I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 18 November 2021

2.00pm

Skype for Business

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Gary Brown

 

Deputy Chairperson

Victoria Short

 

Members

Andy Dunn

 

 

Janet Fitzgerald, JP

 

 

Gary Holmes

 

 

Julia Parfitt, JP

 

 

Alexis Poppelbaum

 

 

Leanne Willis

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Louise Healy

Democracy Advisor

 

12 November 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 419 205

Email: louise.healy@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation: 2nd Hand Golf Limited                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Auckland Transport Update to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

            November 2021                                                                                                              7

12        Allocation of Local Board Transport Capital Fund                                                  11

13        Landowner Approval - Waterworld Summer 2021/2022 Tour

            (Covering report)                                                                                                         15

14        Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy                                 17

15        Draft Contributions Policy 2021                                                                                 55

16        Road names for three new public roads at 2 Pohewa Road, Silverdale               89

17        Members' Reports                                                                                                        99

18        Governance forward work calendar                                                                        111

19        Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshop records                                              115

20        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 21 October 2021, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation: 2nd Hand Golf Limited

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Tania Collins from 2nd Hand Golf has requested a deputation to provide an update on their activities. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Ms Collins for her presentation.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

Auckland Transport Update to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board November 2021

File No.: CP2021/16828

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on Auckland Transport activities in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report updates the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board on transport related activities within the local board area and covers:

·    a summary of Auckland Transport projects and operations in the local board area.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport update November 2021.

Horopaki

Context

3.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways.

4.       This report updates the local board on Auckland Transport projects and operations in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Auckland Transport projects and operations in the local board area

5.       All of Auckland Transport (AT) projects were postponed or put on hold with the announcement by the Government on 17 August that put the country into COVID-19 Level 4 lockdown. This required staff and contractors to stay at home.

6.       COVID-19 Level 3 was then implemented in the Auckland region on 21 September, however this level still included severe restrictions in place which has impacted on the ability to deliver projects as only essential and safety work is being carried out as necessary.

7.       It is unlikely that AT will get back to full delivery on various projects until the region has dropped to COVID-19 Level 2.  In this regard there are only minimal changes to the status of projects as reported in the October report.

8.       AT is intending to provide all Local Boards with an update on our Forward Works Programme before the end of the year. Hibiscus and Bays Local Board is scheduled to have their Capital Works Programme workshop on Thursday, 18 November 2021.

9.       The table below has a general summary of projects and activities of interest to the local board with their current status.  Please note that all timings are indicative and are subject to change:

Item

Update

Glenvar Road / East Coast Road Corridor Improvements

Following the completion of the Single Stage Business Case (SSBC) and subsequent approval by the AT Board, work has commenced to procure Professional Services to carry out the detailed design of the proposed improvements as per the SSBC recommendation.  The Advance Notice to market was released on 28 September 2021.  The Request for Proposal (RFP) was released on 27 October 2021 with tender closing in 4 weeks.  Contract is expected to be awarded in January 2022.

Hibiscus Coast Highway - Hatfields Bridge to Waiwera Road (Road Safety)

Project currently in investigation stage and is planned for delivery in Financial Year 2023/2024.

East Coast Road and Wilks Road intersection (Road Safety)

Ongoing discussions with property owner regarding a driveway on East Coast Road.  Process has been delayed by COVID-19 alert levels as on-site meetings were not permitted.

Whangaparāoa Rd/Karepiro Rd intersection improvements (Network Operations)

Currently in Scheme Design, the plan is to start construction next financial year 2022/2023.

Whangaparāoa Rd / Main St intersection improvements (Network Operations)

Construction expected to commence Sunday 17 October 2021.

301 Beach Road, Campbells Bay - Pedestrian Improvements

Project is in detailed design.

Anzac Road, Browns Bay – Pedestrian Improvements

Project is in detailed design.

Beach Road and Bute Road, Browns Bay – Roundabout upgrade

Project is currently in detailed design stage.

Planned start date for this activity is late January/early February 2022.

Hibiscus Coast Highway – Footpath Project between Noel Avenue and Puriri Avenue

Programmed for delivery next Financial Year.  However, if extra funding is approved this Financial Year team will deliver before June 2022.

Orewa Town Centre Safety Improvements

Construction is underway.

Works completed so far:

·    Asphalt speed humps and side islands on Moenui Avenue, Tamariki Avenue and Moana Avenue. 

·    3 raised pedestrian crossings on Florence, Moana and Tamariki Avenue.

Works in construction: 

An asphalt speed hump on Tamariki Ave and side islands on Moana Avenue and Hibiscus Coast Highway are being constructed this week.

Laurence Street, Manly – Bus stop upgrades

Line marking booked for 11 November 2021.  Construction is almost 50 percent complete.

Ladies Mile, Manly – Bus stop upgrades

Line marking and civil work booked for 9 November 2021.  Construction is almost three-quarters complete.

Whangaparāoa Road/Gulf Harbour Drive, Hobbs Bay – Bus stop upgrades

Whangaparāoa Road line marking undertaken on 25 October 2021 and 1 November 2021.

Construction just over 50 percent complete.

Gulf Harbour Drive line marking booked for 10 November 2021.

Hibiscus Coast Hwy, Hatfield Beach – upgrade stop and turning circle changes

With Design and Standards team for review.  Design is just over 50 percent complete.

Beach Road, Murrays Bay – upgrade bus stop and pedestrian crossing

Significant costs associated with this project, including bus stop relocation and crossing.  This will be brought to the local board in a future business meeting.

94 Brightside Road – raised zebra crossing

Project currently in investigation stage.  Scheme design planned to be finished in the 2021/2022 Financial Year.

3 Sunrise Avenue – raised zebra crossing

Project currently in investigation stage.  Scheme design planned to be finished in the 2021/2022 Financial Year.

218 Hibiscus Coast Highway – signalised midblock crossing

Construction is almost complete, with only minor elements left to complete.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

10.     Auckland Transport engages closely with council on developing strategy, actions, and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan, and council’s priorities.

11.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.     The impact of information (or decisions) in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.     Auckland Transport regularly corresponds with the local board on matters of interest in their area. This is for the local boards information and to provide an opportunity for the local board to provide feedback.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

14.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori.  Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

15.     There are no financial implications in receiving this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

16.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks.  Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for all their projects.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

17.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board next month.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Emma Petrenas – Elected Member Relationship Partner - North

Authorisers

Paul Thompson – Head of Community Engagement – North

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

Allocation of Local Board Transport Capital Fund

File No.: CP2021/15447

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek a resolution to approve the priorities of the projects set by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for Auckland Transport to deliver from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report covers:

3.       A summary of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

4.       Five projects are briefly described and recommended to be funded through the Local Board Transport Capital Fund and the report notes that this will expend nearly all of the budget with Bays School Improvements to be further refined in a future workshop with the local board.

5.       There are risks that the latest COVID-19 lockdown may mean further budget cuts are necessary in the future, therefore it is expedient that prioritised projects are contracted out as soon as practicable.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport Local Board Transport Capital Fund report November 2021

Resolution HB/2021/96 has already approved $1,800,000 for Ōrewa Boulevard Stage 3 with this resolution noting that the remaining $714,746 be allocated to projects in the East Coast Bays subdivision. 

b)      approve expenditure of the local board transport fund as follows:

i)        $14,000 for the formalisation of a crossing on Beachfront Lane, Browns Bay

ii)       $140,000 for walkway lighting in Aickin Reserve (between Deep Creek Road and Beach Road)

iii)      $30,000 for wayfinding signage – contribution of wayfinding previously delivered

iv)      $10,000 for Torbay bollards along the Plaza edge

c)      approve in principle the remaining budget of $520,746 reserved for East Coast Bays School safety improvements.

Horopaki

Context

6.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways.

7.       This report summarises the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) projects in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area to enable the local board to prioritise the projects it wishes to progress.

8.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by AT. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must also be:

·    safe

·    not impede network efficiency

·    be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The local board have indicated their prioritised list for consideration as per the chart below:

Hibiscus and Bays Prioritised Projects

Project

Description

Estimates

Formalised Crossing – Beachfront Lane, Browns Bay

 

Formalisation of a crossing on Beachfront Lane, Browns Bay.  There are two raised tables that can already be considered for investigation.  One links Phoenix Plaza to the reserve and the other links another key route to the play area at the reserve.

$14,000

Walkway lighting in Aicken Reserve

Walkway lighting in Aicken Reserve (between Deep Creek Road and Beach Road)

$140,000

Wayfinding Signage

Continuation of wayfinding signage previously delivered

$30,000

Torbay Bollards

Bollards along the Plaza edge, Torbay

$10,000

Bays School Improvements

 

The scope of these improvements still needs to be agreed with the local board.  Auckland Transport need to engage with the Safer Schools Team to develop proposals for expenditure and this project will be resolved after a further workshop with the local board.

$520,746

 

10.     AT’s recommendation is for the local board to support all of the above projects with the local board allocation for the remainder of this financial year and next totalling $2,514,746.

11.     Funding all the above projects will expend nearly all the Local Board Transport Capital Fund allocation with any left-over budget being available to deliver other minor projects at the local board’s discretion.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     Auckland Transport engages closely with council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and council’s priorities.

13.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network. These projects all support pedestrian and/or cyclist safety therefore contributing to climate change actions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     The impact of information in this report is mainly confined to AT. Where LBTCF projects are being progressed by Auckland Council’s Community Facilities group, engagement on progress has taken place. Any further engagement required with other parts of the Council group will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     AT have workshopped with the local board on their preferred projects they wish to progress. At this workshop matters discussed included:

·    priority of local board projects

·    allocation of the remaining LBTCF to projects.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

16.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts of opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

17.     Allocating the Local Board Transport Capital Fund budget as recommended will expend nearly all of the outstanding funds in this political term.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

18.     The impact of the latest COVID-19 lockdown has not been factored into these recommendations. There is a risk that budgets might be impacted by budget cuts resulting from the August – November 2021 lockdown.

19.     After the last lockdown in 2020, projects that were already contracted out once the Emergency Budget was resolved continued to be delivered, therefore the local board is advised to allocate funding to its preferred projects as soon as possible.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

20.     Once the local board’s resolutions are finalised, Auckland Transport will work to contract out the projects as soon as possible with regular updates to be given to the local board at key milestones for these projects.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Emma Petrenas – Elected Member Relationship Partner – North

Authorisers

Matthew Ah Mu – Programme Support Manager – Local Boards

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

Landowner Approval - Waterworld Summer 2021/2022 Tour (Covering report)

File No.: CP2021/17161

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To consider an application for landowner approval for the proposed Waterworld Summer 2021/2022 Tour event to be held at Browns Bay, Mairangi Bay and Red Beach on various dates in December 2021, January 2022 and February 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This is a late covering report for the above item.  The comprehensive agenda report was not available when the agenda went to print and will be provided prior to the 18 November 2021 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board meeting.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

The recommendations will be provided in the comprehensive agenda report.


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy

File No.: CP2021/16732

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek support for the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Strategy 2022-2032.  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities was adopted in 2014 as council’s strategy for community and social wellbeing. A review of the plan in 2018 identified it needed to be refreshed to align with the Auckland Plan 2050 outcomes and better address the changes and challenges in Tāmaki Makaurau. 

3.       These challenges include growing socio-economic disparities, population growth and intensification, the impacts of climate change and more recently COVID-19.  These impact on communities’ ability to thrive. 

4.       Through the refresh process we heard from diverse communities across the region on what is needed to help them thrive. These insights have shaped the draft strategy. 

5.       The draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities strategy sets out the high-level direction for the next 10 years to respond to these challenges and to what communities told us was important. 

6.       The draft strategy has four main outcome areas which are the building blocks for thriving: 

·    Manaakitanga | Quality of life: 

All Aucklanders enjoy the essentials of a good life and fulfil their potential  

·    Whanaungatanga | Community Connection: 
Aucklanders are connected and feel as though they belong 

·    Kotahitanga | Collective action:  

All Aucklanders can participate and they take collective action to meet common goals 

·    Kaitiakitanga | Sustainable futures:  

Aucklanders are connected to and care for the environment.

 

7.       The high-level outcomes are supported by objectives that cascade to three key shifts in the way we work:  from one-size fits all to targeting our responses, from adhoc and siloed to working in integrated ways, and shifting from council as expert to enabling community leadership. 

8.       Four investment principles focus resources to impact on community challenges. This will ensure there is a strong, intentional link between aspiration, investment and action, and that we focus on communities who experience the greatest inequities.

9.       A key constraint is that there is currently no additional budget attached to the proposed strategy. This means the pace of change will be reliant on future budget and implementation planning to either seek new investment or to refocus existing resources to the strategy’s objectives.

10.     Another limitation is that many of the barriers to people thriving relate to complex socio-economic factors where the council is not the primary deliverer.  

11.     The draft strategy will be reported to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in February 2022 for adoption. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      support the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Strategy 2022 – 2032 as set out in Attachment A to this report.  

Horopaki

Context

12.     The Auckland Plan Participation and Belonging outcome in particular sets the aspiration that ‘All Aucklanders will be part of and contribute to society, access opportunities, and have the chance to develop to their full potential’ 

13.     Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities was adopted in 2014 as council’s community and social wellbeing plan. It is a core plan to deliver the Auckland Plan 2050 which has a strong focus on fostering an inclusive Auckland where everyone has the chance to thrive. 

14.     In 2018 a review of Ngā Hapori Momoho identified several improvement areas. This included refreshing the strategy to better align it the new Auckland Plan 2050 and to address the changes and growing challenges facing Auckland.  

Diverse community voices have shaped the draft strategy approach

 

15.     The refreshed draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities strategy (Attachment A) has been informed by feedback from the diverse communities of Tāmaki Makaurau, key sector stakeholders, partners, and mana whenua. These voices are central to both the content of the strategy and how it will be used.  

16.     During 2019 and 2020 staff looked at feedback from over 50 previous public engagements, and then undertook face-to-face interviews, focus groups and online hui. We heard from over 400 community groups and leaders from across the region on what it means to thrive and what council can do to support that.  

17.     Staff presented the findings from this community engagement to local boards in March 2021 which can be accessed here.  

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Auckland is facing local and international challenges impacting thriving communities  

18.     At the 2018 Census there were nearly 1.6 million usual residents in Auckland, an increase of 11% since the 2013 Census, and this is projected to grow to 2.4 million by 2050[1].

19.     Tāmaki Makaurau is very diverse – it is home to the largest Polynesian population of any city in the world, and 40% of the population were born overseas.  

20.     Whilst many of those living in Auckland can make the most of all this region has to offer, there are still many who have limited capability to access social and economic resources and opportunities compared to the general population.  

21.     Many Aucklanders do not have access to the things they need to thrive. This restricts their ability to fully participate in society and in activities that have meaning and value to them. 

22.     Tāmaki Makaurau’s strong economic growth has not been shared equally, with Māori and Pasifika communities making considerably less each week than the rest of the Auckland population.  

23.     Over a third (38.5%) of Pasifika people and 46% of young people in Auckland are living in overcrowded and unsuitable homes[2].

24.     Only 50% of Aucklanders feel a sense of belonging in their neighbourhoods, and 49% have felt isolated and lonely[3]. 

25.     Tāmaki Makaurau is facing some key challenges over the next 10-20 years that provide the strategic drivers for the refreshed strategy. We need to respond to these if we want to maintain social cohesion and ensure all our people and communities are thriving.   

Challenge 1 

Challenge 2 

Challenge 3 

Growing wealth and income inequality will mean too many whānau cannot thrive. 

The pace and scale of growth and social change could undermine Aucklander’s sense of belonging and connection.

Our changing climate will make outcomes worse for those communities already struggling. 

 

26.     More recently other significant changes both locally and globally are contributing to why we need a strategy that takes an intentional approach to supporting thriving, inclusive and sustainable communities:  

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Changing the way council works can help address community challenges 

27.     In recognition of the 2018 review findings and from our community and stakeholder engagement, we know there needed to be some key shifts in the underlying thinking and approach of the council. We also need to be explicit in our priorities. Key shifts proposed include the following:  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FROM

TO

WHAT CHANGES WILL WE MAKE?

1

Ad hoc and siloed



Integrated and connected

We will work across the Auckland Council group, with government and across communities and sectors to support Aucklanders to thrive. We will share data, evidence and learning.

We will prioritise interventions which support coordination and collective impact to deliver on the multiple outcomes which impact Aucklander’s wellbeing (social, environmental, cultural and environmental).

2

One-size-fits all



Targeted approaches

We will change our current services, activities and ways of working to better meet the needs of whānau and communities, particularly those experiencing the greatest disparity in outcomes.

We will tailor services and activities to meet local needs and opportunities.

3

Council as expert



Council as enabler

We will support communities (whānau, hapū, iwi, people) to lead their own responses. We will enable them to define, deliver, and monitor the things that enable them to thrive.

We will measure our success based on the outcomes we enable rather than just the services and activities that we deliver.

 

What we want to achieve – an overview of the draft strategy 

28.     To guide how we respond to these identified challenges and to support the key shifts we need to make, the draft strategy sets out four outcomes and six objectives. The outcomes set out where communities want to be in the future. Objectives identify where to focus to get there.  

Outcomes: Four building blocks for thriving 

29.     The draft strategy has four main outcome areas which if achieved would contribute to thriving communities. 

·    Manaakitanga | Quality of life 
All Aucklanders enjoy the essentials of a good life and fulfil their potential  

 

·    Whanaungatanga | Community connection 
Aucklanders are connected and feel as though they belong 

 

·    Kotahitanga | Collective action 
All Aucklanders can participate, and they take collective action to meet common goals 

 

·    Kaitiakitanga | Sustainable futures 
Aucklanders are connected to and care for the environment. 

 

Objectives: Where should we focus our action 

30.     To help give direction on how we might achieve the intended outcomes, we have identified six objective areas which will provide guidance on what actions could be taken by the organisation to contribute to the outcomes. 

Application, logo, company name

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31.     While we have grouped action areas under each objective many of these will contribute to multiple objectives. Many are focused on addressing complex societal challenges which council does not have all the levers, resource or influence to directly address.  

32.     These objectives do however provide direction on how we can use the levers available to us (such as our procurement power) to affect and influence change, within our control.  

Investment principles will help us to invest in what will make the greatest difference 

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33.     The draft strategy proposes we invest in our resource to make the biggest impact, and this will be guided by four key principles:

34.     Auckland Council also has a range of roles and levers that we can use to effect change in conjunction with partners to help communities thrive.  

35.     Our presence in and understanding of the community is one of our most powerful tools. This can be utilised in several areas: urban form, procurement, community facilities, our workforce, transport, community development and grants.  

Strengths of the draft strategy  

36.     As an outcome focused strategy, it provides focus and direction, but is not prescriptive on processes or actions. It provides scope for creative and innovative responses to achieving the outcomes and objectives.  

37.     The high-level outcomes and objectives in the draft strategy cascade to key shifts, investment principles and to three-year implementation plans. This will ensure there is a strong and intentional link between aspiration, investment, and action.   

38.     The draft strategy also presents both council and partners with an opportunity to do things differently, apply new approaches and have the flexibility to respond to local needs in ways that are appropriate and effective.  

39.     This is important as it not only addresses current challenges but allows flexibility to respond to emerging challenges in the future as our intended end outcomes will not change.  

40.     It also presents us with an opportunity to partner with our communities to incorporate existing and emerging approaches from global research as well as those generated in Aotearoa, so that we are using all tools available to collectively to achieve the outcomes.  

Constraints and limitations of the draft strategy 

41.     Nga Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities is a 10-year strategy focused on long-term outcomes. It will take some time to see progress and the impact of actions, especially given the complexity of the challenges. 

42.     A key limitation is that many of the barriers to people thriving relate to complex socio-economic factors that council does not hold the primary levers for. 

43.     Council is, however, well-placed to use all of its resources and levers more effectively and work alongside central government and communities to support change. 

44.     A key constraint is that there is no additional budget to support delivery of the draft strategy, so the pace of change will be subject to how effectively existing resources and budget can be realigned and directed to the draft strategy’s new objectives.  

45.     New investment will need to be considered as part of future annual and long-term budget processes. 

46.     There is opportunity, however, for reprioritisation of existing resource and investment to be considered as part of implementation planning. The outcome of this will be reported to the governing body as part of the first three-year implementation plan (FY2022-2025). 

47.     The draft strategy relies heavily on the significant cooperation and commitment across the council, elected members and community partners for it to be effective.  This in turn relies on visible and active leadership, and ongoing monitoring of progress and impact.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

48.     During engagement, we heard from communities that the environment was a significant contributor to their wellbeing. Climate change and environmental degradation are a threat to the way our communities aspire to live in Tāmaki Makaurau. 

49.     The Kaitiakitanga outcome was created to reflect the voices of mana whenua and community, through prioritising environmental wellbeing and encouraging community action and sustainability. Actions developed in the Thriving Communities three-year implementation plans will need to consider the connection between the wellbeing of our communities and the wellbeing of the environment. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

50.     This is a proposed strategy for the whole council group and will also be used to challenge and guide council teams and CCO’s in their implementation roles.  

51.     Staff and teams from across the council and CCO’s have been involved in the refresh process, including attending a series of workshops to help identify existing and future actions to support what communities told us was important.  

52.     Going forward staff will work closely with the council group on implementation planning and the development of the first three-year implementation plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

53.     Local boards have a strong interest, and play a key role, in creating thriving communities in their areas. All local boards have local board plan outcomes that support thriving communities, and many are already working towards several Thriving Communities objectives.

54.     Community engagement included communities from across all local board areas.  

55.     The findings from the engagement phase were shared with elected members and engagement participants in early 2021. They were also published on the Thriving Communities Have Your Say page. 

56.     Staff attended local board workshops in October 2021 to share the high-level draft strategy. Local boards were broadly supportive of the approach and provided helpful feedback that has helped shape the revised draft.  Common themes in local board feedback include: 

·     concern for isolated communities

·     a strong desire to build the strategy into work plans. Local boards could see the benefit of the approach and were eager to turn this into a practical response through their local plans

·     concerns about funding the strategy, and opportunities to leverage existing or additional resource to support their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

57.     The 2018 Census found that over 23% of Aotearoa’s Māori population live in Tāmaki Makaurau, making up 11.5% of Auckland’s population – the highest Māori population in any city in Aotearoa[4].

58.     The average age of Auckland’s Māori population is 24.9 years, compared to Auckland’s average of 34.7 years. As this young population grows and reaches working age, Māori will be a critical part of supporting our economy and ageing population. 

59.     Although Māori make up a large proportion of Tamaki Makaurau’s population, they have not equitably shared in our economic growth. In 2018 the median income for all Aucklanders was $34,000, but for Māori it was $27,000[5]. 

60.     By focusing on achieving equitable outcomes for Māori, this strategy will make a positive impact on the social, cultural and economic wellbeing of tangata, whanau and hapori.  

Engagement to understand the needs of Māori communities 

61.     To ensure the strategy is relevant and effective for Māori, staff undertook individual engagement interviews with 17 mana whenua iwi and two mataawaka organisations.  

62.     Key inputs into the strategy from the engagement process include:

·    an environmental objective to reflect the importance of whenua to wellbeing and thriving

·    focus on achieving equity

·    recognition that whakawhanaungatanga and connection is central to thriving communities.

Delivering Māori outcomes 

63.     The council’s direction for delivering Māori outcomes is set out in Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, which reflects the aspirations of Auckland’s Māori communities.  

64.     The draft strategy supports the Schedule of Issues of Significance 2021 by addressing the four pou of social, cultural, economic, and environmental wellbeing for Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau. 

65.     Mana whenua and mataawaka will have an opportunity to provide further feedback on the draft plan in November 2021. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

66.     There is currently no additional budget attached to the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Strategy. This means in the short term it will need to be delivered within existing budgets and resources of council and CCOs. Where any additional investment is required, this will need to be considered through the long-term plan or annual plan processes.  

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

 

If <event>:

Then <impact>:

Possible mitigations:

If it is not clear that the draft strategy should drive reprioritisation of existing resources. 

It may create expectations that there will be additional budget to support the implementation of the draft strategy.

All public-facing communications and guidance about the draft strategy will make it clear it is intended to focus & re-prioritise existing resources.

Future budget and implementation planning will identify how actions will be funded from existing budgets or through seeking new investment.

If the draft strategy is viewed as too ‘high level’ and does not provide clear enough direction.

The draft strategy may fail to have any meaningful impact on the way the organisation delivers services and therefore would have no meaningful impact on the desired outcomes.

Develop a strong implementation plan and ensure there is visible and active senior leadership to drive implementation.

The objectives will provide appropriate level of direction without being too prescriptive.

Incorporating a measurement framework in the implementation plan to help understand impact.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

67.     Community engagement on the draft strategy will be undertaken in November 2021.

68.     This feedback and local board resolutions will be reported to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in February 2022, when the committee considers the draft strategy for adoption.  

69.     The draft strategy will be supported by a three-year implementation plan with tailored actions, and a monitoring and evaluation framework to track progress and impact. These two items are being developed for consideration in April 2022. 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy

27

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Mackenzie Blucher - Graduate Policy Advisor

Dave Jaggs - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - General Manager - Community and Social Policy

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

Draft Contributions Policy 2021

File No.: CP2021/16773

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the draft Contributions Policy 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Development contributions allow for an equitable and proportionate share of the total cost of growth-related capital expenditure to be recovered from the development community.

3.       The Finance and Performance Committee adopted the draft Contributions Policy 2021 for consultation at its meeting on 16 September 2021 (FIN/2021/84). 

4.       Local board feedback is being sought to inform the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration of the adoption of the Contribution Policy 2021 in December 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the draft Contributions Policy 2021 on the following key consultation topics:

i)        updating policy for capital projects in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031

ii)       inclusion of projects beyond 10-years to the policy in stages starting with Drury

iii)      requiring developers to pay their contributions earlier

iv)      proposal to support Māori development with grants

v)      any other issues.

Horopaki

Context

5.       Auckland’s population is expected to grow by 260,000 in the next ten years on top of the rapid population growth experienced in the last decade, bringing the projected population to approximately 1.9 million by 2031.

6.       Construction of 145,800 new dwellings is forecast in the next ten years. To support the development enabled by the Auckland Unitary Plan, the council is facing immediate demands for infrastructure in key growth areas and in response to construction on upzoned land, plan changes and the impact of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       Development contributions allow for an equitable and proportionate share of the total cost of growth-related capital expenditure to be recovered from the development community. The Contributions Policy sets out how the council will recover from new development an appropriate and fair share of the cost of infrastructure investment attributable to growth. There were four key consultation topics:

i)     Updating policy for capital projects in the 10-year Budget

          The draft policy provides for the recovery of $2.4 billion of development contributions revenue from $9.0 billion of projects with a growth component included in the10-year budget.  The draft policy also included updated forecasts of population growth and dwelling construction. The combined impact of these changes is to lower the weighted average Development Contributions price from $23,900 to $21,100.

ii)  Inclusion of projects beyond 10-years to the policy in stages starting with Drury

          Extensive work has been undertaken in recent years on the infrastructure requirements to support growth in the investment priority areas. However, further work is required before these costs can be included in the contributions policy. Area specific amendments to the contributions policy will be proposed for consultation as the information becomes available.

          The first step in the Contributions Policy 2021 will be to add a programme of expenditure to fund some of the key infrastructure required to support growth in the Drury area. The impact of this change is to raise the Development Contributions price in Drury to $84,900 from between $11,000 and $18,300.

iii) Requiring developers to pay their contributions earlier

          The council proposed that Development Contributions be paid at the time of building consent for all development (residential and non-residential) except non-commercial development on Māori land (explained further below). This requires Development Contributions due at building consent to be paid 6 to 24 months earlier than under the current policy and reverses the changes made to the policy in 2019. When combined with the other changes proposed this lowers the weighted average Development Contributions price to $19,300.

iv) A proposal to support Māori development with grants

          The draft policy proposed continuing the support for marae development and papakāinga and Māori housing[6] on Māori land through grants available through the Cultural Initiatives Fund. These grants can cover payment of development contributions in appropriate circumstances, along with other kinds of development costs.

8.       The proposed changes to the Contributions Policy 2021 were reported to the Finance and Performance Committee at its meeting on 16 September – refer Attachment A - Draft Contributions Policy 2021.

Consultation

9.       Formal public consultation was held in September and October 2021. To support the consultation a number of documents were made available on the Have Your Say website, https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/dc-policy.

10.     Two online Have Your Say events were held to provide opportunities for developers and other interested parties to learn more about the draft policy, ask questions and provide their feedback. A third event was also held to allow interested parties to present their views directly to the Finance and Performance Committee. All comments have been captured and will be reported through to the Finance and Performance Committee to inform decision-making on the final policy.

11.     A summary of the feedback received from submitters is set out in Attachment B: Draft Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement guidance

12.       Recommendations in this report have a neutral climate impact as they relate to the funding of capital investment rather than decisions on the activities to be undertaken.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views guidance

13.       The information presented on the projects included in the draft Contributions Policy 2021 was developed in conjunction with the following council-controlled organisations and council units:

·    Auckland Transport

·    Eke Panuku Development Auckland

·    Healthy Waters

·    Community Facilities

·    Community and Social Policy.

14.        The Chief Economist Unit and Research Investigations and Monitoring Unit supported analysis of the impact of higher development contributions on the pace of development and on land and house prices. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.        The development contribution price varies by location depending on the cost of infrastructure required to support development in an area.

16.        Local board feedback is being sought to inform the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration of the adoption of the Contribution Policy 2021 in December 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.        Recent legislative changes require the contributions policy to support the development of Māori land. Feedback from iwi on the draft policy was sought as part of consultation and via engagement with the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum.  All developers, including mana whenua, were provided an opportunity to present their feedback to the Finance and Performance Committee on 12 October.

18.        The Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum have provided their feedback which has been included in Attachment B: Draft Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     The 10-year budget assumes development contributions revenue of $2.7 billion. After completing the analysis of the cost of investments in the 10-year budget that can be recovered with development contributions and the impact of the proposed policy changes, it is estimated that the revenue will be $2.6 billion. The achievement of this revised revenue forecast requires as a first step the implementation of a contributions policy updated for the capital expenditure decisions in the 10-year budget and the other changes proposed in this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     The recommendation requesting local boards views does not present any risk. The risks associated with amending the contributions policy are set out in the report to the 16 September Finance and Performance Committee, Attachment A: Development Contributions Policy 2021 Consultation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     Feedback from the public consultation will be reported to the Finance and Performance Committee workshop on 10 November 2021.

22.     Potential changes to the draft will be reported at the Finance and Performance Committee workshop on 1 December 2021. Staff will report to Finance and Performance Committee for the final policy adoption on 9 December 2021. Local board feedback will be included in the report.

23.     The Contributions Policy 2021 is proposed to be implemented in January 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Development Contributions Policy 2021 report to the Finance and Performance Committee

59

b

Draft Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received

75

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Andrew Duncan - Manager Financial Policy

Authorisers

Ross Tucker - General Manager, Financial Strategy and Planning

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

Glenn Boyd – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

Road names for three new public roads at 2 Pohewa Road, Silverdale

File No.: CP2021/16576

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve names for three new public roads within the new subdivision undertaken by Build Rich Limited, at 2 Pohewa Road, Silverdale.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, Build Rich Limited (the applicant) shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road names for the local board’s approval. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       Build Rich Limited has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the local board:

 

Applicant’s Preference

Alternatives

Road 1

Kapehu Road                   

Excel Road

Road 2

Clara Road                     

Cleo Road or Silver Harvest Road

Road 3

Bronzewater Drive

Phoenix Drive or Fortune Drive

 

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the guidelines.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)   approve three road names as follows for the new public roads in the Build Rich Limited subdivision at 2 Pohewa Road, East Coast Heights in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

(i)         Kapehu Road                   (Road 1)

(ii)        Clara Road                       (Road 2)

(iii)       Bronzewater Drive           (Road 3)

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The 95-lot subdivision was approved on 30/10/2020 with council reference BUN60343364.

6.       Site and location plans of the subdivision can be found in attachments A and B to the agenda report.

7.       In accordance with the Standards, all public roads and all private roads serving more than five lots require a name.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       The guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

9.       The guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

10.     Theme: Build Rich Limited has chosen a suite of names they consider appropriate for the area.

11.     In this regard the names and their relevance are detailed as below:

Proposed Names for Road 1

Meanings

Kapehu Road            (preferred)

Māori translation for ‘compass’

Excel Road                (alternative)

To be extremely good at something. Implication of the good development of the road and locality

 

Proposed Names for Road 2

Meanings

Clara Road                 (preferred)

Meaning ‘clear, bright, famous’

Cleo Road                  (alternative)

Short for ‘Cleopatra’ the name of one of the most powerful women in history.

Silver Harvest Road (alternative)

Inspired by silver poplar and orchardists historic to the area.

 

Proposed Names for Road 3

Meanings

Bronzewater Drive    (preferred)

Reflective of the non-corrosive bronze used in the Silverdale / Wade river boats and in keeping with the theme of the already approved Goldwater and Silverwater Drives in this locality.

Phoenix Drive            (alternative)

Colourful and vibrant. Associated with the sun, a phoenix obtains new life by arising from the ashes of its predecessor. 

Fortune Road            (alternative)

Phenomenon and belief that defines the experience of notably positive, negative, or improbable events, an emblem of the prosperity of the local community.

 

12.     Assessment: The proposed name options have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

13.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand has confirmed that the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

14.     Road Type: The road types ‘Road’ and ‘Drive’ are acceptable road types for the new roads.

15.     Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of Council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     To aid local board decision making, the guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

20.     On 13 October 2021 14 mana whenua were contacted by council on behalf of Build Rich Limited through the Resource Consent Unit’s central facilitation process as set out in the guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with a general interest in the area were contacted 13 October 2021:

·    Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua

·    Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

·    Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

·    Ngāti Tai Ki Tāmaki

·    Te Kawerau ā Maki

·    Te Akitai Waiohua

·    Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

·    Ngāti Paoa Trust Board

·    Ngati Paoa Iwi Trust

·    Ngāti Maru

·    Ngāti Whanaunga

·    Te Patukirikiri

·    Ngāti Manuhiri

·    Ngāti Wai

 

21.     By the close of the consultation period no responses had been received.

22.     The level of feedback received from mana whenua is often dependent on the scale of the development and its level of significance.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

24.     Build Rich Limited has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new private and public road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Pohewa Road Scheme Plan

95

b

Pohewa Road Locality Plan

97

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bruce Angove – Subdivision Advisor – Orewa

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

Members' Reports

File No.: CP2021/16639

 

  

 

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for members to update the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board on matters they have been involved in over the last month.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for members of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to provide a report on their activities for the month.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the reports from Local Board Members G Brown, V Short, J Fitzgerald, A Poppelbaum and A Dunn.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Gary Brown – Member report

101

b

Victoria Short - Member report

103

c

Janet Fitzgerald - Member report

105

d

Alexis Poppelbaum - Member report

107

e

Andy Dunn - Member report

109

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Louise Healy - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

Governance forward work calendar

File No.: CP2021/16640

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board over the coming months until the end of the electoral term. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is required

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed.  Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      note the governance forward work calendar.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work calendar

113

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Louise Healy - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2021/16641

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Attached are the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshop records for October 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      note the workshop records for October 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

14 October 2021 Public Workshop Record

117

b

28 October 2021 Public Workshop Record

119

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Louise Healy - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator 



[1] Stats NZ (2020). 2018 Census data – Auckland region. Retrieved from https://www.stats.govt.nz/tools/2018-census-place-summaries/auckland-region

[2] Stats NZ (2020). 2018 Census household crowding. Retrieved from https://www.stats.govt.nz/

[3] Allpress, J. and Reid, A. (2021). Quality of Life survey 2020: results for Auckland. Auckland Council technical report, TR2021/16

[4] Stats NZ (2020). 2018 Census. Retrieved from https://www.stats.govt.nz/

[5] ibid

[6] Māori housing grants are only available for housing developments undertaken in conjunction with an urban marae and must fill the same general purpose as papakāinga