Manurewa Local Board

 

OPEN MINUTES

 

 

 

Minutes of a meeting of the Manurewa Local Board held by video conference (Microsoft Teams) on Thursday, 18 November 2021 at 6.07pm. Either a recording or written summary will be uploaded on the Auckland Council website.

 

present

 

Chairperson

Joseph Allan

 

Deputy Chairperson

Melissa Moore

 

Members

Anne Candy

 

 

Tabetha Gorrie

 

 

Rangi McLean

(From 6:16pm, Item 6)

 

Glenn Murphy

 

 

Ken Penney

 

 

Dave Pizzini

 

 

ALSO PRESENT

 

Councillors

Angela Dalton

(Left 7:28pm, Until item 11)

 

Daniel Newman, JP

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

 

1          Welcome

 

Board Member Anne Candy led the meeting in a prayer.

 

 

2          Apologies

 

There were no apologies.

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Member Glenn Murphy declared a conflict of interest with item 14 Manurewa Rangatahi Youth Scholarships 2021-2022, in relation to applications 000000069 and 000000083 and did not speak or vote on this item.

 

Member Anne Candy declared a conflict of interest with item 14 Manurewa Rangatahi Youth Scholarships 2021-2022, in relation to application 000000096 and did not speak or vote on this item.  

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

Resolution number MR/2021/183

MOVED by Chairperson J Allan, seconded by Member G Murphy:  

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)           confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 21 October 2021, as  true and correct.

CARRIED

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

There were no leaves of absence.

 

 

Member Rangi McLean joined the meeting at 6.16pm.

 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

6.1

Acknowledgement – Passing of Theo Gilbert Pizzini

 

The board stood up and observed a moment of silence.

 

Resolution number MR/2021/184

MOVED by Chairperson J Allan, seconded by Member A Candy:  

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)           acknolwedge the passing of Theo Gilbert Pizzini, father of Member Dave Pizzini. Our thoughts go out to him and his family at this difficult time.

CARRIED

 

7          Petitions

 

There were no petitions.

 

 

8          Deputations

 

8.1

Deputation - Blue Light JAM

 

Regina Sheck and Ajayana Timali-Siau from Blue Light JAM were in attendance to provide the board with an update on their 2021 programme.

 

Resolution number MR/2021/185

MOVED by Chairperson J Allan, seconded by Member K Penney:  

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      thank Regina Sheck and Ajayana Timali-Siau from Blue Light JAM for their attendance and presentation.

CARRIED

 

 

8.2

Deputation - Taumata Ake

 

Danica Walker from Taumata Ake was in attendance and spoke about the work that the organisation has been doing.

A PowerPoint presentation was provided. A copy has been placed on the official minutes and is available on the Auckland Council website as a minutes attachment.

 

Resolution number MR/2021/186

MOVED by Chairperson J Allan, seconded by Member R McLean:  

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      thank Danica Walker from Taumata Ake for her attendance and presentation.

CARRIED

 

Attachments

a     18 November 2021, Manurewa Local Board: Item 8.2 - Deputation - Taumata Ake presentation

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

There was no public forum.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

There was no extraordinary business.

 


 

 

11

Governing Body Members' Update

 

Resolution number MR/2021/187

MOVED by Chairperson J Allan, seconded by Member G Murphy:  

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal updates from Councillors Angela Dalton and Daniel Newman.

CARRIED

 

 

12

Members' Update

 

Resolution number MR/2021/188

MOVED by Chairperson J Allan, seconded by Member K Penney:  

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal updates from Members Melissa Moore, Anne Candy and Glenn Murphy.

CARRIED

 

 

13

Chairperson's Update

 

Resolution number MR/2021/189

MOVED by Chairperson J Allan, seconded by Member K Penney:  

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal report from the Manurewa Local Board Chairperson.

CARRIED

 

 

14

Manurewa Rangatahi Youth Scholarships 2021-2022

 

Member Glenn Murphy declared a conflict of interest with item 14 Manurewa Rangatahi Youth Scholarships 2021-2022, in relation to applications 000000069 and 000000083 and did not speak or vote on this item.

Member Anne Candy declared a conflict of interest with item 14 Manurewa Rangatahi Youth Scholarships 2021-2022, in relation to application 000000096 and did not speak or vote on this item. 

 

Resolution number MR/2021/190

MOVED by Chairperson J Allan, seconded by Member D Pizzini:  

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      agree to fund the following Manurewa Rangatahi Youth Scholarship 2021/2022 applications:

Application ID

Requesting scholarship to contribute to…

Recommended funding amount

000000051

University fees (second year) towards

BA and Bachelor in Commerce

$2,000

000000052

Course related costs for Bachelor in Sport and Recreation

$2,000

000000053

Course related costs for BA and Bachelor of Law conjoint

$2,000

000000063

Course related costs for BA and Bachelor in Global Studies

$2,000

000000064

Laptop for Te Pokaitahi Reo

$1,500

000000065

Course related costs for Bachelor of Commerce

$2,000

000000066

Accommodation and transport costs for chefing

$1,500

000000069

Fees for Communication Design at AUT

$2,000

000000073

Course fees towards Bachelor in Counselling

$2,000

000000074

Fees for Bachelor of Medicine and Surgery

$2,000

000000077

Fees, ipad for Bachelor in Counselling

$2,000

000000083

Fees for Bachelor in Contemporary Ministry

 

$2,000

000000091

Accommodation, text books and laptop for Bachelor of Arts and Science

 

$2,000

000000092

Course related costs (tools for nursing) for Bachelor in Nursing

 

$2,000

000000094

Work tools/clothes for NZ Certificate in Electrical Engineering

 

$1,500

000000095

Course related costs for BA and Bachelor of Commerce Conjoint major Japanese, International Business and Marketing

 

$2,000

000000096

Laptop for Bachelor of Veterinary Science

 

$1,500

000000098

Course related costs for Diploma in Architectural technology

 

$2,000

000000099

Course fees, transport for Bachelor of computer and information technology. Double major in data analysis and network cyber security

 

$2,000

0000000102

Course fees, accommodation for Double major in Management and Marketing

 

$2,000

Total:

$38,000

b)          note that 21 applications were received and that one of these was a duplication, meaning 20 applications were considered by the Rangatahi Youth Scholarship Panel

c)           request that $8,000 be allocated to line item 303 Diverse participation: Increase diverse participation in youth initiatives from line item 321 Community grants Manurewa to create a total budget of $38,000, noting this will enable more rangatahi youth scholarship applications to be funded.

CARRIED

 

 

15

Approval for a new private road name at 97 Great South Road, Manurewa

 

Resolution number MR/2021/191

MOVED by Chairperson J Allan, seconded by Member D Pizzini:  

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      agree that Item 15: Approval for a new private road name at 97 Great South Road, Manurewa be deferred to a future meeting of the Manurewa Local Board pending further advice from staff.

CARRIED

 


 

 

16

Update on Ara Kōtui (Improving Māori input into local board decision-making)

 

Resolution number MR/2021/192

MOVED by Chairperson J Allan, seconded by Member G Murphy:  

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the report on progress and achievements of the Ara Kōtui programme and note that staff will report on progress to the participating local boards on a six-monthly basis

b)          thank mana whenua for participating in Ara Kōtui since its inception

c)           note that Ara Kōtui needs to continue to engage mana whenua to ensure all iwi with an interest in the south are aware of the work of Ara Kōtui and have the opportunity to participate

d)          request the chairs of all participating local boards to collectively write to individual mana whenua to thank them for participating to date and/or welcome them to re-engage with the rōpū

e)           reaffirm that it’s representatives to Ara Kōtui (the improving Māori input into local board decision-making project of mana whenua and southern local boards) are Member Rangi McLean and Member Anne Candy as alternate

f)            appoint Chair Joseph Allan as a representative to Ara Kōtui

g)          circulate this report and resolutions to all southern local boards, including Howick and Maungakiekie-Tāmaki, for their information.  

CARRIED

 

 

17

Draft Development Contributions Policy 2021

 

Resolution number MR/2021/193

MOVED by Member K Penney, seconded by Deputy Chairperson M Moore:  

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      provide the following feedback on the Contributions Policy 2021:

i)       The board supports updating the policy for capital projects in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031

ii)     The board supports staged inclusion of projects beyond 10 years of the policy, starting with Drury

iii)   The board notes staff advice that increasing the development contributions does not directly affect house prices. However, we are concerned about the unaffordability of housing in Tāmaki Makaurau and request that staff undertake monitoring of any effects of development contributions on house prices

iv)   The board supports requiring developers to pay their contributions earlier

v)     The board supports the proposal to support Māori development with grants

vi)   The board is concerned that the scope of development contributions policies under current legislation is insufficient to allow for development contributions to be used to fund infrastructure in brownfield areas that are experiencing infill intensification. We believe there should be more scope to require developers to contribute to the cost of renewing and redeveloping existing assets in these areas.

CARRIED

 

 

18

Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy

 

Resolution number MR/2021/194

MOVED by Member K Penney, seconded by Member R McLean:  

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      endorse the approach of the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Strategy 2022 – 2032, and provide the following feedback:

i)       The three key shifts for changing the way the council works (Working in integrated ways, Targeting our responses - particularly to those experiencing the greatest disparity in outcomes, Enabling community leadership) are central to delivering on the strategy’s outcomes and should guide the development of implementation plans

ii)     Development of implementation plans must engage the community as partners from the beginning of the planning process

iii)   With no additional budget to support delivery of the strategy, it is important to ensure that resources and investment are realigned to where there is the greatest need and that the process for doing so is transparent and clear

iv)   Partnerships between the council, community and external organisations (including local) are essential for delivering the strategy’s outcomes and objectives

v)     Resourcing for capacity and capability building of community groups and leadership needs to be stepped up for the strategy to succeed

vi)   Using Auckland Council’s purchasing power is an important lever for achieving Thriving Communities outcomes and objectives, and the council should encourage partner organisations and providers to do the same

vii)  Auckland Council must remain open to new ways of achieving community outcomes that enable and support local innovation and delivery.

CARRIED

 

 

19

Submission on a proposed new national waste strategy and associated waste legislation

 

Resolution number MR/2021/195

MOVED by Member G Murphy, seconded by Member R McLean:  

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      provide the following feedback on the Government’s proposed new waste strategy and proposed changes to waste legislation for inclusion in an Auckland Council submission, noting that feedback is required by 5pm on 22 November 2021 to be appended:

Part 1: Changes to how Aotearoa New Zealand manages its waste and support for moving towards a circular economy

1)              The Manurewa Local Board Plan 2020 objective “We are a low-carbon community with zero waste” and the initiative “to create a community recycling centre plus a recycling centre and resource recovery park in the south” speak to the board’s commitment to reduce waste.

2)              The board supports the circular economy concept.

3)              The board supports the proposed changes to how Aotearoa manages its waste.

Part 2: Proposed new waste strategy

4)              The board supports the proposed vision.

5)              The board supports the following six core waste strategy principles:

i)        Design out waste, pollution and emissions, and unnecessary use of materials

ii)           Keep products and materials in use at their highest value

iii)         Regenerate natural systems, so the environment is healthy for future generations

iv)         Take responsibility for the past, present and future condition of our natural environment

v)           Think in systems, where everything is interconnected

vi)         Deliver equitable and inclusive outcomes

6)              The board believes that targeted investment will be required in learning and development programmes that encourage innovation to ensure this becomes an employment field of preference which is well-paid with qualified workforce that meets future eco and green-industry employment requirements.

7)              The board supports the proposed approach of the three broad stages between now and 2050 but questions whether the timeframe is ambitious enough. 

8)              Each stage should also look for opportunities to create momentum to change societal mindsets in order to garner support for waste minimisation over convenience.  For example, the single use plastic bags legislation forced the use of alternatives which created momentum at the time to question the necessity for so much plastic packaging on food products, particularly on things like fruit and vegetables. 

9)              Communication campaigns will be required to ensure all facets of society are on board and actively participating.

10)           The board supports the following strategic targets for stage 1 – 2030 targets:

Area

Responsibility

Strategic target by 2030

Waste

Whole country

Reduce waste generation by 5-10 per cent per person

 

Public sector

Reduce waste generation by 30 – 50 per cent

 

Business

Reduce waste disposal by 30 - 50 per cent

 

Households

Reduce waste disposal by 60 – 70 per cent

Emissions

Whole country

Reduce biogenic waste methane emissions by at least 30 per cent

Litter

Whole country

Reduce litter by 60 per cent

Part 3: Development of more comprehensive legislation on waste: issues and options

Embedding a long-term, strategic approach to reducing waste

11)      Do you think the new legislation should require the government to have a waste strategy and periodically update it? (pages 45 – 46)

 

The board believe there should be a requirement for all tiers of government to take a long-term and co-ordinated view on waste.

 

The legislation should require the government to have a waste strategy and periodically update it.

 

12)        How often should a strategy be reviewed? (pages 46 - 47)

 

The board believe the strategy should be reviewed every 3 – 6 years and be aligned to the local government long-term plan cycle.

 

13)      How strongly should the strategy (and supporting action and investment plans) influence local authority plans and actions? (pages 47 – 48)

 

The board believes strategy should give clear direction from central government. 

 

Any additional requirements placed on local authorities to administer the new legislative requirements should come with the commensurate central government funding.

 

14)       What public reporting on waste by central and local government would you like to see? (page 47)

 

The board agrees central government should be required to report:

·        at an overall level on progress, including against the specific targets it has set for the country

·        generally on waste data

·        on the use of levy revenue.

 

The board agrees that local authorities should support this by reporting on progress against the same measures and on their use of levy funds, as well as reporting from relevant parts of the waste management industry.

 

15)       Do you agree with the suggested functions for central government agencies? (page 48)

 

The board agrees with the suggested functions for central government agencies.

16)       What central agencies would you like to see carry out these functions? (page 48)

 

The board believe that the best fit to carry out the functions is with the Ministry for the Environment.  The risk with splitting the functions across agencies could lead to a disjointed less focused approach.

17)        How should independent, expert advice on waste be provided to the government? (pages 48 -49)

 

The board can see the benefit of having a Waste Advisory Board that could provide independent expertise and advice in developing future waste strategy and action and investment plans, product bans, assessing significant investment and funding proposals to the minister or ministry or to separate bodies for different functions.

 

18)       How could the legislation provide for Māori participation in the new advice and decision making systems for waste?

(page 49)

The board agree it is imperative to provide for Māori participation in the new advice and decision making systems for waste.

 

The board is mindful of the capacity issues for Māori to engage at all levels of government, however, the opportunity should be created. 

 

The board believe it is a discussion with Māori as to how best this works for them.

 

 

19)       What are your views on local government roles in the waste system, in particular the balance between local and regional? Who should be responsible for planning, service delivery, regulatory activities like licensing, and enforcement of the different obligations created? (pages 49 – 50)

 

The board does not have a view on this question as Auckland Council is a unitary authority, therefore the separation of regional and local is a moot point.

 

 

Putting responsibility at the heart of the new system

20)       Do you see benefit in adapting the United Kingdom’s duty-of-care model for Aotearoa New Zealand’s waste legislation, supported by appropriate offences and penalties? (pages 51 – 52)

 

The board agrees that the duty-of-care approach will encourage a change in attitudes and mindsets. 

21)       Do you support strengthening obligations around litter by creating an individual ‘duty of care’ to dispose of waste appropriately?

 

The board supports strengthening obligations around litter by creating an individual ‘duty-of-care’ to dispose of waste appropriately.

22)       What else could we do so that litter is taken more seriously as a form of pollution?

 

The board believes illegal dumping or fly-tipping should be made a criminal offence.

23)       Do you support a nationwide licensing regime for the waste sector? (pages 53 – 54)

 

The board supports a nationwide licensing regime for the waste sector.

24)       Should the new legislation include a power to require a tracing system to be developed for some or all types of waste? (pages 54 – 55)

 

The board supports the new legislations including a power to require a tracing system to be development for waste.

 

Overall, make it easy for people to engage and dispose of waste in all its forms appropriately.

 

25)       What aspects of the proposals for regulating the waste sector could be extended to apply to hazardous waste? (page 55)

 

The board believes there should be a requirement for local collection points for hazardous waste with associated communication plans so the general public know what is hazardous waste, where to take it and when.  This includes the disposal of e-waste.  Convenience and education will be key to higher levels of compliance.

 

Improving legislative support for product stewardship schemes

26)       Should the new legislation keep an option for accreditation of voluntary product stewardship schemes?

(pages 57 – 58)

 

The board supports the new legislation keeping an option for accreditation of voluntary product stewardship schemes.

27)       How could the accreditation process for new product stewardship schemes be strengthened? (page 58)

 

The board supports the proposed improvements to the accreditation process for product stewardship schemes.

28)       How else could we improve the regulatory framework for product stewardship? (pages 59 – 60)

 

The board believes the product stewardship scheme monitoring, reporting and enforcement regulations should be strengthened to provide formal tools for schemes that are not performing well. 

 

Enhancing regulatory tools to encourage change

29)       What improvements could be made to the existing regulatory powers under section 23 of the Waste Management Act 2008? (page 61 - 62)

 

The board agrees that relying on voluntary action is unlikely to see transformation to a circular economy or meet emission reduction targets.

30)       What new regulatory powers for products and materials would be useful to help Aotearoa move towards a circular economy? (page 62 - 63)

 

The board does not have a formal view on this question.

31)       Would you like to see a right to return packaging to the relevant business? (page 64 - 65)

 

The board believes a right to return packaging to the relevant business approach would be a powerful tool to encourage businesses to take a take on board product stewardship and potentially drive innovation in a circular economy.

 

32)       Would you like to see more legal requirements to support products lasting longer and being able to be repaired? (pages 66 – 67)

 

The board supports more legal requirements to support products lasting longer and being able to be repaired.  Investment will be required to ensure there is a workforce with the required skillsets to make this a reality.

 

33)       Is there a need to strengthen or make better use of import and export controls to support waste minimisation and circular economy goals? For example, should we look at ways to prohibit exports of materials like low-value plastics? (pages 67 – 68)

 

The board believes the import and export controls should be strengthened to support waste minimisation and the circular economy goals.  Aotearoa should not be exporting low value plastics.

Ensuring the waste levy is used to best effect

34)       What types of activities should potentially be subject to a levy? Should the levy be able to be imposed on final disposal activities other than landfills (such as waste to energy facilities)? (pages 69 - 70)

 

The board believes the levy should be applied with the principle to encourage activities that support a circular economy.  Those activities not supporting the circular economy should be charged a higher levy.

35)       What factors should be considered when setting levy rates? (pages 69 – 70)

 

The board believes there should be a requirement for consideration of the overall effectiveness of the waste minimisation measures and the contribution to a circular economy when setting levy rates.

 

36)       How could the rules on collection and payment of the waste levy be improved? (page 70)

 

The board agrees that the new legislation should also take into account management of stockpiling materials, reuse of materials on site at disposal facilities, waivers and exemptions.

 

37)       What should waste levy revenue be able to be spent on? (pages 71 – 72)

The board agrees with the broader scope proposed for what the waste levy can be used for.

38)       How should waste levy revenue be allocated to best reflect the roles and responsibilities of the different layers of government in relation to waste, and to maximise effectiveness? (pages 72 – 73)

 

The board supports an adjustment to the population-based formula for the waste levy that takes into account:

 

·        visitor populations

·        the area, size and distance to high-population centres, to reflect the higher waste-related costs incurred by some territorial authorities

or

·        a fixed base amount, combined with a ‘top up’ proportional amount using one of the options above. For example, 5 per cent of each territorial authority’s total share of revenue could be allocated equally, with the remaining 95 per cent allocated on a population basis.

39)       How should waste levy revenue be allocated between territorial authorities? (pages 72 - 73)

 

The board does not have a formal view on this question.

Improving compliance, monitoring and enforcement

40)       Which elements of compliance, monitoring and enforcement should be the responsibility of which parts of government (central government, regional councils, territorial authorities) under new waste legislation? (pages 75 – 76)

 

The board does not have a formal view on this question.

41)       The need for enforcement work will increase under the new legislation. How should it be funded? (pages 76 – 77)

 

The board agrees that wherever the functions site, they need to be adequately resourced.  The scope for use of the waste levy fund should be expanded to encourage a circular economy.

 

42)       What expanded investigation powers, offences and penalties do you think should be included in new waste legislation?

 

The board supports a legislative change that makes illegal dumping a criminal offence.

 

 

43)       What regulatory or other changes do you think would help better manage inappropriate disposal of materials (that is, littering and fly-tipping)?

 

The board believes that there is a need to provide a range of options for disposing of waste that recognises the diversity of needs between households. These could include: access to local recycling centres; periodically placing skips or bins in neighbourhoods to allow for disposal of inorganic waste without the need to make a booking or place limitations on the amount of waste that can be collected (similar to the ‘Neat Streets’ programme); or other services.

 

The board is a strong advocate for local resource recovery centres and recycling facilities.

 

 

CARRIED

 


 

 

20

National Emissions Reduction Plan Discussion Document – draft council submission

 

Resolution number MR/2021/196

MOVED by Member K Penney, seconded by Member T Gorrie:  

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      provide the following feedback to the Governing Body on the Government’s Emissions Reduction Plan submission:

i)             The board notes that Auckland Council already has existing strategic direction in emissions reduction through Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan and that our board has previously supported the goals of this plan to reduce emissions by 50 per cent by 2030 and transition to net zero emissions by 2050.

ii)           We note that Auckland Council’s 2019 climate change risk assessment rated most coastal areas of Manurewa very high on the climate change impact index, representing exposure and sensitivity to climate change, while most of Manurewa was rated as having a very low capacity to adapt to climate change. Having both high impact risk and low capacity to adapt concentrated in same area means that addressing climate change is important for our board.

Implementation and delivery of the emissions budgets

iii)         The board agrees that a partnership approach between central and local government will be needed to successfully deliver on emissions reduction targets and that upskilling, education, information, and awareness raising campaigns to promote behaviour change will be an important part of this.

iv)         It is also vital that a partnership approach is taken with Māori, and we support the suggestion that a Māori Advisory Group is created to ensure that a Te Ao Māori worldview is embedded in development of the emissions reduction plan.

Funding and finance

v)           The board agrees that significant funding from central Government will need to be made available to local authorities, businesses and individuals to support in the implementation and delivery of emissions budgets.

Planning

vi)         The board supports using urban design and planning tools to reduce vehicle kilometres travelled and car dependence in urban areas, and encourage the uptake of walking, cycling and public transport.

Behaviour change

vii)        The board supports the view that the best way to drive behaviour change is through face-to-face community engagement and empowering local champions.

Moving to a circular economy

viii)      The board supports measures to increase the circularity of the economy, reduce avoidable food waste and extend product stewardship schemes to a wider range of products. We would like to see a central and local government partner on resource recovery initiatives that support local employment and entrepreneurship.

Transport

ix)         The board notes that, according to data from the 2018 Census, 87 per cent of Manurewa residents travel to work in a car, truck or van. Only six per cent use public transport for their commute, and around one per cent use active modes of transport. It is our view that a significant improvement to public transport infrastructure in Manurewa will be needed to change this pattern.

x)           We believe that improvements to the frequency and convenience of bus linkages to our three train stations (Te Mahia, Manurewa and Homai), and improved infrastructure such as bus shelters are needed. Infrastructure for active modes, such as separated cycle paths and shared paths, is also needed to link residents with transport hubs. We support trialling options such as ride share services or on-demand shuttles to address gaps in public transport in lower-density areas.

xi)         The board supports policy interventions to reduce congestion and encourage greater use of public transport and active transport modes. We support exploring tools such as congestion charging to achieve this, provided that the needs and interests of the most vulnerable members of the community and those who would be disproportionately impacted by such charging are safeguarded, and that the revenue is used to improve access to public transport.

xii)        We support the proposal to provide targeted support for low-income groups and transport disadvantaged, such as subsidies for low-emissions vehicles. We also support the suggestion of a vehicle scrappage scheme to help low-income groups swap from older vehicles to cleaner models.

Building and construction

xiii)      The board supports measures to address the operational efficiency and thermal performance of buildings. These will allow us to ensure that our buildings are able to maintain a healthy temperature without contributing to climate change.

Waste

xiv)      The board has provided separate feedback on the Government’s proposals for a new waste strategy and associated waste legislation, and that feedback should be read in conjunction with this.

xv)        We believe that low-income communities such as ours will require initiatives and policy settings to support the behaviour change needed to make necessary reductions to household waste. Our community is already struggling to cope with changes that have been made to waste collections in recent years, and illegal dumping is a significant problem in our local board area.

CARRIED

 

 

21

Three Waters Economic Regulation Submission

 

Resolution number MR/2021/197

MOVED by Deputy Chairperson M Moore, seconded by Member D Pizzini:  

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      provides the following feedback for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on the Economic Regulation and Consumer Protection for Three Waters Services in New Zealand discussion paper:

The need for economic regulation

1)               The board supports the need to regulate the new water authorities to ensure they are responsive to the communities they serve.

The type of regulation and who would pay the costs

2)               The board supports the proposal that the regulator be a price-quality regulator, provided “quality” includes factors such as the social, cultural, environmental, and the financial wellbeing of communities.

3)               The board supports the proposal that the administrative costs of the regulator be recovered through levies as this is a straightforward, transparent, and standard way of recovering these costs providing that the regulations are designed to ensure they are net beneficial to consumers. 

What parts of three waters the regulation would apply to

4)               The board contends that without further information it is difficult to understand how the provision of stormwater could be economically regulated or to demonstrate how the cost of that regulation is net beneficial to consumers.

Should the regulation apply to all providers

5)               The board supports the proposal that small community or private schemes should only be regulated if the cost of regulation is outweighed by the benefits.

How and when should regulation be implemented

6)               The board supports a graduated approach to implementing a conventional price-quality path, providing that this considers the social, cultural, environmental, and the financial wellbeing of communities.

What should be the statutory objectives of the regulation regime

7)               The board supports statutory objectives that would:

i)                 incentivise innovation and investment

ii)               improve efficiency

iii)             share efficiency gains with consumers

iv)             consider the impacts of climate change

v)               consider Te mana o te Wai.

What should compliance and enforcement look like

8)               The board supports the need for effective compliance and enforcement to ensure the regulation is effective.

Who the economic regulator should be

9)               The board has no view on who the economic regulator should be.

Additional consumer protections and how those are regulated

10)            The board supports the provisions in the proposal to ensure the regulator is responsive to its customers.

11)            The board requests provisions to ensure the regulator is responsive to the plans and priorities of local communities as expressed through the local boards.

12)            The board requests further consideration of the role of local boards in advocating for their communities and how this will be reflected in the statutory objectives of the regulator. 

CARRIED

 

 

22

Summary of Previously Confidential Decisions, Local Board Feedback and Related Information, now released into Open

 

Resolution number MR/2021/198

MOVED by Chairperson J Allan, seconded by Member T Gorrie:  

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      note the previously confidential local board feedback dated 31 August 2021, and now publicly available:

i)       Manurewa Local Board Input to Auckland Light Rail engagement July / August 2021.

CARRIED

 

 

23

For Information: Reports referred to the Manurewa Local Board

 

Resolution number MR/2021/199

MOVED by Member K Penney, seconded by Member D Pizzini:  

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the following information from the Governing Body committee meetings, Council Controlled Organisations, forums or other local board meetings:

No.

Report Title

Item no.

Meeting Date

Governing Body Committee or Council Controlled Organisation or Forum or Local Board

1

Notice of Motion - Contractor Performance in Relation to Volunteer Groups in Kaipātiki

12

20 October 2021

Kaipātiki Local Board resolutions circulated to all local boards for their information

2

Chairperson's report

12

27 October 2021

Waiheke Local Board resolutions circulated to all local boards for their information

3

Extraordinary Business - Resource Management (Enabling Housing Supply) Amendment Bill

12.1

2 November 2021

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board resolutions circulated to all local boards for their information

 

CARRIED

 

 

24

Manurewa Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar - November 2021

 

Resolution number MR/2021/200

MOVED by Member G Murphy, seconded by Member A Candy:  

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      note the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

CARRIED

 

 

25

Manurewa Local Board Workshop Records

 

Resolution number MR/2021/201

MOVED by Chairperson J Allan, seconded by Deputy Chairperson M Moore:  

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      note the Manurewa Local Board workshop records held on:

i)       14 October 2021

ii)      28 October 2021.

CARRIED

 

 

26        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 

There was no consideration of extraordinary items.

 

Member Rangi McLean closed the meeting with a karakia.

 

 

8.09 pm                                              The Chairperson thanked Members for their attendance and attention to business and declared the meeting closed.

 

CONFIRMED AS A TRUE AND CORRECT RECORD AT A MEETING OF THE Manurewa Local Board HELD ON

 

 

 

DATE:.........................................................................

 

 

 

CHAIRPERSON:.......................................................