I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 16 November 2021

2.00pm

 

This meeting will be held via Skype for Business

 

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Ruth Jackson

 

Deputy Chairperson

Jan O'Connor, QSM

 

Members

Aidan Bennett, QSM

 

 

Trish Deans

 

 

Toni van Tonder

 

 

George Wood, CNZM

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Michelle Riley

Democracy Advisor

 

11 November 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 027 229 8404

Email: michelle.riley@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Allan Morris and Tony Lewis - Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove                           6

8.2     Tabitha Becroft - Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove                                                  6

8.3     Melissa Firth - Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove                                                      6

8.4     Edward Ashby (Te Kawerau a Maki) and Gabriel Kirkwood (Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki) - Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove                                                                             7

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  7

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                           8

12        Notice of Motion - George Wood - Street Trading                                                     9

13        Notice of Motion - Jan O'Connor - Kennedy Park signage                                     17

14        Approval of developed design for Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove of Pohutukawa at Takapuna Beach Reserve                                                                                           21

15        Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round One 2021/2022, grant allocations 85

16        Draft Development Contributions Policy 2021                                                       177

17        Three Waters Economic Regulation Submission                                                  211

18        Submission on a proposed new national waste strategy and associated waste legislation                                                                                                                   219

19        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      225

20        Devonport-Takapuna Local Board - Record of Workshops October 2021         229

21        Elected Members' Reports                                                                                        243

22        Chairpersons' Report                                                                                                255

23        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

Whakataka te hau ki te uru

Whakataka te hau ki te tonga

Kia mākinakina ki uta

Kia mātaratara ki tai

E hī ake ana te atakura

He tio

He huka

He hau hū

Tīhei mauri ora!

 

Cease o winds from the west

Cease o winds from the south

Bring calm breezes over the land

Bring calm breezes over the sea

And let the red-tipped dawn come

With a touch of frost

A sharpened air

And promise of a glorious day

 

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 2 November 2021, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

 

 

 

8.1       Allan Morris and Tony Lewis - Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Allan Morris, Chair of the Rocks Body Corporate and spokesman for the Mon Desir, and Tony Lewis will be in attendance to address the board regarding Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation from Allan Morris, Chair of the Rocks Body Corporate and spokesman for the Mon Desir, and Tony Lewis and thank them for their attendance.

 

Attachments

a          Allan Morris - Presentation - Sacred Grove................................................. 259

b          Sacred Grove - Boardwalk Report............................................................... 271

 

 

8.2       Tabitha Becroft - Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Tabitha Becroft from Pupuke Birdsong Project will be in attendance to address the board regarding the Boardwalk at Te Uru Tapu / Scared Grove.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation from Tabitha Becroft representing Pupuke Birdsong Project and thank her for her attendance.

 

 

 

8.3       Melissa Firth - Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Melissa Firth will be in attendance to address the board regarding Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation from Melissa Firth, and thank her for her attendance.

 

 

 

 

8.4       Edward Ashby (Te Kawerau a Maki) and Gabriel Kirkwood (Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki) - Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.         Edward Ashby – Te Kawerau a Maki (speaking),

Gabriel Kirkwood – Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki (speaking),

Adrian Pettit - Te Ākitai Waiohua,

Geoff Cook – Ngāti Maru,

Edith Tuhimata - Ngāti Tamaoho,

Gavin Anderson - Ngaati Whanaunga

Will be in attendance to address the board regarding the future of Te Uru Tapu / Scared Grove.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

2.         receive the presentation from Edward Ashby – Te Kawerau a Maki, Gabriel Kirkwood – Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki, Adrian Pettit - Te Ākitai Waiohua, Geoff Cook – Ngāti Maru, Edith Tuhimata - Ngāti Tamaoho; and Gavin Anderson - Ngaati Whanaunga and thank them for their attendance.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

Under Standing Order 2.5.1 (LBS 3.11.1) or Standing Order 1.9.1 (LBS 3.10.17) (revoke or alter a previous resolution) Notices of Motion have been received from <Member Names>  for consideration under items 12 and 13 respectively.

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

Notice of Motion - George Wood - Street Trading

File No.: CP2021/16588

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary https://aklcouncil.sharepoint.com/sites/how-we-work/SitePages/executive-summary-reports.aspx

1.       Member George Wood has given notice of a motion that they wish to propose.

2.       The notice, signed by Member George Wood and Member Aiden Bennett as seconder, is appended as Attachment A.

3.       Supporting information is appended as Attachment A.

 

Motion

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      to see the Takapuna Metro Centre return quickly to a place of strength as a retail, hospitality and entertainment centre which draws people from a wide area of the Auckland region;

b)      local board officers to explore the manner in which al fresco dining on the public footpaths and other public areas, which Auckland Council is encouraging, so that cafes, cars and restaurants return to business;

c)      local board to advise on the implications of alcoholic drinks being consumed with meals when diners are enjoying al fresco dining and if necessary request that Auckland Council explore a change of the liquor licensing laws, if this is required;

d)      details of how Hurstmere Road can be closed off to vehicles more regularly and at a more reasonable cost; and

e)      what financial assistance the D-T LB would be able to assist with closure of Hurstmere Road.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport Takapuna Local Board - 16 November 2021 - Notice of Motion - George Wood

11

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Michelle Riley - PA/Office Manager

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

Notice of Motion - Jan O'Connor - Kennedy Park signage

File No.: CP2021/16724

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary https://aklcouncil.sharepoint.com/sites/how-we-work/SitePages/executive-summary-reports.aspx

1.       Member Jan O’Connor has given notice of a motion that they wish to propose.

2.       The notice, signed by Member Jan O’Connor and Member George Wood as seconder, is appended as Attachment A.

3.       Supporting information is appended as Attachment A.

 

Motion

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      consider a memorial plaque on the park referring to its original name, J.F. Kennedy Memorial Park as part the local board’s 2022/2023 work programme

b)      request that the park sign can be renamed from the 2021/2022 work programme item ID 1853

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport Takapuna Local Board - 16 November 2021 - Notice of Motion - Jan O'Connor - Kennedy Park - Attachment A

19

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Michelle Riley - PA/Office Manager

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

Approval of developed design for Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove of Pohutukawa at Takapuna Beach Reserve

File No.: CP2021/15797

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the developed design for the Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove of Pohutukawa area, within Takapuna Beach Reserve. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove of Pohutukawa is a group of 19 pohutukawa trees that are between 300 and 400 years old, within Takapuna Beach Reserve. The trees are wāhi tapu (sacred) to mana whenua and an important part of New Zealand’s natural heritage.

3.       A pathway, lookout area and boardwalk are currently located within Te Uru Tapu. The area was prioritised for improvements following the closure of the boardwalk in June 2018, due to safety risk posed by falling tree branches, and subsequently the poor condition of the boardwalk.

4.       Mana whenua support preservation of the tapu trees, removing infrastructure to return it to natural state and to showcase the sites history/stories through interpretive signage.

5.       Feedback from the community and neighbouring properties was sought on two long term solution options (Attachment C):

·   Option 1 – Close the boardwalk and lookout, remove all infrastructure and close access.

·   Option 2 – Close the boardwalk but retain access to the lookout.

6.       Using mana whenua views, arborist advice and the engagement feedback, Option 1 was revised to include removing the boardwalk, undertaking tree management where required and retaining both the western and southern accessways The Rocks and Mon Desir apartments, and the Sands respectively.

7.       A proportion of the community feedback requested to retain the boardwalk. An independent arborist determined that the amount of pruning required to ensure public safety on the boardwalk would result in the loss or shortened lifespan of at least seven trees (Attachment D) and therefore was determined not to be a feasible option.

8.       The revised option was supported in principle by mana whenua, neighbouring residents, the arborist, and the local board at a combined workshop on 10 September 2019. It was then progressed to developed design.

9.       The developed design options were identified for the lookout area,

·        Option 1a: to close the lookout

·        Option 1b: to retain and upgrade the lookout

10.     A multiple criteria analysis (MCA) was carried out and recommended Option 1b. This option enables better recreational use of the reserve as well as an opportunity to provide interpretive signage.

11.     Staff now seek approval of Option 1b in Attachment B.

12.     The design aligns with the recommendations of the Takapuna Beach Reserve Management Plan 2013, to give effect to tangata whenua values. In particular, to recognise the tapu nature of the site and manage it with the highest level of sensitivity.

13.     Staff also seek approval to include tree management works relevant to the design, as outlined in Attachment D, to undertake some pruning and the installation of tree props and bracing. The prop and bracing designs allow for the inclusion of cultural artwork and/or informative signage, to be developed in collaboration with mana whenua.

14.     The recommended design, including the tree management, requires a budget of $881,000. This can be funded through the Takapuna Beach Development Plan project, to which $1,051,126 has been proposed in the draft 2022 to 2024 Community Facility Work Programme.

15.     Key risks with the development are related to public safety and access. These have been mitigated through the comprehensive concept design process. The risk to public safety posed by falling tree branches will mitigated by removing the boardwalk and completing the proposed tree management works and permanent fencing as soon as possible.  Staff have provided the local board with a memo containing additional information regarding the health and safety risks associated with Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove (refer Attachment A).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      approve the developed design for Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove of Pohutukawa, within the Takapuna Beach Reserve, as per Option 1b in Attachment B to the agenda report, including tree management works as recommended in Attachment D to the agenda report

b)      note that the allocation of funding towards the Takapuna Beach Development Plan project was approved as part of the 2022 to 2024 Community Facilities Work Programme; $881,000 of which will be utilised for the Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove of Pohutukawa remedial work.

 

Horopaki

Context

16.     Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove of Pohutukawa is located at the northern end of Takapuna Beach, between The Promenade and The Strand. It is noted as one of the finest mainland pohutukawa groves, consisting of 19 trees between 300 and 400 years old. It is one of the only remnants of its type in the Auckland region. A pathway, lookout area and boardwalk are located within the grove, providing linkages to the beach, and viewing areas.

17.     It is a wāhi tapu (sacred) site for mana whenua as the trees are a continuous living link to ancestors and centuries of occupation of the site. The trees were used for a process called "secondary burial", where the decaying nutrients of the dead would have been taken up by the host tree, becoming a living part of it.

18.     The majority of Te Uru Tapu is held by Council under the Reserves Act 1977 as local purpose (esplanade) reserve. The remainder is one small parcel of recreation reserve.

19.     The Takapuna Beach Reserve Management Plan was adopted in May 2013 for guiding the use, management, and development of the reserve. The management plan provides several objectives and policies specific to Te Uru Tapu in the tangata whenua section (page 79) that reinforce the sites cultural heritage values, including direction that:

·        mana whenua representatives “will participate in decision-making on management issues of importance to Māori”

·        “Māori cultural heritage and archaeological sites of importance will be protected against adverse effects of development”

·        “The tapu and ancient nature of Te Uru Tapu/sacred grove of pohutukawa is recognised and this taonga will be managed with the highest level of sensitivity for its embodied cultural values”.

20.     Te Uru Tapu is listed in Auckland Councils’ cultural heritage inventory (CHI) as an historic botanical site.

21.     Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove of Pohutukawa is one of eight identified areas in the Takapuna Beach Reserve South Concept Plan (resolution number DT/2014/212) with proposed recommendations for enhancement.

22.     In June 2018, a section of boardwalk underneath the trees to the south of the lookout was closed due to the increased risk of falling tree branches onto users. A large branch has since fallen onto the boardwalk during a weather event, confirming the risk to public safety. 

23.     In September 2018, an asset condition assessment of the wooden boardwalk also concluded that it was in poor condition and required remedial work, however as the boardwalk was already closed no further action was taken.

24.     A long-term solution for tree management and public infrastructure is required at Te Uru Tapu.

25.     The local board approved two long-term solution options for public consultation at a business meeting on 4 June 2019 (resolution number DT/2019/89):

·        Option 1 – Close the boardwalk and lookout, remove all infrastructure in Te Uru Tapu and close access.

·        Option 2 – Close the boardwalk but retain access to the lookout.

26.     The local board requested staff engage further with mana whenua, the body corporates of the surrounding residential apartment buildings and the public.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Mana whenua views

27.     A hui with mana whenua took place on 4 July 2019. Council staff and local board members were present to hear the views of mana whenua regarding the management of Te Uru Tapu. Representatives from the following iwi were present:

·        Te Ākitai Waiohua

·        Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

·        Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

·        Ngaati Whaanaunga

·        Ngāti Te Ata

·        Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei and Ngāti Manuhiri were not present at the hui but made a submission in support of Option 1.

28.     At the hui, mana whenua supported:

·        closing all access to Te Uru Tapu to preserve the area and safeguard the trees

·        minimal remedial works to make the trees safe

·        remove all infrastructure and return the site to its natural state

·        provide an opportunity to showcase the sites history/stories through interpretive signage.

Community Engagement

29.     Consultation with the local community took place between 19 June and 12 July 2019 through the following means:

·        Auckland Council Have Your Say webpage

·        a meeting with the residents of the neighbouring apartments at the Takapuna War Memorial Hall

·        through providing information to Takapuna beach visitors on Takapuna Beach on 4 July 2019

·        a community drop-in event held on 11 July 2019 at the Takapuna Library over a period of three hours.

30.     A summary of the consultation feedback is provided as Attachment C. Of the 328 submissions received, 43 per cent were in favour of Option 1, while 23 per cent had a contrary view. A further 34 per cent had no preference, did not provide a response, or answered neither.

Closing the boardwalk

31.     Feedback from the engagement indicated that a proportion of the submitters had no preference for either option but requested an alternative option to retain the boardwalk.

32.     An independent arborist determined this option was not feasible if the trees were to be preserved. The full arborist assessment is outlined in Attachment D.

33.     Having a boardwalk under the trees introduces a “target” for branches to potentially hit when they fall. In order to safely have public use the boardwalk, the risk of branches falling onto users’ needs to be removed. However, given the age and condition of many of the trees, the amount of pruning required to eliminate the risk would cause at least seven of the trees to die or suffer a greatly shortened life span.

34.     Significant harm to just one of the trees would be in contrary to a number of legislative documents, including the Treaty of Waitangi Act 1975, the Reserves Act 1977, and the Resource management Act 2011.

35.     Damaging the trees would also disrespect the tapu of the site, going against Auckland Councils commitments to the Treaty of Waitangi, and towards Māori identity and wellbeing (Auckland Plan 2050).

36.     A resource consent is required to undertake any works on the trees. An application for resource consent to undertake the required amount of pruning to reopen the boardwalk, as outlined in Attachment D, is almost certain to be declined. 

Revised concept design

37.     Option 1 was refined using the mana whenua views, community engagement and arborist advice. The revised option proposed to:

·        remove the boardwalk structure and close access to Te Uru Tapu

·        retain access along the western edge of Te Uru Tapu, along the existing footpath, to The Rocks and Mon Desir apartments

·        retain access from the beach to The Sands apartments at the southern end of Te Uru Tapu

·        undertake recommended tree management works to protect the trees, while also keeping the surrounding public and property safe.

38.     A survey of the reserve boundary was completed as part of the concept design process. This identified that the current boundary fence alignment, adjacent to the neighbouring apartments, is incorrectly positioned within the reserve. It is proposed to remove a section of fence and install a new fence in the correct location as part of this project.

39.     An independent arborist was engaged to advise on the tree management works required to both improve the health of the trees and improve public safety for the revised option. The condition of the trees and the recommended tree management works are provided as Attachment D.

40.     The local board supported the revised option, in principle, at a workshop on 10 September 2019. Representatives of the residents of The Rocks, The Sands and Mon Desir apartments and iwi attended the workshop.

41.     A new local board was elected in October 2019, and a local board workshop was held on 3 December 2019 to update the new local board.

Developed design and lookout options

42.     The revised concept progressed to developed design and is provided as Attachment B – Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove of Pohutukawa Developed Design.

43.     Two design options for the lookout have been investigated, to either close the area or retain access.

44.     A multiple criteria analysis (MCA) was carried out to assess the two options. A summary of the criteria and weightings is included in Attachment B. The main points of the MCA are provided below in Table 1. The cost estimates provided for both options include a construction estimate, plus an estimate of $250,000 for tree preservation work, professional services and contingency.

Table 1- Options assessment for the lookout at Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove

Options

Multiple Criteria Analysis (MCA)

CAPEX

(preliminary estimate only)

Comments

Option 1a: Close lookout

·    Replant lookout area with native species

·    Remove furniture and handrails within lookout area

·    Install a new fence between the path and the grove

2nd

$997,000

 

·    This option is not recommended as it will not provide public access to the lookout. There is also less opportunity to experience the grove.

·    Removing the existing surface within the lookout area and replanting increases the risk of damaging tree roots.

Option 1b: Retain public access to lookout

·    Upgrade furniture and fence panels within the lookout

 

1st

$881,000

 

·    This option is recommended as it will provide public access to the lookout, opportunities to experience the unique aspects of the grove of pohutukawa trees, and opportunities to share the history of the site through interpretive signage.

·    More cost effective.

Do nothing

 

$0

·    This option is not recommended. The area is temporarily closed, and a permanent solution is sought.

 

Tree prop and bracing design

45.     As part of the tree management works, the arborist recommended installation of tree props and bracing for the areas where branches pose a risk to public safety and property. These can be designed in collaboration with mana whenua to include cultural artwork and/or informative signage, as described in the Takapuna Beach Reserve Management Plan 2013. Examples are provided in the images below.

Figure 1: Steel upright post prop with a steel ‘cup’ or U-shaped plate to support tree. The prop can be encased in timber, which can be used to house informative signage and / or cultural artwork.

Figure 2: Timber archway / tunnel along the path. The facing can be carved. It will serve to provide a feature entrance to the path and lookout.

 

Figure 3: Two timber props provide support to the tree which leans over the path, and towards The Rocks to the south west.

Recommended developed design option

46.     It is recommended that the local board approve the developed design Option 1b, to remove the boardwalk structures and retain public access to the lookout as outlined in Attachment B, including the tree management approach of bracing and props where necessary. The tree props and bracing shall be carved and designed in collaboration with mana whenua.

47.     A small extension to the existing seawall between the lookout and The Promenade will be investigated through a separate design process, as part of the regional coastal work programme. This work was not included as part of the developed design.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

48.     There will be an increase in carbon emission from construction. Staff will seek to minimise carbon emissions as far as possible by minimising contractor travel. Selecting low-carbon materials, including sourcing supplies locally as much as possible, will also curb emissions.

49.     Maximising the upcycling and recycling of existing material will be prioritised to minimise waste produced by the project.

50.     Timber boardwalk posts will remain in-situ reducing the quantity of waste removed from site and preventing damage to tree roots.

51.     Preserving the trees will ensure the carbon absorption cooling they currently provide will also be retained.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

52.     Parks Services have been involved throughout the design process and are supportive of the upgrade as it will improve the quality of the park.

53.     Councils’ coastal specialists have also been consulted throughout the design process and will continue to provide advice for the assets that have a coastal interface.

54.     Councils’ legal services have also been consulted throughout the design process, in particular in regard to council's health and safety obligations, as well as the legal parameters of what is allowed to occur at the site.

55.     All design work has been, and will continue to be, developed in collaboration with councils’ arborists and urban forest specialists.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

56.     The local board have been involved in the consultation and design development, with the most recent update being presented at a workshop on 25 May 2021.

57.     The Reserves Act 1977 enables the local board, by public notice, to prohibit public access to Te Uru Tapu in order to

·        protect the public from the health and safety risks of tree failure,

·        to preserve the significant biological values of the important grove of pohutukawa trees,

·        to protect the wāhi tapu of multiple mana whenua, including to actively protect the significant Māori customary values of the land and trees that are Te Uru Tapu.

58.     The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board, as Auckland Council, and as the administering body of Te Uru Tapu, has the primary responsibility for health and safety issues arising from the land and improvements/fixtures. Therefore, it is the local boards responsibility to address risks that could impact on the health and safety of workers and the public.  Staff have provided the local board with a memo containing additional information regarding the health and safety risks associated with Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove (refer Attachment A).

59.     The project aligns with multiple outcomes within the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020, including:

Table 2: Devonport- Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives

Outcome

Description

One: Environment and heritage

 

Our natural environment, heritage features and cultural taonga are celebrated, protected, and enhanced.

Two: Parks, facilities, and open spaces

 

Our parks, sports fields, community facilities, beaches and open spaces are well maintained to meet the recreation and social needs of our growing population.

Three: Community participation and wellbeing

.

Our communities, including mana whenua, feel connected and supported to plan, deliver, and participate in activities and services in their local area.

Six: Māori values ngā tikanga a te Māori

 

Our unique Māori history, values and stories are told, celebrated, and embedded into our area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

60.     The relevant statutory Treaty of Waitangi/te Tiriti o Waitangi obligations are important. The Reserves Act 1977 is one of the Acts in the First Schedule to the Conservation Act 1987. Section 4 of the Conservation Act contains an obligation to give effect to the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi/te Tiriti o Waitangi. As such, in performing functions and duties under the Reserves Act, decision-makers must also interpret the Reserves Act to give effect to the principles of te Tiriti. Treaty obligations are overarching and not something to be considered or applied after all other matters are considered.

61.     Treaty principles require active protection of Māori interests. The principles of te Tiriti likely to be most relevant are:

·        partnership – the mutual duties to act towards each other reasonably and in good faith are the core of the Treaty partnership

·        informed decision making – being well-informed of the mana whenua interests and views. Early consultation is a means to achieve informed decision-making

·        active protection – this involves the active protection of Māori interests retained under te Tiriti/the Treaty. It includes the promise to protect rangatiratanga and taonga.

62.     Option 1b will adhere to these obligations.

63.     Option 1b will benefit Māori, and the wider community, through recognising and celebrating the cultural significance of the site to Māori. Although mana whenua initially preferred to remove all infrastructure from Te Uru Tapu, through further concept discussions the option to keep the lookout open was later supported, to enable a place to learn about and celebrate the sites cultural history.

64.     The design includes opportunities for iwi to share the history of the site through carving of the tree props and interpretive signage. This aligns with the recommendations of the Takapuna Beach Reserve Management Plan 2013, to give effect to tangata whenua values. 

65.     Concept designs were discussed with local iwi at hui prior to April 2019, and in July 2019 and September 2019.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

66.     The estimated cost for Option 1b is $881,000. This estimate includes $125,000 for tree management works as described, including props and bracing, as well as $50,000 for interpretation such as signs and information panels.

67.     To date, $137,990 has been spent on specialist reports, consultation, designs and project management.

68.     A budget of $1,051,126 has been approved as part of the 2022 to 2024 Community Facilities Work Programme for advancing the Takapuna Beach Development Plan, which includes Te Uru Tapu. This budget will be sufficient to deliver the recommended design.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

69.     The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board has a responsibility to ensure the health and safety of workers and the public by permanently removing the boardwalk structure from Te Uru Tapu.

70.     Section 24 of the Health and Safety at Work Regulations 2016 deals specifically with falling objects and requires Auckland Council (as a person conducting a business or undertaking) to manage the risks to health and safety associated with a falling object if the object is reasonably likely to fall on and injure a person.

71.     The works, as proposed, will greatly reduce the risk to public safety. The boardwalk is currently closed with a barrier, but there have been instances of public climbing the barriers to gain access. Once the boardwalk is removed people will no longer be actively lead into the area of Te Uru Tapu where there is a risk of falling branches. Access will still be possible into the grove by foot if people jump the fence, therefore some signage on site will likely be necessary to deter this.

72.     All work around the trees will be monitored by independent arborists to ensure no damage is caused to the trees during construction.

73.     Public expectation has been raised because of the consultation undertaken. If the design is not supported, it may lead to community disappointment and a reduction in the willingness to engage with council in the future.

74.     Anti-social behaviour has been experienced in the lookout area. Upgrading of the lookout area, furniture and the addition of interpretive signage will attract a wider section of the community to experience the location and increase passive surveillance of the site.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

75.     Begin the detailed design and resource consent phases of the project, including engagement with mana whenua to design the tree props and bracing.

76.     Assuming both phases do not encounter unforeseen delays, construction is likely to begin early to mid-2022.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo - Te Uru Tapu

31

b

Te Uru Tapu / Sacred Grove of Pohutukawa, Takapuna, Developed Design (4 February 2021)

33

c

Public Engagement Results

65

d

Tree management proposal for Sacred Grove with map

79

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kaitlyn White - Renewals Coordinator

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round One 2021/2022, grant allocations

File No.: CP2021/16376

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round One 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received for the Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round One as shown in Attachment B to the agenda report.

3.       The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board adopted the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 20 April 2021 as shown in Attachment A to the agenda report. The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of 218,331 for the 2021/2022 financial year. A total of $83,782.83 was allocated in the previous round. This leaves a total of $134,548.17 to be allocated to one quick response and one local grants round.

5.       Twenty-one applications were received for Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response, Round One 2021/2022, requesting a total of $36,402.85.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round One 2021/2022 listed in the following table:   

Table One: Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round One 2021/2022 grant applications.

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR2202-118

Depot Arts and Music Space Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the three artists and one writer's fee for an art exhibition "Two Truths and a Lie" in March 2022.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-119

Art In the Dark Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the workshop materials, facilitators/artist fee and koha to panelists to deliver "HER festival" on 5 April 2022.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-124

North Shore Theatre and Arts Trust (The PumpHouse Theatre)

Arts and culture

Towards the choir and musician fees, the printing of songbooks, a professional master of ceremonies/Santa, usher, and technical staff costs for the 2021 Christmas Carols in the amphitheater of the Pumphouse Theatre on 12 December 2021.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-127

Auckland Multicultural Society Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the costs of venue hire, insurance, sound, and printing for the "Lakeside Multicultural Festival 2022” on 27 March 2022 to be held at the Pump House Theatre.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-104

Our Women's Network

Takapuna Community Facilities Trust

Community

Towards the costs of advertising, catering, performers fees, decorations, venue hire, and karakia donations for the "Older Women’s Network Festival” on 28 May 2022.

$1,095.00

Eligible

QR2202-105

Forrest Hill Community Garden Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the cost of a lockable storage shed including flooring and shelving for housing gardening equipment.

$1,979.00

Eligible

QR2202-107

Local Life NZ

Devonport Community House Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of website development and poster boards.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-109

Epilepsy Association of New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards the educator's fuel costs for support services for people living with epilepsy.

$500.00

Eligible

QR2202-115

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the counselling services for vulnerable youth and in-school promotion of services in the Devonport-Takapuna area from 1 December 2021 to 30 June 2022.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-117

PHAB Association (Auckland) Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of delivering a safe, fun, and accessible "PHABulous Fun Summer Celebration" for 200 disabled young people, specifically the cost of project coordination, youth workers’ wages, printing flyers, advertising, and catering.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-120

Road Safety Education Limited

Community

Towards the venue hire, catering and facilitators' costs to deliver the “Road Safety” programme for the students from the Rosmini College.

$1,230.00

Eligible

QR2202-123

The Wilson Home Trust

Community

Towards the cost of providing “pets assisting therapy” (petting zoo) for the Wilson Home Trust three-day Christmas Party for disabled children.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-126

The Scout Association of New Zealand - Calliope Sea Scouts

Community

Towards the purchase of uniforms for volunteer leaders and scouts in the troop.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-116

Takapuna Community Facilities Trust

Environment

Towards the purchase of plants.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-125

Environmental Education for Resource Sustainability Trust

Environment

Towards purchase and delivery of 416 plants, 76 recycling bins and administrative costs associated with running the Paper4Trees programme.

$1,997.85

Eligible

QR2202-101

Lake Pupuke Tennis Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of a defibrillator.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-106

Belmont Park Bowling Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase and installation of sunshades at the Belmont Park Bowling Club.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-110

Milford Bowling Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of repainting the ladies’ toilets at the Milford Bowling Club.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-113

Paul Cornish

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of road signs, flyers, and "Jets" stickers for the run season from 1 December 2021 to 30 March 2022.

$601.00

Eligible

QR2202-121

Waitemata Golf Club

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of the "SNAG (Starting New at Golf) kit” for the free 40 weeks "Junior Golf Programme".

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-122

Ngataringa Tennis Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of replacing the deteriorated fence posts supporting the tennis court fences.

$2,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$36,402.85

 

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       Auckland Council’s Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·    local board priorities

·    lower priorities for funding

·    exclusions

·    grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·    any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board adopted the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 20 April 2021 as shown in Attachment A to the agenda report. The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

10.     The community grants programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

11.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of 218,331 for the 2021/2022 financial year. A total of $83,782.83 was allocated in the previous round. This leaves a total of $134,548.17 to be allocated to one quick response and one local grants round.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The aim of the local board grants programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include:

·    local food production and food waste reduction

·    decreasing use of single-occupancy transport options

·    home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation

·    local tree planting and streamside revegetation

·    education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

15.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

17.     Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they can increase their chances of success in the future.

18.     A summary of each application received through Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response, Round One 2021/2022 is provided in Attachment B.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Maori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Maori. Auckland Council’s Maori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grants processes.

20.     Eleven applicants applying to Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round One 2021/2022 indicate projects that target Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted 10-year Budget 2021/2031 and local board agreements.

22.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of 218,331 for the 2021/2022 financial year. A total of $83,782.83 was allocated in the previous round. This leaves a total of $134,548.17 to be allocated to one quick response and one local grants round.

23.     Twenty-one applications were received for Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response, Round One 2021/2022, requesting a total of $36,402.85.

24.       Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Following the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board allocating funding for round one of the quick response grants and multiboard grants, grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Grants Programme 2021/2022

91

b

Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round One 2021/2022 - grant applications

95

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Moumita Dutta - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Rhonwen Heath - Head of Rates Valuations & Data Mgmt

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

Draft Development Contributions Policy 2021

File No.: CP2021/16547

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the draft Contributions Policy 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Development contributions allow for an equitable and proportionate share of the total cost of growth-related capital expenditure to be recovered from the development community.

3.       The Finance and Performance Committee adopted the draft Contributions Policy 2021 for consultation at its meeting on 16 September 2021, FIN/2021/84. 

4.       Local board feedback is being sought to inform the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration of the adoption of the Contribution Policy 2021 in December 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      resolve feedback on the Contributions Policy 2021 on the key consultation topics:

i)        updating policy for capital projects in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031

ii)       inclusion of projects beyond 10-years to the policy in stages starting with Drury

iii)      requiring developers to pay their contributions earlier

iv)      proposal to support Māori development with grants

v)      any other issues.

Horopaki

Context

5.       Auckland’s population is expected to grow by 260,000 in the next ten years on top of the rapid population growth experienced in the last decade, bringing the projected population to approximately 1.9 million by 2031.

6.       Construction of 145,800 new dwellings is forecast in the next ten years. To support the development enabled by the Auckland Unitary Plan, the council is facing immediate demands for infrastructure in key growth areas and in response to construction on upzoned land, plan changes and the impact of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development.

 

 

 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       Development contributions allow for an equitable and proportionate share of the total cost of growth-related capital expenditure to be recovered from the development community. The Contributions Policy sets out how the council will recover from new development an appropriate and fair share of the cost of infrastructure investment attributable to growth. There were four key consultation topics:

i)     Updating policy for capital projects in the 10-year Budget

          The draft policy provides for the recovery of $2.4 billion of development contributions revenue from $9.0 billion of projects with a growth component included in the10-year budget.  The draft policy also included updated forecasts of population growth and dwelling construction. The combined impact of these changes is to lower the weighted average Development Contributions price from $23,900 to $21,100.

ii)  Inclusion of projects beyond 10-years to the policy in stages starting with Drury

          Extensive work has been undertaken in recent years on the infrastructure requirements to support growth in the investment priority areas. However, further work is required before these costs can be included in the contributions policy. Area specific amendments to the contributions policy will be proposed for consultation as the information becomes available.

          The first step in the Contributions Policy 2021 will be to add a programme of expenditure to fund some of the key infrastructure required to support growth in the Drury area. The impact of this change is to raise the Development Contributions price in Drury to $84,900 from between $11,000 and $18,300.

iii) Requiring developers to pay their contributions earlier

          The council proposed that Development Contributions be paid at the time of building consent for all development (residential and non-residential) except non-commercial development on Māori land (explained further below). This requires Development Contributions due at building consent to be paid 6 to 24 months earlier than under the current policy and reverses the changes made to the policy in 2019. When combined with the other changes proposed this lower the weighted average Development Contributions price to $19,300.

iv) A proposal to support Māori development with grants

          The draft policy proposed continuing the support for marae development and papakāinga and Māori housing[1] on Māori land through grants available through the Cultural Initiatives Fund. These grants can cover payment of development contributions in appropriate circumstances, along with other kinds of development costs.

8.       The proposed changes to the Contributions Policy 2021 were reported to the Finance and Performance Committee at its meeting on 16 September- see Attachment A  Draft Development Contributions Policy 2021.

Consultation

9.       Formal public consultation was held in September and October 2021. To support the consultation a number of documents were made available on the Have Your Say website, https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/dc-policy.

10.     Two online Have Your Say events were held to provide opportunities for developers and other interested parties to learn more about the draft policy, ask questions and provide their feedback. A third event was also held to allow interested parties to present their views directly to the Finance and Performance Committee. All comments have been captured and will be reported through to the Finance and Performance Committee to inform decision-making on the final policy.

11.     A summary of the feedback received from submitters is set out in Attachment B: Draft Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement guidance

12.       Recommendations in this report have a neutral climate impact as they relate to the funding of capital investment rather than decisions on the activities to be undertaken.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views guidance

13.       The information presented on the projects included in the draft Contributions Policy 2021 was developed in conjunction with the following council-controlled organisations and council units:

·    Auckland Transport

·    Eke Panuku Development Auckland

·    Healthy Waters

·    Community Facilities

·    Community and Social Policy

14.        The Chief Economist Unit and Research Investigations and Monitoring Unit worked with us on the impact of higher development contributions on the pace of development and on land and house prices. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.        The development contribution price varies by location depending on the cost of infrastructure required to support development in an area.

16.        Local board feedback is being sought to inform the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration of the adoption of the Contribution Policy 2021 in December 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.        Recent legislative changes require the contributions policy to support the development of Māori land. Feedback from iwi on the draft policy was sought as part of consultation and via engagement with the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum.  All developers, including mana whenua, were provided an opportunity to present their feedback to the Finance and Performance Committee on 12 October.

18.        The Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum have provided their feedback which has been included in Attachment B: Draft Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received.

 

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     The 10-year budget assumes development contributions revenue of $2.7 billion. After completing the analysis of the cost of investments in the 10-year budget that can be recovered with development contributions and the impact of the proposed policy changes, it is estimated that the revenue will be $2.6 billion. The achievement of this revised revenue forecast requires as a first step the implementation of a contributions policy updated for the capital expenditure decisions in the 10-year budget and the other changes proposed in this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     The recommendation requesting local boards views does not present any risk. The risks associated with amending the contributions policy are set out in the report to the 16 September Finance and Performance Committee, Attachment A: Development Contributions Policy 2021 Consultation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     Feedback from the public consultation will be reported to the Finance and Performance Committee workshop on 10 November 2021.

22.     Potential changes to the draft will be reported at the Finance and Performance Committee workshop on 1 December 2021. Staff will report to Finance and Performance Committee for the final policy adoption on 9 December 2021. Local board feedback will be included in the report.

23.     The Contributions Policy 2021 is proposed to be implemented in January 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Development Contributions Policy 2021 report to the Finance and Performance Committee

181

b

Draft Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received

197

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Andrew Duncan - Manager Financial Policy

Authorisers

Ross Tucker - General Manager, Financial Strategy and Planning

Glenn Boyd – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

Three Waters Economic Regulation Submission

File No.: CP2021/16901

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To outline the Government’s Economic Regulation and Consumer Protection for Three Waters Services in New Zealand discussion paper, circulated by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, and to seek feedback from local boards.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 27 October 2021, the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment released a discussion paper, “Economic Regulation and Consumer Protection for Three Waters Services in New Zealand”.

3.       The discussion document describes how the economic regulator is envisioned to operate and what its statutory obligations would be. The discussion document also provides a brief explanation of why economic regulation is required in the face of three waters reform. Finally, it asks for feedback on several topics.

4.       The views of local boards on the proposal are requested by 6 December 2021 to enable those views to influence the overall submission and to be included as an attachment to the council submission.

5.       Final submissions from Auckland Council to Government on this topic are due at 5pm on 20 December 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      provide feedback for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on the Economic Regulation and Consumer Protection for Three Waters Services in New Zealand discussion paper

b)      make the following points in the administrative areas of:

i)        the need for economic regulation

ii)       the type of regulation and who would pay the costs

iii)      what parts of three waters the regulation would apply to

iv)      should the regulation apply to all providers

v)      how and when should regulation be implemented

vi)      what should be the statutory objectives of the regulation regime

vii)     what should compliance and enforcement look like

viii)    who the economic regulator should be

ix)      whether we need additional consumer protections and how those are regulated

c)      make the following points in the policy areas of:

i)        how the regulator should liaise with local government to ensure the growth aspirations of Auckland are met

ii)       how the regulator should liaise with local government to ensure the social, cultural, and environmental aspirations of Auckland and met.

Horopaki

Context

6.       On 27 October 2021, the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) released a discussion paper, “Economic Regulation and Consumer Protection for Three Waters Services in New Zealand”.

7.       The issues of economic regulation and consumer protection for three waters services in New Zealand is related, but separate, to the broader issue of the Water Services Bill. They require separate submissions as they are two different processes run by two different bodies and on different timeframes. There is a separate process to provide feedback about the reform in general. This process is to provide feedback on only the proposed economic regulation.

8.       According to central government, economic regulation will have a crucial role to play in driving the level of efficiency that will be required to keep water services affordable in the long run.

9.       Economic regulation ensures that the best outcomes for consumers will occur when there are monopoly markets, and the suppliers have a large amount of market power.

10.     In this case, it is proposed that the economic regulator will also act as the consumer protection regulator and be funded through levies.

11.     It is proposed that the Commerce Commission act in both capacities to regulate the newly-formed three waters industry in New Zealand after the Water Services Bill is enacted.

12.     The discussion document describes how the economic regulator is envisioned to operate and what its statutory obligations would be. The discussion document also provides a brief explanation of why economic regulation is required in the face of three waters reform. Finally, it asks for feedback on several topics.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     What follows is a short summary of the discussion document and the areas where feedback is sought through the submissions process.

What is economic regulation and why do we need it?

14.     Economic regulation protects consumers from the problems that can occur in markets with little or no competition and/or a large amount of market power. The regulation is intended to make businesses in the market behave similarly to how they would in a competitive market.

15.     Utilities tend to be what is known as a “natural monopoly”. These markets are more cheaply served by one firm rather than many because of massive fixed costs.

16.     Without regulation, markets with natural monopolies tend to have higher prices and/or lower outputs and/or lower output quality.

17.     While consumer involvement in the governance of natural monopolies is helpful, it is not sufficient to ensure the best outcomes for consumers. Consumer involvement must work in concert with regulation.

18.     Ultimately, the purpose of economic regulation is to advance the long-term interests of consumers. This ensures that suppliers deliver high-quality services that reflect consumer demand and incentivises improved efficiency. It also ensures any gains by the suppliers are passed through to the consumers.

What type of regulation is being proposed and who would pay the costs?

19.     There are several types of regulation – price-quality, information disclosure, and quality-only. In this case, it is proposed that the regulator be a price-quality regulator.

20.     Price-quality regulators essentially set upper limits on the price that can be charged by the supplier while setting lower limits on the quality of service that must be delivered.

21.     Typically, price-quality regulators operate on regulatory cycles of four to six years. It is proposed that the economic regulator operate on a five-year cycle, with the possibility of the first regulatory cycle being shorter.

22.     Economic regulation has costs. These costs come from two places. On one hand, the economic regulator costs money to operate and administer. On the other hand, the suppliers incur compliance costs to meet the requirements of the regulator.

23.     It is proposed that the administrative costs of the regulator be recovered through levies. This is a straightforward, transparent, and standard way of recovering these costs. Ultimately these costs are borne by the consumers.

24.     The cost to the supplier of complying with regulation is also ultimately borne by the consumers. Since both categories of regulatory costs are borne by the consumers, it is necessary to design the regulations to ensure they are net beneficial to consumers.

25.     Given the amalgamation proposed by the Water Services Bill will increase the market power of the water providers, it is likely that regulation is necessary. Further, the research for the Water Services Bill finds that even the current absence of profit motives, and the obligations to promote the social, cultural, environmental, and financial wellbeing of communities has been insufficient to ensure delivery of effective and efficient three waters service. Put another way, there is probably a case for economic regulation, even in the absence of the proposed three waters amalgamation.

26.     Thus, the MBIE’s recommendation is that three waters be price-quality regulated.

27.     However, there is also a question as to whether the regulation should be applied generically across all suppliers or tailored to individual suppliers. Given the inflexibility of generic regulation and Government’s strong commitment to water service quality, it is recommended that the price-quality regulation be flexible to allow for different incentives to the different suppliers.

What parts of three waters should regulation apply to?

28.     The delivery of stormwater services is fundamentally different to drinking water and wastewater.

29.     While drinking water and wastewater services are delivered directly to the beneficiaries (that is, the person drinking the water or flushing the toilet), stormwater services have a public good element as well. When the stormwater in one area is managed, it could make other areas less likely to flood, for instance. This means that it is difficult to identify and charge the consumers of stormwater services.

30.     Additionally, while drinking water and wastewater infrastructure is easily identified, stormwater infrastructure is more difficult. Stormwater systems are often integrated into roading networks, use natural topographical features, and are owned by various land holders and infrastructure providers.

31.     Internationally, when stormwater systems are operated alongside drinking water and wastewater, they tend to be economically regulated.

32.     The preliminary view put forward by the MBIE is that stormwater should be economically regulated, but it will be less straightforward to demonstrate that it is net beneficial.

Should the regulation apply to all providers?

33.     Three waters reform is proposed to result in four main entities serving approximately 85% of the population. The remainder would be served by small community or private schemes, or through self-supply. A recent study for Taumata Arowai suggested that there could be between 75,000 and 130,000 unregistered drinking water suppliers.

34.     None of these small-scale suppliers serves more than 5,000 customers. There are only three non-defense force suppliers that serve between 500 and 5,000 customers. 

35.     For even smaller (less than 500 customers) providers, it is likely that the owners of three waters supplier and the consumers of the services are largely the same people. Therefore, it is less critical to have a regulatory framework to ensure consumer wellbeing.

36.     Since the goal of the reform is to further consumer wellbeing, these other suppliers should only be regulated if the cost of regulation is outweighed by the benefits.

37.     Given the small scale and relatively high compliance costs, the MBIE has recommended that regulatory framework only apply to the new water service entities created by the Water Services Bill.

How and when should regulation be implemented?

38.     To be effective, price-quality regulation requires high quality information on the assets, costs and quality of service provided by regulated suppliers. However, the Three Waters Reform Programme has found that the scope and quality of the available information is not currently at the level that would be required to implement an effective economic regulation regime.

39.     Because of this information gap, it is unlikely that the regulatory regime would be operational by the time the new three waters entities are set to begin operation in 1 July 2024.

40.     However, starting the new entities operations without a regulatory framework in place poses its own risk.

41.     Therefore, the Government’s recommendation is that there should be a graduated approach to implementing a conventional cost-based price-quality path, with the first regulatory pricing period beginning 1 July 2027. In the interim the industry would improve its data and the regulator would work with the industry on information disclosure.

42.     This interim period from 1 July 2024 through to 30 June 2027 would leave the supplies unregulated in terms of price-quality. There are two potential solutions to this gap. The first is that the regulator impose a price-quality path based on incomplete information but using its best judgment. The second option is that an interim price-quality path be implemented by government. There are significant pros and cons to each option and the MBIE is seeking feedback on this issue.

 

 

 

 

 

What should be the statutory objectives of the regulation regime?

43.     Recently in New Zealand, regulatory regimes are set to achieve four goals.

a)     There must be incentives to innovate and invest.

b)     There should be incentives to improve efficiency.

c)     That the efficiency gains must be shared with consumers.

d)     Lastly, suppliers are limited in their ability to turn profits. This point is irrelevant to the three waters reform scenario.

44.     However, there is scope for the economic regulator to have responsibility for a broader range of objectives (including issues such as climate change and Te mana o te Wai).

45.     There is also a question as to how Te Tiriti o Waitangi considerations factor into the design of any economic regulatory regime for the three waters sector.

46.     The MBIE seeks feedback on what the precise role of the economic regulator should be and whether it should be expanded in the ways described above.

What should compliance and enforcement look like?

47.     Compliance and enforcement are essential for regulation to be effective.

48.     An economic regulator’s compliance and enforcement toolkit typically includes education initiatives, warning letters, infringement offences, pecuniary penalties, enforceable undertakings, and other civil remedies such as out-of-court settlements.

49.     The MBIE is seeking feedback on whether there needs to be any other tools in the toolkit.

Who should the economic regulator be?

50.     To be effective, regulators need to be at arms-length from government, transparent, accountable, credible, freely share information, and act in a coordinated way with policy agencies.

51.     There are three potential options for the economic regulator: Taumata Arowai, the Commerce Commission, or a new regulatory authority created specifically for economic regulation of three waters.

52.     The MBIE’s multi-criteria analysis suggests that the Commerce Commission is best suited to be the economic regulator. 

Do we need additional consumer protections and how are those regulated?

53.     Due to the nature of the three waters sector, there may be other consumer protections required. There likely needs to be rules around the acceptable likelihood and duration of supply outages, the acceptable level of leakage from reticulated supply networks, the level of resilience to natural and man-made hazards, and the amount of innovation and efficiencies delivered to consumers.

54.     These protections will be required because three waters is a natural monopoly and consumers cannot go elsewhere when unhappy with their service.

55.     Importantly, the current democratic, consultation, and governance mechanisms that are provided for in the Local Government Act 2002 will not apply to the proposed new Water Services Entities. In addition, the Ombudsman’s current role in dealing with complaints about local government agencies will cease.

56.     These points suggest that regulation needs to consider these angles of consumer protection above and beyond the standard roles of an economic regulator.

57.     There is also a need for additional protections for vulnerable consumers. It is recommended that that there should be a positive obligation on the regulator to consider interests of vulnerable consumers, and that minimum service level requirements are flexible enough able to accommodate a wide range of approaches to addressing consumer harm and vulnerability.

58.     The MBIE is seeking feedback on how the consumer protection regime could be designed in a way that contributes to equitable outcomes and mitigates unintended impacts on Māori. This includes impacts on different iwi/hapū, Māori landowners, urban Māori consumers, and rural Māori consumers. Additionally, views are sought on how the consumer protection regulator could be expected to consider Treaty obligations, and the cultural competency of the economic regulator to recognise the significance of water as a taonga for Māori.

59.     As with economic regulation, a multi-criteria analysis suggests that the Commerce Commission should be the consumer protection regulator.

How should consumer disputes be resolved?

60.     There are several ways that consumer disputes can be resolved.

61.     The preliminary preferred option put forward by the MBIE is for mandatory provision of consumer dispute resolution services, but feedback is sought as to whether this should be achieved through a new scheme or by expanding the mandate of an existing scheme.

62.     Traditionally, vulnerable populations face difficulties in accessing dispute resolution schemes. Therefore, it is important that both suppliers and the dispute resolution provider ensure that underserved and vulnerable communities can participate in processes that affect them including dispute resolution processes.

Local Board Feedback

63.     While the MBIE has posed 46 questions to submitters in the discussion document, only a few are acutely relevant. The following 11 questions are the most critical for the council family to provide feedback:

a)      What are your views on whether the stormwater networks that are currently operated by local authorities should be economically regulated, alongside drinking water and wastewater?

b)      Do you consider that the economic regulation regime should be implemented gradually from 2024 to 2027, or do you consider that a transitional price-quality path is also required?

c)      If you consider a transitional price-quality path is required, do you consider that this should be developed and implemented by an independent economic regulator, or by Government and implemented through a Government Policy Statement?

d)      What are your views on how Treaty of Waitangi principles, as well as the rights and interests of iwi/Māori, should be factored into the design of an economic regulatory regime for the three waters sector?

e)      Who do you consider should have primary responsibility for determining the structure of three waters prices: a. The Water Services Entity, following engagement with their governance group, communities, and consumers; b. The economic regulator; or c. The Government or Ministers?

f)       Who do you think is the most suitable body to be the economic regulator for the three waters sector? Please provide reasons for your view.

g)      What are your views on whether minimum service level requirements should be able to vary across different types of consumers?

h)      What are your views on whether the regulatory regime should include a positive obligation to protect vulnerable consumers, and that minimum service level requirements are flexible enough to accommodate a wide range of approaches to protecting vulnerable consumers?

i)        What are your views on how Treaty of Waitangi principles, as well as the rights and interests of iwi/Māori, should be factored into the design of a consumer protection regime for the three waters sector?

j)        Do you agree with the preliminary view that the Commerce Commission is the most suitable body to be the consumer protection regulator for the three waters sector?

k)      Do you consider that there should be special considerations for traditionally under-served or vulnerable communities? If so, how do you think these should be given effect?

64.     A recommendation requesting the views of local boards on the proposal is included in this report.

65.     Local board views are requested by 6 December 2021 to enable those views to influence the overall submission and to be included as an attachment to the council submission.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

66.     The discussion paper acknowledges that addressing climate change challenges and ensuring water service resilience is one of the drivers of the overall Three Waters Reform. However, the economic regulation regime is not being considered for these reasons directly.

67.     The proposed economic regulation framework does not have direct impacts on greenhouse gas emissions or climate. However, it may be in the purview of the regulator to ensure consumer expectations are met with regards to environmental and climate outcomes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

68.     Relevant council departments and council-controlled organisations have been identified and contributions will be sought from them in developing the council group’s response to the Economic Regulation and Consumer Protection for Three Waters Services in New Zealand discussion paper.

69.     While overall three waters reform will have a direct impact on council and council-controlled organisations, economic regulation put in place after that reform will not have any impact on council or remaining council-controlled organisations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

70.     Local board views are sought as part of the development of the council’s submission and will be reported back to Governing Body. Local board resolutions will be included as part of council’s submission. 

 

 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

71.     The overall three waters reform is, in part, to recognise and provide for iwi/Māori rights and interests with a specific focus on service delivery. It is proposed that iwi/Māori will have a greater role in the new Three Waters system, including pathways for enhanced participation by whānau and hapū as these services relate to their Treaty rights and interests.

72.     On a price-quality basis, economic regulation of the three waters industry does not directly impact on Māori any differently than other three waters services consumers. However, the overall three waters reform and specific topics within the economic regulation of three waters are likely to be of significant interest. In particular, how treaty obligations are considered, the recognition of water as taonga for Māori, and the overrepresentation of Māori in the group of consumers vulnerable to price shocks.

73.     Māori outcomes leads within the council family are being consulted on these topics.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

74.     The submission can be developed within existing budget provision and as part of business-as-usual central government advocacy activity.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

75.     There is little risk in making a submission on the economic regulation of three waters. Conversely, there is high risk if we do not make a submission. As the work programme progresses, staff can provide further information about the potential impacts on council’s activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

76.     The office of the Chief Economist is current drafting a submission on behalf of Auckland Council.

77.     Staff are preparing a report for the Governing Body seeking a delegation of Governing Body members to approve the council’s submission.

78.     The views of local boards on the proposal are requested by the 6 December 2021 to enable those views to influence the overall submission and to be included as an attachment to the council submission.

79.     The deadline for the final submission to Government is 20 December 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Shane Martin - Senior Economist

Authorisers

Jim Stabback - Chief Executive

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

Submission on a proposed new national waste strategy and associated waste legislation

File No.: CP2021/16992

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To invite local board input into Auckland Council’s submission to the Government’s proposed new waste strategy and changes to waste legislation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 15 October 2021, the Ministry for the Environment released its consultation document on proposals for a new national waste strategy together with other issues and options relating to new waste legislation.

3.       This describes existing actions the Government has committed to and sets out new proposed actions it may include in the new national waste strategy to transform the way New Zealand manages its waste.

4.       The consultation document seeks feedback on the following three areas:

·     Part 1: seeking support for changes to how Aotearoa New Zealand manages its waste and support for moving towards a circular economy

·     Part 2: seeking feedback on a proposed new waste strategy

·     Part 3: seeking feedback on the development of more comprehensive legislation on waste: issues and options.

5.       A draft submission is being prepared by staff for discussion and endorsement by the Environment and Climate CHange Committee. Local board input into that submission is being sought, with a deadline of 10 November at 5pm for feedback to be considered in the council’s submission or 22 November 2021 at 5pm for feedback to be appended.

6.       The council’s submission will be developed based on policy positions articulated in relevant council strategy, such as Te Mahere Whakahaere me te Whakaiti Tukunga Para i Tāmaki Makaurau 2018 / Auckland Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 and other recent council submissions on government policy relating to waste management and minimisation.

7.       Waste Solutions staff will lead the development of the council’s submission which is due to the Ministry for the Environment by 26 November 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the Government’s proposed new waste strategy and proposed changes to waste legislation for inclusion in an Auckland Council submission, noting that feedback is required by 5pm on 22 November 2021 to be appended.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       On 15 October 2021, the Ministry for the Environment released its consultation document, Te kawe i te haepapa para: Taking responsibility for our waste: Proposals for a new waste strategy – issues and options for new waste legislation.

9.       A snapshot of the consultation document has also been made available online.

10.     This consultation intersects with other central government and Ministry for the Environment initiatives that focus on reducing waste and associated environmental impacts. These include:

·     the design of a container return scheme for beverage containers

·     the development of a national action plan for plastics

·     the increase and expansion of the waste levy

·     reducing greenhouse gas emissions from organic wastes via a proposed Emissions Reduction Plan.

11.     Recent Auckland Council submissions to the Ministry for the Environment on waste related topics have largely supported the government to use existing legislative tools to phase out single-use plastic shopping bags, to address single-use plastics, restrict the export of plastic wastes, and increase and expand the waste levy.

12.     These previous submissions related to specific aspects of the waste system. The current consultation proposes changes to the wider national policy framework for waste management and minimisation in Aotearoa New Zealand.

13.     The reasons for the proposed changes include the need to:

·     transform the way waste is managed, noting that Aotearoa New Zealand is one of the highest generators of waste per person in the world

·     strengthen and better align the existing legal framework that crosses the Waste Minimisation Act 2008, the Litter Act 1979, the Local Government Act 2002, the Health Act 1956 and the Resource Management Act 1991

·     address technical problems within the Waste Management Act 2008.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Summary of the consultation document

14.     The consultation document seeks feedback across three separate areas as follows:

·     Part 1: seeking support for changes to how Aotearoa New Zealand manages its waste and support for moving towards a circular economy

·     Part 2: seeking feedback on a proposed new waste strategy

·     Part 3: seeking feedback on the development of more comprehensive legislation on waste: issues and options.

15.     Part 1 outlines the need to transform waste management and global shifts to a circular economy.

16.     Part 2 relates to a proposed new waste strategy for Aotearoa New Zealand to replace the 2010 Waste Strategy. The new strategy will reset the vision, direction and priorities for waste minimisation, along with setting targets for waste reduction.

17.     Part 3 details issues and options relating to a review of existing waste legislation. It sets out to reset the purpose, principles, governance, roles and responsibilities for waste management and minimisation, replacing the Waste Minimisation Act 2008 and the Litter Act 1979.

Development of the council’s submission

18.     The council’s submission will be developed based on policy positions articulated in related plans and strategies together with evidence and data from subject matter experts from across the council family, and input from previous mana whenua engagement and public submissions. We are also seeking local board feedback to inform our submission.

19.     Auckland Council’s position on waste management is guided by Te Mahere Whakahaere me te Whakaiti Tukunga Para i Tāmaki Makaurau – Auckland Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 (‘the Waste Plan 2018’), and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

20.     The Waste Plan 2018 is guided by the vision ‘Auckland aspires to be Zero Waste by 2040, taking care of people and the environment and turning waste into resources’ and sets out over 100 actions to achieve this vision. It continues a zero-waste vision that was originally set out in Auckland Council’s first Waste Minimisation and Management Plan 2012.

21.     Auckland Council is a member of the WasteMINZ Territorial Local Authority working group that will also be responding to the consultation document.

22.     Submissions received by the Ministry for the Environment as part of this consultation process will inform the government’s decisions regarding new waste legislation.

Timeframe for development of the Submission on a proposed new national waste strategy and associated waste legislation

Milestone

Date

Discussion document released

15 October 2021

Deadline for appended feedback

22 November 2021 at 5pm

Consultation period closes

26 November 2021

23.     The new waste strategy is to be finalised in 2022. A bill will be developed and introduced to Parliament later in 2022 for new legislation.

Further material and links

24.     Consultation document - Te kawe i te haepapa para: Taking responsibility for our waste: Proposals for a new waste strategy – issues and options for new waste legislation.

25.     A snapshot – consultation document - Taking responsibility for our waste: Proposals for a new waste strategy – issues and options for new waste legislation: A Snapshot.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     The disposal and treatment of waste comprises around four per cent of Aotearoa’s gross greenhouse gas emissions. The main sources include organic waste, wastewater treatment, incineration and open burning, and biological waste treatment (composting).

27.     The consultation period aligns with a separate consultation led by the Ministry for the Environment on a national Emissions Reduction Plan. The outcomes from both consultations will influence the development of actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions associated with the waste sector, and Auckland’s ability to achieve its regional emissions reduction targets of halving emissions by 2030 and reaching net zero emissions by 2050, as adopted by the council through Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     Feedback on the consultation document from relevant council departments and council-controlled organisations will be sought from subject matter experts.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     Changes to the waste strategy and legislation would impact many aspects of waste management including public awareness and education campaigns, purchasing choices, the way waste is collected and managed, and individual roles and responsibilities.

30.     The vision and direction of government efforts to support a circular economy may stimulate opportunities for greater reuse, recycling and recovery of materials such as through local resource recovery centres. Principles proposed for a new waste strategy such as taking responsibility for waste and delivering equitable and inclusive outcomes underpin the changes proposed and the way those would be assessed and delivered.

31.     Local board views provided on the draft submission will be either incorporated within the report or appended to the submission, depending on when feedback is received. Local boards provided strong direction through the development of the Waste Plan 2018 and other related recent submissions on government policy and these views will inform the overall direction of the submission.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     Staff have contacted the Independent Māori Statutory Board, the Tāmaki Makaurau Kaitiaki Forum and the Infrastructure and Environmental Services Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum to alert them to this proposal and the opportunity to input.

33.     The proposal includes opportunities for Māori expertise in any new independent advisory bodies, and increased Māori participation in decision-making at different levels, especially investment. It also seeks to address the gap in current waste management legislation around te Tiriti o Waitangi and Te Ao Māori.

34.     Previous feedback from consultation on the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan included 214 submissions received from Māori, with three from Para Kore Marae. These submissions showed key areas of support were for increasing the waste levy, resources and support for Māori initiatives, the food scraps kerbside collection (particularly from south Auckland respondents), Community Recycling Centres and local jobs, advocating for product stewardship (particular a container deposit scheme) and a focus on construction and demolition waste.

35.     Feedback expressed on previous related submissions, including consultation undertaken in March 2018 on the draft Waste Plan 2018 and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri will be incorporated into the development of this submission.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     The submission can be developed within existing budget provision and as part of business-as-usual central government advocacy activity.

37.     As the consultation is on proposed policy and legislation changes, it is not yet possible to quantify the budgetary consequences for the council. Potential financial implications for the council will be considered as part of the council’s submission.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     No risks related to the local board input into this process have been identified.

39.     Potential risks to the council arising from strategy and legislation changes will be considered as part of the council’s submission.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     The consultation document contains 43 questions that the Ministry is seeking responses to. Following discussion with staff, the feedback template provides a targeted list of questions that local boards may wish to focus their feedback on. This has been sent separately to the Senior Advisors and Advisors.

41.     Any local board feedback received after 10 November, but before 5pm 22 November 2021 will be appended to the council’s submission.

42.     The final submission is due to the Ministry for the Environment by 26 November 2021. A copy of the final submission will be provided to all elected members, local board members, and the Independent Māori Statutory Board once submitted.  

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacob van der Poel – Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol Hayward – Team Leader Policy & Operations Manager

Glen Boyd – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2021/00624

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on reports to be presented to the board for 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme. The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by the local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance to staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to local board business meetings, and distributed to council staff.

4.       The October 2021 governance forward work calendar for the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board is provided as Attachment A. The information contained within this attachment is as accurate as possible under covid-19 circumstances.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      note the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board governance forward work calendar for October 2021 as set out in Attachment A of this agenda report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Govenance Forward Work Calendar November 2021

227

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Michelle Riley - PA/Office Manager

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board - Record of Workshops October 2021

File No.: CP2021/00611

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a record of Devonport-Takapuna Local Board workshops held during October 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the workshop held on 5 October 2021, the board was briefed on:

 

Local Board Services

-     Briefing on implementation of Local Board Plan

 

Auckland Unlimited

-     Improving Economic Development Outcomes

 

Auckland Transport

-     Lake Road Improvements

 

3.       At the workshop held on 26 October 2021, the board was briefed on:

 

Local Board Services & Finance

-     Workshop 1 LBWP and LBA Consultation

 

Planning

-     National Policy Statement on Urban Development

Records of these workshops are attached to this report.

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the records of the workshops held in October 2021

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport Takapuna Local Board Workshop Record Tuesday 5 October 2021

231

b

Devonport Takapuna Local Board Workshop Record Tuesday 26 October 2021

239

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Michelle Riley - PA/Office Manager

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

Elected Members' Reports

File No.: CP2021/00601

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the members of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board to provide updates on the projects and issues they have been involved in since the October 2021 Meeting

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive and thank member George Wood for his written report.

b)      receive and thank member Jan O’Connor for her written report

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport Takapuna Local Board - 16 November 2021 - George Wood members report

245

b

Devonport Takapuna Local Board - 16 November 2021 - Jan O'Connor members report

253

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Michelle Riley - PA/Office Manager

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

Chairpersons' Report

File No.: CP2021/00591

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the Chairperson of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board to provide updates on the projects and issues relevant to the board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive and thank Chairperson R Jackson for her verbal report

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Michelle Riley - PA/Office Manager

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Allan Morris - Presentation - Sacred Grove  Page 259

Item 8.1      Attachment b    Sacred Grove - Boardwalk Report                Page 271


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 












Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

16 November 2021

 

 

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[1] Māori housing grants are only available for housing developments undertaken in conjunction with an urban marae and must fill the same general purpose as papakāinga