I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Howick Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Venue:

 

Monday, 15 November 2021

6.00pm

Via Skype for Business

 

Howick Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Adele White

 

Deputy Chairperson

John Spiller

 

Members

Katrina Bungard

 

 

Bo Burns

 

 

David Collings

 

 

Bruce Kendall

 

 

Mike Turinsky

 

 

Bob Wichman

 

 

Peter Young, JP

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Tracey Freeman

Democracy Advisor

 

10 November 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 537 862

Email: tracey.freeman@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum update to Howick Local Board on the clean streams project                                                                                          5

8.2     Macleans Park Mountain Bike Track                                                                  6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Governing Body Member update                                                                                 9

12        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                  11

13        Grant of a new commercial licence term and use of the site at 115 Picton Street, Howick                                                                                                                           15

14        Howick Local Grant Round Two 2021/2022 grant allocations                                21

15        National Emissions Reduction Plan Discussion Document – draft council submission                                                                                                                   33

16        Submission on a proposed new national waste strategy and associated waste legislation                                                                                                                     39

17        Draft Contributions Policy 2021                                                                                 45

18        Landowner approval for mobile trading in Macleans Park and Cockle Bay Reserve                                                                                                                                       79

19        Three Waters Economic Regulation Submission                                                    83

20        Urgent Decision - Howick Local Board Feedback on the Resource Management Enabling Housing Supply Amendment Bill                                                              91

21        Governance forward work calendar                                                                          99

22        Workshop records                                                                                                     105

23        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Howick Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Monday, 18 October 2021, as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Howick Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum update to Howick Local Board on the clean streams project

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Julie Chambers on behalf of the Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum will be in attendance to present an update on the clean streams project to the local board.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from the Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum and thank Julie Chambers for her attendance.

Attachments

a          Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum Update............................................ 117

 

 

8.2       Macleans Park Mountain Bike Track

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Mr Martin Spinks will present to the board on the mountain bike track that is currently being used at Macleans Park.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      thank Martin Spinks for his deputation and attendance.

Attachments

a          Macleans Park Mountain Bike Track............................................................ 125

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

Governing Body Member update

File No.: CP2021/00032

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Howick Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the local board on regional matters.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing the Howick Ward Councillors with an opportunity to update the local board on regional matters they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal reports from Cr Paul Young and Cr Sharon Stewart QSM.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Freema - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2021/00019

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This item gives the local board chairperson an opportunity to update the local board on any announcements and note the chairperson’s written report.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing the local board chairperson with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the chairperson’s verbal update and written report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairpersons Report November 2021

13

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

Grant of a new commercial licence term and use of the site at 115 Picton Street, Howick

File No.: CP2021/13670

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.         To seek Howick Local Board approval to grant a new commercial licence term and retain the existing use as an open-air market operator to Howick Village Association Incorporated over approximately 1356 square metres of the site located at 115 Picton Street, Howick.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.         The land at 115 Picton Street, Howick is currently held in fee simple by Auckland Council under the Local Government Act 2002 (hereon referred to as the LGA), the site is not classified as a reserve.

3.         Howick Village Association Incorporated (hereon referred to as the licensee) hold a commercial licence with Auckland Council for use of the land at 115 Picton Street, Howick operating as an open-air market on Saturdays between 8.00am and 3:30pm.

4.         The site is known as the ‘Howick Village Market’ and is considered an iconic commodity to the local area.

5.         The current licence with Council commenced on 1 April 2016 with a final expiry date of 31 August 2021. The licence automatically operates as a monthly tenancy on the same terms and conditions on final expiry of the licence.

6.         The licensee has formally applied to Auckland Council for a new licence term over approximately 1356sqm of the following parcel:

·    Part Lots 2 & 3 DP 31428 – containing approximately 1356sqm situated at 115 Picton Street, Howick

7.         The licensee wishes to continue operating the site known as the ‘Howick Village Market’ as an open-air market under the proposed new licence.

8.         The licensee has also applied to increase the market use to include operations on Sundays.

9.         This report seeks Local Board approval for the new licence term and existing use over approximately 1356sqm of the site at 115 Picton Street, Howick.

10.       A twelve-month termination clause for redevelopment purposes in favour of Auckland Council will be included in the new licence agreement applicable from the first renewal term commencing 1 September 2026.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve a new commercial licence term and use to Howick Village Association Incorporated over approximately 1356 square metres of the site at 115 Picton Street, Howick to continue operation as an open-air market on the following terms:

i)        The new licence term commences on 1 September 2021 with an initial term of five years with an expiry date of 31 August 2026.

ii)       Four rights of renewals of five-year terms with a final expiry date of 31 August 2046 (subject to all rights of renewals being exercised).

iii)      The new licence will contain a twelve-month termination clause in favour of Auckland Council for redevelopment purposes.

iv)      The earliest opportunity the twelve-month termination clause can be evoked is from the initial five-year term commencing 1 September 2026.

v)      The site continues to operate as open-air market use on Saturdays only.

Horopaki

Context

11.       This report considers the commercial licensing conditions with respect to the commercial licence dated 23 May 2016.

12.       Howick Village Association Incorporated hold a commercial licence with Auckland Council for use of approximately 1356sqm of the land at 115 Picton Street, Howick operating as an open-air market site on Saturdays between 8.00am and 3:30pm.

13.       The commercial licence commenced on 1 April 2016 with a final expiry date of 31 August 2021.

14.       Since the final expiry date, the existing licence has continued to roll over on a monthly tenancy on the same terms and conditions.

15.       Howick Village Association Incorporated has formally applied to Auckland Council for a new licence term of an initial five years with four rights of renewal of five-year terms commencing from 1 September 2021.

16.       The licensee has also applied to increase the market use to include operating the open-air markets on Sundays as well as Saturdays.

17.       The governance over the land at 115 Picton Street, Howick sits with the Howick Local Board under the LGA, as such, landowner approvals need to be canvassed with the Local Board.

18.       The Howick Local Board is the allocated authority relating to commercial lease and licencing matters for this site located within the Local Board area.

19.       The Howick Local Board has the delegation to grant a new licence term and approve the use over the site.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

20.       Eke Panuku recommends that the Howick Local Board approve the new licence term of five years commencing on 1 September 2021 with four rights of renewal of five-year terms to Howick Village Association Incorporated over approximately 1356sqm of the site at 115 Picton Street, Howick.

21.       The licensee continues operating the site as open-air market use under the proposed new licence on Saturdays only.

22.       The inclusion of a 12-month termination clause in the new licence applicable from the first renewal term of 1 August 2026 will provide future flexibility and protection should there be a requirement to review the use of the site.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.       There will be no material change to emissions associated with the activity as the licence will continue the current activities and the decision does not relate to any operational changes or physical works.

24.       There are no significant effects anticipated from climate change on the site and activity over the lifespan of the decision.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.       Eke Panuku has engaged with Auckland Council and there is no objection to granting a new commercial licence commencing on 1 September 2021 with an initial term of five years with four rights of renewal of five-year terms with a final expiry of 31 August 2046.

26.       Noting the inclusion of a twelve-month termination clause applicable from the first renewal term of 1 August 2026, providing flexibility and protection should there be a requirement for Council to review the use of the site in the future.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.       Eke Panuku attended a workshop with the Howick Local Board on 5 August 2021 to discuss the lessee’s application for a new commercial licence and other related matters.

28.       The board confirmed support of a new licence and the initial term of five years.

29.       The board confirmed support of four rights of renewal of five years.

30.       The board confirmed support of the inclusion of a termination clause applicable from the first renewal term commencing on 1 September 2026.

31.       The board confirmed support of the licensee’s intent to apply to Council to extend the hours of operation from 8.00am to 3:30am to 7.00am to 3:30pm on Saturdays.

32.       The Board confirmed they do not support the increase of market use to include Sundays and support the existing use remaining on Saturdays only.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.       As there is no change to the property, the existing tenants, or re-tender of the property, there has been no Iwi engagement undertaken in respect of the tenants’ new licence application.

34.       The recommendations contained in this report allow status quo with no change of use of the site. Accordingly, there are no anticipated iwi engagement requirements in respect of the new licence for this site.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.       If a new licence term is not granted there will be a risk of the tenant vacating the site resulting in a loss of commercial rental and the opportunity to review the existing commercial rental.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.       Should the Howick Local Board resolve not to approve a new commercial licence term the licensee may choose to vacate the site and no longer operate an open-air market. This will not only affect the commercial revenue but may cause a flow-on effect to the local community who will lose access to this long-standing commodity.

 

 

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.       Eke Panuku will inform the licensee of the Local Board’s decision on a new commercial licence term and continued use of the site.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Licenced Area

19

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rosalyn Cowe - Alternative Assets Property Manager

Authorisers

Lori Butterworth - Property Management, Panuku Development Auckland

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

Howick Local Grant Round Two 2021/2022 grant allocations

File No.: CP2021/15642

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Howick Local Board with information on applications in Howick Local Grants Round Two 2021/2022; to enable a decision to fund, part fund or decline each application.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Howick Local Board adopted the Howick Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 17 May 2021 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

3.       This report presents applications received in Howick Local Grants Round Two 2020/2021 (Attachment B).

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $589,334.00 for the 2021/2022 financial year.

5.       For the 2021/2022 financial year, there are a total of three Local Grant rounds, two Multi-board and two Quick Response rounds.

6.       Twenty-eight applications were received for the 2021/2022 Howick Local Grants Round Two, requesting a total of $314,684.24.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in Howick Local Grants Round Two 2021/2022 listed in the following table:

 

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2207-239

9 Lives Orphanage

Environment

Towards the costs of 100 female spays, 100 male neuters and 10 vet bills including medication

$10,500.00

Eligible

LG2207-205

Aotea Sport and Recreation Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the costs of self-defense classes, equipment hire, venue hire and transport

$5,482.00

Eligible

LG2207-221

Botany & Flat Bush Ethnic Association Incorporated

Community

Towards venue hire and training fees for tai-chi classes

$4,480.00

Eligible

LG2207-213

Botany Chinese Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the costs of a website, the Dragon Boat Festival performance fee and board member communication fee

$3,125.00

Eligible

LG2207-240

International Buddhist Trust of New Zealand (North Island)

Community

Towards the costs of 200 calligraphy pens, calligraphy paper, bodhi leaves, an outdoor banner, lotus origami puzzles, staples, rubber bands and catering

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2207-207

Dance Therapy NZ

Arts and culture

Towards the delivery of “STARS Pakuranga” workshops between February and July 2022, including venue hire, facilitation, coordination, supervision, client support and liaison, equipment and administration costs

$5,350.00

Eligible

LG2207-201

David Riley

Arts and culture

Towards sponsorship of 50 Kainga pukapuka (home books), to be delivered to schools in Howick

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2207-210

East Skate Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the costs of skateboarding lessons, including coaching fees, salary costs and an indoor skatepark session

$24,192.00

Eligible

LG2207-227

Environmental Education for Resource Sustainability Trust

Environment

Towards 870 native plants and 115 recycling bins and delivery to schools and preschool in Howick

$8,417.48

Eligible

LG2207-238

Event Horizon (NZ) Limited

Events

Towards the costs of the 'Farm Cove Beach Movie Night Series', including event management, audio and visual costs, waste management, security, portaloos, and licensing rights

$67,721.20

Eligible

LG2207-219

The Scout Association of New Zealand

Community

Towards the costs of tents

$5,699.89

Eligible

LG2207-237

Harlequin Music Theatre Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the costs of a projector and screen

$31,755.73

Eligible

LG2207-235

Highland Park Community Creche Incorporated

Community

Towards the costs of upgrading the Highland Park Community Creche

$5,436.00

Eligible

LG2207-217

Howick Gymnastic Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the costs of school gymnastics equipment

$4,189.56

Eligible

LG2207-223

Howick Tourism Incorporated

Community

Towards the costs of marketing on social media

$7,000.00

Eligible

LG2207-228

Independent Living Charitable Trust

Community

Towards venue hire, catering, gratuity, PPE, cleaning products, stationery, and phone bills.

$5,553.00

Eligible

LG2207-225

John Walker Find Your Field of Dreams Foundation

Sport and recreation

Towards the costs of delivering the Community Swim programme

$25,000.00

Eligible

LG2207-214

Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

Community

Towards the delivery of the applicant's health and well-being programme, covering running costs of the mobile classrooms including educational resources, insurances and teachers' salaries

$16,767.38

Eligible

LG2207-242

Muskaan Care Trust NZ

Community

Towards the costs of delivering the Connecting the DOTS about your Health programme

$9,000.00

Eligible

LG2207-218

Muskaan Care Trust NZ

Community

Towards the costs of "BollyEX - Exercising to Bollywood tunes"

$8,050.00

Eligible

LG2207-211

'NAAD' CHARITABLE TRUST (NZ)

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of sound hire, professional fees, Instrument hire, videography, and venue hire

$7,000.00

Eligible

LG2207-232

Pakuranga and Howick Budgeting Service Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of website development

$4,000.00

Eligible

LG2207-229

Pakuranga Athletic Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the costs of replacing the floodlights at Yvette Williams Track at Lloyd Elsmore Park

$12,676.00

Eligible

LG2207-231

Rainbow Celebrating Life Trust

Community

Towards the costs of a DJ, set up and hire, insurance, 6 toilets and marketing for 'Colours of Joy'

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2207-203

Te Tuhi Contemporary Art Trust

Community

Towards the costs of floor replacement inside cafe, kitchen aid appliances and cafe dishware

$10,340.00

Eligible

LG2207-226

The Howick Little Theatre Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards a new Toshiba printer

$3,950.00

Eligible

LG2207-224

The Uxbridge Community Projects Incorporated

Community

Towards audio and camera equipment

$3,999.00

Eligible

LG2207-212

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards counsellor helpline training, management, and support

$5,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$314,684.24

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

8.       Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme. The local board grants programme sets out:

·   local board priorities

·   higher priorities for funding

·   lower priorities for funding

·   exclusions

·   grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·   any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Howick Local Board adopted the Howick Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 17 May 2021 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio and community networks

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the Howick Local Board Plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

12.     As outlined in the Howick Grants Programme 2021/2022, staff have also assessed each application according to which applications to the needs of the community in support of the recovery from COVID-19.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way.

14.     Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

16.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Howick Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

18.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states; “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

19.     A summary of each application received through the Howick Local Grants, Round Two is provided (refer Attachment B)

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

21.     Twelve applicants applying to the Howick Local Grants, Round Two have indicated that their project targets Māori or contribute to Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements.

23.     The Howick Local Board adopted the Howick Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 17 May 2021 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

24.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $589,334.00 for the 2021/2022 financial year.

25.     There will be a total of three local grant, two Multi-board and two quick response rounds in the 2020/2021 financial year.

26.     Fifty-five applications were received for the 2021/2022 Howick Local Grants Round One, requesting a total of $644,647.92, and twelve applications for the 2021/2022 Multi-board Grants Round One requesting a total of $516,841.44.

27.     Forty-three applications for the 2021/2022 Howick Local Grants Round One, was granted a total of $293,560.86. Five 2021/2022 Howick Multi-board Grant Round One applications was granted a total of $12,600.00. A total of $306,160.86 allocated.

28.     The total balance available of the 2021/2022 grants budget is $283,173.14.

29.     Twenty-eight applications have been received for the 2021/2022 Howick Local Grants Round Two, requesting a total of $314,684.24.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

31.     Staff recommend that due to current COVID19 crisis, if an applicant is unable to carry out the project in this financial year, then a clause is added to the recommendation, that the applicant can retain the funds to carry out the event in the next financial year or postpone the event date, to when alert levels have reduced, and the event can be conducted safely.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Following the Howick Local Board allocation of funding for the Local Grants Round Two 2021/2022, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Howick Local Grants Programme 2021/2022

29

b

Howick Local Grants Round Two - applications summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Arna Casey - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Rhonwen Heath - Head of Rates Valuations & Data Mgmt

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

National Emissions Reduction Plan Discussion Document – draft council submission

File No.: CP2021/16497

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To invite local board input into Auckland Council’s submission to the National Emissions Reduction Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ministry for the Environment has released for public consultation a discussion document seeking to inform the development of the first National Emissions Reduction Plan.

3.       This describes existing actions the Government has committed to and sets out new proposed actions it may include in the National Emissions Reduction Plan to further reduce emissions and meet climate targets.

4.       The document proposes a range of new strategies and policies for consideration which span every sector of the economy and include changes to our funding and finance system, the way we organise our urban areas, and a shift to a circular economy.

5.       The Government is required to publish the National Emissions Reduction Plan by the end of May 2022.

6.       Auckland Council already has existing strategic direction in emissions reduction through Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan and has agreed positions that have recently been provided through previous submissions on climate change and transport emissions.

7.       As such, the council will not, in the main, be developing new positions through this submission, but will base it on relevant strategies and these existing agreed positions.

8.       Local board input into that submission is sought, closing on 17 November for feedback to be considered in the council’s submission or 19 November 2021 for feedback to be appended.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the National Emissions Reduction Plan discussion document to inform the council’s draft submission.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Government is required to develop a National Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP) which will set direction for climate action for the next 15 years.

10.     The Ministry for the Environment (MfE) released a discussion document on 13 October 2021 which describes existing actions the Government has committed to and sets out new proposed actions it may include in the ERP to further reduce emissions and meet climate targets. Feedback is sought on these proposed new actions.

11.     The discussion document – Te hau mārohi ki anamata Transitioning to a low-emissions and climate-resilient future is available at the following link: https://consult.environment.govt.nz/climate/emissions-reduction-plan/.

12.     An eight-page summary of the discussion document is available at the following link:

https://environment.govt.nz/assets/publications/Snapshot-of-the-emissions-reduction-plan-discussion-document.pdf

13.     The ERP is part of an extensive climate change programme being undertaken by the Government.

14.     The Climate Change (Zero Carbon) Response Amendment Act (Act) set a national target to reduce net emissions for all greenhouse gases to zero by 2050, except for biogenic methane which has a separate target. The net zero target is required of Aotearoa New Zealand to meet its commitment to the Paris Agreement, which is to limit the global average temperature rise to 1.5oC above pre-industrial levels. 

15.     The Act requires Government to set five yearly emissions budgets out to 2050. The budgets set a limit on how much greenhouse gases can be produced across each of the five-year periods. The first budget will be for four years only.

16.     The Act also established He Pou a Rangi Climate Change Commission (the Commission) to provide independent, expert advice to government on actions that will reduce emissions and meet Aotearoa New Zealand’s 2050 emission reduction and adaptation goals.

17.     The Commission’s role includes reviewing Aotearoa New Zealand’s emissions targets and recommending emissions budgets every five years.

18.     On 31 May 2021, the Commission provided the Government with advice on the first three emissions budgets (2022-2025, 2026-2030, 2031-2035).

19.     The Government proposes to broadly accept the Commission’s recommended budgets. It has also agreed in principle to recognise changes in projected forestry emissions that were not available when the Commission prepared its advice.

20.     Final decisions on the first three budgets will be made and published alongside the ERP.

21.     Next year, the Government will publish a National Adaptation Plan (NAP) which responds to the first National Climate Change Risk Assessment. The Act requires risk assessments to be carried out every six years.

22.     Government is also addressing climate change through the resource management reforms, for both mitigation and adaptation through for example land use planning and intensification, and identification of areas to avoid for development.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Summary of National Emissions Reduction Plan discussion document

Purpose

1.       The ERP, which must be in place by the end of May 2022, will set out strategies and policies to meet the first emissions budget (2022-2025).

2.       The policies in the ERP will span every sector of the economy and include changes to our funding and finance system, the way we organise our urban areas, and a shift to a circular economy.

3.       The ERP will also set out strategies and policies to manage the impacts the proposed policies may have on employers and employees, regions, iwi, and wider communities.

Focus of public consultation

4.       The Commission consulted earlier in 2021 on emissions budgets and the policy direction of the ERP. This discussion document gives more detailed information on new strategies and policies that the Government may include in the ERP. Since some other ideas have already been consulted on, this discussion document does not represent a full draft ERP.

5.       Government policy will not, by itself, meet the full extent of any given emissions budget. Therefore, the Government is also wanting to hear about steps which communities and particularly the private sector can take to enable a low carbon transition, and what they need from Government to support those changes.

6.       Decisions are still to be made on the new strategies and policies. Many are dependent on future funding decisions, including decisions on future Emissions Budgets and how policies will be implemented.

7.       Through this public consultation, the areas which Government is seeking feedback on are:

·     Overall strategy

·     Meeting the net-zero challenge

Transitioning pathway

Working with our Tiriti partners

Making an equitable transition

·      Aligning systems and tools

Government accountability and coordination

Funding and finance o Emissions pricing o Planning

Research, science and innovation

Behaviour change

Moving Aotearoa to a circular economy

·      Transitioning key sectors

·      Transport o Energy and industry

·      Building and construction

·      Agriculture

·      Waste

·      Fluorinated (F) – gases

·      Forestry.

8.       The council has significant interest in the ERP and has existing strategic direction in emissions reduction including through Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

9.       As such, the council will not, in the main, be developing new positions through this submission. Instead, it will be based on relevant strategies and existing agreed positions in council’s recent submissions (see below).

            Timeframe for development of the National Emissions Reduction Plan

Milestone

Date

Discussion document released

13 October 2021

Draft submission available

12 November 2021

Deadline for incorporated feedback

17 November 2021

Deadline for appended feedback

19 November 2021

Consultation period closes

24 November 2021

Emissions Reduction Plan published

May 2022

Further material

10.     Relevant strategies and existing agreed positions in the council’s recent submissions are mainly from:

·    Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan

https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/plans-projects-policies-reports-bylaws/our-plans-strategies/Pages/te-taruke-a-tawhiri-ACP.aspx

 

·    He Pou a Rangi – the Climate Change Commission’s draft advice to Government (2021)

https://www.climatecommission.govt.nz/our-work/advice-to-government-topic/inaia-tonu-nei-a-low-emissions-future-for-aotearoa/submissions/organisation-submissions/

 

·    Hīkina te Kohupara – Kia mauri ora ai te iwi: Transport Emissions: Pathways to Net Zero by 2050 – Ministry of Transport Discussion Document (2021).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     The Climate Change Commission’s advice to Government, and the subsequent emissions budgets and emissions reduction plan, have the potential to strongly influence Auckland’s ability to achieve its regional emissions reduction targets of halving emissions by 2030 and reaching net zero emissions by 2050, as adopted by council through Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

24.     The council’s submission to the National Emission Reduction Plan consultation document can reiterate its position and advocate for an ERP that places Auckland in the best position to achieve its, and Aotearoa’s emission reduction targets.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     Feedback from relevant council departments and Council Controlled Organisations on the draft submission will be sought. The council-group was involved in establishing existing council positions.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     Local board views are being sought on the draft submission and will be incorporated into the council’s final submission as appropriate.  Local boards provided strong direction through the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, and this will inform the overall direction of the submission.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     The Climate Change Commission have clearly stated that climate change action will compound disadvantage for Māori if it does not address policy, legislative, or other barriers that prevent Māori from exercising their rights under the Treaty.

28.     Both the Commission and the Minister for Climate Change have highlighted the need for a Treaty based partnership approach to be embedded in the ERP to enable an equitable transition for Iwi/Māori. This aligns well with the direction set by Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan. A strategy to mitigate the impacts on iwi and Māori is a legal requirement of the ERP.

29.     Feedback from mana whenua, the Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB), and the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on previous related submissions and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri will be used in the development of this submission.

30.     Feedback on the draft submission will be sought from the IMSB and nineteen iwi entities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     It is not yet possible to quantify the budgetary consequences for the council. However, the rate and scale of change that will be required of the council under the ERP is likely to require a large increase in funding. It is well established that climate mitigation and adaptation action taken now will be less costly than delaying action.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     There is little risk in making a submission on the consultation on the ERP.

33.     Risks in relation to local government’s role in the implementation of the ERP, e.g., funding and financing, will be considered as part of the council’s response.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

11. Local board resolutions on the ERP draft will be included in the Auckland Council       submission on this matter.

12.     Below are the key dates for input into the submission:

·     17 November: deadline for feedback to be considered in the council’s submission

·     19 November: final date for any formal local board feedback to be appended to the submission

·     24 November: final submission will be approved by Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson of the Environment and Climate Change Committee and an IMSB Member (as agreed at the Environment and Climate Change Committee on 24 November 2021 (ECC/2021/41))

·     02 December: The final submission will be reported retrospectively to the Environment and Climate Change Committee and circulated to elected members.

 

CHANGE AUTHOR TO Jacob van der Poel - Policy Advisor

 

Author: Jacob van der Poel – Policy Advisor

Authorisers: Carol Hayward – Team Leader Policy & Operations Manager

Glenn Boyd – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacob van der Poel – Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol Hayward - Principal Advisor Panels

Glenn Boyd – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

 


Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

Submission on a proposed new national waste strategy and associated waste legislation

File No.: CP2021/16499

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To invite local board input into Auckland Council’s submission to the Government’s proposed new waste strategy and changes to waste legislation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 15 October 2021, the Ministry for the Environment released its consultation document on proposals for a new national waste strategy together with other issues and options relating to new waste legislation.

3.       This describes existing actions the Government has committed to and sets out new proposed actions it may include in the new national waste strategy to transform the way New Zealand manages its waste.

4.       The consultation document seeks feedback on the following three areas:

·    Part 1: seeking support for changes to how Aotearoa New Zealand manages its waste and support for moving towards a circular economy

·    Part 2: seeking feedback on a proposed new waste strategy

·    Part 3: seeking feedback on the development of more comprehensive legislation on waste: issues and options.

5.       A draft submission is being prepared by staff for discussion and endorsement by the Environment and Climate CHange Committee. Local board input into that submission is being sought, with a deadline of 10 November at 5pm for feedback to be considered in the council’s submission or 22 November 2021 at 5pm for feedback to be appended.

6.       The council’s submission will be developed based on policy positions articulated in relevant council strategy, such as Te Mahere Whakahaere me te Whakaiti Tukunga Para i Tāmaki Makaurau 2018 / Auckland Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 and other recent council submissions on government policy relating to waste management and minimisation.

7.       Waste Solutions staff will lead the development of the council’s submission which is due to the Ministry for the Environment by 26 November 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the Government’s proposed new waste strategy and proposed changes to waste legislation for inclusion in an Auckland Council submission, noting that feedback is required by 5pm on 22 November 2021 to be appended.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       On 15 October 2021, the Ministry for the Environment released its consultation document, Te kawe i te haepapa para: Taking responsibility for our waste: Proposals for a new waste strategy – issues and options for new waste legislation.

9.       A snapshot of the consultation document has also been made available online.

10.     This consultation intersects with other central government and Ministry for the Environment initiatives that focus on reducing waste and associated environmental impacts. These include:

·    the design of a container return scheme for beverage containers

·    the development of a national action plan for plastics

·    the increase and expansion of the waste levy

·    reducing greenhouse gas emissions from organic wastes via a proposed Emissions Reduction Plan.

11.     Recent Auckland Council submissions to the Ministry for the Environment on waste related topics have largely supported the government to use existing legislative tools to phase out single-use plastic shopping bags, to address single-use plastics, restrict the export of plastic wastes, and increase and expand the waste levy.

12.     These previous submissions related to specific aspects of the waste system. The current consultation proposes changes to the wider national policy framework for waste management and minimisation in Aotearoa New Zealand.

13.     The reasons for the proposed changes include the need to:

·    transform the way waste is managed, noting that Aotearoa New Zealand is one of the highest generators of waste per person in the world

·    strengthen and better align the existing legal framework that crosses the Waste Minimisation Act 2008, the Litter Act 1979, the Local Government Act 2002, the Health Act 1956 and the Resource Management Act 1991

·    address technical problems within the Waste Management Act 2008.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Summary of the consultation document

14.     The consultation document seeks feedback across three separate areas as follows:

·    Part 1: seeking support for changes to how Aotearoa New Zealand manages its waste and support for moving towards a circular economy

·    Part 2: seeking feedback on a proposed new waste strategy

·    Part 3: seeking feedback on the development of more comprehensive legislation on waste: issues and options.

15.     Part 1 outlines the need to transform waste management and global shifts to a circular economy.

16.     Part 2 relates to a proposed new waste strategy for Aotearoa New Zealand to replace the 2010 Waste Strategy. The new strategy will reset the vision, direction and priorities for waste minimisation, along with setting targets for waste reduction.

17.     Part 3 details issues and options relating to a review of existing waste legislation. It sets out to reset the purpose, principles, governance, roles and responsibilities for waste management and minimisation, replacing the Waste Minimisation Act 2008 and the Litter Act 1979.

Development of the council’s submission

18.     The council’s submission will be developed based on policy positions articulated in related plans and strategies together with evidence and data from subject matter experts from across the council family, and input from previous mana whenua engagement and public submissions. We are also seeking local board feedback to inform our submission.

19.     Auckland Council’s position on waste management is guided by Te Mahere Whakahaere me te Whakaiti Tukunga Para i Tāmaki Makaurau – Auckland Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018  (‘the Waste Plan 2018’), and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

20.     The Waste Plan 2018 is guided by the vision ‘Auckland aspires to be Zero Waste by 2040, taking care of people and the environment and turning waste into resources’ and sets out over 100 actions to achieve this vision. It continues a zero-waste vision that was originally set out in Auckland Council’s first Waste Minimisation and Management Plan 2012.

21.     Auckland Council is a member of the WasteMINZ Territorial Local Authority working group that will also be responding to the consultation document.

22.     Submissions received by the Ministry for the Environment as part of this consultation process will inform the government’s decisions regarding new waste legislation.

Timeframe for development of the Submission on a proposed new national waste strategy and associated waste legislation

Milestone

Date

Discussion document released

15 October 2021

Deadline for appended feedback

22 November 2021 at 5pm

Consultation period closes

26 November 2021

23.     The new waste strategy is to be finalised in 2022. A bill will be developed and introduced to Parliament later in 2022 for new legislation.

Further material and links

24.     Consultation document - Te kawe i te haepapa para: Taking responsibility for our waste: Proposals for a new waste strategy – issues and options for new waste legislation.

25.     A snapshot – consultation document - Taking responsibility for our waste: Proposals for a new waste strategy – issues and options for new waste legislation: A Snapshot.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     The disposal and treatment of waste comprises around four per cent of Aotearoa’s gross greenhouse gas emissions. The main sources include organic waste, wastewater treatment, incineration and open burning, and biological waste treatment (composting).

27.     The consultation period aligns with a separate consultation led by the Ministry for the Environment on a national Emissions Reduction Plan. The outcomes from both consultations will influence the development of actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions associated with the waste sector, and Auckland’s ability to achieve its regional emissions reduction targets of halving emissions by 2030 and reaching net zero emissions by 2050, as adopted by the council through Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan


 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     Feedback on the consultation document from relevant council departments and council-controlled organisations will be sought from subject matter experts.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     Changes to the waste strategy and legislation would impact many aspects of waste management including public awareness and education campaigns, purchasing choices, the way waste is collected and managed, and individual roles and responsibilities.

30.     The vision and direction of government efforts to support a circular economy may stimulate opportunities for greater reuse, recycling and recovery of materials such as through local resource recovery centres. Principles proposed for a new waste strategy such as taking responsibility for waste and delivering equitable and inclusive outcomes underpin the changes proposed and the way those would be assessed and delivered.

31.     Local board views provided on the draft submission will be either incorporated within the report or appended to the submission, depending on when feedback is received. Local boards provided strong direction through the development of the Waste Plan 2018 and other related recent submissions on government policy and these views will inform the overall direction of the submission.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     Staff have contacted the Independent Māori Statutory Board, the Tāmaki Makaurau Kaitiaki Forum and the Infrastructure and Environmental Services Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum to alert them to this proposal and the opportunity to input.

33.     The proposal includes opportunities for Māori expertise in any new independent advisory bodies, and increased Māori participation in decision-making at different levels, especially investment. It also seeks to address the gap in current waste management legislation around te Tiriti o Waitangi and Te Ao Māori.

34.     Previous feedback from consultation on the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan included 214 submissions received from Māori, with three from Para Kore Marae. These submissions showed key areas of support were for increasing the waste levy, resources and support for Māori initiatives, the food scraps kerbside collection (particularly from south Auckland respondents), Community Recycling Centres and local jobs, advocating for product stewardship (particular a container deposit scheme) and a focus on construction and demolition waste.

35.     Feedback expressed on previous related submissions, including consultation undertaken in March 2018 on the draft Waste Plan 2018 and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri will be incorporated into the development of this submission.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     The submission can be developed within existing budget provision and as part of business as usual central government advocacy activity.

37.     As the consultation is on proposed policy and legislation changes, it is not yet possible to quantify the budgetary consequences for the council. Potential financial implications for the council will be considered as part of the council’s submission.


 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     No risks related to the local board input into this process have been identified.

39.     Potential risks to the council arising from strategy and legislation changes will be considered as part of the council’s submission.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     The consultation document contains 43 questions that the Ministry is seeking responses to. Following discussion with staff, the feedback template provides a targeted list of questions that local boards may wish to focus their feedback on. This has been sent separately to the Senior Advisors and Advisors.

41.     Any local board feedback received after 10 November, but before 5pm 22 November 2021 will be appended to the council’s submission.

42.     The final submission is due to the Ministry for the Environment by 26 November 2021. A copy of the final submission will be provided to all elected members, local board members, and the Independent Māori Statutory Board once submitted.  

 

Authors

Jacob van der Poel - Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol Hayward – Team Leader Policy & Operations Manager

Glenn Boyd – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacob van der Poel – Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol Hayward – Team Leader Policy & Operations Manager

Glenn Boyd - Acting General Manager Local Board Services

 


Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

Draft Contributions Policy 2021

File No.: CP2021/16554

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the draft Contributions Policy 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Development contributions allow for an equitable and proportionate share of the total cost of growth-related capital expenditure to be recovered from the development community.

3.       The Finance and Performance Committee adopted the draft Contributions Policy 2021 for consultation at its meeting on 16 September 2021, FIN/2021/84. 

4.       Local board feedback is being sought to inform the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration of the adoption of the Contribution Policy 2021 in December 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      resolve feedback on the Contributions Policy 2021 on the key consultation topics:

i)        updating policy for capital projects in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031

ii)       inclusion of projects beyond 10-years to the policy in stages starting with Drury

iii)      requiring developers to pay their contributions earlier

iv)      proposal to support Māori development with grants

v)      any other issues.

Horopaki

Context

5.       Auckland’s population is expected to grow by 260,000 in the next ten years on top of the rapid population growth experienced in the last decade, bringing the projected population to approximately 1.9 million by 2031.

6.       Construction of 145,800 new dwellings is forecast in the next ten years. To support the development enabled by the Auckland Unitary Plan, the council is facing immediate demands for infrastructure in key growth areas and in response to construction on upzoned land, plan changes and the impact of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       Development contributions allow for an equitable and proportionate share of the total cost of growth-related capital expenditure to be recovered from the development community. The Contributions Policy sets out how the council will recover from new development an appropriate and fair share of the cost of infrastructure investment attributable to growth. There were four key consultation topics:

i)     Updating policy for capital projects in the 10-year Budget

          The draft policy provides for the recovery of $2.4 billion of development contributions revenue from $9.0 billion of projects with a growth component included in the10-year budget.  The draft policy also included updated forecasts of population growth and dwelling construction. The combined impact of these changes is to lower the weighted average Development Contributions price from $23,900 to $21,100.

ii)  Inclusion of projects beyond 10-years to the policy in stages starting with Drury

          Extensive work has been undertaken in recent years on the infrastructure requirements to support growth in the investment priority areas. However, further work is required before these costs can be included in the contributions policy. Area specific amendments to the contributions policy will be proposed for consultation as the information becomes available.

          The first step in the Contributions Policy 2021 will be to add a programme of expenditure to fund some of the key infrastructure required to support growth in the Drury area. The impact of this change is to raise the Development Contributions price in Drury to $84,900 from between $11,000 and $18,300.

iii) Requiring developers to pay their contributions earlier

          The council proposed that Development Contributions be paid at the time of building consent for all development (residential and non-residential) except non-commercial development on Māori land (explained further below). This requires Development Contributions due at building consent to be paid 6 to 24 months earlier than under the current policy and reverses the changes made to the policy in 2019. When combined with the other changes proposed this lower the weighted average Development Contributions price to $19,300.

iv) A proposal to support Māori development with grants

          The draft policy proposed continuing the support for marae development and papakāinga and Māori housing[1] on Māori land through grants available through the Cultural Initiatives Fund. These grants can cover payment of development contributions in appropriate circumstances, along with other kinds of development costs.

8.       The proposed changes to the Contributions Policy 2021 were reported to the Finance and Performance Committee at its meeting on 16 September- see Attachment A  Draft Contributions Policy 2021.

Consultation

9.       Formal public consultation was held in September and October 2021. To support the consultation a number of documents were made available on the Have Your Say website, https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/dc-policy.

10.     Two online Have Your Say events were held to provide opportunities for developers and other interested parties to learn more about the draft policy, ask questions and provide their feedback. A third event was also held to allow interested parties to present their views directly to the Finance and Performance Committee. All comments have been captured and will be reported through to the Finance and Performance Committee to inform decision-making on the final policy.

11.     A summary of the feedback received from submitters is set out in Attachment B: Draft Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement guidance

12.       Recommendations in this report have a neutral climate impact as they relate to the funding of capital investment rather than decisions on the activities to be undertaken.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views guidance

13.       The information presented on the projects included in the draft Contributions Policy 2021 was developed in conjunction with the following council-controlled organisations and council units:

·    Auckland Transport

·    Eke Panuku Development Auckland

·    Healthy Waters

·    Community Facilities

·    Community and Social Policy

14.        The Chief Economist Unit and Research Investigations and Monitoring Unit worked with us on the impact of higher development contributions on the pace of development and on land and house prices. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.        The development contribution price varies by location depending on the cost of infrastructure required to support development in an area.

16.        Local board feedback is being sought to inform the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration of the adoption of the Contribution Policy 2021 in December 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.        Recent legislative changes require the contributions policy to support the development of Māori land. Feedback from iwi on the draft policy was sought as part of consultation and via engagement with the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum.  All developers, including mana whenua, were provided an opportunity to present their feedback to the Finance and Performance Committee on 12 October.

18.        The Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum have provided their feedback which has been included in Attachment B: Draft Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     The 10-year budget assumes development contributions revenue of $2.7 billion. After completing the analysis of the cost of investments in the 10-year budget that can be recovered with development contributions and the impact of the proposed policy changes, it is estimated that the revenue will be $2.6 billion. The achievement of this revised revenue forecast requires as a first step the implementation of a contributions policy updated for the capital expenditure decisions in the 10-year budget and the other changes proposed in this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     The recommendation requesting local boards views does not present any risk. The risks associated with amending the contributions policy are set out in the report to the 16 September Finance and Performance Committee, Attachment A: Development Contributions Policy 2021 Consultation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     Feedback from the public consultation will be reported to the Finance and Performance Committee workshop on 10 November 2021.

22.     Potential changes to the draft will be reported at the Finance and Performance Committee workshop on 1 December 2021. Staff will report to Finance and Performance Committee for the final policy adoption on 9 December 2021. Local board feedback will be included in the report.

23.     The Contributions Policy 2021 is proposed to be implemented in January 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Development Contributions Policy 2021 report to the Finance and Performance Committee

49

b

Draft Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received

65

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Andrew Duncan - Manager Financial Policy

Authorisers

Ross Tucker - General Manager, Financial Strategy and Planning

Glenn Boyd – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

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Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

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Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

Landowner approval for mobile trading in Macleans Park and Cockle Bay Reserve

File No.: CP2021/16809

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.    To seek approval from the Howick Local Board for the landowner application from Super Kool (NZ) Ltd for an ice cream van to operate in the car park areas of Cockle Bay Reserve and Macleans Park for a period of three months.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.    The applicant, Super Kool (NZ) Ltd (SKNZ) seeks landowner approval to operate an ice cream van from the car park areas of Macleans Park and Cockle Bay Reserve.

3.    The van will operate from 1 December 2021 until 28 February 2022 during weekends, school holidays and public holidays from 12pm to 6pm.

4.    The proposal is consistent with the Howick Local Board Plan 2020 as it promotes and encourages user engagement within the park.

5.    Staff recommend that the Howick Local Board approves the application.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)    approve the application from Super Kool (NZ) Ltd to operate an ice cream van in the car park areas of Cockle Bay Reserve and Macleans Park for a period of three months (1 December 2021 to 28 February 2022) between 12pm and 6pm on weekends, public holidays and school holidays.

 

Horopaki

Context

Macleans Park

6.    67 The Esplanade, Eastern Beach, known as Macleans Park, is largely owned by the Auckland Council in fee simple as a classified recreation reserve, subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

Cockle Bay Reserve

7.    47R Shelly Beach Parade, Cockle Bay, known as Cockle Bay Reserve, is largely owned by the Auckland Council in fee simple as a classified recreation reserve, subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

Proposal

8.    SKNZ has requested landowner approval to operate an ice cream van within the carpark        areas of Macleans Park and Cockle Bay Reserve. The ice cream van will operate between 1 December 2021 and 28 February 2022, from 12pm to 6pm during weekends, school holidays (daily), and public holidays.

9.    There will only be one ice cream van in operation in the area at any one time. This van will roam around and stop in different areas as required – generally for no more than 30 minutes at a time. The van will also trade at the roadside in other locations. 

10.    The applicant will be required to have a valid mobile trading licence, which will be issued by the council’s regulatory department. This allows the applicant to trade in a public space.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Specialist consultation

11.    The facilities manager for Howick in Community Facilities and a Parks and Places specialist are supportive of this request for mobile trading by SKNZ.

Options

12.    If the board supports the application, this will enable SKNZ to trade from within the car park areas of the two parks. If the board declines the application, the applicant will not be able to trade from within the park car park and will only be able to trade from the roadside.

13.    It is recommended that the Howick Local Board approves the application for the following    reasons:

·    the ice cream van will add to the enjoyment of the parks

·    the activity won’t affect the use of the parks in any way

·    the activity is temporary and is only for the summer months

·    being able to use the beach car park area instead of the roadside will ensure greater safety of customers

Proposed conditions

14.     Conditions that will be placed on the landowner approval if approved will include:

·    the operator is responsible for satisfying all occupational health and safety legislation and regulations

·    public liability insurance must be obtained

·    full reinstatement will be undertaken should any damage be made to the reserves

·    dates and times of operation must be limited to those specified

·    ensuring the applicant controls litter

·    ensuring the non-displacement of other park users.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.       The van being used by the applicant is a source of emission, however, emissions will be limited by the van parking at the reserves for a period of time rather than regularly driving around on the road.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.       As discussed above the relevant council specialists were consulted and are supportive of the proposal. Staff do not consider any other council departments or the council-controlled organisations ​to be impacted by the proposal.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.       Staff attended a workshop with the Howick Local Board on 30 September 2021. The board was supportive of the application.

18.       The application is consistent with and supports the Howick Local Board Plan 2020 Outcome 1 by enabling people in our communities to feel safe, engaged and connected.  It adds to the enjoyment of the reserves and allows the mobile trader to operate safely.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.       The operation of the ice cream van does not trigger any Treaty of Waitangi settlement issues or matters in relation to customary rights outcomes. In this matter, iwi consultation has not been undertaken by the applicant as there are no readily identifiable impacts on Māori and any impacts will be no different to those on others.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.       There are no financial implications related to this application.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.       It is recommended that the local board approve the application, as the proposed activity will add to the public’s ability to enjoy the reserves. Any risks to the reserves will be mitigated by the proposed conditions (paragraph 14).

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.       Should the local board approve the proposal, the applicant will receive landowner approval to operate the ice cream van in Macleans Park and Cockle Bay Reserve. A landowner approval letter will be issued to the applicant with conditions that will mitigate any potential adverse effects on the parks.

23.       If the local board declines the application, the proposal will not be able to proceed and landowner approval will not be granted.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kate Burson – Land Use Advisor Property and Commercial Business

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 

 

 

Three Waters Economic Regulation Submission

File No.: CP2021/16914

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To outline the Government’s Economic Regulation and Consumer Protection for Three Waters Services in New Zealand discussion paper, circulated by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, and to seek feedback from local boards.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 27 October 2021, the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment released a discussion paper, “Economic Regulation and Consumer Protection for Three Waters Services in New Zealand”.

3.       The discussion document describes how the economic regulator is envisioned to operate and what its statutory obligations would be. The discussion document also provides a brief explanation of why economic regulation is required in the face of three waters reform. Finally, it asks for feedback on several topics.

4.       The views of local boards on the proposal are requested by 6 December 2021 to enable those views to influence the overall submission and to be included as an attachment to the council submission.

5.       Final submissions from Auckland Council to Government on this topic are due at 5pm on 20 December 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      provide feedback for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on the Economic Regulation and Consumer Protection for Three Waters Services in New Zealand discussion paper;

b)      make the following points in the administrative areas of:

i)        the need for economic regulation

ii)       the type of regulation and who would pay the costs

iii)      what parts of three waters the regulation would apply to

iv)      should the regulation apply to all providers

v)      how and when should regulation be implemented

vi)      what should be the statutory objectives of the regulation regime

vii)     what should compliance and enforcement look like

viii)    who the economic regulator should be

ix)      whether we need additional consumer protections and how those are regulated

c)      make the following points in the policy areas of:

i)        how the regulator should liaise with local government to ensure the growth aspirations of Auckland are met

ii)       how the regulator should liaise with local government to ensure the social, cultural, and environmental aspirations of Auckland are met.

Horopaki

Context

6.       On 27 October 2021, the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) released a discussion paper, “Economic Regulation and Consumer Protection for Three Waters Services in New Zealand”.

7.       The issues of economic regulation and consumer protection for three waters services in New Zealand is related, but separate, to the broader issue of the Water Services Bill. They require separate submissions as they are two different processes run by two different bodies and on different timeframes. There is a separate process to provide feedback about the reform in general. This process is to provide feedback on only the proposed economic regulation.

8.       According to central government, economic regulation will have a crucial role to play in driving the level of efficiency that will be required to keep water services affordable in the long run.

9.       Economic regulation ensures that the best outcomes for consumers will occur when there are monopoly markets, and the suppliers have a large amount of market power.

10.     In this case, it is proposed that the economic regulator will also act as the consumer protection regulator and be funded through levies.

11.     It is proposed that the Commerce Commission act in both capacities to regulate the newly-formed three waters industry in New Zealand after the Water Services Bill is enacted.

12.     The discussion document describes how the economic regulator is envisioned to operate and what its statutory obligations would be. The discussion document also provides a brief explanation of why economic regulation is required in the face of three waters reform. Finally, it asks for feedback on several topics.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     What follows is a short summary of the discussion document and the areas where feedback is sought through the submissions process.

What is economic regulation and why do we need it?

14.     Economic regulation protects consumers from the problems that can occur in markets with little or no competition and/or a large amount of market power. The regulation is intended to make businesses in the market behave similarly to how they would in a competitive market.

15.     Utilities tend to be what is known as a “natural monopoly”. These markets are more cheaply served by one firm rather than many because of massive fixed costs.

16.     Without regulation, markets with natural monopolies tend to have higher prices and/or lower outputs and/or lower output quality.

17.     While consumer involvement in the governance of natural monopolies is helpful, it is not sufficient to ensure the best outcomes for consumers. Consumer involvement must work in concert with regulation.

18.     Ultimately, the purpose of economic regulation is to advance the long-term interests of consumers. This ensures that suppliers deliver high-quality services that reflect consumer demand and incentivises improved efficiency. It also ensures any gains by the suppliers are passed through to the consumers.

What type of regulation is being proposed and who would pay the costs?

19.     There are several types of regulation – price-quality, information disclosure, and quality-only. In this case, it is proposed that the regulator be a price-quality regulator.

20.     Price-quality regulators essentially set upper limits on the price that can be charged by the supplier while setting lower limits on the quality of service that must be delivered.

21.     Typically, price-quality regulators operate on regulatory cycles of four to six years. It is proposed that the economic regulator operate on a five-year cycle, with the possibility of the first regulatory cycle being shorter.

22.     Economic regulation has costs. These costs come from two places. On one hand, the economic regulator costs money to operate and administer. On the other hand, the suppliers incur compliance costs to meet the requirements of the regulator.

23.     It is proposed that the administrative costs of the regulator be recovered through levies. This is a straightforward, transparent, and standard way of recovering these costs. Ultimately these costs are borne by the consumers.

24.     The cost to the supplier of complying with regulation is also ultimately borne by the consumers. Since both categories of regulatory costs are borne by the consumers, it is necessary to design the regulations to ensure they are net beneficial to consumers.

25.     Given the amalgamation proposed by the Water Services Bill will increase the market power of the water providers, it is likely that regulation is necessary. Further, the research for the Water Services Bill finds that even the current absence of profit motives, and the obligations to promote the social, cultural, environmental, and financial wellbeing of communities has been insufficient to ensure delivery of effective and efficient three waters service. Put another way, there is probably a case for economic regulation, even in the absence of the proposed three waters amalgamation.

26.     Thus, the MBIE’s recommendation is that three waters be price-quality regulated.

27.     However, there is also a question as to whether the regulation should be applied generically across all suppliers or tailored to individual suppliers. Given the inflexibility of generic regulation and Government’s strong commitment to water service quality, it is recommended that the price-quality regulation be flexible to allow for different incentives to the different suppliers.

What parts of three waters should regulation apply to?

28.     The delivery of stormwater services is fundamentally different to drinking water and wastewater.

29.     While drinking water and wastewater services are delivered directly to the beneficiaries (that is, the person drinking the water or flushing the toilet), stormwater services have a public good element as well. When the stormwater in one area is managed, it could make other areas less likely to flood, for instance. This means that it is difficult to identify and charge the consumers of stormwater services.

30.     Additionally, while drinking water and wastewater infrastructure is easily identified, stormwater infrastructure is more difficult. Stormwater systems are often integrated into roading networks, use natural topographical features, and are owned by various land holders and infrastructure providers.

31.     Internationally, when stormwater systems are operated alongside drinking water and wastewater, they tend to be economically regulated.

32.     The preliminary view put forward by the MBIE is that stormwater should be economically regulated, but it will be less straightforward to demonstrate that it is net beneficial.

Should the regulation apply to all providers?

33.     Three waters reform is proposed to result in four main entities serving approximately 85% of the population. The remainder would be served by small community or private schemes, or through self-supply. A recent study for Taumata Arowai suggested that there could be between 75,000 and 130,000 unregistered drinking water suppliers.

34.     None of these small-scale suppliers serves more than 5,000 customers. There are only three non-defense force suppliers that serve between 500 and 5,000 customers. 

35.     For even smaller (less than 500 customers) providers, it is likely that the owners of three waters supplier and the consumers of the services are largely the same people. Therefore, it is less critical to have a regulatory framework to ensure consumer wellbeing.

36.     Since the goal of the reform is to further consumer wellbeing, these other suppliers should only be regulated if the cost of regulation is outweighed by the benefits.

37.     Given the small scale and relatively high compliance costs, the MBIE has recommended that regulatory framework only apply to the new water service entities created by the Water Services Bill.

How and when should regulation be implemented?

38.     To be effective, price-quality regulation requires high quality information on the assets, costs and quality of service provided by regulated suppliers. However, the Three Waters Reform Programme has found that the scope and quality of the available information is not currently at the level that would be required to implement an effective economic regulation regime.

39.     Because of this information gap, it is unlikely that the regulatory regime would be operational by the time the new three waters entities are set to begin operation in 1 July 2024.

40.     However, starting the new entities operations without a regulatory framework in place poses its own risk.

41.     Therefore, the Government’s recommendation is that there should be a graduated approach to implementing a conventional cost-based price-quality path, with the first regulatory pricing period beginning 1 July 2027. In the interim the industry would improve its data and the regulator would work with the industry on information disclosure.

42.     This interim period from 1 July 2024 through to 30 June 2027 would leave the supplies unregulated in terms of price-quality. There are two potential solutions to this gap. The first is that the regulator impose a price-quality path based on incomplete information but using its best judgment. The second option is that an interim price-quality path be implemented by government. There are significant pros and cons to each option and the MBIE is seeking feedback on this issue.

What should be the statutory objectives of the regulation regime?

43.     Recently in New Zealand, regulatory regimes are set to achieve four goals.

a)     There must be incentives to innovate and invest.

b)     There should be incentives to improve efficiency.

c)     That the efficiency gains must be shared with consumers.

d)     Lastly, suppliers are limited in their ability to turn profits. This point is irrelevant to the three waters reform scenario.

44.     However, there is scope for the economic regulator to have responsibility for a broader range of objectives (including issues such as climate change and Te mana o te Wai).

45.     There is also a question as to how Te Tiriti o Waitangi considerations factor into the design of any economic regulatory regime for the three waters sector.

46.     The MBIE seeks feedback on what the precise role of the economic regulator should be and whether it should be expanded in the ways described above.

What should compliance and enforcement look like?

47.     Compliance and enforcement are essential for regulation to be effective.

48.     An economic regulator’s compliance and enforcement toolkit typically includes education initiatives, warning letters, infringement offences, pecuniary penalties, enforceable undertakings, and other civil remedies such as out-of-court settlements.

49.     The MBIE is seeking feedback on whether there needs to be any other tools in the toolkit.

Who should the economic regulator be?

50.     To be effective, regulators need to be at arms-length from government, transparent, accountable, credible, freely share information, and act in a coordinated way with policy agencies.

51.     There are three potential options for the economic regulator: Taumata Arowai, the Commerce Commission, or a new regulatory authority created specifically for economic regulation of three waters.

52.     The MBIE’s multi-criteria analysis suggests that the Commerce Commission is best suited to be the economic regulator. 

Do we need additional consumer protections and how are those regulated?

53.     Due to the nature of the three waters sector, there may be other consumer protections required. There likely needs to be rules around the acceptable likelihood and duration of supply outages, the acceptable level of leakage from reticulated supply networks, the level of resilience to natural and man-made hazards, and the amount of innovation and efficiencies delivered to consumers.

54.     These protections will be required because three waters is a natural monopoly and consumers cannot go elsewhere when unhappy with their service.

55.     Importantly, the current democratic, consultation, and governance mechanisms that are provided for in the Local Government Act 2002 will not apply to the proposed new Water Services Entities. In addition, the Ombudsman’s current role in dealing with complaints about local government agencies will cease.

56.     These points suggest that regulation needs to consider these angles of consumer protection above and beyond the standard roles of an economic regulator.

57.     There is also a need for additional protections for vulnerable consumers. It is recommended that that there should be a positive obligation on the regulator to consider interests of vulnerable consumers, and that minimum service level requirements are flexible enough able to accommodate a wide range of approaches to addressing consumer harm and vulnerability.

58.     The MBIE is seeking feedback on how the consumer protection regime could be designed in a way that contributes to equitable outcomes and mitigates unintended impacts on Māori. This includes impacts on different iwi/hapū, Māori landowners, urban Māori consumers, and rural Māori consumers. Additionally, views are sought on how the consumer protection regulator could be expected to consider Treaty obligations, and the cultural competency of the economic regulator to recognise the significance of water as a taonga for Māori.

59.     As with economic regulation, a multi-criteria analysis suggests that the Commerce Commission should be the consumer protection regulator.

How should consumer disputes be resolved?

60.     There are several ways that consumer disputes can be resolved.

61.     The preliminary preferred option put forward by the MBIE is for mandatory provision of consumer dispute resolution services, but feedback is sought as to whether this should be achieved through a new scheme or by expanding the mandate of an existing scheme.

62.     Traditionally, vulnerable populations face difficulties in accessing dispute resolution schemes. Therefore, it is important that both suppliers and the dispute resolution provider ensure that underserved and vulnerable communities can participate in processes that affect them including dispute resolution processes.

Local Board Feedback

63.     While the MBIE has posed 46 questions to submitters in the discussion document, only a few are acutely relevant. The following 11 questions are the most critical for the council family to provide feedback:

a)      What are your views on whether the stormwater networks that are currently operated by local authorities should be economically regulated, alongside drinking water and wastewater?

b)      Do you consider that the economic regulation regime should be implemented gradually from 2024 to 2027, or do you consider that a transitional price-quality path is also required?

c)      If you consider a transitional price-quality path is required, do you consider that this should be developed and implemented by an independent economic regulator, or by Government and implemented through a Government Policy Statement?

d)      What are your views on how Treaty of Waitangi principles, as well as the rights and interests of iwi/Māori, should be factored into the design of an economic regulatory regime for the three waters sector?

e)      Who do you consider should have primary responsibility for determining the structure of three waters prices: a. The Water Services Entity, following engagement with their governance group, communities, and consumers; b. The economic regulator; or c. The Government or Ministers?

f)       Who do you think is the most suitable body to be the economic regulator for the three waters sector? Please provide reasons for your view.

g)      What are your views on whether minimum service level requirements should be able to vary across different types of consumers?

h)      What are your views on whether the regulatory regime should include a positive obligation to protect vulnerable consumers, and that minimum service level requirements are flexible enough to accommodate a wide range of approaches to protecting vulnerable consumers?

i)        What are your views on how Treaty of Waitangi principles, as well as the rights and interests of iwi/Māori, should be factored into the design of a consumer protection regime for the three waters sector?

j)        Do you agree with the preliminary view that the Commerce Commission is the most suitable body to be the consumer protection regulator for the three waters sector?

k)      Do you consider that there should be special considerations for traditionally under-served or vulnerable communities? If so, how do you think these should be given effect?

64.     A recommendation requesting the views of local boards on the proposal is included in this report.

65.     Local board views are requested by 6 December 2021 to enable those views to influence the overall submission and to be included as an attachment to the council submission.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

66.     The discussion paper acknowledges that addressing climate change challenges and ensuring water service resilience is one of the drivers of the overall Three Waters Reform. However, the economic regulation regime is not being considered for these reasons directly.

67.     The proposed economic regulation framework does not have direct impacts on greenhouse gas emissions or climate. However, it may be in the purview of the regulator to ensure consumer expectations are met with regards to environmental and climate outcomes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

68.     Relevant council departments and council-controlled organisations have been identified and contributions will be sought from them in developing the council group’s response to the Economic Regulation and Consumer Protection for Three Waters Services in New Zealand discussion paper.

69.     While overall three waters reform will have a direct impact on council and council-controlled organisations, economic regulation put in place after that reform will not have any impact on council or remaining council-controlled organisations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

70.     Local board views are sought as part of the development of the council’s submission and will be reported back to Governing Body. Local board resolutions will be included as part of council’s submission. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

71.     The overall three waters reform is, in part, to recognise and provide for iwi/Māori rights and interests with a specific focus on service delivery. It is proposed that iwi/Māori will have a greater role in the new Three Waters system, including pathways for enhanced participation by whānau and hapū as these services relate to their Treaty rights and interests.

72.     On a price-quality basis, economic regulation of the three waters industry does not directly impact on Māori any differently than other three waters services consumers. However, the overall three waters reform and specific topics within the economic regulation of three waters are likely to be of significant interest. In particular, how treaty obligations are considered, the recognition of water as taonga for Māori, and the overrepresentation of Māori in the group of consumers vulnerable to price shocks.

73.     Māori outcomes leads within the council family are being consulted on these topics.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

74.     The submission can be developed within existing budget provision and as part of business-as-usual central government advocacy activity.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

75.     There is little risk in making a submission on the economic regulation of three waters. Conversely, there is high risk if we do not make a submission. As the work programme progresses, staff can provide further information about the potential impacts on council’s activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

76.     The office of the Chief Economist is current drafting a submission on behalf of Auckland Council.

77.     Staff are preparing a report for the Governing Body seeking a delegation of Governing Body members to approve the council’s submission.

78.     The views of local boards on the proposal are requested by the 6 December 2021 to enable those views to influence the overall submission and to be included as an attachment to the council submission.

79.     The deadline for the final submission to Government is 20 December 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Shane Martin - Senior Economist

Authoriser

Jim Stabback - Chief Executive

 


Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

Urgent Decision - Howick Local Board Feedback on the Resource Management Enabling Housing Supply Amendment Bill

File No.: CP2021/16416

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To report to the Howick Local Board the urgent decision to provide the board’s feedback on the Resource Management Enabling Housing Supply Amendment Bill to be included in Auckland Council’s submission.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Resource Management (Enabling Housing Supply and Other Matters) Amendment Bill (the Bill) was released on 19 October. The stated purpose of the Bill is to improve housing supply in Tier 1 council areas (i.e. New Zealand’s high growth cities) by speeding up implementation of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS-UD) by at least one year and enabling more medium density homes.

3.       The council is required to implement the NPS-UD through a plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) by August 2022.

4.       The Bill provides for a new Intensification Streamlined Planning Process (ISPP) for this plan change with no Environment Court appeal rights.

5.       The Bill would also require Auckland Council to adopt Medium Density Residential Standards (MDRS) that allow properties across all urban areas to have three dwellings up to three storeys in height without the need for a resource consent, and more than three dwellings per site through a non-notified resource consent process.

6.       The MDRS are based on (but more flexible than) the council’s Mixed Housing Urban zone. The Mixed Housing Urban zone is generally located close to local and town centres and in locations with good public transport. The proposed MDRS rules would have legal effect from the time the council notifies the relevant plan change by August 2022 unless:

·    a qualifying matter applies (e.g. heritage, special character, national grid, designations, open space)

·    the council has proposed more permissive height standards

·    greenfield land is being re-zoned to residential land.

7.       In these cases, planning provisions would have legal effect once the plan change decisions have been completed after the submissions and hearings period.

8.       Under the Bill, resource consent applications lodged after 20 August 2022 (or sooner if the plan change is notified sooner) would be assessed against these changes.

9.       The Bill also requires the withdrawal in part or full, of relevant proposed plans, plan changes or private plan changes which have been notified but have not completed a hearing by 20 February 2022. Relevant proposed plans or plan changes include those that: implement NPS-UD policies 3 and 4 and/or propose changes to or create new residential zone(s) but do not incorporate the MDRS. This requirement is to ensure that the MDRS becomes the minimum expected density throughout Tier 1 residential areas, and that these plan changes go through the ISPP. The ISPP would be faster than a regular plan change process and have no Environment Court appeal rights.

10.     The Bill also clarifies that financial contributions (under the Resource Management Act) can apply to permitted activities (i.e. those that do not require a resource consent. The council currently collects development contributions (under the Local Government Act), not financial contributions.

11.     Lastly, the Bill makes changes to Policy 3(d) of the NPS-UD to clarify this policy and provide less scope for interpretation. Policy 3(d) would be changed to focus solely on enabling height and density adjacent to neighbourhood, local and town centres. At present the NPS-UD links height and density to levels of accessibility to a range of goods and services, and demand for housing.

12.     Due to the limited three-week submission period, local board views on the Bill will need to be provided by midday on 3 November 2021 and be formalised using an urgent decision-making process.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the urgent decision to approve the board’s feedback on the Resource Management Enabling Housing Supply Amendment Bill to be included in Auckland Council’s submission.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent Decision: Howick Local Board Feedback on the Resource Management Enabling Housing Supply Amendment Bill

93

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

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Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

Governance forward work calendar

File No.: CP2021/00042

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Howick Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Howick Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities;

·   clarifying what advice is expected and when; and

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the governance forward work calendar included as Attachment A of the agenda report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work calendar

101

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

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Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

Workshop records

File No.: CP2021/00052

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This item attaches the workshop records taken for the period stated below.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under Standing Order 12.1 workshop records shall record the names of members attending and a statement summarising the nature of the information received, and nature of matters discussed.  No resolutions are passed, or decisions reached but are solely for the provision of information and discussion.

3.       This report attaches the workshop records for the period stated below.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the workshop records for workshops held on 7, 14, 21 and 28 October 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop record 7 October 2021

107

b

Workshop record 14 October 2021

109

c

Workshop record 21 October 2021

111

d

Workshop record 28 October 2021

113

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator 


Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum Update Page 117

Item 8.2      Attachment a    Macleans Park Mountain Bike Track             Page 125


Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 









Howick Local Board

15 November 2021

 

 
















[1] Māori housing grants are only available for housing developments undertaken in conjunction with an urban marae and must fill the same general purpose as papakāinga