SAP), to local boards for feedback.

42.    Local boards were advised in 2020 that:

·    The SAP would be considered by the Environment and Climate Change Committee for adoption as a regional policy.

·    If adopted as a regional policy, the SAP would ensure that, if budgets are under pressure, green ratings are not descoped during the design process as a way of reducing costs.

·    The SAP would commit Community Facilities to carbon neutral growth in operation and a minimum of Five-Star Green Star rating (or equivalent certification) for significant new investment.

·    There is typically an initial cost premium between two and six per cent to achieve a Five-Star Green Star rating.

·    The cost premium would be paid back over time through lower operating costs, and higher levels of occupant satisfaction and productivity.

·    Budget provision for the implementation of the SAP would be sought through the Climate Action Investment Package as part of the 2021 – 2031 Long-term Plan.

 

43.    Local board feedback was supportive of the adoption of the SAP as a regional policy, although six local boards highlighted concern that the cost of green ratings would exceed currently allocated project budgets.

44.    The budget provision was not secured through the 2021-2031 Long-term Plan, because it was included in option B of the climate action package which was not taken forward for public consultation or adoption. As a result, costs associated with implementing the Sustainable Asset Policy will need to be met within relevant existing project budgets with support of additional funding sources when available.

45.    A memorandum to update local boards on financial implications due to the change of budget source for the Sustainable Asset Policy has been sent to local boards (Attachment B). The changes to requirements within the Sustainable Asset Policy are also included. Financial implications have been discussed in detail under “Financial implications”.

46.    The memorandum also detailed changes to the scope of the SAP. This includes increasing the threshold for green ratings from projects with budgets greater than $5 million to $10 million and removing green rating requirements for renewals.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

47.    The SAP aligns with the Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework - Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau and supports the delivery on the following priority-aligned Māori outcomes:

·    Kia ora te Reo: Te reo Māori

·    Kia ora te Taiao: Kaitiakitanga

·    Kia ora te Ahurea: Māori Identity and Culture

·    Mana outcome: Kia ora te Whānau: Whānau and Tamariki Wellbeing

·    Kia ora te Hononga: Effective Māori Participation

48.    Engagement with mana whenua on the SAP that has been carried out to date includes:

·    Community Facilities/Parks, Sports and Recreation hui – Central/South – 31 March 2021

·    Natural Environment pou hui – 7 April 2021

·    Community Facilities/Parks, Sports and Recreation hui – North/West – 8 April 2021

·    Wānanga: Climate Change Action Plan – 21 July 2021

49.    The engagement with mana whenua on the SAP does not replace the project level consultation and engagement. We understand that priorities and views might be different for local iwi and hapū. Therefore, engagement with mana whenua on projects is key to ensure the views of individual iwi and hapū are reflected in project outcomes.

50.    This is to reassure that all the requirements from mana whenua are heard, discussed and addressed through the project planning, design and construction phases. The “Take Mauri Take Hono” cultural and environmental assessment tool will also be used as per the request from mana whenua on a project-by-project basis.

51.    The Sustainable Asset Policy also supports Auckland Council’s statutory responsibilities relating to Māori participation in decision-making and take into account Māori relationships with land, water, waahi tapu, etc, before taking significant decisions, as required by the Local Government Act (LGA), i.e. ss 14(1)(d) and 81(1)); s 77(1)(c)).

 

 

52.    Green ratings provide frameworks that enhance the council’s existing processes for engaging with mana whenua. It ensures a higher-level partnership with mana whenua in relation to environmental impacts and the decision making takes account of Māori culture and history. 

53.    Achieving credits of the rating require Te Reo Māori and Māori culture and identity to be reflected in asset design. The Sustainable Asset Policy thereby embeds and requires that new asset development is responsive to mana whenua and Māori in general.

54.    Through adopting the Sustainable Asset Policy, CF intends to influence green ratings and other organisations to emphasis cultural significance when defining sustainability in Aotearoa and support the achievement of Māori aspirations.  

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

55.    While whole of life costs for green rated buildings are lower than un-rated buildings, there is typically an initial cost premium between two and six per cent to achieve a Five-Star Green Star rating. This is comprised of:

·    certification fees (approximately. $25,000, less than one per cent of total project cost)

·    the cost of documenting and compiling the submission (approximately. one per cent of total project cost), and

·    capital costs for sustainability features (one to five per cent of total project cost).

56.    If adopted by the Environment and Climate Change Committee, the SAP will ensure that if project budgets are under pressure, green ratings are not de-scoped during the design process. 

57.    For existing projects, costs above project budgets will need to be sourced through other funding sources, reducing project scope or reallocating existing project budgets.

58.    For the financial years 2022-2024, the cost impacts will be limited, as the SAP will only apply to the three projects detailed below, which have already incorporated green rating requirements into their design:

·    Scott Point sports park - has achieved an Infrastructure Sustainability Council (IS) - Leading Design rating

·    Avondale Community Centre and Library – the design brief includes achieving a Five-Star Green Star rating

·    Te Whau pathway - currently in design development, the requirements of the Sustainable Asset Policy are one of several cost-critical design considerations that will determine the extent of physical works that can be delivered through the central government’s “Shovel Ready” budget.

59.    The initial cost premium that is required to implement the Sustainable Asset Policy for these three projects is $1.1 – 3.3 million, based on the two to six per cent cost premium including contingency. However, the whole of life cost savings will be delivered through reduced utility bills and operation and maintenance costs over the long term. 

60.    From financial year 2024-2025 onwards, the cost of implementing the SAP will be included in baseline project budgets. As the impact of the SAP on project budgets is relatively minor (i.e., two to six per cent increase), the policy is not expected to have a material impact on local board work programmes.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

61.    The SAP is currently an internal departmental guidance or community assets within Community Facilities. The key risk to the implementation of this policy is that it is not adopted by the Environment and Climate Change Committee as a regional policy.

62.    In this case, local boards may choose not to apply the SAP on projects that are eligible. This could compromise council’s commitment, under Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri, to achieve the GHG emission reduction targets.

63.    There is also a risk that the cost premium of green ratings could be higher than anticipated. Cost estimates are based on current market rates. The cost could change as the project progresses, due to the high demand and short supply of certain products. If the cost premium escalates over the budget allocated to work programmes, as a direct result of green ratings, this will be discussed with the local boards before proceeding further.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

64.    Should the Sustainable Asset Policy be adopted by the Environment and Climate Change Committee, a memo will be drafted to be sent to all local boards to inform Local Boards of the decision by Environment and Climate Change Committee, and Community Facilities will continue work to implement the policy.

65.    Incorporate decarbonisation principles into guidance documents (e.g. Practice Notes) for renewals and new asset development of all community assets, completed within FY2021/2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Community Facilities Sustainable Asset Policy

19

b

Memo - Sustainable Asset Standard

21

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kirk Archibald - Energy Efficiency & Sustainability Manager

Vivien Li - Asset Sustainability Specialist

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy


Environment and Climate Change Committee

14 October 2021

 

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Environment and Climate Change Committee

14 October 2021

 

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Environment and Climate Change Committee

14 October 2021

 

End of year report for natural environment and water quality targeted rates 2020/2021

File No.: CP2021/09779

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To note the end of year report for 2020/2021 on delivery of the natural environment and water quality targeted rate work programmes and the annual report on implementation of the Regional Pest Management Plan 2020-2030.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Auckland Council is investing in protecting our natural environment and cleaning up our waterways through two targeted rates, with a total value of $763 million over the 10-year period from 2018-2028.

3.      As part of Auckland’s Recovery Budget 2021-2031 (adopted June 2021), the natural environment targeted rate has been extended to 2031, with an additional $107 million of investment into environmental outcomes, and the water quality targeted rate has been extended to 2031 and will increase in line with general rates, providing an additional $218 million investment into water quality outcomes. This means by 2031, the targeted rates combined will have provided over a billion in additional investment for environmental outcomes.

4.      Key highlights from the third year of delivery of the natural environment and water quality targeted rate work programmes are summarised in the end of year report in Attachment A.

5.      Key achievements from the natural environment work programmes in 2020/2021 include:

·        Kauri-safe tracks: we have upgraded 33.6 kilometres of tracks to kauri-safe standards in our regional parks, as well as 9.4 kilometres of tracks in local parks. We have also installed 31 new hygiene cleaning stations

·        Pest management: we committed over $12 million to tackling pest animals, including possums, and 60 pest plant species across the Auckland region. Over 200 sites were actively managed for low incidence pest plants with infestations eradicated on 77 sites

·        Protecting our islands: we carried out 446 inspections of ferries and 207 inspections of high risk loads going to islands with our biosecurity dog team, keeping invasive species such as stoats from establishing on our Hauraki Gulf islands. The last feral pigs were controlled on Waiheke, and 64 per cent of Argentine ant sites were free of ants on Aotea. These programmes are tracking towards eradication status

·        Supporting community groups and schools: we awarded $650,000 to 44 community groups through the pilot Community Coordination and Facilitation grant to grow community conservation activity, and we are now working with 280 Enviroschools across the region

·        Enabling tools: the Tiaki Tāmaki Makaurau / Conservation Auckland website was launched in August 2020. The website is a one-stop-shop to get all Aucklanders involved in conservation. In its first year, Tiaki Tāmaki Makaurau exceeded its target of 80,000 page views.

6.      Key achievements from the water quality work programmes in 2020/2021 include:

·        Cleaner inner harbours: four major infrastructure projects have been completed since the beginning of the western isthmus water quality improvement programme, resulting in the construction of 7.6km of major pipes, of which 5.8km were completed during 2020/2021. This means that more than 3,700 properties are now serviced by upgraded networks, significantly reducing overflows into the inner city harbour

·        Safeguarding healthier beaches and swimming spots: the Safe Networks programme has carried out investigations and sampling to identify sources of water pollution at 120 stormwater outlets on 13 beaches. 190 hectares of stormwater catchment has been inspected to find wastewater entering our waterways

·        Checking onsite wastewater systems: we checked almost 6,000 onsite wastewater inspection records for compliance during 2020/2021, with almost 10,000 records received since the start of the programme

·        Protecting urban and rural streams: 76,982 trees have been planted across the South Auckland region to reduce contaminant run off and protect and restore our streams, waterways, wetlands and riparian margins

·        Cleaner beaches and streams: we are continuing our work with industry to stop harmful sediment entering our waterways. We visited 6,000 construction sites and fined 672 people for not meeting their sediment control requirements.

7.      Some programmes were deferred in 2020/2021 due to the Emergency Budget. These included the natural environment targeted rate top up to the Regional Environmental Natural Heritage fund and some kauri dieback track upgrades. A number of Healthy Waters projects were deferred, as well as some community funding which would normally go towards community riparian projects, and the decision was made to defer new sites being added to the Safe Networks programme. These deferred budgets and projects will recommence from 2021/2022. As the targeted rates are ring-fenced, the funding must be spent on the outcomes the rates are struck for.

8.      The next end of year report will be provided to the Environment and Climate Change Committee following the end of the 2021/2022 financial year. Throughout the year, quarterly updates will be provided to the Finance and Performance Committee and additional updates on specific programmes will be provided to committees and local boards as required.

Regional pest management plan

9.      The natural environment targeted rate funds the implementation of the Regional Pest Management Plan 2020-2030. This includes those pest management highlights set out above, as well as other pest programmes such as marine biosecurity.

10.    Under section 100B of the Biosecurity Act, the council is required to report annually on its operational plan for implementing the Regional Pest Management Plan. The annual report for 2020/2021 is shown in Attachment B.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      note the end of year report on the natural environment and water quality targeted rate work programmes shown in Attachment A to the agenda report

b)      note the annual report on the operational plan implementing the Regional Pest Management Plan 2020-2030.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Natural environment and water quality targeted rate highlights report 2020/2021

29

b

Annual report on the Operational Plan 2021-2030: Implementing the Auckland Regional Pest Management Plan 2020-2030

33

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Rachel Kelleher – General Manager Environmental Services

Craig Mcilroy – General Manager Healthy Waters

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 



Environment and Climate Change Committee

14 October 2021

 

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Environment and Climate Change Committee

14 October 2021

 

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Environment and Climate Change Committee

14 October 2021

 

National Emissions Reduction Plan Submission

File No.: CP2021/14920

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To delegate approval of Auckland Council’s submission on the soon to be released National Emissions Reduction Plan consultation document.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Government is developing a National Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP) which will be in place by the end of May 2022. It will set out strategies and policies to meet the National Emissions Budgets.

3.      The consultation document is expected to be released shortly with a six-week period for submissions. A delegated authority to approve council’s submission is being sought in advance because it is likely that the submission will be due before the next meeting of this committee.

4.      The ERP will be based on advice from the Climate Change Commission, and Hīkina te Kohupara – Kia mauri ora ai te iwi: Transport Emissions: Pathways to Net Zero by 2050 from the Ministry of Transport. Auckland Council submitted in the development of both documents.

5.      Council’s submission to the ERP will be developed based on The Auckland Plan 2050, Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, and policy positions articulated in other relevant documents such as previous Auckland Council submissions in this area.

6.      Once developed, council’s draft submission will be circulated to subject matter experts across the council group, and then to elected members for input. Should there be any new areas in the discussion document not covered by existing council positions, these will be highlighted for feedback.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      delegate authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Environment and Climate Change Committee and an Independent Māori Statutory Board member to approve council’s submission on the National Emission Reduction Plan consultation document.

Horopaki

Context

7.      The Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Act requires the Government to develop a National Emission Reduction Plan (ERP). An ERP is developed every five years and is aligned to the Emissions Budget for the same period.

8.      The ERP legally must include:

i)        sector-specific policies to reduce emissions and increase removals

ii)       a multi-sector strategy to meet emissions budgets and improve the ability of those sectors to adapt to the effects of climate change

iii)      a strategy to mitigate the impacts that reducing emissions and increasing removals will have on employees and employers, regions, iwi and Māori, and wider communities, including the funding for any mitigation action

iv)      any other policies or strategies that the Minister considers necessary.

Inputs into the development of the ERP

9.      The Climate Change Commission provided advice in May 2021 on the direction of the policy required in the emissions reduction plan covering the first budget period from 2022-25.

10.    This advice spanned the following areas and sectors:

·    cross sectoral policy change (including: circular economy; innovation, finance, and behaviour change; urban form, function and development)

·    transport

·    energy, industry, and buildings

·    waste and fluoridated gases

·    agriculture

·    forest and other carbon stocks

·    a equitable transition for Iwi/Māori

·    a fair, inclusive, equitable transition.

11.    The Ministry of Transport has developed and consulted on Hīkina te Kohupara – Kia mauri ora ai te iwi: Transport Emissions: Pathways to Net Zero by 2050 which outlines potential approaches to emissions reduction in the transport sector specifically.

12.    In addition, the Minister for Climate Change set out in July 2021 five principles for the development of the ERP:

·    a Just Transition;

·    a science-led response;

·    enhancing the role of nature based solutions;

·    genuine partnership with Māori;

·    and a clear, ambitious, and affordable path.

13.    The rate and scale of change that will be required of council under the ERP is likely to require a large increase in funding, although it is not possible at this stage to quantify the budgetary consequences. However, it is well established that climate mitigation and adaptation action taken now will be less costly than delaying action.

Timeframe

14.    The consultation document is expected to be released shortly with a six-week period for submissions. A delegated authority to approve council’s submission is being sought in advance because it is likely that the submission will be due before the next meeting of this committee.

15.    The Emission Budget is due to be finalised in December 2021, although this could be deferred to May 2022 to align with the release of the ERP.

16.    The Emissions Reduction Plan will be finalised by May 2022.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

17.    Council has significant strategic direction in this area including The Auckland Plan 2050 and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan. Council has also made several submissions in this area in recent time. As such, council’s submission will be developed based on relevant strategies and existing agreed positions in recent submissions.

18.    The two most relevant submissions were in response to:

·    He Pou a Rangi - the Climate Change Commission’s draft advice to Government (2021)

·    Hīkina te Kohupara – Kia mauri ora ai te iwi: Transport Emissions: Pathways to Net Zero by 2050 - Ministry of Transport Discussion Document (2021).

19.    It is expected that these two submissions will provide most of the content for council’s response as these documents are closely aligned with the expected structure and content of the draft ERP.

20.    In addition, council could potentially draw on positions in other existing council submissions, including:

·    MBIE Building for Climate Change Programme (2020)

·    Accelerating renewable energy and energy efficiency – MBIE discussion document (2020)

·    Process Heat in New Zealand: Opportunities and barriers to lowering emissions - Technical paper (2019)

·    A vision for hydrogen in New Zealand – MBIE green paper (2019)

·    Climate Change Response (Emissions Trading Reform) Amendment Bill (2019)

·    Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill (2019).

21.    Once developed, council’s draft submission will be circulated to all elected members and the IMSB for input. Should there be any new areas in the discussion document not covered by existing council positions, these will be highlighted in the draft submission for specific consideration.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.    The Commission’s advice to Government, and the subsequent emissions budgets and emissions reduction plan, have the potential to strongly influence Auckland’s ability to achieve its regional emissions reduction targets of halving emissions by 2030 and reaching net zero emissions by 2050, as adopted by council through Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

23.    Council’s submission to the National Emission Reduction Plan consultation document can reiterate its position and advocate for an ERP that places Auckland in the best position to achieve its, and Aotearoa’s emission reduction targets.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.    Feedback from relevant council departments and Council Controlled Organisations on the draft submission will be sought. The council-group was involved in establishing existing council positions.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.    Local board views will be sought on the draft submission and incorporated into council’s final submission as appropriate.  Local boards provided strong direction through the development of Te Tāruke-ā-TāwhiriAuckland’s Climate Plan, and this will inform the overall direction of the submission.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.    The Climate Change Commission have clearly stated that climate change action will compound disadvantage for Māori if it does not address policy, legislative, or other barriers that prevent Māori from exercising their rights under the Treaty. Both the Commission and the Minister for Climate Change have highlighted the need for a Treaty based partnership approach to be embedded in the ERP to enable an equitable transition for Iwi/Māori. This aligns well with the direction set by Te Tāruke-ā-TāwhiriAuckland’s Climate Plan. A strategy to mitigate the impacts on iwi and Māori is a legal requirement of the ERP.

27.    Feedback from mana whenua, the IMSB, and the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on previous related submissions and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri will be used in the development of this submission.

28.    Feedback on the draft submission will be sought from the IMSB and nineteen iwi entities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.    The submission can be developed within existing budget provision and as part of business-as-usual central government advocacy activity.

30.    As the ERP has not yet been released, it is not possible to quantify the budgetary consequences for Council. However, the rate and scale of change that will be required of council under the ERP is likely to require a large increase in funding. It is well established that climate mitigation and adaptation action taken now will be less costly than delaying action.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.    There is little risk in making a submission on the consultation on the ERP.

32.    Risks in relation to local government’s role in implementation of the ERP, e.g., funding and financing, will be considered as part of council’s response.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.    The ERP is expected to be released shortly with a six-week period for submissions. Once released, a memo outlining its key elements will be circulated to elected members and the IMSB.

34.    Council’s draft submission will be circulated to all elected members and the IMSB for input. Contact will be made with iwi and their input sought.

35.    The submission will be signed off by delegated authority to meet the submission deadline which is anticipated to be before next committee meeting.

36.    The final ERP will be in place by the end of May 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Adam Morris - Principal Strategic Advisor

Authorisers

Jacques Victor – General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

14 October 2021

 

Summary of Environment and Climate Change Committee information memoranda and briefings (including forward work programme) - 14 October 2021

File No.: CP2021/15052

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To note the progress on the forward work programme included as Attachment A.

2.      To receive a summary and provide a public record of memos or briefing papers that have been held or been distributed to committee members.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.      This is a regular information-only report which aims to provide greater visibility of information circulated to the Environment and Climate Change Committee members via memoranda/briefings or other means, where no decisions are required.

4.      The following memos were circulated to members of the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

Date

Memo

4/08/2021

Regional Streets for People fund

6/08/2021

Government Response Strategy

26/08/2021

Flood modelling and hazard information

10/09/2021

Update on the Mayoral Conversation Awards 2021

27/09/2021

Regional Streets for People Assessment Criteria

6/10/2021

Climate Action

6/10/2021

Safeswim programme

 

5.      The following workshops/briefings have taken place:

Date

Workshop/Briefing

8/09/2021

Kerbside Refuse Policy Review – CONFIDENTIAL

15/09/2021

Auckland Water Strategy – Outcome Area - CONFIDENTIAL

22/09/2021

Auckland Water Strategy – Outcome Area - CONFIDENTIAL

 


 

 

6.      These documents can be found on the Auckland Council website, at the following link:

http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

at the top left of the page, select meeting/ Kōmiti Mō Te Hurihanga Āhuarangi me Te TaiaoEnvironment and Climate Change” from the drop-down tab and click “View”.

under ‘Attachments’, select either the HTML or PDF version of the document entitled ‘Extra Attachments’.

7.      Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary.  Governing Body members should direct any questions to the authors.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      note the progress on the forward work programme included as Attachment A of the agenda report.

b)      receive the Summary of Environment and Climate Change Committee information items and briefings – 14 October 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Work Programme

63

b

Government Response Strategy (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Flood modelling and hazard information (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Update on the Mayoral Conversation Awards 2021 (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Regional Streets for People Assessment Criteria (Under Separate Cover)

 

f

Climate Action (Under Separate Cover)

 

g

Safeswim programme (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Suad Allie - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

14 October 2021

 

 

Kōmiti Mō Te Hurihanga Āhuarangi me Te Taiao / Environment and Climate Change] Committee
Forward Work Programme 2021

This committee deals with the development and monitoring of strategy, policy and action plans associated with environmental and climate change activities. The full terms of reference can be found here:[i Terms of reference].

This committee will meet bi-monthly commencing February 2021

 

 

Area of work and Lead Department

Reason for work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Expected timeframes

Highlight the month(s) this is expected to come to committee in 2021

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Strategic approach to Climate Change: - Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan

Chief Sustainability Office

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019] Link to decision

 

To provide a pathway to zero emissions by 2050 and ensure the region is prepared for the impacts of climate change.  This addresses Council’s commitments to develop a plan to keep within 1.5 degrees of warming and the Climate Emergency declaration.

 

Consultation on the Climate Change Commission’s draft advice to government

 

Community Facilities to Report October 2021

Progress to date:

C40 Update 11 February 2021
Link to decision

Consultation on the Climate Commission draft advice to Government 11 February 2021
Link to decision

Kia mauri ora ai te iwi: Transport Emissions: Pathways to Net Zero by 2050 – June 2021
Link to decision

C40 Divest/Invest Declaration – August 2021
Link to decision

 

Sustainability Asset Standards/Corporate Emissions October 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transport Emissions

Transport Emissions Reduction Plan for Auckland

To approve:

 

Progress to date:

Approach - August 2021
Link to decision

 

Progress update – December 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Council Controlled Organisation’s Climate Change Update

To give elected member’s visibility of the work undertaken by CCOs to adapt & mitigate the impacts of climate change.

For information: Currently providing CCO performance updates to the CCO Oversight Committee. The plan is for 1-2 CCOs to come present at this Committee meeting on their climate actions/programs.

 

Progress to date:

Auckland Transport Update 11 February 2021
Link to decision

Auckland Unlimited Update 15 April 2021
Link to decision

Auckland Unlimited – Zoo – 10 June 2021
Link to decision

Watercare – 12 August 2021
Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natural hazards coastal renewals, slips and remediation

Coastal Management Framework and delivery of individual coastal compartment management plans

Resilient Land and Coast

 

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

 

Coastal compartment management plans will apply a long term, sustainable approach to management of our coast over the next 100 years. Adaptive management plans will be developed in collaboration with mana whenua and communities. Plans will consider the experiences and values we place on the coast and how these may change over time due to coastal hazards and climate change.

ECC to approve the Whangaparaoa Pilot and the CMP process in 2021. ECC then to approve completed Coastal Management Plans on a yearly basis following endorsement via the respective the Local Boards. 

ECC to approve all Coastal Management Plans following endorsement via the respective the Local Boards. 

 

Progress to date:

Adoption of the Natural Hazards Risk Management Action Plan – June 2021
Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natural Hazards Risk Management Action Plan (NHRMAP)

NHRMAP is reporting tool that collates all of the work programmes across Auckland Council that mitigate long term natural hazard risk, outside of emergency management. As natural hazard events are expected to escalate in size and frequency due to climate change, this work is an important step to ensure that the council is appropriately managing risk.

Receive 6 monthly reporting updates.

 

Progress to date

Adoption of the Natural Hazards Risk Management Action Plan – June 2021
Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Waste Minimisation

Review of the Waste Minimisation and Innovation fund

Waste Solutions

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

Review the Fund, in line with the recommendations of the S17A Value for Money review.

To approve any significant changes to the grant framework arising from the review.

Memorandum to be sent to committee in Q3.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Waste Political Advisory Group

Waste Solutions

To provide feedback and guidance on implementation of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018.

Waste Political Advisory Group meetings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consultation on container return scheme design

Waste Solutions

Ministry for the Environment consultation on design for national container return scheme design – Auckland Council submission

To approve the Auckland Council submission on Ministry for the Environment consultation on container return scheme design

[according to latest information on MfE proposed timetable]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kerbside refuse policy charging review

Review of PAYT model to assess whether PAYT is still the best solution for achieving the objectives of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan

To consider and determine to deviate, or not, from current Waste Management and Minimisation Plan policy.

Any deviation will require a special consultative procedure likely as part of the Annual Plan 2022/2023 process.

Workshop scheduled for September 2021

 

Progress to date:

A report will go to the Finance and Performance committee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water

Auckland’s Water Strategy

Chief Planning Office

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

*ENV/2019/75

The health of Auckland’s waters is a critical issue. Both freshwater and marine environments in Auckland are under pressure from historic under-investment, climate change and rapid growth. The draft Auckland Plan 2050 identifies the need to proactively adapt to a changing water future and develop long-term solutions.

Series of workshops scheduled for 2021

Workshops to be held to seek feedback and guidance on strategic direction of proposed Water Strategy ahead of decision making in December 2021.

 

Progress to date:

Water Consumption targets report 15 April 2021
Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Environment Standards for human drinking water and wastewater discharges and overflows

 

 

 

 

 

 

Auckland Plan, Strategy and Research (Natural Environment Strategy, Infrastructure Strategy)

 

National Environmental Standard for Sources of Human Drinking Water

National Environmental Standard for Wastewater Discharges and Overflows.

The National Environmental Standards will have a significant impact on the council family and so the council will provide input into these. Further detailed opportunity to provide Auckland Council input on specific regulatory proposals, probably through Planning Committee, awaiting advice from MFE, likely in 2021.  Not linked to release of Water Services Bill in mid-2020.

Dates for the release of these NES are anticipated to be in the second half of 2021 at earliest.

Note: Overlap with Planning Committee

 

 

For information: Decision to provide feedback on the Water Services Bill and other reforms noted at Planning Committee in early 2020. The Natural Environment Strategy Unit (APRSR) provided proposed council submission on the Taumata Arowai Water Regulator Bill to Environment and Climate Change Committee in March 2020. Status of proposed NES for human drinking water and wastewater discharges and overflows will be provided to relevant committees when more is known about central government process.

 

Progress to date:

Waters Strategy and Long-term Plan update 10 September 2020
Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Healthy Waters Portfolio

Healthy Waters

 

 

There are several work programmes that require decisions from other committees but are relevant to the E&CC Committee.

 

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

Waitākere Ranges septic tank pump out scheme. Options are being consulted on as part of the Annual Budget. Decisions with the Finance and Performance Committee.

Rodney Drainage districts. Managing land drainage assets within Rodney and funding and responsibility for these assets. Decision making sits with Rodney Local Board and Finance and Performance Committee.

Clevedon wastewater. Possible opt-in targeted rate being proposed to the Governing Body as part of Annual Plan, decisions with the Finance and Performance Committee

 

For information: No decisions are required from Environment and Climate Change Committee at this stage.

 

Progress to date:

Update on water programme end of year – October 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management (NPSFM)

Plans and Places

Healthy Waters

Natural Environment Strategy

 

The NPSFM being implemented, with periodic reporting to council committees on progress, and responding to ongoing central government refinement of the framework for achieving water outcomes. Decision making for this area of work will be split between the Planning Committee (for planning decisions such as Plan Changes) and Environment and Climate Change for non-statutory functions

To provide guidance on the council’s implementation of non-statutory functions under the National Policy Statement.

 

For Information: Planning Committee agenda report scheduled for March 2021 setting out proposed Auckland Council approach to implement the NPSFM 2020, as driven from a planning approach.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water Quality Targeted Rate Programme

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Healthy waters and streams projects supported by the water quality targeted rate for projects that will ensure cleaner beaches, streams and harbours across the region

For information: Currently providing quarterly updates to the Finance and Performance Committee. End of year report will be provided in October.

 

Progress to date:

End of year report 10 September 2020
Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Too Much Water Policy

To develop an adaptive approach to protecting Aucklanders from harms as a result of a future with’ too much’ water.

For decision: Position Statements to guide future responses while policy is further developed and update on programme approach to be provided in March 2022.

Progress to date:

A workshop will be held in December 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HARBOUR

Manukau Harbour

Natural Environment Strategy

 

To achieve better outcomes for the Manukau Harbour including:

·    increased visibility of Auckland Council initiatives through updates on work programmes to the committee

·    greater E&CC oversight, and

work to strengthening relationships with mana whenua and other parties

Annual update provided through 30 June 2021 closed workshop which included overview of synthesis report of findings from the council’s 2020 State of the Environment report, current and future operational programmes, and strategic direction.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hauraki Gulf

Natural Environment Strategy

 

Work to ensure that the outcomes that Auckland Council intends to achieve in the Hauraki Gulf under its statutory responsibilities are clearly articulated. 

To ensure that the central government work programme is complementary to council’s aspirations for the Hauraki Gulf

i)          matters that need greater internal synergies within council’s statutory responsibilities to give effect to improved Hauraki Gulf outcomes (i.e., resource management)

ii)         matters that Auckland Council wishes to contribute to the central government work programme encompassed by ‘Revitalising Our Gulf: Government Action on the Sea Change plan’, as it relates to complementary activities within Auckland Council’s mandate.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants

Allocation of the Regional Natural Heritage Grant

Environmental Services

 

 

Decision-making over regional environment fund as per the grants funding policy and fund guidelines. Funds to contribute to the council’s goals related to protecting our natural environment.

 

Decision to confirm allocation of grants for the 2021/2022 funding round. Decision report December 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Allocation of Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund 2021

Decision making over medium and large funds from the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund in line with the fund’s adopted policy. Funds to contribute towards the council’s aspirational goal of zero waste to landfill by 2040.

 

Decision to confirm allocation of grants for the 2021/2022 funding round. Decision report December 2021.

 

Progress to date:

Update on guidelines - Report to June 2021
Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natural Heritage

Review of Auckland Council’s Regional Pest Management Plan

 

Environmental Services

Council has statutory obligations under the Biosecurity Act to control weeds and animal pests. The purpose of work in 2020 will be to resolve any remaining appeals against the plan and complete final steps required for it to become operative.

To update the committee when the plan becomes operative.

 

Progress to date:

Memorandum regarding operative in part as part of items for information in February 2021. No further decisions for 202

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inter-regional marine pest pathway management plan

Environmental Services

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

A Pathway Management Plan is a statutory plan under the Biosecurity Act.  Council is working with MPI, DOC and neighbouring councils (a group known as Top of the North) to develop one to manage the spread of marine pests to avoid or minimise their negative impacts on the environment.

 

To endorse Top of the North to undertake consultation on a proposed pathway management plan.

To subsequently approve a preferred option for management of marine pests and development of a plan under the Biosecurity Act. Decision to approve draft proposal for consultation to be confirmed.

Awaiting confirmation from central government on potential alternative approaches

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natural Environment Targeted Rate Programme

 

Environmental Services

Natural environment projects supported by the natural environment targeted rate will help protect the environment and tackle the pests, weeds and diseases that are threatening the native species

 

For information: Currently providing quarterly updates to the F&P Committee. End of year report will be provided to this Committee in October.

 

Progress to date:

End of year report 10 September 2020
Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annual report on the council’s operational plan for implementing the Regional Pest Management Plan 2020-2030

Environmental Services

Under section 100B of the Biosecurity Act, the council is required to report annually on its operational plan for implementing the Regional Pest Management Plan.

For information:. End of year report will be provided to this Committee in October.

 

Progress to date:

Report October 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kauri dieback work programme update

 

 

Environmental Services

 

The natural environment targeted rate included a $100m package to improve the protection of kauri in Auckland.  The work programme includes a significant track upgrade package to reduce the spread of kauri dieback, as well as funding for education, enforcement, monitoring, treatment and research.

 

To update the committee on ongoing regional kauri dieback management work programme.

 

Progress to date:

Memo sent November 2020, link found here

Memo: annual update for 2021/2022 will be sent approximately October 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Biodiversity Strategy and National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity

Natural Environment Strategy and Environmental Services

Government is launching these two programmes. 

To endorse council’s approach to responding to the strategy and policy?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weed Management Political Advisory Group

 

 

Community Facilities

Resolution number ECC/2020/13. Implementing this resolution will include engagement with local boards from September – November

Oversee the implementation and delivery of the Weed Management Policy, taking into account both community and technical considerations.

This year will have a focus on providing oversight over the implementation Resolution number ECC/2020/55 relating to the standardisation of funding for weed management within the urban road corridor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Project Streetscapes – Regional Review of Weed Management in the Road Corridor

 

Community Facilities

Resolution number ECC/2020/55 f)

Consideration of engagement of with mana whenua, the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum and the IMSB

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Completed

Lead Department

Area of work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Decision

 

Update to the Resource Recovery Network Strategy

Waste Solutions

[From the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee 2013-2016]

Options for a new operating and governance model for the Resource Recovery Network

To approve the recommended option for a new operating and governance model for the Resource Recovery Network

 

Decision can be found here

State of Environment Report

 

Monitoring and reporting on the state of all or part of the environment is required under section 35 of the Resource Management Act 1991.  As part of meeting our reporting obligations, the Research and Evaluation Unit (RIMU) is releasing a suite of technical reports accompanied by a simplified synthesis report on 11 February 2021 when high level results will be presented to the Environment and Climate Change Committee.

For information only. As part of meeting council’s RMA obligations, the synthesis report that brings together information from 13 new and recent technical reports on the state and trends for the air, land, and water domains in the Tāmaki Makaurau/Auckland was considered significant enough to warrant an information item on the agenda

Decision can be found here

Proposed Auckland Council submission on Water Services Bill

 

 

Auckland Plan, Strategy and Research (Natural Environment Strategy)

Auckland Council made submission on Taumata Arowai Water Regulator Bill in March 2020. Subsequent Bill extends regulatory regime to all drinking water suppliers (other than domestic self-supply) and increased requirements to manage risks to drinking water sources. Implications for council roles in being a drinking water supplier, and planning and regulatory functions.

To approve substance of proposed Auckland Council submission on Water Services Bill, with final approval delegated to Chair and other members of ECC Committee prior to 2 March 2021 central government deadline.

 

 

Decision can be found here