I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Upper Harbour Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 21 October 2021

9.30am

Via Skype for Business

 

Upper Harbour Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Lisa Whyte

 

Deputy Chairperson

Margaret Miles, QSM, JP

 

Members

Anna Atkinson

 

 

Uzra Casuri Balouch, JP

 

 

Nicholas Mayne

 

 

Brian Neeson, JP

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Max Wilde

Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

 

14 October 2021

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 4142684

Email: Max.Wilde@AucklandCouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                             5

2          Apologies                                                                                                           5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                   5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                             5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                     5

8.1    Deputation: Hobsonville Point Residents Society - Art installation                                                                             5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                     6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                 6

11        Minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held Thursday, 16 September 2021                                                      7

12        Approval for a change of purpose to a local board grant       37

13        Upper Harbour Local and Multi-Board Round One 2021/2022 grant allocations                                                                           41

14        Allocation of 2021 - 2023 Local Board Transport Capital Fund                                                                                                        47

15        Upper Harbour local parks classification                                  59

16        Approval for new private road names at 153 and 155 Clark Road, Hobsonville                                                                        77

17        Local board input to Auckland Council's feedback on the Three Waters reform proposal by the New Zealand Government                                                                                  85

18        Local board members' reports - October 2021                         89

19        Record of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 9 and 23 September, and 7 October 2021                91

20        Governance forward work calendar                                           99

21        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)           confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting held on Thursday 16 September 2021, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Upper Harbour Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation: Hobsonville Point Residents Society - Art installation

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To outline a potential art installation project in Hobsonville Point.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Lindsey Dawson, from the Hobsonville Point Residents Society, will be in attendance to discuss the process to install two outdoor sculptures in Hobsonville Point, recently donated by the Brick Bay Sculpture Trail in Matakana.

3.      The Hobsonville Point Residents Society has agreed to cover installation costs for the sculptures and Lindsey would like to have an initial discussion with board members to receive any relevant advice on the land-owner approval process.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from Lindsey Dawson thank them for their attendance and presentation.

Attachments

a          Supporting information from the Hobsonville Point Residents Society regarding application for landowner approval....................................................................... 105

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

Minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held Thursday, 16 September 2021

File No.: CP2021/14710

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      The open unconfirmed minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board ordinary meeting held on Thursday, 16 September 2021, are attached at item 11 of the agenda for the information of the local board only.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      note that the open unconfirmed minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held on Thursday, 16 September 2021, are attached at item 11 of the agenda for the information of the local board only and will be confirmed under item 4 of the agenda.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board open unconfirmed minutes - 16 September 2021

9

b

Upper Harbour Local Board minutes attachments - 16 September 2021

21

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Max Wilde – Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

Approval for a change of purpose to a local board grant

File No.: CP2021/11522

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To approve a change of purpose, for a grant awarded to the Sustainable Paremoremo Group

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      A grant was awarded to the Sustainable Paremoremo Group (grant reference UH15_2021) for $3,990, in 2015. The purpose of the grant was “towards the hire of a digger and the purchase of sand for the jump track at Sanders Reserve.” The jump track did not go ahead due to a number of issues including insufficient funds to advance and complete the project.

3.      The group have now sent a proposal to repurpose the grant “towards a first aid course for up to 20 participants and the purchase of a defibrillator” (Attachment A to the agenda report).

4.      The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world-class city.

5.      If the purpose of an awarded grant changes significantly, the local board is asked to consider the proposed change. This brief report provides an opportunity for the board to formally decide on the proposed change by the group.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve the change of purpose for the grant awarded to Sustainable Paremoremo (grant reference UH15_2021) to utilise the grant funding of $3,990 towards a first aid course for up to 20 participants and the purchase of a defibrillator.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Sustainable Paremoremo change of grant purpose

39

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rikka Barbosa - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Rhonwen Heath - Head of Rates Valuations & Data Mgmt

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

      

Upper Harbour Local and Multi-Board Round One 2021/2022 grant allocations

File No.: CP2021/13147

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Upper Harbour Local and Multi-Board Grants Round One 2021/2022

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Upper Harbour Local Board adopted the Upper Harbour Local Grants Programme 2021/2022 as presented in Attachment A to the agenda report. The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

3.      This report presents applications received in the Upper Harbour Local Board Grants Round One 2021/2022 (Attachment B to the agenda report) and Multi-Board Grants Round One 2021/2022 (Attachments C to the agenda report).

4.      The Upper Harbour Local Board has set a total of $96,133 community grants budget for the 2021/2022 financial year.

5.      Nine applications were received for Upper Harbour Local Board Grants Round One, requesting $76,731.00 and thirteen applications were received for Multi-Board Grants Round One 2021/2022, requesting $41,628.52: a total of $118,359.52.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in the Upper Harbour Local Board Grants Round One 2021/2022, listed in the following table:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

LG2217-110

North Harbour BMX Association

Sport and recreation

Towards the removal and replacement costs of galvanized steel stairs that access the start ramp at the North Harbour BMX Club

$25,688.00

LG2217-101

The Auckland Softball Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the running costs of the Easter Classic Tournament 2022 at Rosedale Softball Park in April 2022

$10,000.00

LG2217-102

Albany Chinese Association Incorporated

Community

Towards venue hire, teacher, tutor, and accounting fees for the singing, dancing, and performing activities from September 2021 to March 2022

$8,223.00

LG2217-113

Marist North Harbour Rugby Club

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of rugby balls and partial support for the club administrator position from December 2021 to November 2022

$7,200.00

LG2217-112

AFL New Zealand

Sport and recreation

Towards facility or ground hire of North Harbour Stadium for the AFL New Zealand - Academy Programme from February to April 2022

$8,620.00

LG2217-108

The StarJam Charitable Trust

Community

Towards core operational costs for two Albany Jazzy Jamming dance workshops for youth with disability at Albany Community Hub from January 2022 to December 2022

$5,000.00

LG2217-107

New Zealand Council of Victim Support Groups National Office

Community

Towards Victim Support’s volunteer programme in the Upper Harbour Local Board area

$3,000.00

LG2217-105

Harbour Hospice Trust

Community

Towards catering costs, event promotion, stationery, billboards, online advertising expenses, decorations, gifts, auction item and hire of equipment for the Rock the Hithe' fundraising event in November 2021

$4,000.00

LG2217-109

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards annual budgeted costs for volunteer training and clinical supervision of the helpline service in the Upper Harbour area from November 2021 to June 2022

$5,000.00

Total

 

 

 

$76,731.00

 

b)      agree to fund, part fund, or decline each application in the Upper Harbour Multi-Board Grants Round One 2021/2022, listed in the following table:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

MB2022-114

North Shore Centres of Mutual Aid

Community

Towards a proportion of operational costs, excluding wages, for eight centres in the North Shore between January and December 2022

$5,000.00

MB2022-125

Mark PInto de Menezes

under the umbrella of Matchbox 2000 Productions Limited

Community

Towards an "80s Flashback" tribute event at Murray's Bay Intermediate School Hall on 9 October 2021

$3,000.00

MB2022-154

Yes Disability Resource Centre

Community

Towards a "Future Leaders" workshop of two days for young people on the North Shore with a disability, held at Shore Junction from 1 November 2021 to 30 September 2022.

$2,750.00

MB2022-111

Neighbourhood Support North Shore

Community

Towards the manager's salary and operating expenses between June 2021 and June 2022

$5,000.00

MB2022-113

Big Buddy Mentoring Trust

Community

Towards operational costs including wages, rent, transport, and equipment to recruit, screen, and train up to 50 more Auckland men to be volunteers (Big Buddies) to Auckland boys who do not have a father in their life

$5,000.00

MB2022-121

The Student Volunteer Army Foundation

Community

Towards the Student Volunteer Army (SVA) "Kids Programme Volunteer Project" in various primary schools including the costs of school kits and providing administrative support from 31 October 2021 to 1 August 2022.

$2,000.00

MB2022-123

Babystart Charitable Trust

Community

Towards 60 babystart boxes, baby clothing, care items, courier, logistics and storage costs.

$3,452.00

MB2022-146

North Shore Womens Centre

Community

Towards the wages at Womens Centre Waitakere from November 2021 to November 2022

$2,000.00

MB2022-147

Guardians of our Children Charitable Trust

Community

Towards Parental Disputes workshops "Make Them Proud" including facilitation, handouts and venue hire at Orakei Community Centre from 1 October 2021 to 30 September 2022.

$2,930.00

MB2022-152

Road Safety Education Trust

Community

Towards the operational costs to manage the delivery of the Road Safety Programme across Auckland, including wages for the programme co-ordinator, national manager and support staff for programmes between 1 October 2021 to 30 September 2022.

$3,000.00

MB2022-153

Multiples Auckland Trust

Community

Towards training, support groups and equipment for Multiples Auckland from 1 October 2021 to 1 December 2021.

$1,271.52

MB2022-156

CNSST Foundation, formerly known as Chinese New Settlers Services Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the Community Connection programme at Westlake Boys High School from 30 October to 23 July 2022.

$4,500.00

MB2022-164

Life Education Trust North Shore

Community

Towards the Life Education Trust North Shore "Child Healthcare" programme, specifically workbooks, from 1 January to 1 July 2022 at various north shore schools.

$1,725.00

Total

 

 

 

$41,628.52

 

Horopaki

Context

6.      The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world-class city.

7.      The local board grants programme sets out:

·   local board priorities

·   lower priorities for funding

·   exclusions

·   grant types, the number of grant rounds, and when these will open and close

·   any additional accountability requirements.

8.      The Upper Harbour Local Board adopted the Upper Harbour Local Grants Programme 2021/2022 as presented in Attachment A. The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

9.      The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.    The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

11.    The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action.

12.    Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts.

13.    Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.    The focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment, or heritage. Based on the focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice.

15.    The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.    Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Upper Harbour Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

17.    The local board is requested to note that section 50 of the Community Grants Policy states:
“We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

18.    A summary of each application received through 2021/2022 Upper Harbour Local and Multi-Board Grants Round One is provided in Attachments B and C.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.    The local board grants programme aims to respond to the council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.    The Upper Harbour Local Board adopted the Upper Harbour Local Grants Programme 2021/2022 as presented in Attachment A. The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

21.    This report presents applications received in the Upper Harbour Local Board Grants Round One 2021/2022 (Attachment B) and Multi-Board Grants Round One 2021/2022 (Attachments C).

22.    The Upper Harbour Local Board has set a total of $96,133 community grants budget for the 2021/2022 financial year.

23.    Nine applications were received for Upper Harbour Local Board Grants Round One, requesting $76,731.00 and thirteen applications were received for Multi-Board Grants Round One 2021/2022, requesting $41,628.52: a total of $118,359.52.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.    The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.    Following the Upper Harbour Local Board allocating funding for Round One Local and Multi-Board grants, grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board Grant Programme 2021/2022 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Upper Harbour Local Grant Round One 2021/2022 Application Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Upper Harbour Multi-Board Grants Round One 2021/2022 Application Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rikka Barbosa - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Rhonwen Heath - Head of Rates Valuations & Data Mgmt

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

Allocation of 2021 - 2023 Local Board Transport Capital Fund

File No.: CP2021/15190

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To allocate $1,519,538 of the 2021 – 2023 Local Board Transport Capital Fund to the local board approved list of projects.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      This report provides an update to the Upper Harbour Local Board on its Local Board Transport Capital Fund for the current political term (until 30 June 2023) and an opportunity for the local board to resolve on allocation on funds.

3.      The local board has $1,519,538 remaining in its Local Board Transport Capital Fund budget following the June 2021 adoption of the Regional Land Transport Plan 2021 – 2031.

4.      The Upper Harbour Local Board requested Rough Order of Costs on the following projects, noting that these are not listed in order of priority:

·        Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park shared path

·        Ōtehā Valley Road (connecting existing shared paths to fill in the gaps)

·        Shared path on Bush Road from the hockey stadium to Rosedale Road

·        Improve safety between Albany shared path and the new SH18 shared path

·        Kyle Road

·        Scott Road School Zone Safety Infrastructure.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      allocate $1,519,538 from its 2021 – 2023 Local Board Transport Capital Fund to the projects to be determined by the Local Board.

Horopaki

Context

5.      Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. As set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan, AT reports on a regular basis to local boards. The regular reporting commitment acknowledges the important role local boards play in the governance of Auckland on behalf of their local communities.

6.      AT has been reporting in 2021 on projects and operations in the local board areas by way of a monthly bulletin. Information on local board consultations and updates on the status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) have been conveyed by memo or email.

7.      The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by AT. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must also be:

·    Safe

·    not impede network efficiency

·    be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Scott Point Sustainable Sport Park

8.      A new sports park (Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park) is currently being developed within the Hobsonville area. The site is currently a greenfield area and new housing developments are occurring on sites adjacent to the park.

9.      The park has road boundaries on Clark Road and Joshua Carder Drive. In addition, Squadron Drive Extension and Craigs Way are currently being constructed and form the northern and part of the southern park boundaries.

Map

Description automatically generated

            Image 1. Approximate location of Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park shared path

 

10.    There is a need for shared walkway/cycleways to provide linkages between neighbouring communities with the park, nearby school developments and adjacent retirement village facilities. The paths would link Clark Road and Joshua Carder Drive and provide connections to Squadron Drive Extension.

11.    There is no road boundary between the park and most of the southern boundary, and an opportunity exists to construct a safe off-road linkage for pedestrians and cyclists in this location, as well as linkages from the north to the south through the centre of the park.

12.    A 6m wide shared path is proposed (3m for walking and 3m for cycling) separated by a planted buffer (along the southern park boundary).

13.    The design has been approved by AT and incorporates feedback from AT. High volumes of cyclists and pedestrians are anticipated and there will potentially be additional park users using the path as a viewing area for watching sport on the adjacent fields.

14.    The proposed shared paths are expected to provide a safe off-road connection through the park between local communities, schools, and aged care facilities.

15.    Community engagement for the overall design of the park has been undertaken and there is support for the inclusion of shared pathways through and around the park.

16.    The adjacent Ryman retirement complex supports the shared path and has agreed to contribute funding of $25,800 towards increasing safety around access points from their property onto the proposed path.

17.    Local iwi has been engaged with as part of the development of the concept design for the park and are working with council on the project. Te Kawerau Iwi Tribal Authority have completed a Cultural Impact Assessment (CIA).

18.    The project is part of the overall development of the park being undertaken by Auckland Council.

19.    The Rough Order of cost of this project is $700,000.

Oteha Valley Road (connecting existing shared paths to fill In the gaps)

20.    Oteha Valley Road is an arterial route with a 60 km speed limit and is part of the Auckland Cycle Network. The road is of variable width, generally two lanes in each direction with a central grassed median strip. Footpaths are also of variable width, some being a standard 1.5m while other sections can be 2.5m or up to 3m wide.

21.    The local board would like to consider widening of paths in the narrower sections to encourage more use by cyclists.

22.    Auckland Transport active modes staff have advised that the preferred option for a cycle facility along Oteha Valley Road would be Copenhagen type cycleways, or on-road separated cycleways each side of the road or a bi-directional on-road cycleway.

23.    Without a complete and costly investigation and Scheme Design Assessment the most appropriate style of cycle facility cannot yet be determined

A picture containing text, way, road, scene

Description automatically generated

Image 2. Examples of shared paths

 

24.    It is evident that the local board would have insufficient funds to install these types of facilities in Oteha Valley Road, so it is understood that the local board wish to consider funding some widening of footpaths as an interim improvement.

25.    This would be particularly beneficial to children and young adults while not impeding potential cycle improvements in the future. This would also greatly improve the pedestrian amenity along Oteha Valley Road.

26.    There are key destinations in the area such as the bus station and Albany shopping precinct.

27.    It is recommended that the local board focus on the section west of State Highway One (SH1) as this section has the higher number of existing widened paths currently. It also has considerably more berm width than the eastern end making the proposal more practical and cost effective.

28.    The eastern side of SH1 has long lengths of retaining walls with limited berm width, along with many street light poles that would need relocation and trees to be removed.

29.   A plan indicating possible sections to be replaced and widened is outlined in the next pages.

West of SH1

         Option 1 – Remove and Replace

         (AT approved methodology – full replacement)

         Legend:

·        3m wide path – 3m wide path

·        Waka Kotahi-funded shared path (out of scope)

          Rough Order of Cost (ROC)

·        Northern Side Sections -            Total   = $1,011,920

·        Southern Side Sections -           Total   = $817,275

·        ROC Total:  $2,377,954 (includes a 30 per cent contingency sum)

 

Map

Description automatically generated

 


 


            Option 2 – Path Widening

         (Non-approved AT methodology- departure from standards; approval will be needed)

            Legend:

·          path widening (0.5m)

·          path widening (1.0m)

·          path widening (1.5m)

·          NZTA-funded shared path (out of scope)

 

            Rough Order of Cost

·   Northern Side Sections

o 1.0m Widening     = $186,240

o 0.5m Widening     = $350,440

o Total = $536,680

·   Southern Side Sections

o 0.5m Widening     = $96,940

o 1.0m Widening     = $90,030

o 1.5m Widening     = $232,900

o Total = $419,870

·      ROC Total:  $1,243,515 (includes a 30 per cent contingency sum)

 


 

Shared path on Bush Road from the hockey stadium to Rosedale Road

30.    The Upper Harbour Local Board requested a Rough Order of Cost to design and construct “shared path on Bush Road from the hockey stadium to Rosedale Road”.

Map

Description automatically generated

Existing 3m wide shared path that runs from Albany ExpresswayImage 3. Overall Site Plan Bush Rd near Hockey Centre

 

A picture containing grass, sky, outdoor, tree

Description automatically generated

Image 4. Overall Site Plan Bush Rd near Hockey Centre

 

31.    There is an existing 950m long 3m wide “Share with Care” path on the berm running from Albany Expressway to Rosedale Road.

32.    There is then a gap of 280m with no formal path from Rosedale Road to the new hockey centre path recently constructed. This could be constructed as a 3m wide shared path with little difficulty (Section A).

33.    The new path constructed as part of the hockey centre development runs for 350m but is only 2m wide. There is currently approximately a 1m gap to the kerb which is grassed berm. There is potential to widen the path to three meters to provide consistency (Section B).

34.    There is a section of 100m length south of the hockey centre path to where the existing footpath starts again at No. 179 Bush Road. This Section C could also be formed at a 3m width and then split into footpath for walkers and cyclists returning to the road. (Section C)

35.    None of the sections appear to pose any difficulties in construction.

            Rough Order of Cost

·      Section A - $ 295,000

·      Section B - $ 179,000

·      Section C - $ 139,000

·      Total if done separately: $ 613,000 (includes a 30 per cent contingency sum).

36.    If all three sections were to be constructed as one contract, savings can be made, and the Rough Order of Cost would be $ 541,000 (all ROC’s include a 30 per cent contingency sum).

Albany Shared Path

37.    As part of the Northern Corridor Improvements (NCI) project, Waka Kotahi is constructing a cycleway down the northern side of the new motorway link. This is likely to be constructed in 2022.

38.    There are some on road cycle lanes that run from south of the motorway interchange, through the interchange and the Bush Road intersection, where they change to off road paths.

Map

Description automatically generated

Image 5. Plan View of Proposed new Cycle Route Albany Highway Interchange

 

39.    Waka Kotahi’s new motorway cycle path will continue as a shared path along Albany Highway to the Bush Road Intersection on the eastern side of Albany Highway.

40.    In the past AT technical specialists have advised the local board that if they wished to invest in improved connections to this shared path a high-quality upgrade of the Bush Rd/Albany Highway Intersection, to allow cyclists coming from the motorway path better access would be a priority.

41.    This upgrade would provide a dual crossing of Bush Rd and Albany Highway to link onto the off-road cycle paths heading north down Albany Highway. The work would require changes to traffic islands, relocation of traffic signal poles, changes to traffic light phasing, road markings and signage.

42.    Considering the path is likely not to be completed till 2022, as an alternative there may be value in advocating for the intersection’s inclusion in the shared paths project scope instead. If this approach was not successful, the local board could then consider funding it as part of next terms budget.

43.    The Rough Order of Cost to upgrade the intersection is $210,000.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

44.    AT engages closely with council on developing strategy, actions, and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan, and council’s priorities.

45.    AT’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network. These projects all support pedestrian and/or cyclist safety therefore contributing to climate change actions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

46.    The impact of information in this report is mainly confined to AT. Where LBTCF projects are being progressed by Auckland Council’s Community Facilities group, engagement on progress has taken place. Any further engagement required with other parts of the council group will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

47.    Auckland Transport discussed the LBTCF with the Upper Harbour Local Board at a workshop on 9 September 2021. AT staff will be available to support further discussions with members to support their decision-making on this item.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

48.    The proposed decision is to allocate funding and has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

49.    Allocating the Local Board Transport Capital Fund budget as recommended will expend nearly all the outstanding funds in this political term.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

50.    The impact of the latest COVID-19 lockdown has not been factored into these recommendations. There is a risk that budgets might be impacted by budget cuts resulting from the August/September 2021 lockdown.

51.    After the last lockdown in 2020, projects that were already contracted out once the Emergency Budget was resolved continued to be delivered, therefore the local board is advised to allocate funding to its preferred projects as soon as possible.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

52.    Once the local board’s resolution is finalised, Auckland Transport will work to contract out the project as soon as possible.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Owena Schuster - Elected Member Relationship Partner

Authorisers

Claire Dixon - Head of Community Engagement, Western Hub

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

Upper Harbour local parks classification

File No.: CP2021/15239

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To confirm land to be held under the Local Government Act 2002 and make decisions on the classification of land under the Reserves Act 1977.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      As part of the classification programme and development of the local parks management plan under the Reserves Act 1977, additional classification decisions are needed for some local parks in the Upper Harbour Local Board area for the reasons outlined;

·        some parcels were excluded from earlier reports to the local board, including new parcels that were recently acquired and drainage reserves that were previously excluded from this programme

·        the park values of one Reserves Act 1977 parcel which the local board has previously resolved to classify has been investigated further and a change to the classification is recommended to align with the primary values

·        technical advice has confirmed that 13 parcels that were thought to be classified under section 16(1) of the Reserves Act 1977 still require a resolution of the local board under section 16(2A)

·        a further resolution is required to confirm the proposed classification actions for three parcels following the close of public notification with no submission received. 

3.      Criteria used to assess the classification of each parcel, included consideration of the local park’s values, current and likely future use of the local park, workshop feedback from the local board and consultation with mana whenua.

4.      The status and recommendations for parcels of land included in this report are as follows:

Land status

Recommended actions

14 parcels held under the Local Government Act

·    Retain three parcels at Albany Lakes Reserve, Headquarters Park and Sunderland Lounge under the Local Government Act

·    Publicly notify proposals to declare six parcels as reserve and classify under s.14(1) of the Reserves Act 1977, as identified in Attachment A to the agenda report.

·    Declare five parcels as reserve and classify under s.14(1) of the Reserves Act 1977, including one at Taihinui Historical Reserve that has been publicly notified, as identified in Attachment A.

112 unclassified parcels and one notified parcel held under the Reserves Act 1977

·    Classification is required for 113 parcels under s.16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977, including one at Rosedale Park that has been publicly notified, as identified in Attachment B to the agenda report.

·    Public notification is still required for four parcels.

13 parcels incorrectly classified under s.16(1) of the Reserves Act 1977

·    Revoke the previous resolution classifying 13 parcels at five parks in Hobsonville under s.16(1) of the Reserves Act 1977.

·    Include the correct classification in resolution classifying these 13 parcels under s.16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977, as identified in Attachment B.

One parcel reassessed for classification relating to primary purpose under the Reserves Act 1977

·    Revoke the previous resolution classifying the western extent of Hooton Reserve as local purpose (carparking) reserve.

·    Include an updated classification of recreation reserve in the resolution classifying parcels under s.16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977, as identified in Attachment B

One classified parcel under the Reserves Act 1977

·    Approve the reclassification of one parcel at Gills Reserve from scenic reserve to scenic reserve s.19(1b), under s.24(2)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977, following the close of public notification.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      confirm that Lot 4 DP 201569 (Albany Lakes Reserve), Section 1 SO 490900 (part of Headquarters Park) and Section 3 SO 490900 (Sunderland Lounge) will continue to be held under the Local Government Act 2002

b)      approve public notification of the proposal to declare and classify pursuant to section 14(1) of the Reserves Act 1977 six parcels described in Attachment A (dated 21 October 2021)

c)      declare and classify pursuant to section 14(1) of the Reserves Act 1977 five parcels described in Attachment A (dated 21 October 2021)

d)      revoke part of clause c) of resolution number UH/2019/48 regarding the classification of Lot 1 DP 198079 at Hooton Reserve as local purpose car parking reserve pursuant to section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act

e)      revoke part of clause d) of resolution number UH/2019/161 regarding the classification of 13 parcels of land, as described in Attachment B (dated 21 October 2021) pursuant to section 16(1) of the Reserves Act 1977

f)       approve public notification of the proposal to classify pursuant to section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 four parcels described in Attachment B (dated 21 October 2021)

g)      approve the classification of 123 parcels of reserve land pursuant to section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977, as described in Attachment B (dated 21 October 2021)

h)      approve the reclassification of Lot 1 DP 308086 at Gills Reserve from scenic reserve to scenic reserve 19(1b), pursuant to section 24(2)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977.

 

Horopaki

Context

Background information

5.      Upper Harbour Local Board has allocated and delegated decision-making responsibility for all local parks in the local board area.

6.      On 21 June 2018, the local board resolved to prepare an omnibus open space management plan for all local parks in the local board area (local parks management plan), to assist park management and to meet obligations for reserve management planning under the Reserves Act 1977 (RA) (resolution UH/2018/66).

7.      The local parks management plan will be a statutory reserve management plan prepared in line with section (s.) 41 of the Act. It will cover parkland held under the RA as well as the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA), and include land covered by existing reserve management plans.

8.      In April 2019 staff completed a comprehensive park land status investigation for all local parks in Upper Harbour. This was an essential preliminary task in developing the draft local parks management plan and a statutory requirement under the RA. Section 16 of the RA requires all land held as reserve under the RA be classified appropriately.

9.      The classification of reserve land in Upper Harbour has been covered in four previous reports to the local board as shown in the timeline.

            *One parcel was incorrectly publicly notified and one was unintentionally excluded from the report.

10.    Following further investigation of existing parcels and an assessment of acquisitions of new park land, we have determined that further classification decisions are required.

11.    A further resolution of the local board is also required to confirm classification actions for three parcels following the close of public notification.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Proposed actions for land held under the LGA

12.    The local board have the option to hold parks under the LGA or the RA. Any land held under the LGA which the local board wishes to manage under the RA must be declared reserve and classified appropriately in accordance with s.14 of the RA.

13.    When reviewing the future land status options for land under the LGA, staff considered the following:

·        why does the council own the land and how was it acquired?

·        what is the current and likely future purpose of the land?

·        what potential does the land have for protection, enhancement and development?

·        is there likely to be a need to retain flexibility for future use?

·        what is the status of adjacent parcels of land within the same park?

Retain three parcels of land under the LGA

14.    Three parcels of land are recommended to be retained under the LGA to provide flexibility for current and future use as listed in Table 1 below.

            Table 1: Parcels to be retained under the LGA

Reserve name

Appellation

Function

Albany Lakes Reserve

Lot 4 DP 201569

Dual stormwater management and open space. Civic park in Albany Metropolitan Centre.

Headquarters Park

Section 1 SO 490900

Community facility Te Mahere / Headquarters Building leased to Hobsonville Community Trust.

Sunderland Lounge

Section 3 SO 490900

Community facility Te Rere / Sunderland Lounge leased to Hobsonville Community Trust.

 

15.    No further action is required by the local board for land that is to remain under the LGA.

Proposal to declare and classify 10 parcels of land held under the LGA

16.    Ten parcels of land are recommended to be declared reserve under s.14 of the RA and classified to align with their primary purpose (see Attachment A). The classifications are for recreation and local purpose reserves including esplanade, drainage and carparking. 

17.    Public notification is required for six of these parcels as they are not zoned open space in the Auckland Unitary Plan, largely due to them being newly acquired park land. 

Confirm declaration and classification of one parcel following public notification

18.    At its business meeting on 20 August 2020, the local board approved public notification of the proposal to declare and classify under s.14 of the RA one parcel (Allot 663 Parish of Paremoremo) at Taihinui Historical Reserve as scenic reserve (s.19(1a) of the RA).

19.    This was publicly notified on 24 September 2020 in the North Harbour News in accordance with the requirements outlined in section 119(1)(b) of the RA. The submission period closed on 25 October 2020 and no submissions were received.

20.    The local board may choose to approve the proposed classification action as it was publicly notified or change the action. As there have been no submissions, we recommend that the local board approves the proposal as described above.

Proposed actions for land held under the RA

21.    For land held under the RA, the following options have been considered:

·        classify according to its primary purpose

·        reclassify to align to its primary purpose

·        revoke the reserve status and hold the land under the LGA

·        continue to hold the land as unclassified reserve under the RA.

22.    The option to continue to hold the land as unclassified reserve has been discounted as it would mean that the local parks management plan would not comply with the RA and the council would not be meeting its statutory obligations under the RA.

23.    In the context of this investigation, we have not identified any parcels of local park that warrant revocation of the reserve for management under the LGA.

Classification of land held under the RA

24.    Classification involves assigning a reserve (or part of a reserve) a primary purpose, as defined in s.17 to 23 of the Act, that aligns with its present values. Consideration is also given to potential future values and activities and uses.

25.    We have identified 112 parcels of unclassified reserve land that require classification under s.16(2A) of the RA (refer to Attachment B for proposed classifications). Four of these parcels require public notification as they are not zoned open space in the Auckland Unitary Plan.

26.    Staff have considered the Reserves Act Guide[1] and the following questions when determining the primary purpose and appropriate classification for each parcel:

·        what was the intended purpose of the reserve when it was acquired?

·        what are the main values of the land or potential future values, uses and activities?

·        what potential does the land have for protection, preservation, enhancement or development?

·        what is the status of adjacent parcels of land within the park?

·        is there likely to be a need to retain flexibility for future use?

27.    The majority of the classifications proposed are local purpose (esplanade) or local purpose (drainage) reserve.

28.    Drainage reserves are primarily held for the purposes of stormwater management but often provide for recreation and other park uses. Buckley Avenue Wetland is an example of where this occurs as the stormwater pond (wetland) is complemented by a boardwalk, pathways, and seating.

29.    Esplanade reserves are held for the purpose of contributing to the protection of conservation values, enabling public access and/or enabling recreational use of land and adjacent water bodies. Fernbank Reserve is an example of where this classification has been applied as the park helps to protect the natural values of Kyle Stream.     

30.    A scenic reserve (s.19(1b) of the RA) classification is proposed for seven parcels which are recognised as sites of ecological significance or over time will develop these qualities, including at Gully and Borneo Reserves which are valued for their high-quality indigenous vegetation.   

31.    Other classifications proposed include recreation and local purpose (accessway, utility, community building or landscape protection) reserve.

Correcting decisions to classify 13 parcels pursuant to s.16 of the RA

32.    During the gazettal process, we determined that thirteen parcels of land contained in five parks, as described in Attachment B, were incorrectly classified under s.16(1) of the RA being part of resolution d) UH/2019/161. The parks are:

·    Catalina Water Play Park

·    Hobsonville Esplanade North

·    Hobsonville Point Park

·    Kittyhawk Park

·    The Parade Ground.

33.    These parcels vested with council pursuant to the Resource Management Act 1991 and require classification under s.16(2A) of the RA.

34.    To correct this administrative error, we recommend revoking the earlier resolution as it relates to the 13 parcels of land and correctly classifying these under s.16(2A) of the RA as set out in Attachment B. No public notification is required.

Correcting decisions to classify one parcel at Hooton Reserve

35.    A recreation classification is recommended for Lot 1 DP 198079 being the western extent of Hooton Reserve as this supports the current and potential future use of the parcel as a site for recreation and sporting activities.

36.    To classify Lot 1 DP 198079 as a recreation reserve, the local board needs to revoke part of an earlier resolution to classify the parcel as local purpose (carparking) reserve (part resolution c) UH/2019/48) and pass a new resolution. No public notification is required.

37.    Part of the parcel is occupied by a BMX facility leased to North Harbour BMX Association and the remainder is an old carparking area. This area has been identified as the potential site for a proposed destination indoor court facility.

Confirm classification decisions following public notification

38.    At its business meeting on 16 May 2019, the local board approved the public notification of proposals listed in the Table 2 below.

Table 2: Proposals publicly notified

Reserve name

Appellation

Action under RA

Classification

Public notification

Rosedale Park

Lot 106 DP 183218

Classify s.16(2A)

Recreation

1 August 2019 to

2 September 2019

Gills Reserve

Lot 1 DP 308086

Reclassify s.24(2)(b)

Scenic 19(1b) (formerly scenic)

24 September 2020 to 25 October 2020

 

39.    These proposals were publicly notified in the North Harbour News in accordance with the requirements outlined in section 119(1)(b) of the RA. The submission period was one month and no submissions were received.

40.    The local board may choose to approve the proposed classification and reclassification actions as they were publicly notified or to change those actions. As there have been no submissions, we recommend that the local board approves the proposals as described in Table 2.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

41.    The decisions in this report are largely administrative and we anticipate that they will have no direct impact on greenhouse gas emissions.

42.    However future management and potential development of park land, which is determined by its purpose, could have a potential positive or negative impact on greenhouse gas emissions. The degree and nature of the impact is dependent on the specific management and development of each park. Two examples of potential impacts are:

·        a potential reduction of emissions by classifying land as scenic reserve. The purpose of a scenic reserve is largely to protect and restore the natural environment; ecological restoration of a site could result in a reduction of emissions and increase in carbon sequestration

·        a potential increase in emissions through increased traffic, following the development of a community facility; the development of facilities could be enabled through the classification of local purpose (community building) reserve or recreation reserve.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

43.    The land classification investigations that have formed the recommendations in this report have been discussed with relevant council units including Parks, Sport, and Recreation, Community Facilities (including Leasing), and Environmental Services who have provided information and technical advice to inform reserve classification proposals.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

44.    Workshops were held with the local board on 3 June 2021 and 12 August 2021 to present the classification recommendations detailed in this report. The local board were supportive of the majority of the classifications and amendments have been made to reflect feedback received at the workshops. 

45.    The local board had previously sought clarification of the decision-making responsibilities for local purpose (drainage) reserves as this is a unique category in the governance framework of council where responsibilities are shared according to their function.

46.    An explanatory note was published in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 where the allocation of decision-making responsibility to the Governing Body and local boards are set out. It states that:

“the decision-making of local boards in relation to local parks may be constrained where decisions relate to council stormwater management activities, including the stormwater network” (Volume 2, p.284).

47.    Where decisions are for non-regulatory activities such as local park improvements, place shaping, and community events this decision-making sits with the local board. Where the decision-making relates to functional and operational stormwater purposes these decisions are managed by the Healthy Waters department (delegated from the Governing Body).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

48.    In May and July 2021, mana whenua hui were held to discuss the proposed actions for land held under the LGA described in Attachment A and land held under the RA described in Attachment B.

49.    The first hui was attended by a representative from Ngaati Whanaunga and written feedback was later provided by a representative from Te Kawerau ā Maki. The second hui in July was attended by representatives from Ngaati Whanaunga, Te Ākitai Waiohua and Ngāti Maru.

50.    These representatives were supportive of most classifications but sought greater alignment with the natural values associated with land adjoining water bodies at three parks as listed in Table 3 below.

Table 3: Amendments to classifications requested by mana whenua representatives

Reserve name

Appellation

Proposed classification

Preferred classification

9 Boundary Road (Hobsonville)

Lot 9 DP 511649

Recreation

Local purpose (esplanade)

Canaveral Drive Reserve

Lot 104 DP 326799, Lot 102 DP 351982, Lot 104 DP 373988

Recreation

Local purpose (esplanade)

Rawiri Stream Reserve

Section 2 & 5 SO 511858, Section 2, 3, 7 & 10 SO 490597

Retain under the LGA

Local purpose (esplanade)

 

51.    These amendments are supported by staff and reflected in our recommendations, as enabling the recreational use of land adjoining water bodies is one of the purposes of esplanade reserves. 

52.    Legal advice was considered in relation to 9 Boundary Road Reserve and the proposed development of marine recreation facilities. The classification of local purpose (esplanade) is considered appropriate as the proposed development does not intend to restrict public access and the land should be viewed as forming part of the contiguous line of council esplanade reserves around the peninsula.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

53.    This report has no financial implications for the local board. The costs for public notices and gazette notices for the classifications will be covered through existing departmental budgets.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

54.    The following table outlines relevant risks and mitigations associated with the actions for land held under the LGA and RA contained in this report.

Risk

Mitigation

Perception that land held under the LGA is at risk of sale or disposal

Emphasise the restrictions on disposal of parks under Section 138 of the LGA and the requirement to undertake consultation, including prior to granting leases for more than six months.

RA classifications constrain the range of uses that land can be used for

Recommendations reflect current and likely future use of each individual parcel and do not add additional restrictions.

The lack of submissions on the proposals that were notified mean no additional risks around the range of uses contemplated have been identified.

 

55.    The revocation of parts of previous resolutions is intended to ensure reserve land is correctly classified under the relevant section of the RA and according to its primary purpose to avoid any future issues.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

56.    Once the local board has approved the classification actions, the next steps are:

·    publish notice in the local newspaper for the parcels requiring public notification (for at least one calendar month)

·    report back to the local board in December 2021 to address any submissions and confirm classification proposals that were publicly notified

·    arrange gazette notices for the classifications. Approval of gazette notices has delegated from the Minister of Conservation to the General Manager Community Facilities. A report will be prepared approval for the gazette notices

·    reflect updates to the classifications in the draft Upper Harbour Local Parks Management Plan

·    ensure all classifications are correctly recorded on council’s databases.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Proposal to declare and classify under s.14(1) of the Reserves Act 1977

69

b

Parcels to be classified under s.16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977

71

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jessica Morris - Service and Asset Planner

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

Approval for new private road names at 153 and 155 Clark Road, Hobsonville

File No.: CP2021/14887

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To approve four new private road names created by way of the approved land use consent for the Metlifecare Retirement Village at 153 and 155 Clark Road, Hobsonville.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider / developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for local board approval.

3.      On behalf of the applicant and developer, Metlifecare Limited, agent Louis Venter from Harrison Grierson has submitted the names below for the consideration of the local board.

4.      The proposed road name options have been assessed against the guidelines and the Australian and New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing (AS NZS 4819:2011) and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 (LINZ OP G 01245) and the LINZ guideline for addressing in retirement villages (LINZG80700). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity.

5.      Mana whenua have been consulted in the manner required by these guidelines.

6.      The proposed names for the four new private roads are:                                                     

Reference

Name

12

Pipi Lane (preference)

Toropapa Lane (alternative)

Moho Pererū Lane (alternative)

13

Shellbank Lane (preference)

Tuna Lane (alternative)

Te toi uku Lane (alternative)

14

Māpere Lane (preference)

Mioweka Lane (alternative)  

Pūkaki Lane (alternative)

16

Kahakaha Lane (preference)

Tahatika Lane (alternative)

Tapātai Lane (alternative)

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve the following names for four new private roads created by way of the approved land use consent for the Metlifecare Retirement Village at 153 and 155 Clark Road, Hobsonville:

i)        Pipi Lane (road 12)

ii)       Shellbank Lane (road 13)

iii)      Māpere Lane (road 14)

iv)      Kahakaha Lane (road 16).

Horopaki

Context

7.      Resource consent BUN60337440 (land use consent reference number LUC60337362) was issued in June 2020 for the construction of the MetlifeCare Retirement Village.

8.      Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachment A to the agenda report.

9.      In accordance with the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the guidelines) and standards, any private roads within a retirement village require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering which will enable all units in the retirement village to be readily located.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.    The guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region. The guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for local board approval.

11.    The guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·        a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area

·        a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature

·        an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

12.    The Metlifecare Limited (the applicant) has chosen names that reflect the natural environment that surrounds the locality and the ‘Clark family’ who have had a significant presence in the area. The retirement village is located at Orion Point in Hobsonville.

13.    The applicant has proposed the names set out in the following table:

Reference

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

12

Pipi Lane (preference)

Māori name for a type of shellfish

Toropapa Lane (alternative)

A small evergreen shrub endemic to New Zealand

Moho Pererū Lane (alternative)

Māori name for the banded rail, a native New Zealand bird that inhabits wetlands

13

Shellbank Lane (preference)

Reference to a unique geological formation that can be found along the Auckland coastline

Tuna Lane (alternative)

Māori word for ‘eel’

Te toi uku Lane (alternative)

Meaning ‘the art of clay’ in Māori, this pays homage to the legacy of the Clark family at Orion Point

14

Māpere Lane (preference)

A common name for gahnia setifolia, giant gahnia or razor sedge which is a native sedge of New Zealand found throughout the North Island

Mioweka Lane (alternative)

Māori name for the banded rail, a native New Zealand bird that inhabits wetlands

Pūkaki Lane (alternative)

Māori word for ‘stream’, referring to the existing stream at Orion Point

16

Kahakaha Lane (preference)

Perching lily (collospermum hastatum) - a native plant with long, broad, tufted, grass-like leaves with black leaf bases and arranged in fans - grows in trees, on rocks or on the ground

Tahatika Lane (alternative)

Māori word for ‘riverbank’, referring to the existing banks of the stream at Orion Point

Tapātai Lane (alternative)

Māori word for ‘coastline’, referring to the location Orion Point in relation to the coastline

14.    All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the guidelines and the standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity. It is therefore, for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

15.    Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

16.    ‘Lane’ is an acceptable road type for the new private roads, suiting the form and layout of the private roads.

17.    Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in paragraph 21 below.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.    The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.    The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.    The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.    To aid local board decision-making, the guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

22.    The road names proposed in this report have been provided to all mana whenua by council for their consideration. In this instance, no replies were received.

23.    The level of feedback received from mana whenua is often dependent on the scale of the development and its level of significance.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.    The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

25.    The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.    There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.    Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand-wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site plan - 153 and 155 Clark Road

81

b

Location map - 153 and 155 Clark Road

83

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dale Rewa - Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

PDF Creator



Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

Local board input to Auckland Council's feedback on the Three Waters reform proposal by the New Zealand Government

File No.: CP2021/15169

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To receive the Upper Harbour Local Board’s input to Auckland Council’s feedback on the Three Waters reform proposal by the New Zealand Government.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      For the past four years, the government has been exploring the challenges and opportunities facing the three waters system.

3.      Central government is seeking to address a complex set of issues relating to the regulation, funding, financing, and provision of drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater services (the three waters), and to deliver better outcomes for New Zealand’s people, environment, and economy.

4.      The Three Waters reform proposes a comprehensive, system-wide change that aims to improve the safety, quality, and environmental performance of three water services. Central government is proposing to establish four publicly-owned entities to take responsibility for drinking water, wastewater and stormwater infrastructure across New Zealand.

5.      In June 2021, central government released its case for change, the key design features of a new water services system (including the number of entities, boundaries, the regulatory environment and governance arrangements) and information and analysis specific to individual councils.

6.      Auckland Council was given the opportunity to provide feedback on the Three Waters reform proposal in September 2021 and approval of the Auckland Council’s submission was resolved by the Governing Body at its 23 September 2021 business meeting.

7.      Formal feedback from local boards to inform the council’s submission was due before or on the 10 September 2021. The was required in order to meet the deadlines for the Governing Body meeting.

8.      As the Upper Harbour Local Board’s September business meeting was scheduled for 16 September 2021, the local board could not resolve its feedback by the 10 September deadline at a business meeting.

9.      The local board’s formal feedback was agreed by the local board and approved by the Upper Harbour Local Board Chairperson using the following delegation process:

13

Local board feedback for inclusion in Auckland Council submissions

 

Resolution number UH/2020/47

MOVED by Member N Mayne, seconded by Member A Atkinson:  

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      delegate authority to the chairperson to approve the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, parliament, select committees and other councils, where timeframes do not allow for local board input to be considered and approved at a local board meeting.

b)      restate resolution number UH/2019/138 b) iv) from the local board business meeting on 21 November 2019 as follows:

b)     agree to establish topic area leads to effectively and efficiently manage some aspects of the governance work of the local board for the 2019-2022 triennium, and confirm that topic area leads will:

iv)    lead the development of local board feedback on regional policies, plans and strategies relevant to the topic area and report back to the full local board for approval.

c)      note all local input approved and submitted for inclusion in an Auckland Council submission is to be included on the next local board meeting agenda for the public record.

CARRIED

 

10.    A copy of the Upper Harbour Local Board formal feedback, submitted on 9 September 2021, is available under Attachment A of this agenda report.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the Upper Harbour Local Board’s input to Auckland Council’s feedback on the Three Waters reform proposal by the New Zealand Government.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board’s input to Auckland Council’s feedback on the Three Waters reform proposal by the New Zealand Government

87

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rita Bento-Allpress - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

Local board members' reports - October 2021

File No.: CP2021/14897

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      An opportunity for members to provide an update on projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

[Note: This is an information item and if the local board wishes any action to be taken under this item, a written report must be provided for inclusion on the agenda.]

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal and written local board members’ reports.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Max Wilde - Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

Record of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 9 and 23 September, and 7 October 2021

File No.: CP2021/14896

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      Upper Harbour Local Board workshops were held on Thursday, 9 and 23 September, and 7 October 2021. Copies of the workshop records are attached (refer to Attachments A, B and C).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the records of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 9 and 23 September, and 7 October 2021 (refer to Attachments A, B and C to the agenda report).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 9 September 2021

93

b

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 23 September 2021

95

c

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 7 October 2021

97

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Max Wilde - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

Governance forward work calendar

File No.: CP2021/14891

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To present the updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The governance forward work calendar for the Upper Harbour Local Board is in Attachment A to the agenda report. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.      The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·      ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·      clarifying what advice is expected and when

·      clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.      The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the Upper Harbour Local Board governance forward work calendar

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board governance forward work calendar

101

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Max Wilde - Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Supporting information from the Hobsonville Point Residents Society regarding application for landowner approval                 Page 105


Upper Harbour Local Board

21 October 2021

 

 

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[1] https://www.doc.govt.nz/Documents/about-doc/role/legislation/reserves-act-guide.pdf