I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 23 November 2021

2.00pm

This meeting will be held remotely and a recording

of the meeting will be available on:

https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/meetings-council-bodies/Pages/webcasts-council-meetings.aspx

 

Kōmiti Aromātai Whakahaere Kaupapa Kei Raro I

Te Maru O te Kaunihera / Council Controlled

Organisation Oversight Committee

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

Chairperson

Deputy Mayor Cr Bill Cashmore

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Angela Dalton

 

Members

Cr Josephine Bartley

Cr Richard Hills

 

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

Cr Tracy Mulholland

 

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Cr Pippa Coom

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Chris Darby

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Alf Filipaina

IMSB Chair David Taipari

 

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

Cr John Watson

 

IMSB Member Hon Tau Henare

Cr Paul Young

 

Cr Shane Henderson

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

Duncan Glasgow

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere /
Governance Advisor

 

18 November 2021

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 890 2656

Email: duncan.glasgow@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 



 

Terms of Reference

 

Responsibilities

 

The purpose of the committee is to:

 

·         have a general overview and insight into the strategy, direction and priorities of all Council Controlled Organisations (CCO)

·         set policy relating to CCO governance

·         approve CCO Statements of Intent

·         monitor performance of CCOs and other entities in which the council has an equity interest (such as CRLL, Tāmaki Regeneration Company and Haumaru Housing).

 

Key responsibilities include:

 

·         monitoring the financial and non-financial performance targets, key performance indicators, and other measures of each CCO and the performance of each organisation

·         advising the mayor on the content of the annual Letters of Expectations (LoE) to CCOs and Ports of Auckland Limited

·         exercising relevant powers under Schedule 8 of the Local Government Act 2002, which relate to the Statements of Intent of CCOs

·         exercising relevant powers under Part 1 of the Port Companies Act 1988, which relate to the Statements of Corporate Intent for port companies

·         exercising Auckland Council’s powers as a shareholder or given under a trust deed, including but not limited to modification of constitutions and/or trust deeds, granting shareholder approval of major transactions where required, exempting CCOs, and approving policies relating to CCO and CO governance

·         approval of a work programme which includes a schedule of quarterly reporting of each CCO to balance reporting across the meetings.

 

Powers

 

(i)         All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities.

Except:

(a)          powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2)

(b)          where the committee’s responsibility is limited to making a recommendation only

(ii)        Power to establish subcommittees.

 

 

Code of conduct

 

For information relating to Auckland Council’s elected members code of conduct, please refer to this link on the Auckland Council website - https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/elected-members-remuneration-declarations-interest/Pages/elected-members-code-conduct.aspx

 

 


 

Auckland Plan Values

 

The Auckland Plan 2050 outlines a future that all Aucklanders can aspire to. The values of the Auckland Plan 2050 help us to understand what is important in that future:

 

 


 

Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·           Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·           Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·           Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·           In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·           The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·           However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·           All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·           Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·           Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·           All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·           Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·           Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·           Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 


Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

23 November 2021

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        9

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   9

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               9

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          9  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    9

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          9

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                              10

8          2021/2022 Substantive council-controlled organisation and Ports of Auckland Limited performance reports for the quarter ending 30 September 2021            11

9          CCO Review: Implementation Programme Update                                                 99

10        Liaison councillors' updates                                                                                    119

11        Summary of Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee information memoranda and briefings (including the forward work programme) - 23 November 2021                                                                                                                             121

12        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

13        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               135

C1       CONFIDENTIAL: Unsolicited Bid Guidelines - Report back of bid                      135


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 26 October 2021, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public input had been received.

 

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 

 

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

23 November 2021

 

2021/2022 Substantive council-controlled organisation and Ports of Auckland Limited performance reports for the quarter ending 30 September 2021

File No.: CP2021/14708

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a summary and comments on the substantive Council-controlled Organisation (CCO) and Ports of Auckland Limited (POAL) first quarter reports, for the period ending 30 September 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under Auckland Council’s accountability framework, each substantive Council-Controlled Organisation (CCO) must provide a quarterly report to the CCO Oversight Committee. The reports for the first quarter of 2021/2022 are contained in Attachments A to E and are measured against the updated 10-year Budget and the 2021-2024 Statements of Intent (SOIs). 

3.       Under the Memorandum of Understanding between POAL and Auckland Council, POAL is to provide a quarterly report to the council as shareholder.  The report for first quarter of 2021/2022 is contained in Attachment F.

4.       The disruption and impacts of COVID-19 and the mid-August 2021 lockdown and ongoing alert level restrictions is a theme common across the substantive CCO and POAL 2021/2022 quarter one reports.  This includes:

·     some capital delivery underspends due to alert level 4 restrictions, labour and construction material availability

·     several performance indicators not on track to meet targets - noting that a number of indicators will be calculated/measured in the last quarter of the 2021/2022 financial year

·     lower than budgeted revenues for the quarter reflecting the closure of venues and facilities, lower patronage, event cancellations etc.

5.       Council group and parent financial results will be presented at the Finance and Performance Committee meeting on 9 December 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee:

a)      receive the 2021/2022 first quarter reports of the substantive Council-controlled Organisations and Ports of Auckland Limited, provided as attachments A to F of the agenda report.

Horopaki

Context

6.       Each substantive CCO must provide a quarterly report to the Council-Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee. They are required to:

·        summarise the CCO’s performance against the approved budget and agreed targets in the 10-year Budget and statement of Intent (SOI)

·        provide a forecast of the CCO’s performance

·        identify the cause of major variances

·        highlight major achievements for the quarter

·        signal any potential or developing issues.

7.       The reports for the first quarter of 2021/2022 are contained in attachments A to E.

8.       Under the Memorandum of Understanding between POAL and Auckland Council, POAL is to provide a quarterly report to the council as shareholder.  Council and POAL have agreed a format similar to the quarterly report for substantive CCOs. The report for the first quarter of 2021/2022 is provided at attachment F.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Auckland Transport

Financial results

9.       The Chair of Auckland Transport has written a covering letter (Attachment A), which notes that the budget was prepared on the assumption of Auckland remaining at Alert Level 1 for the year.  At this stage, AT is estimating an operating deficit of around $50m for the year.  This would be significantly reduced if government provided a top-up to public transport revenues as it did for the 2020 lockdowns (it has yet to do so for the extended 2021 lockdown). 

10.     AT had a year-to-date net operating deficit of $113 million. This is $15 million unfavourable to budget mainly due to the impact of COVID-19 lockdown on revenue.

11.     Operating revenue is $28 million lower than budget mainly due to lower-than-expected public transport income and parking and enforcement revenue.

12.     Operating expenditure is $13 million lower than budget mainly due to lower public transport service contract cost, contractor maintenance, unplanned facilities maintenance, AT delivered events and training, and advertising costs.

13.     Capital delivery is $53 million lower than budget mainly driven by underspend in renewals and growth projects due to Alert Level 4 restrictions. Therefore, Waka Kotahi capital funding revenue is also $8 million lower than budget, mainly due to the delay in renewals funded delivery.

14.     Fifty-eight per cent of the capital programme was funded by the Crown, comprising Waka Kotahi co-investment and other capital grants from Crown Infrastructure Partners.

Performance against indicators

15.     Eight performance measures are on track to meet or exceed their targets, 10 are below target, and nine have not been measured to date. 

16.     Of the measures which have not achieved targets, perhaps the most concerning is in the safety area, where all three of the indicators were worse than what AT has been aiming for.  There continues to be significant delivery of the various safety programmes, especially in terms of infrastructure improvements, but also behavioural change efforts.  However, there is little commentary about the causes of the safety issues and this will be an area which the Committee can explore further at the meeting. 

17.     As would be expected, the Delta outbreak has had a very significant impact on public transport boardings, and in particular the Rapid and Frequent Network (RFN). RFN boardings decreased faster than total boardings, instead of increasing faster as per the target.  This is to be expected, given that the RFN is largely focussed on the city centre, where many workers are at home.  Obviously, with lockdown extending into Quarter Two of the financial year, it can be expected that results will continue to be impacted as the year progresses.

18.     Cycle movements past the 26 count sites have also decreased, but relatively speaking have held up well considering the impact of lockdown. 

19.     Other measures such as peak a.m. arterial productivity and service levels on the freight network are on track to exceed their annual targets.  This also would be expected given the lockdown, with many fewer vehicles on the roads. 

20.     For the first time, an additional section dedicated to AT’s response to climate change has been added.  This documents the various elements of work AT is undertaking, both in terms of organisational and construction emissions, and policy and strategy work which will set up AT for the future.  This will be a critical part of these reports in the future. 

Auckland Unlimited

Financial results

21.     Net direct expenditure has a favourable variance of $3.3m due to changes in the timing of planned expenditure, in response to the adverse revenue result driven by the current lockdown and ongoing uncertainties of future revenues.

22.     Direct revenue is $3.5m unfavourable for the quarter, due to a reduction in visitor and event revenues resulting from the COVID-19 lockdowns.  Wage subsidy receipts in the Trust have offset timing differences in other grant receipts.

23.     Direct expenditure is $6.8 million favourable due to changes in programme timing from trans-Tasman border restrictions and the resurgence of COVID-19, delays in implementation of the organisational design/target operating model and further cost controls during lockdown.

24.     Capital expenditure is $9.3m lower than budget resulting from delays in capital works due to lockdown, including the completion of the Southeast Asia Jungle Trail at the Zoo. Auckland Unlimited advises that disruptions to labour and construction material availability from COVID-19 restrictions are also impacting capital delivery.

Performance against indicators

25.     Auckland Unlimited has a total of 11 SOI measures, of which seven are Long-term Plan (LTP) measures. Nine of the 11 measures are tracked quarterly. One measure is a six-monthly measure and one is an annual measure.

26.     In quarter one, of the 11 measures, one was achieved, five are on track against the year-end target, and two are not on track as a result of COVID-19 restrictions. Three have not been measured.  The two measures that are not on track are:

·     The number of people who are issued tickets to attend Auckland Live, Auckland Zoo, Auckland Art Gallery, NZ Maritime Museum and Auckland Stadiums venues and events.  The year end target (1.44m) is now unlikely to be achieved due the extended COVID-19 restrictions and resulting venue closures.

·     The percentage of operating expenses funded through non-rates revenues.  The quarter one result (37%) is below target (44%) due to the closure of all Trust facilities on 18 August 2021. This significantly impacted revenue generated by the Trust in all brands.

27.     Highlights for quarter one include funding for Auckland Film Studios expansion in Henderson which was announced on 3 August, comprising $30m from the Government and $5m from Auckland Council, for two sound stages, workshops and offices on site.

28.     Auckland Zoo also completed its fourth consecutive year of Toitū carbon zero certification, achieving a 36 per cent absolute reduction in greenhouse gas emissions since the 2016 baseline year.

29.     The Moana Pasifika Super Rugby Team announced Mt Smart Stadium as its new home base and Elemental AKL 2021 ran successfully (14 July-1 August 2021) with more than 50 events taking place across the region. Fifteen of these events sold out.

Issues/risks

30.     Screen Auckland is identifying opportunities with potential productions following Amazon Studios’ announcement (13 August) it was moving production of its series based on The Lord of the Rings to the United Kingdom for season two.

31.     Auckland was at COVID-19 alert levels 4 and 3 from 18 August 2021, meaning the closure of all Auckland Unlimited facilities and venues, the cancellation or postponement of a range of events and no visitation to Auckland.  There are also disruptions to labour and construction material availability as a result of border closures and COVID-19 restrictions.

32.     There is also potential significant financial risk to revenue reflecting current uncertainties around: the red, amber, green framework definitions, period lengths and restriction impacts; event cancellations; uncertain visitor hesitancy/ behaviours; and also impacts of economic hardships on customers.

33.     However, the ‘Auckland is Calling’ campaign development continues in anticipation of the region being in Alert Level 2 in November/December 2021.

Eke Panuku

Financial results

34.     Eke Panuku overall capital delivery is $11.9 million lower than budget, due to the impact of COVID-19. Physical works stopped for five weeks during alert level 4 and have continued at a slower pace under alert level 3 (due to health and safety site protocols). Shortages in construction material, escalating costs and slower consenting are additional factors. The annual capital spend is now forecast to be $74m against a budget of $90m, however a more accurate forecast will be provided at the end of quarter two. 

35.     More specifically, capital spend on urban regeneration was $3.9 million, against a budget of $12.4 million. Capital spend on property management was $2.5 million against a budget of $9.5 million.

36.     Direct revenue is currently $0.3 million favourable to budget. However, in the property management area, requests from tenants for COVID-19 hardship relief are still being processed and any further lockdown extensions will increase this cost.

37.     Direct expenditure is $3.2 million favourable to budget, with lockdowns meaning that spend has been slower than anticipated. There are also a number of vacant roles within Eke Panuku, which have lowered salary costs.

Performance against indicators

38.     Eke Panuku has 11 performance measure with set targets and nine of these performance measures are currently on track. There are two performance measures around property sales that are at risk:

·    Net sales in transform and unlock areas (urban regeneration)

·    Asset recycling target (property management).

·    For both measures quarterly performance is on track, but the full year target is at risk due to uncertainty due to COVID-19 and other property market factors.

39.     Despite delays in the capital programme, Eke Panuku anticipate that capital project milestones can be met. These capital project milestones are for specified projects within both the urban regeneration and property management areas. 

Urban regeneration

40.     Urban regeneration programmes that are on track are strategic and town centre planning, strategic acquisitions and placemaking. COVID-19 has impacted the public good investment programme and the property development programme, which have an ‘at risk’ status.

41.     Highlights from urban regeneration programmes include:

·    Completion of the Te Ara Tukutuku Plan (informing Wynyard Point plan change). The council led plan change is on track for lodgement by mid-2022.

·    Engagement on the thriving town centres guidelines, for the urban regeneration of Eke Panuku town centres.

·    Placemaking events including Haumi the 10th anniversary of Wynyard Quarter, Matariki on the waterfront at Silo Park and a celebration of the Percy Vos boat shed restoration.

Property management

42.     Eke Panuku report that the residential market is still strong given high demand in Auckland for residential properties. Marina use is also high, which is reflected in an average occupancy figure of 95% for the quarter.

43.     Some commercial property tenants have lodged financial hardship requests, with more expected. Once these requests have been processed, a more accurate assessment of financial impacts can be provided.

44.     Capital delivery to maintain the property portfolio is at risk, due to impacts from COVID-19.  The asset recycling of $1.9 million is on track for the quarter but is at risk for the year (as noted above).

Watercare

Financial results

45.     The impact of COVID-19 lockdowns are evident in the lower than budgeted capital expenditure. Capital expenditure is tracking at $127.3 million against a year to date budget of $196.9 million (64.7% of planned expenditure).

46.       Watercare’s net direct revenue is $12.8 million favourable against budget.

47.     Watercare’s net direct revenue is $39.8 million favourable against budget, due to higher than budgeted infrastructure growth charges (IGCs) and revenue associated with new developments.

48.     Direct expenditure is $27 million unfavourable to budget. $17.7 million is due to COVID-19 payments, uplift in the Waikato capital programme and digital project spend. Employee costs are also higher than anticipated due to COVID-19 impacts.

Performance against indicators and other matters

49.     COVID-19 has impacted on Watercare's operations and has caused delays to Watercare’s capital programme, including the Central Interceptor, and this will impact on the completion date (now expected in the first quarter of 2026). COVID-19 has also impacted proceedings on the Waikato River Board of Inquiry (although a decision is expected by 7 January 2022, despite adjournments).

50.     Over the last quarter, Watercare successfully opened the Waikato 50 plant. Watercare are also undertaking customer insights research, and a number of customer service improvements (improved communications, addition of Google Pay and self-service online improvements). As a result their Net Promotor Score trust score has improved.

51.     Watercare is updating its Drought Management Plan (referring to national and international learnings, and lessons learnt from the recent drought). This includes a review of communication with customers and with council. The Watercare website has been updated to include a wider perspective on the water supply situation beyond the dams and to provide more transparency around the water use restrictions and potential trigger levels.

 

52.     Watercare has a total of 27 SOI measures (14 are also LTP measures).  Twenty-two measures are measured on a quarterly basis. Of these, 21 measures have been met. One SOI measure continues to not be achieved – attendance at sewerage overflows. Watercare notes that improvements should be seen over the coming months due to increased staffing and training.

53.     The percentage of real water loss from the local authority's networked reticulation system (12-month rolling average) has not been measured for the period due to insufficient data, with meters not being read during Alert Level 4 lockdown. Watercare has completed its assessment of economic level of leakage. Staff recommend that this work is shared with council.

54.     Two measures are yearly measures (debt to revenue ration and engagement with mana whenua) and are reported on annually. Watercare commentary notes that these are on track against the year-end target. One measure is six-monthly (average asset age) and was not measured in this quarter.

Ports of Auckland Limited

Key Strategic Objectives

55.     POAL has reported on three key strategic areas.

56.     Safety and wellbeing: POAL report 17 of the 45 CHASNZ recommendations have been completed. Due to COVID-19 restrictions the target dates for nine recommendations have been pushed back as they require face-to-face engagement or outsourcing capability to complete. POAL is still on target to have all CHASNZ recommendations completed by 30 June 2022.

57.     Recover container terminal productivity: POAL are below productivity targets for ship rate and crane rate. Container volumes are also below target but steadily improving. Following the fatality in August 2020, POAL reduced staff work hours effectively creating a staff shortage. To address this POAL has committed to recruiting and training staff to return to higher productivity.

58.     Straddle carrier automation: A safety fix for the June 2021 incident is complete and has been successfully tested on the automated straddles. Work is also being done to ensure straddle operators are informed and trained in the new operation of the enhanced manual straddles. The ongoing COVID-19 lockdown means it will not be possible to go live with full terminal roll-out by end March 2022 as initially hoped, however POAL are still on schedule to deliver full terminal roll out before the end of the financial year on June 30.

Financial results

59.     Of the six key finance performance targets, four are on track and two are only just below target.

60.     Port Operations Revenue is favourable to budget driven by multi-cargo and subsidiaries. Container terminal volume is down 10% on budget, while revenue is only down 3% on budget.

61.     Direct operation costs are unfavourable to budget by $1.1m, which is largely wage related. Indirect expenses are favourable to budget by $0.9m, with most indirect costs tracking below budget, in particular salaries, which is under budget by $0.7m due to vacancies.

62.     Capital delivery spend for the quarter was $5.1m against a budget of $13.0m, down due to the lockdown.

63.     Underlying profit is forecast at $20.9m, above budget by $0.3m and below the Statement of Corporate Intent (SCI) target by $0.1m.

64.     POAL are still forecasting a final dividend in line with the $2.1m target.

Performance against indicators

65.     Of a total of 11 non-financial key performance targets, seven are on track and three have not been met or are not on track. The remining target is an absolute emission reduction target which is measured and reported on at year end. 

66.     Nine Lost Time Injuries (LTIs) were recorded in quarter one versus two LTIs in quarter one last year. With 17 in total last year, it is already impossible for POAL to achieve the 50% reduction target. POAL addressed the high number of LTIs at the Governing Body meeting in October and noted that they are undertaking research to better understand any trends and are looking at potential training sessions to address the increased LTIs.

67.     Crane rate is 24.1 which is just below the 25 target. POAL have a major focus to achieve improvements. Ship rate is 46 which is well below the 62.5 target, but POAL note that this will improve once crane rates improve.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

68.     The quarterly performance reports are a key tool to monitor the progress of each CCO in action on climate change.  The CCOs quarterly reports contain commentary on activities relating to climate change.

69.     Auckland Transport has included a new Climate Change page in its quarterly report (Attachment B, p17).  This covers AT’s greenhouse gas emissions performance, its role in the Transport Emissions Reduction Plan, reducing emissions from the bus fleet and construction, and its risk assessment of the impacts of climate change for AT’s business.  Devoting a page of its quarterly reporting to climate change in this way is a welcome addition to the report, and reflects and supports the seriousness with which AT’s Chair, other board members, and senior executives are treating this challenge, as reflected in their commentary in recent workshops with councillors on the Annual Budget. 

70.     Auckland Unlimited note that a governance group, chaired by the Mayor, has been formed in preparation of approaching central government for funding of the 9ha Eco Park in Mangere.  A project plan to launch the Climate Innovation Hub by June 2022 has been developed and a recruitment process to hire dedicated staff has started. The Auckland Unlimited Chief Executive and Director Investment and Industry met with the Minister of Climate Change to provide an overview of the hub and seek endorsement and support of the planned hub from government.

71.     Eke Panuku is a Toitū carbon reduce certified organisation, committed to measuring and managing its greenhouse gases and publicly reporting on them.  Its emissions are audited and reported on annually by Toitū NZ.

72.     Watercare note that there has been a 10 per cent increase in emissions from last year. This is due to expanded reporting and three of the four co-generation gas engines being brought back on-stream. These gas engines will be phased out between 2024-28. Watercare have launched their Water Efficiency Plan and have been working with council on the Auckland Water Strategy.

73.     POAL commenced their Sustainable Procurement Strategy, which will help deliver on climate related targets and support the zero-waste target. It will also enable POAL to realise social impact opportunities through procurement choices. A key requirement for the strategy is to assist in achieving the significant Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi) supplier target by 2025. This target states that 67% of suppliers (measured by emissions) shall be measuring and reporting their emissions and themselves also have targets equivalent to that of SBTi.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

74.     Each CCOs quarterly report contains information on how they are contributing to the council’s outcomes and objectives.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

75.     The governance of substantive CCOs and POAL is a responsibility delegated to the CCO Oversight Committee. We have not sought the views of local boards. CCOs provide six-monthly progress and performance reports to local boards. The quarterly reports also provide a summary of the engagement that CCOs have carried out with local boards during the quarter.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

76.     Each CCO reports on their contribution towards achieving Māori Outcomes in their quarterly report.

77.     There has been a significant amount of work by Auckland Transport in this space (page 9 of its quarterly report). Te reo Māori is being progressively added to signage and announcements across the public transport network. A number of marae safety programmes are underway, at various stages (investigation through to construction), and several road safety programmes and drivers’ licence programmes have been delivered.  The report records the various engagements with mana whenua relating to specific project. The work being done internally by AT to promote Māori responsiveness internally is outlined in detail. 

78.     The Auckland Unlimited Māori Outcomes Plan is being finalised. Next steps are to have the plan approved by the Auckland Unlimited Board, and engagement with mana whenua and the Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB) to ensure that it delivers on desired outcomes for Māori.

79.     Eke Panuku have continued engagement with mana whenua partners on projects across the business. This includes technical expertise provided on the Te Ara Tukutuku Plan, public art strategy for Manukau and the draft town centre guidelines. Six properties have been presented to mana whenua as commercial opportunities.

80.     Watercare has released its Māori Outcomes Plan, which aligns with Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau. Watercare will be presenting this to iwi and mana whenua partners over the next quarter. They have also increased staffing in their new Māori Outcomes and Relationships Unit, and this combined with their plan will play a key role in delivering to the Three Waters Reform objectives.

81.     POAL met with the head of Ngā Mātārae and the General Manager Advisory and Performance for IMSB to discuss the ambition and applicability of the proposed Māori Outcomes Framework milestones and timeline. From this engagement revised milestones were agreed. The work required to complete the Māori Outcomes Plan by end of this financial year is significant but achievable.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

82.     Each of the CCOs and POAL’s quarterly reports contain information regarding their financial performance.

83.     Council group and parent financial results will be presented at the Finance and Performance Committee meeting on 9 December 2021.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

84.     The substantive CCO quarterly reports provide a summary of the top risks and mitigations. This supports more detailed quarterly reporting to the Audit and Risk Committee.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

85.     This report is primarily for information purposes. The next CCO quarterly reports for the period ending 31 December 2021 will be provided to the CCO Oversight Committee in February 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Transport Chair covering letter, Quarter One report 2021/2022

21

b

Auckland Transport Quarter One report 2021/2022

23

c

Auckland Unlimited Quarter One report 2021/2022

41

d

Eke Panuku Quarter One report 2021/2022

51

e

Watercare Quarter One report 2021/2022

71

f

Ports of Auckland Limited Quarter One report 2021/2022

89

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Johnstone-Smith - Principal Advisor

Claire Gomas - Principal Advisor

Edward Siddle - Principal Advisor

Rachel Wilson - Principal Advisor

Chris Levet - Principal Advisor

Authoriser

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

 


Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

23 November 2021

 

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23 November 2021

 

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Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

23 November 2021

 

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Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

23 November 2021

 

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Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

23 November 2021

 

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Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

23 November 2021

 

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Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

23 November 2021

 

CCO Review: Implementation Programme Update

File No.: CP2021/16043

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the monthly update on the implementation of the Council-controlled Organisations (CCO) Review (the Review).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Review investigated the effectiveness of the council’s CCO model; whether the council has adequate accountability measures and is using them effectively, and accountability to Māori and the public; and CCO culture.

3.       There continues to be good progress overall implementing the recommendations of the Review. Overall, 17 of the 64 recommendations are fully implemented. 

4.       Implementation of 38 recommendations are underway and many are well advanced.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee:

a)      receive the update on the implementation programme for the Council-controlled Organisations Review.

Horopaki

Context

5.       The independent panel highlighted that their recommendations are interrelated and should be considered as a package. Implementation of recommendations is about improving accountability to the community and the council. The focus is on increasing collaboration and trust across the group.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       Seventeen of the 64 recommendations of the Review are now fully implemented.

7.       Implementation is underway for 38 of the Review’s 64 recommendations and many are well advanced.

8.       Scoping of two recommendations has been completed recently and they are now underway:

·    Auckland Unlimited is working with MOTAT to explore how the Review recommendation 3b[1] can be implemented in practice and have agreed a process to carry out an examination of the options and the matters to be considered, with an aim to have an appropriate model for council’s consideration by the end of June 2022.

·    Work is underway for the council organisation to assume responsibility from Eke Panuku for the process to support decision making by elected members on which non-service properties to sell (excluding unlock and transform areas) (Recommendation 11).

9.       Six recommendations have not progressed to or beyond scoping at this stage but will be initiated in 2021/2022.

10.     Eight recommendations have a RAG status of Amber and one has a RAG status of Red, due to delay against timeframes.

Chart 1: Status of review recommendations

Note, there are 65 recommendations recorded in the chart as recommendation 3 on a) the Museum and b) MOTAT is split into two for reporting purposes.

Recent progress

11.     Recent progress on the implementation programme is summarised below. Commentary on each recommendation is provided in Attachment A.

Auckland Unlimited

12.     Together Auckland Unlimited and Eden Park Trust are exploring joint operating models for Auckland’s four stadiums. The current phase focusses on critical areas such as financials, structure and asset management. Due to the commercial nature of these conversations, updates on the work is being provided in confidential workshops for this committee. The next workshop is schedule in December 2021.

Auckland Transport

13.     Auckland Transport and council staff have established a joint project team to address the recommendation that bylaw-making powers are clearly delineated between the two organisations. The current and future state analyses are complete. Actions have been identified which will be refined over November 2021.

14.     Auckland Transport undertook a design sprint to review its project development processes for small projects. Work is progressing to implement the improvements. A design sprint is being prepared to look at opportunities for speeding up delivery and managing the effect on customers from temporary traffic management on construction sites.

 

15.     As part of work to support streamlined funding processes a draft Memorandum of Understanding has been prepared to cover the process for ensuring Auckland Transport receives its targeted National Land Transport Fund allocation, and for substituting projects if required.

Eke Panuku

16.     Work is underway for the council organisation to assume responsibility for the process to support decision making by elected members on which non-service properties to sell. This excludes unlock and transform areas which will remain the responsibility of Eke Panuku.

Watercare

17.     Watercare continues to support the overall development of the water strategy. Workshops on the strategy with the Environment and Climate Change Committee are continuing through November 2021.

18.     Watercare has confirmed the next asset management plan update will be provided to council by the end of June 2022 and work is progressing with Auckland Transport on its approach. 

19.     Council, Auckland Transport and Watercare have appointed a project manager to drive the Better Faster Consents project.

Accountability

20.     Work is underway to establish a group approach for reporting on climate change risk management. The first phase of work is to develop group climate scenario parameters.

21.     The water strategy and strategic stadium work are underway, which together with economic development, were the strategies recommended by the Review. There has been further work across the group to identify and review prioritised topics where more strategic direction is needed by CCOs.

22.     Future improvements to the group strategic planning function are being addressed as phase 2 of the group strategic planning project. An online workshop to support the development of letters of expectation was held between CCO chairs and chief executives and the CCO Oversight Committee on 10 November 2021.

23.     Visits have been booked for the CCO Oversight Committee to meet with each CCO in 2021 to build understanding of its business and culture and to informally build relationships. The visit to Watercare took place in early August. Sessions with Auckland Transport in October and Auckland Unlimited in November were online due to current COVID-19 restrictions. The final online session of 2021, with Eke Panuku, is planned for 16 November.

24.     A workshop with the CCO Oversight Committee is planned to scope issues to be addressed in the updated no surprises policy about the sharing of information between CCOs and the council.

Culture

25.     Governance Fundamentals modules for inducting new staff were launched in October 2021. Places on the first cohort commencing in November 2021 (and ongoing cohorts) will be offered to CCO staff.

26.     CCOs have provided examples of updated executive positions descriptions include requirements about collaborating with the council, following council directions and meeting council expectations.

27.     CCOs and council have shared current practice to complaint handling and reporting. CCO and council staff agreed in November 2021 a base template to use for reporting trends in the type of formal complaints, actuals for the statement of intent complaints KPI and insights. The information can also be used in CCO quarterly performance reports.

28.     NZIER has provided a review report on the Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited and Eke Panuku selection of reports (Watercare do not report). This gives CCOs first-time feedback about papers going to council governing body, committees and local boards. CCO staff attended feedback sessions for authors and authorisers in November 2021.

29.     Following the communication of the 2021 Elected Members Survey results, analysis of the findings from focus groups has been completed and the research report is currently being finalised.

30.     To support the approach to shared services a feasibility assessment is underway across back-office functions at Eke Panuku, Auckland Unlimited and the council. Engagement starts with Auckland Transport functions in November 2021. Engagement with Watercare functions has been parked on agreement with the Watercare Board and the Shared Service Governance Group, pending decisions on the three waters reform. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     Climate impacts are considered through the implementation of individual recommendations.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

32.     The council group is working collectively to implement the recommendations of the Review.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

33.     Local impacts and local board views are considered when implementing individual recommendations.

34.     CCOs are working with local boards to implement recommendations to improve local board engagement, implementation of local projects and community consultation (see recommendations 34, 6, 53).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     The Review made seven recommendations to improve the use of mechanisms to ensure CCOs meet their obligation to Māori at governance, senior management and staff levels. Ngā Mātārae have been convening staff from council, CCOs and the Independent Māori Statutory Board secretariat to progress the recommendations.

36.     Independent Māori Statutory Board and Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum secretariats are in the process of developing guidance material for the approval of the Board and Forum to explain their respective roles and how CCOs should engage with each entity.

37.     All CCOs have undertaken work to align their plans that set out commitments to Māori to the new Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau Outcomes Framework. Auckland Unlimited approved a new Māori outcomes plan for the merged entity in October 2021.

38.     All CCOs have included the need to contribute to Māori outcomes in staff position descriptions.

39.     The council/ CCO chief executives’ group has initiated a quarterly meeting with the Independent Māori Statutory Board chief executive focused on Māori outcomes. The secretariats of the Independent Māori Statutory Board and the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum are scoping areas in their respective work programmes where they can work together and with CCOs. The Auckland Unlimited board met with Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum in November 2021.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

40.     There is no financial impact from the committee receiving this report on the implementation programme for the Review.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

41.     The current COVID-19 restrictions are continuing to impact on the speed on implementation and milestone timeframes for some recommendations. However, no major impacts across the programme have been reported.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     CCOs report on their contribution to implementing the Review in their quarterly reporting to the CCO Oversight Committee.

43.     Updates on the Review programme will be provided regularly at the CCO Oversight Committee meetings.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

CCO review implementation - progress by recommendation

105

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Trudi Fava - CCO Programme Lead

Authoriser

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

 


Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

23 November 2021

 

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Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

23 November 2021

 

Liaison councillors' updates

File No.: CP2021/16190

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To receive an update from liaison councillors to the boards of Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In February 2020, the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee resolved to establish the role of a CCO liaison councillor (Resolution number CCO/2020/3).

3.       The key purpose of the liaison councillor role is to develop trusting relationships with the CCOs, to allow a better exchange of information. Liaison councillors can act as a key point of contact when specific issues arise, and provide advice when issues are likely to be of high public interest. They can provide the CCO with Governing Body perspectives which may help board decision-making, while at the same time being able to provide Governing Body colleagues with information about the rationale and detail of board decisions.

4.       Liaison councillors are required to regularly report verbally to the CCO Oversight Committee, or in writing if unavailable to attend in person, about activities undertaken in the role and issues arising.

5.       Liaison councillors are allocated to each CCO as follows:

·        Auckland Transport: Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore and Cr Chris Darby

·        Auckland Unlimited: Cr Richard Hills and Cr John Watson

·        Eke Panuku Development Auckland: Cr Efeso Collins

·        Watercare: Cr Linda Cooper.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee:

a)      receive the updates from liaison councillors to the Council Controlled Organisations.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Duncan Glasgow - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

 


Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

23 November 2021

 

Summary of Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee information memoranda and briefings (including the forward work programme) - 23 November 2021

File No.: CP2021/16186

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A.

2.       To receive a summary and provide a public record of memoranda or briefing papers that may have been held or been distributed to Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee members.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This is a regular information-only report which aims to provide greater visibility of information circulated to Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee members via memoranda/briefings or other means, where no decisions are required.

4.       The following information items have been distributed:

Date

Subject

9/11/2021

Information paper: Stakeholder Insights programme - Eke Panuku

 

5.       The following workshops/briefings have taken place:

Date

Subject

8/11/2021

Confidential Workshop: Auckland Unlimited – virtual site visit

10/11/2021

Confidential Workshop: Letters of Expectation

16/11/2021

Confidential Workshop: Eke Panuku – virtual site visit

 

6.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary.  Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee members should direct any questions to the authors.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee:

a)      tuhi / note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A of the agenda report.

b)      tūtohi / receive the Summary of Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee information memoranda and briefings – 23 November 2021.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Forward Work Programme

123

b

Information paper: Stakeholder Insights programme - Eke Panuku

129

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Duncan Glasgow - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

 


Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

23 November 2021

 

 

Kōmiti Aromātai Whakahaere Kaupapa Kei Raro I Te Maru O te Kaunihera / CCO Oversight Committee
Forward Work Programme 2021

This committee deals with the performance monitoring of CCOs and other entities in which the council has an equity interest. The committee are to have a general overview and insight into the strategy, direction and priorities of all CCOs, set policy relating to CCO governance and approve the CCO statements of intent.

The full terms of reference can be found here: Terms of Reference - Agreed 12 November 2019

 

Area of work and Lead Department

Reason for work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Expected timeframes

Highlight the month(s) this is expected to come to committee in 2021

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

CCO Review Updates

CCO Governance and External Partnerships

As per the CCO Review: Terms of Reference, agreed by the Governing Body in November 2019 (Resolution number: GB/2019/127), an independent review panel conducted a review of Auckland Council’s Substantive Council-Controlled Organisations.

The recommendations from the CCO Review report were received by the Governing Body on 27 August 2020 (Resolution number: GB/2020/89).

It was agreed that that the implementation team report on the programme and proposed approach timing to the CCO Oversight Committee within three months, and that progress reports on the programme implementation were to be provided to the CCO Oversight Committee every six months.

To receive updates on the implementation and progression of the 64 summary recommendations of the CCO Review

Progress to date:

A programme update was received in February 2020

The CCO Review was received by the Governing Body on 27 August 2020.

An update by way of memorandum was provided in November 2020.

An update was received in February 2021.

An update by way of memorandum was provided in March 2021.

Updates were received in May 2021, June 2021, August 2021, September 2021 and October 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liaison Councillor Updates

CCO Governance and External Partnerships

Mayor Phil Goff has appointed a list of six CCO liaison councillors to attend the board meetings of the CCOs allocated to them, and report back to this committee. 

To receive updates from the CCO Liaison Councillors.
Progress to date:

Principals and draft protocols for the liaison councillor role were agreed in February 2020

Updates were provided in September, October and November 2020.

Updates were provided in September, October and November 2020.

Updates were provided in May 2021, June 2021, August 2021, September 2021 and October 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quarterly, Half-Year and Annual Reports

CCO Governance and External Partnerships

Under the LGA and LGACA the council must regularly undertake performance monitoring of the CCO to evaluate its contribution to meeting its objectives, and the desired results identified in the SOI.

Receive quarterly reports, receive and adopt half yearly and annual reports.  The CCOs will present to the CCO Oversight committee twice a year on their performance.

Progress to date:

First quarter reports were received for substantive council-controlled organisations in December 2019, and December 2020.

Second quarter reports received for substantive council-controlled organisations in March 2020, and March 2021

Third quarter reports were scheduled for June 2020; however this meeting was cancelled due to COVID-19; received in May 2021.

Fourth quarter reports were received for substantive council-controlled organisations September 2020, and September 2021.

The Ports of Auckland Limited Interim Report for the six months ending 31 December 2020 were received in March 2021, annual report received in October 2021.

Annual reports for non-substantive CCOs received in October 2021.

 

First quarter reports for substantive council-controlled organisations will be received in November 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stadiums Strategy

CCO Governance and External Partnerships

A workshop was requested following Auckland Unlimited’s presentation of its strategic work programme on 27 April 2021.

To receive information on Auckland Unlimited’s ‘what’s best for Auckland’ position on stadium investment and business case for a single stadium operator as well as advice on options to move forward. 

Third confidential workshop scheduled for December.

Report to committee early 2022

Progress to date:

Confidential Workshop held 7 July 2021.

Confidential Workshop held September 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Letters of Expectation

CCO Governance and External Partnerships

Council issues an annual letter of expectations to each of its substantive CCOs to inform the development of the CCOs’ Statements of Intent.

Seeking committee approval of the content of draft 2021/2022 letters of expectation.

A report will be provided in December 2021.

Progress to date:

Confidential Workshop held 10 November 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Completed

Area of Work

Committee Role

(decision and/or direction)

Decision

Letters of Expectation

Seeking committee approval of the content of draft 2020/21 letters of expectation.

Decision to approve content of 2020/2021 letters of expectation, authority delegated to mayor to finalise and issue the letters, 12 December 2019.

(Link to decision CCO/2019/2)

CCO AGM Resolutions

To delegate the authority to Auckland Council’s chief executive to act as Auckland Council’s shareholder representative to execute a written resolution in lieu of an annual meeting. 

Decision to delegate authority to council’s chief executive to act as council’s shareholder representation to the substantive council-controlled organisations and also Tāmaki Regeneration Company and City Rail Link Limited and sign written resolutions

(Link to decision CCO/2019/3)

Final SOIs

Seeking committee approval of final 2020/21 Statements of Intent from its substantive and non-substantive CCOs.

Decision to approve the 2020-2023 statements of intent, 22 September 2020.

(Link to decision CCO/2020/10)

Haumaru Housing – End of year results

Haumaru Housing will report to CCO Oversight Committee once a year to discuss performance and end of year results.

Results presented in a workshop, 21 October 2020.

City Rail Link Limited (CRLL) – end of year results

CRLL reports quarterly as part of the group report to the Finance and Performance Committee. CRLL will present to the CCO Oversight Committee twice a year to discuss performance and end of year results.

Results presented in a workshop, 21 October 2020.

Tamaki Regeneration Company (TRC) - End of year results

TRC will report to CCO Oversight Committee once a year to discuss performance and end of year results.

Results presented in a workshop, 21 October 2020.

Merged Entity – new name

To approve the new name for the merged entity resulting from the amalgamation of RFAL and ATEED.

Decision to approve name of merged entity, 27 October 2020.

(Link to decision CCO/2020/17)

Legacy CCO Review

To agree a set of criteria that will guide a review of Auckland Council’s legacy CCOs and the sequence of their review.

Decision to approve a review of the status of non-substantive CCOs and framework, 27 October 2020.

(Link to decision CCO/2020/21)

Auckland Unlimited Final SOI

To approve a statement of intent for the new merged entity, Auckland Unlimited, resulting from the amalgamation covering the period 1 December 2020 to 30 June 2021.

Decision to approve a statement of intent for the new merged entity, Auckland Unlimited, 24 November 2020.

(Link to decision CCO/2020/27)

Ports of Auckland statement of corporate intent

To consider POAL’s final statement of corporate intent.

Draft statement of corporate intent received by the Governing Body, 27 August 2020.

Decision to approve POAL’s final statement of corporate intent 2020-2023, 8 December 2020. (Link to decision CCO/2020/33)

Te Puru Community Charitable Trust Organisation – extension of exemption

To approve Te Puru’s extension to the exemption from council-controlled organisation requirements under the Local Government Act 2002.

Decision to extend the Trust’s exemption, 23 February 2021.

(Link to decision CCO/2021/5)

Draft SOIs

To approve proposed shareholder comments on substantive and non-substantive CCO draft 2021/2024 Statements of Intent.

Decision to note recommended comments, focus of the feedback and feedback received at committee, and agree the process of providing feedback to substantive and non-substantive CCOs, 21 May 2021.

(Link to decision CCO/2021/18)

Highbrook Park Trust - Review of Trust Deed and Management Contract

To disestablish the trust

Decision to disestablish the trust, 18 May 2021. 

(Link to decision CCO/2021/19)

Statement of Expectation

Approve the statement of expectations content and process.

Decision to approve the Statement of Expectations for substantive Council-controlled Organisations, agreed that the CCO Governance Manual is no longer required, 22 June 2021.

(Link to decision CCO/2021/26)

Auckland Council Branding Guidelines

Approve new Auckland Council branding guidelines.

Decision to approve the updated Auckland Council group brand guidelines, require CCOs to comply with the updated guidelines, and note updates on compliance will be reported annually, 24 August 2021.

(Link to decision CCO/2021/32)

Final SOIs

Approval of final 2020/24 Statements of Intent for substantive and non-substantive CCOs.

Decision to approve the 2021-2024 statements of intent for substantive and non-substantive CCOs

(Link to decision CCO/2021/34)

Ports of Auckland statement of corporate intent

To consider POAL’s final statement of corporate intent.

Decision to receive Ports of Auckland Limited’s final Statement of Corporate Intent 2021-2024

(Link to decision CCO/2021/46)

Haumaru Housing – End of year results

Haumaru Housing will report to CCO Oversight Committee once a year to discuss performance and end of year results.

Decision to receive annual reports in October 2021

(Link to decision CCO/2021/47)

City Rail Link Limited (CRLL) – end of year results

CRLL reports quarterly as part of the group report to the Finance and Performance Committee. CRLL will present to the CCO Oversight Committee twice a year to discuss performance and end of year results.

Decision to receive annual reports in October 2021

(Link to decision CCO/2021/47)

CCO ‘Scan the Horizon’ Workshops

The topics and sequencing of these workshops is being developed and will be agreed early in 2020.

Future of these workshops being considered as part of CCO Review.

Workshops were held as follows:

ATEED - February 2020

Auckland Transport - March 2020

Watercare - July 2020 (Governing Body workshop)

CCO site visits

To implement CCO Review recommendation 27 - The governing body spends half a day each year visiting each CCO to better understand its business and culture and to informally build relationships.

Watercare site visit – 10 August 2021

Auckland Transport briefing in lieu of site visit due to Covid – 19 October 2021

Auckland Unlimited briefing in lieu of site visit due to Covid – 8 November 2021

Eke Panuku briefing in lieu of site visit due to Covid – 16 November 2021

 



Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

23 November 2021

 

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Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

23 November 2021

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       CONFIDENTIAL: Unsolicited Bid Guidelines - Report back of bid

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(b)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information.

In particular, the report contains information where making available the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied the information (7(2)(ii).

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 



[1] Recommendation 3b: The council explores with the War Memorial Museum and MOTAT bringing both institutions into the merged entity and seeks such legislative change as is necessary.