I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 23 November 2021

10.00am

Local Board Office
7-13 Pilkington Road
Panmure

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Maria Meredith

 

Deputy Chairperson

Chris Makoare

 

Members

Don Allan

 

 

Debbie Burrows

 

 

Nerissa Henry

 

 

Peter McGlashan

 

 

Tony Woodcock

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Blair Morrow

Democracy Advisor

 

18 November 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 027 278 6975

Email: Blair.morrow@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                   5

2          Apologies                                                                                 5

3          Declaration of Interest                                          5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                    5

6          Acknowledgements                                              5

7          Petitions                                                                 5

8          Deputations                                                           5

8.1     Gareth Teahan of Auckland Softball         5

8.2     Julie Chambers of Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum                                 6

8.3     John Burns and Sue Cooper of the Character Coalition Incorporated              6

9          Public Forum                                                                            6

10        Extraordinary Business                                       7

11        Governing Body Member's Update                    9

12        Chairperson's Report                                         11

13        Board Member's Reports                                   17

14        To classify unclassifed parcels of land - Apirana Corner Reserve                                    19

15        Local board feedback on the Central Government's proposed Auckland Light Rail 37

16        Approval for one public and three private road names for the Richmond Stage 4 development - 55 Mangahoe Road, Mount Wellington          45

17        Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Two 2021/2022, grant allocations                     55

18        Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy                                                      65

19        Draft Contributions Policy 2021                      101

20        Governance Forward Work Calendar             135

21        Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops                                                        139

22        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 26 October 2021 as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Gareth Teahan of Auckland Softball

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Providing Gareth Teahan of Auckland Softball with the opportunity to present to the board on getting the licence to occupy the old Cricket clubrooms at Hamlin Park, in order to carry out the necessary work to get the building up to health and safety standards.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       As per standing orders the Chairperson has approved the deputation request from Gareth Teahan of Auckland Softball.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      thank Gareth Teahan of Auckland Softball for his attendance.

 

 

8.2       Julie Chambers of Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Providing Julie Chambers of Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum with the opportunity to present to the board on the clean streams project

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       As per standing orders the Chairperson has approved the deputation request from Julie Chambers of Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      thank Julie Chambers of Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum for her attendance.

 

 

8.3       John Burns and Sue Cooper of the Character Coalition Incorporated

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Providing John Burns and Sue Cooper of the Character Coalition Incorporated with the opportunity to present to the board on the impact the Council’s response to the National Policy Statement on Housing and Urban Development may have on the Special Character Areas in your Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       As per standing orders the Chairperson has approved the deputation request from John Burns and Sue Cooper of the Character Coalition Incorporated.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      thank John Burns of and Sue Cooper of the Character Coalition Incorporated for their attendance.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

Governing Body Member's Update

File No.: CP2021/17456

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on local activities that the Governing Body representative is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To provide the Governing Body Member an opportunity to update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Governing Body Member’s update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Blair Morrow – Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2021/17457

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the Chairperson is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing the Chairperson with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Chairperson’s report for November 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

23 November 2021 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Chair's Report

13

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Blair Morrow – Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

Board Member's Reports

File No.: CP2021/17459

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the local board members are involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the board members report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Blair Morrow – Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

To classify unclassifed parcels of land - Apirana Corner Reserve

File No.: CP2021/16013

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To classify two parcels of land that form Apirana Corner Reserve situated at 233 Apirana Avenue, Pt England as a recreation reserve under the Reserves Act 1977.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Apirana Corner Reserve is made up of two parcels of land, Lot 480 DP 44485 and Part Allotment 43 District Tāmaki. Both parcels are held as unclassified recreation reserves subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

3.       Land Advisory Services has received an application from Wyborn Capital Properties Ltd to alter an existing access across Apirana Corner Reserve into the adjacent industrial site for traffic safety reasons. This requires an easement to be created.

4.       The proposed easement aligns with the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020 “Outcome 6: Our people and businesses prosper economically and socially” by providing additional light industry and employment opportunities for the local community. 

5.       Land advisory staff recommend the formal classification of the parcels identified in Apirana Corner Reserve as a recreation reserve as the reserve was acquired for recreation purposes.

6.       The purpose of recreation reserves as set out in section 17 of the Reserves Act 1977 is to provide for recreation activities and the physical welfare and enjoyment of the public, with emphasis on the retention of open spaces.

7.       Auckland Council is statutorily obliged to classify all unclassified reserves. This is undertaken under section 16 of the Reserves Act 1977 and if not taken would mean the council is not meeting its statutory obligations.

8.       Local boards hold the delegated authority under Section 16 (1) of the Reserves Act to classify all council held reserves. 

9.       This report recommends that Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board classify two parcels of land at Apirana Corner Reserve as indicated in Attachment A to the agenda report to comply with the statutory requirement to classify reserves according to their principal or primary purpose.  

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      resolve to classify pursuant to Section 16 (1) of the Reserves Act 1977 Lot 480 Deposited Plan 44485 comprised in situated at 233 Apirana Avenue, Pt England, held in fee simple by Auckland Council under record of title NA18D/1348 (Part-Cancelled) as a recreation reserve, subject to the Reserves Act 1977,

b)      resolve to classify pursuant Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 Part Allotment 43 District Tāmaki, situated at 233 Apirana Avenue, Pt England, held in fee simple by Auckland Council under record of title NA31B/922 as a recreation reserve, subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

Horopaki

Context

10.     Classification is a mandatory process under section 16 of the Reserves Act 1977 which involves assigning a reserve (or parts of a reserve) to the appropriate class. The class determines the principal or primary purpose of the reserve. The present values of the reserve are considered as well as the future “potential” values and the possible future uses and activities on the reserve. 

11.     Land advisory staff recommend the classification of two parcels of land being Lot 480 Deposited Plan 44485 and of Part Allotment 43 District Tāmaki, situated at 233 Apirana Avenue, Pt England so that an easement can be created to alter existing access for traffic safety purposes.  

12.     Reserve classification gives council the ability to grant an easement for the re-alignment of the accessway to provide straight access so traffic can safely enter and leave the development site at 233 Apirana Avenue, Pt England, from Apirana Avenue across Apirana Corner Reserve.

13.     A Recreation Reserve classification is recommended for the two parcels on Apirana Corner Reserve as indicated in Attachment A. The reserve was acquired for recreation purposes with an emphasis on the retention of open spaces. The reserve is an open space area that allows for informal recreation in an almost totally urbanised area. There is no plan to change the reserves intended use as recreation reserve.

14.     Local boards hold delegated authority under Section 16(1) of the Reserves Act 1977 to classify all council owned reserves, subject to all statutory processes having been satisfied.

15.     As the proposed classification is substantially the same as the purpose for which the reserve is held, council is not required to publicly notify its intention to classify the reserve. However, engagement with iwi is still necessary in terms of Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987.

16.     The proposed classification was presented to the South/Central Mana Whenua Forum on 28 July 2021.

17.     There was support from all the attendees. Iwi identified as having the main interest in the land is Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki. A follow-up email and PowerPoint presentation was forwarded to the kaitiaki representing Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki on 4 August 2021 to share with the management team. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The land

18.     Apirana Corner Reserve consists of two triangular reserves that adjoin Apirana Avenue and a commercial property at 167 Pilkington Road that is also referred to as 233 Apirana Avenue.

19.     There is no plan to change the reserves intended use as a recreation reserve.

20.     The reserve is zoned as Open Space – Informal Recreation Zone under the Auckland Unitary Plan. There are no natural resources, heritage layers or special character areas indicated on council’s Geomaps. The site is not a closed landfill or contaminated site.

Reserves Act 1977

21.     The Reserves Act 1977 requires all reserves to be classified for their primary purposes.

22.     Apirana Corner Reserve is made up of two parcels of land, Lot 480 DP 44485 and Part Allotment 43 District Tāmaki. Both parcels are unclassified recreation reserves subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

23.     The purpose of recreation reserves as set out in section 17 of the Reserves Act 1977 is to provide for recreation with the emphasis on the retention of open spaces. Staff consider this classification is appropriate as it allows for walking, formal and informal recreation in an almost totally urbanised area, enabling local residents and visitors to enjoy the reserve in a manner supported by the Reserves Act 1977. This was also the intended purpose for the reserve when it was originally acquired. 

24.     Staff recommend the two parcels of Apirana Corner Reserve outlined above be classified to meet the statutory requirements.

 Specialists’ comments and consultation

25.     Community Facilities’ Land Advisory Services and Operations staff, Parks and Places Specialist and Senior Urban Forest Specialist staff were consulted about the proposed classification and support the proposal. 

26.     With regard to the actual land use/landowner component of the application council’s Senior Urban Forest Specialist advises the loss of some small shrubs but a gain of two trees and that the move doesn’t impact roots of any other nearby larger trees. Replanting will be requested in accordance with the applicant’s arborist report attached to this report as Attachment B to the agenda report. 

27.     Council’s Parks and Places Specialist queried if Auckland Transport had reviewed the plans. This review will be undertaken during the consenting process. In particular, resource consent will be for changing the use and design of a crossing that is subject to a Vehicle Access Restriction, which applies as Apirana Avenue is classified as an arterial road. The access has been designed with input from the applicant’s traffic and civil engineers.

28.     The Parks and Places Specialist noted that council will gain some reserve on the southern side of the existing exit and lose some on the north.  The accessway is located in a narrow part of the reserve and there will be no loss of amenity with only minor visual effect and no increase from the current use.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan sets out two core goals:

·    climate mitigation: to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) by 50 per cent by 2030 and achieve net zero emissions by 2050

·    climate adaptation: to be resilient and adapt to the impacts and effects of climate change by ensuring we plan for the projected changes.

30.     There is a minimal impact on greenhouse gas emissions that will occur during construction with the use of trucks for delivery. The actual access way is over a smaller area than the original access and will not introduce any new source of emissions on completion of the access way at the site. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     The proposed reserve classification is an administrative requirement and has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     The proposed easement aligns with the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020 “Outcome 6: Our people and businesses prosper economically and socially” as the increase in light industrial development on the adjoining site will provide employment opportunities for the local community.

33.     The formal classification of the parcels of land outlined will enable the easement for the access way into the development and make it safer for traffic movements in and out of the site.  This is not possible on an unclassified reserve.  

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori.

35.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2012-2022, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework, Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau - Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework and Local Board Plans.

36.     Prior to proceeding with the classification, the council is required under Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 to engage with local iwi. The item was presented to the mana whenua groups identified as having an interest in the land as indicated in paragraph 16. 

37.     Further iwi engagement was completed with Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki who have ahi kaa in this area. There were no objections to the proposal received.

38.     There are no sites of value or significance to mana whenua identified in the Auckland Unitary Plan – Operative in Part in relation to the application.  

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

39.     There are no financial operational implications for the local board over and above the existing maintenance requirements of this reserve. 

40.     The local board’s resolution to classify the reserve will be published in the New Zealand Gazette as a public record of the classification. The cost of publication is approximately $100 and will be borne by Community Facilities. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

41.     Classification of reserves is a mandatory requirement. Should the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board not resolve to classify the parcels indicated in Attachment A to this report as recommended, this decision would contravene the Act’s requirements of the administering body.   

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     Land advisory staff will complete the classification statutory requirements. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Reserve

25

b

Arborist assessment

27

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tamara Zunic - Specialist Technical Statutory Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

Local board feedback on the Central Government's proposed Auckland Light Rail

File No.: CP2021/16652

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board of its formal feedback, developed through delegation by the Chair and Deputy Chair on the Central Government’s proposed Auckland Light Rail.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s 28 April 2020 business meeting it delegated authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair to approve and submit the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, parliament, select committees and other councils (resolution: MT/2020/32).

3.       The local board’s feedback has been approved by the Chair and Deputy Chair for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission to the central government.

4.       A copy of the local board’s feedback is Attachment A of this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the local board’s feedback on the Central Government’s proposed Auckland Light Rail.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

23 November 2021 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Feedback on Central Government's Proposed Lightrail

39

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mal Ahmu - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

Approval for one public and three private road names for the Richmond Stage 4 development - 55 Mangahoe Road, Mount Wellington

File No.: CP2021/16825

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board to name one new public road and three new private roads, being commonly owned access lots (COALs), created by way of subdivision developments at Richmond Stage 4 - 55 Mangahoe Road, Mount Wellington.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The Guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider / developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval.

3.       On behalf of the developer and applicant, Wilshire Ryburn Development Limited, Olivia Walraven has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the Local Board.

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana Whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines.

5.       The proposed names for the new public road are:

ROAD 1:

·    Torenia Street (Applicant Preferred)

·    Parehua Street (Alternative 1)

·    Kaimanu Street (Alternative 2)

6.       The proposed names for the three new private roads are:

COAL 1:

·    Nemesia Lane (Applicant Preferred)

·    Taukaka Lane (Alternative 1)

·    Hurupī Lane (Alternative 2)

COAL 2:

·    Kōpiha Way (Applicant Preferred)

·    Carnation Way (Alternative 1)

·    Konaki Way (Alternative 2)

COAL 3

·    Panehe Lane (Applicant Preferred)

·    Arawaru Lane (Alternative 1)

·    Zinnia Lane (Alternative 2)

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      approves the following road names for one new public road and three private roads, being commonly owned access lots (COALs), created by way of subdivision at Richmond Stage 4 - 55 Mangahoe Road, Mount Wellington in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (road naming reference RDN90095857, and resource consent references BUN60369875 and Stage 4 – SUB60328054-5-A);

i)       Torenia Street for the new public road – ROAD 1; and

ii)       Nemesia Lane for the new private road – COAL 1;

iii)      Kōpiha Way for the new private road – COAL 2;

iv)      Panehe Lane for the new private road – COAL 3.

Horopaki

Context

7.       Richmond is a terrace home development between Panama and Hillside Roads, Mt Wellington, developed by Founders Development. 233 dwellings have been completed across three stages, and the remainder of the site is to be developed in over the next two to three years.

8.       Richmond 4 will see another 111 homes built. There are three private joint access laneways (COALs) and one public vested road to name. Location and Site Plans of the development can be found in Attachments A and B.

9.       In accordance with the Standards, any road including private ways, COALs, and right of ways, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

10.     For this development it has been confirmed by LINZ that the new public road and three new COALs require road names because they serve more than five lots.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval

12.     The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

13.     Theme: There have been many streets and lanes that required naming throughout Richmond. To enable enough choice to meet Council, NZ Post and LINZ requirements, and to ensure enough variety to create authenticity, the applicant has used several themes throughout the site. The applicant invited suggestions for road names from local Iwi, and most of the following suggested names were provided by Te Aakitai Waiohua:

Road ref.

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

ROAD 1

Torenia Street

(Applicant preferred)

Also called wishbone flowers, Torenia produces masses of brightly coloured flowers.

In reference to the nursery that previously occupied the site.

Parehua Street

(Alternative 1)

(noun) ridge, terrace (landform).

In reference to the site previously being hills. Suggested by Te Ākitai Waiohua Waka Taua.

Kaimanu Street

(Alternative 2)

New Zealand passionfruit with small white flowers and orange- coloured, pear-shaped fruit.

COAL 1

Nemesia Lane

(Applicant preferred)

A small colourful flowering plant that grows annual flowers.

In reference to the nursery that previously occupied the site.

Taukaka Lane

(Alternative 1)

(noun) ridge, spur (of a hill).

In reference to the site previously being hills. Suggested by Te Ākitai Waiohua Waka Taua.

 

Hurupī Lane

(Alternative 2)

(noun) fresh growth.

Refers to the agricultural history of the site, and the new development being established here.

COAL 2

Kōpiha Way

(Applicant preferred)

(noun) kumara storage pit.

The site was used by the Māori to grow kumara. Suggested by Te Ākitai Waiohua Waka Taua.

 

Carnation Way

(Alternative 1)

Carnation is an herbaceous perennial plant.

In reference to the plant nursery that used to occupy the site.

Konaki Way

(Alternative 2)

(noun) to spring up, grow, swell.

In reference to the naturally occurring spring that is under this part of the site.

COAL 3

Panehe Lane

(Applicant preferred)

(noun) small stone adze.

In reference to the Māori artifacts found on site. Suggested by Te Ākitai Waiohua Waka Taua.

Arawaru Lane

(Alternative 1)

(noun) sound of running water.

In reference to the naturally occurring spring that is under this part of the site.

Zinnia Lane

(Alternative 2)

Zinnia is a genus of plants of the sunflower tribe within the daisy family.

In reference to the nursery that previously occupied the site.

 

14.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity. It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

15.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

16.     Road Type: The suffix of ‘Street’ for COAL 3 was proposed by the applicant and is generally used for public roads, according to the Guidelines. It is therefore recommended that ‘Lane’ for COAL 3 be used as it more accurately reflects the form, layout and type of roads being named. The applicant has confirmed they have no problem with the recommended suffix of ‘Lane’. The other proposed road types are acceptable.

17.     Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

22.     On 19 August 2021 mana whenua were contacted by council on behalf of the applicant, through the Resource Consent department’s central facilitation process, as set out in the Guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with an interest in the general area were contacted:

·    Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki (Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Tribal Trust)

·    Ngāti Maru (Ngāti Maru Rūnanga Trust)

·    Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

·    Ngāti Pāoa (Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust)

·    Ngāti Pāoa (Ngāti Paoa Trust Board)

·    Ngāti Tamaterā (Ngāti Tamaterā Settlement Trust)

·    Ngāti Te Ata (Te Ara Rangatu o Te Iwi o Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua)

·    Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua (Makaurau Marae Māori Trust)

·    Te Ākitai Waiohua (Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority)

·    Te Patukirikiri (Te Patukirikiri Incorporated)

·    Ngāti Tamaoho

23.     Te Ākitai Waiohua have been actively engaged to propose names within this development and those names have been utilised in this instance. Comment was received from Waikato-Tainui who deferred to local mana whenua, and by the close of the consultation period, no other responses, comments, or feedback were received. As Mana whenua have been directly involved and the suggested names are included for consideration by the Local Board, it is considered that appropriate engagement with mana whenua has been undertaken in this instance.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the Council.

25.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     There are no significant risks to Council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan

51

b

Location map

53

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elizabeth Salter - Subdivision Technical Officer

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Two 2021/2022, grant allocations

File No.: CP2021/16839

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Round Two 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.     This report presents applications received for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Two (Attachment B) 2021/2022.

3.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board adopted the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Community Grants Programme 2020/2021 on 27 April 2021 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

4.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $112,522 for the 2021/2022 financial year. A total of $68,482 was allocated in the previous grant rounds. This leaves a total of $44,040.00 to be allocated to two local grants and one multiboard round.

5.     Eighteen applications were received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Two 2021/2022, requesting a total of $121,508.32.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Two 2021/2022, listed in Table One below:

Table One: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Two 2021/2022

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2211-202

He Waka Eke Noa Charitable Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of three professional mural artist’s fees and art materials to mentor four young local artists over a week-long period in the arts of mural design, creation, and execution.

$8,279.00

Eligible

LG2211-203

David Riley

Arts and culture

Towards the distribution of children's book bundles at primary and intermediate schools in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-209

Dolphin Theatre Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the royalty fees, advertising, electricity, cleaning, promotional photography, printing, and promotional materials costs for the theatre production "Show 3" of the Dolphin Theatre Annual 2022 Show programme.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-206

Dunkirk Road Activity Centre Incorporated

Community

Towards the purchase of furniture for the lounge area of the hall at the Dunkirk Road Activity Centre.

$7,375.00

Eligible

LG2211-210

Blue Light Ventures Incorporated

Community

Towards the printing and production costs of the "Street Smart" life skills resource handbook for 350 Year-13 students in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki schools, Tamaki College, and One Tree Hill College.

$1,225.00

Eligible

LG2211-211

New Zealand Council of Victim Support Groups Incorporated

Community

Towards the operational costs of the "Volunteer Support" programme, including the cost of staff expenses, volunteer expenses, technology, administration, learning, development, and training, operational travel, and communications.

$6,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-213

Pakuranga Inter-Church Charitable Trust - Pakuranga Counselling Centre

Community

Towards the counselling sessions for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki community between 1 December 2021 to 30 November 2022.

$9,500.00

Eligible

LG2211-215

CCS Disability Action Auckland Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of New Zealand Signage Language interpreters for three local community events to celebrate the International Day of Disabled People, Disability Day of Mourning, and International Women’s Day events.

$2,500.00

Eligible

LG2211-216

More for Kidz Foundation Trust

Community

Towards facility hire at Ken Maunder Park for a summer sports camp.

$3,400.00

Eligible

LG2211-217

The Tongan Health Society Incorporated

Community

Towards the delivery of the “Pacific Elderly Day Programme”, including costs for driver's wages and petrol, speakers’ and instructors’ fees, resources for activities, advertising, and catering.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-221

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the cost of clinical supervision, services for vulnerable youth and in-school promotion of services in the Māungakiekie-Tāmaki area from 1 December 2021 to 30 June 2022.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-222

Everybody Eats Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the cost of 1,250 free meals to feed people who have been negatively affected by COVID-19, including the cost of food materials, takeaway containers, rent, electricity, and gas.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-228

YMCA North Incorporated

Community

Towards the "Raise Up" Maungakiekie-Tāmaki programme and event costs between December 2021 to October 2022 including meeting, camp, recruitment, uniform, training, marketing, materials, equipment, venue hire, workshop facilitators, transport, mileage, gifts, and prizes costs.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-219

Glen Taylor School

Environment

Towards employment of a kitchen specialist and a garden specialist both 12 hours a week for 40 weeks

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-229

The Auckland King Tides Initiative

The Institution of Professional Engineers New Zealand Inc

Environment

Toward design and production of water level (tidal) gauge signage, Installation of water level (tidal) gauges, including chart datum calculation. and coordination of a public launch of water level (tide) gauges.

$8,340.00

Eligible

LG2211-224

Manukau Outriggers Canoeing Club Incorporated

Events

Towards the purchase of regatta resources, specifically the cost of buoys, weights, and ropes.

$1,110.00

Eligible

LG2211-214

Auckland Basketball Services Limited

Sport and recreation

Towards the Community Basketball Manager's wages, coaching fees, basketballs, and basketball bags from 1 December 2021 to 18 October 2022.

$9,971.32

Eligible

LG2211-225

Sport Auckland

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of delivering free community-focused exercise sessions, specifically the cost of exercise equipment, instructors fee, and venue hire.

$8,808.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$121,508.32

 

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       Auckland Council’s Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·     local board priorities

·     lower priorities for funding

·     exclusions

·     grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·     any additional accountability requirements.

 

9.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board adopted the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 27 April 2021 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

10.     The community grants programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The aim of the local board grants programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include:

·        local food production and food waste reduction

·        decreasing use of single-occupancy transport options

·        home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation

·        local tree planting and streamside revegetation

·        education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

15.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

17.     Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they can increase their chances of success in the future.

18.     A summary of each application received through Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Two 2021/2022 is provided in Attachment B.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grants processes.

20.     Thirteen applicants applying to Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Two 2021/2022 indicate projects that target Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements.

22.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $112,522 for the 2021/2022 financial year. A total of $68,482 was allocated in the previous grant rounds. This leaves a total of $44,040.00 to be allocated to two local grants and one multiboard round.

23.     Eighteen applications were received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Two 2021/2022, requesting a total of $121,508.32.

24.     Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Following the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board allocating funding for round two of the local grants, grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Grants Programme 2021/2022

61

b

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Two 2021/2022 - grant applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moumita Dutta - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Rhonwen Heath - Head of Rates Valuations & Data Mgmt

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy

File No.: CP2021/16862

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.   To seek support for the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho/Thriving Communities Strategy 2022-2032.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.   Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities was adopted in 2014 as council’s strategy for community and social wellbeing. A review of the plan in 2018 identified it needed to be refreshed to align with the Auckland Plan 2050 outcomes and better address the changes and challenges in Tāmaki Makaurau.

3.   These challenges include growing socio-economic disparities, population growth and intensification, the impacts of climate change and more recently COVID-19. These impact on communities’ ability to thrive.

4.   Through the refresh process we heard from diverse communities across the region on what is needed to help them thrive. These insights have shaped the draft strategy.

5.   The draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities strategy sets out the high-level direction for the next 10 years to respond to these challenges and to what communities told us was important.

6.   The draft strategy has four main outcome areas which are the building blocks for thriving:

·    Manaakitanga | Quality of life:

All Aucklanders enjoy the essentials of a good life and fulfil their potential

·    Whanaungatanga | Community Connection:
Aucklanders are connected and feel as though they belong

·    Kotahitanga | Collective action:

All Aucklanders can participate and they take collective action to meet common goals

·    Kaitiakitanga | Sustainable futures:

Aucklanders are connected to and care for the environment.

 

7.   The high-level outcomes are supported by objectives that cascade to three key shifts in the way we work:  from one-size fits all to targeting our responses, from adhoc and siloed to working in integrated ways, shifting from council as expert to enabling community leadership. 

8.   Four investment principles focus resources to impact on community challenges. This will ensure there is a strong, intentional link between aspiration, investment and action, and that we focus on communities who experience the greatest inequities.

9.   A key constraint is that there is currently no additional budget attached to the proposed strategy. This means the pace of change will be reliant on future budget and implementation planning to either seek new investment or to refocus existing resources to the strategy’s objectives.  

10. Another limitation is that many of the barriers to people thriving relate to complex socio-economic factors where the council is not the primary deliverer.

11. The draft strategy will be reported to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in February 2022 for adoption.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      support the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Strategy 2022 – 2032 as set out in Attachment A to this report.  

 

Horopaki

Context

12. The Auckland Plan Participation and Belonging outcome in particular sets the aspiration that ‘All Aucklanders will be part of and contribute to society, access opportunities, and have the chance to develop to their full potential’.

13. Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities was adopted in 2014 as council’s community and social wellbeing plan. It is a core plan to deliver the Auckland Plan 2050 which has a strong focus on fostering an inclusive Auckland where everyone has the chance to thrive.

14. In 2018 a review of Ngā Hapori Momoho identified several improvement areas. This included refreshing the strategy to better align it to the new Auckland Plan 2050 and to address the changes and growing challenges facing Auckland.

Diverse community voices have shaped the draft strategy approach

 

15. The new draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities strategy has been informed by feedback from the diverse communities of Tāmaki Makaurau, key sector stakeholders, partners, and mana whenua. These voices are central to both the content of the draft strategy and how it will be used. 

16. During 2019 and 2020 staff looked at feedback from over 50 previous public engagements, and then undertook face to-face interviews, focus groups and online hui. We heard from over 400 community groups and leaders from across the region on what it means to thrive and what council can do to support that.

17. Staff presented the findings from this community engagement to local boards in April 2021 which can be accessed here.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Auckland is facing local and international challenges impacting thriving communities  

18. At the 2018 Census there were nearly 1.6 million usual residents in Auckland, an increase of 11% since the 2013 Census, and this is projected to grow to 2.4 million by 2050[1].

19. Tāmaki Makaurau is very diverse – it is home to the largest Polynesian population of any city in the world, and 40% of the population were born overseas.

20. Whilst many of those living in Auckland can make the most of all this region has to offer, there are still many who have limited capability to access social and economic resources and opportunities compared to the general population.

21. Many Aucklanders do not have access to the things they need to thrive. This restricts their ability to fully participate in society and in activities that have meaning and value to them.

22. Tāmaki Makaurau’s strong economic growth has not been shared equally, with Māori and Pasifika communities making considerably less each week than the rest of the Auckland population.

23. Over a third (38.5%) of Pasifika people and 46% of young people in Auckland are living in overcrowded and unsuitable homes[2].

24. Only 50% of Aucklanders feel a sense of belonging in their neighbourhoods, and 49% have felt isolated and lonely[3].

25. Tāmaki Makaurau is facing some key challenges over the next 10-20 years that provide the strategic drivers for the refreshed strategy. We need to respond to these if we want to maintain social cohesion and ensure all our people and communities are thriving.  

Challenge 1

Challenge 2

Challenge 3

Growing wealth and income inequality will mean too many whānau cannot thrive.

The pace and scale of growth and social change could undermine Aucklander’s sense of belonging and connection.

Our changing climate will make outcomes worse for those communities already struggling.

 

26.
More recently other significant changes both locally and globally are contributing to why we need a strategy that takes an intentional approach to supporting thriving, inclusive and sustainable communities:

 

 

Changing the way council works can help address community challenges 

27. In recognition of the 2018 review findings and from our community and stakeholder engagement, we know there needed to be some key shifts in the underlying thinking and approach of the council. We also need to be explicit in our priorities. Key shifts proposed include the following:

 

FROM

TO

WHAT CHANGES WILL WE MAKE?

1

Ad hoc and siloed



Integrated and connected

We will work across the Auckland Council group, with government and across communities and sectors to support Aucklanders to thrive. We will share data, evidence and learning.

We will prioritise interventions which support coordination and collective impact to deliver on the multiple outcomes which impact Aucklander’s wellbeing (social, environmental, cultural and environmental).

2

One-size-fits all



Targeted approaches

We will change our current services, activities and ways of working to better meet the needs of whānau and communities, particularly those experiencing the greatest disparity in outcomes.

We will tailor services and activities to meet local needs and opportunities.

3

Council as expert



Council as enabler

We will support communities (whānau, hapū, iwi, people) to lead their own responses. We will enable them to define, deliver, and monitor the things that enable them to thrive.

We will measure our success based on the outcomes we enable rather than just the services and activities that we deliver.

 

What we want to achieve – an overview of the draft strategy 

28. To guide how we respond to these identified challenges and to support the key shifts we need to make, the draft strategy sets out four outcomes and six objectives. The outcomes set out where communities want to be in the future. Objectives identify where to focus to get there.

Outcomes: Four building blocks for thriving

29. The draft strategy has four main outcome areas which if achieved would contribute to thriving communities.  

·    Manaakitanga | Quality of life
All Aucklanders enjoy the essentials of a good life and fulfil their potential

·    Whanaungatanga | Community connection
Auckland are connected and feel as though they belong

·    Kotahitanga | Collective action
All Aucklanders can participate and they take collective action to meet common goals

·    Kaitiakitanga | Sustainable futures
Aucklanders are connected to and care for the environment.

Objectives: Where should we focus our action

30. To help give direction on how we might achieve the intended outcomes, we have identified six objective areas which will provide guidance on what actions could be taken by the organisation to contribute to the outcomes.

Application, logo, company name

Description automatically generated

31. While we have grouped action areas under each objective many of these will contribute to multiple objectives. Many are focussed on addressing complex societal challenges which council does not have all the levers, resource or influence to directly address.

32. These objectives do however provide direction on how we can use the levers available to us (such as our procurement power) to affect and influence change, within our control.

Investment principles will help us to invest in what will make the greatest difference 

33. The draft strategy proposes we invest our resource to make the biggest impact and this will be guided by four key principles:

34. Auckland Council also has a range of roles and levers that we can use to effect change in conjunction with partners to help communities thrive.

35. Our presence in and understanding of the community is one of our most powerful tools. This can be utilised in several areas: urban form, procurement, community facilities, our workforce, transport, community development and grants.

Strengths of the draft strategy  

36. As an outcome focused strategy, it provides focus and direction, but is not prescriptive on processes or actions. It provides scope for creative and innovative responses to achieving the outcomes and objectives.

37. The high-level outcomes and objectives in the draft strategy cascade to key shifts, investment principles and to three-year implementation plans. This will ensure there is a strong and intentional link between aspiration, investment and action. 

38. The draft strategy also presents both council and partners with an opportunity to do things differently, apply new approaches and have the flexibility to respond to local needs in ways that are appropriate and effective.

39. This is important as it not only addresses current challenges but allows flexibility to respond to emerging challenges in the future as our intended end outcomes will not change.

40. It also presents us with an opportunity to partner with our communities to incorporate existing and emerging approaches from global research as well as those generated in Aotearoa, so that we are using all tools available to collectively to achieve the outcomes.

Constraints and limitations of the draft strategy 

41. Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities is a 10-year strategy focused on long-term outcomes. It will take some time to see progress and the impact of actions, especially given the complexity of the challenges.

42. A key limitation is that many of the barriers to people thriving relate to complex socio-economic factors that council does not hold the primary levers for.

43. Council is, however, well-placed to use all of its resources and levers more effectively and work alongside central government and communities to support change. 

44. A key constraint is that there is no additional budget to support delivery of the draft strategy, so the pace of change will be subject to how effectively existing resources and budget can be realigned and directed to the draft strategy’s new objectives.

45. New investment will need to be considered as part of future annual and long-term budget processes.

46. There is opportunity, however, for reprioritisation of existing resource and investment to be considered as part of implementation planning. The outcome of this will be reported to the governing body as part of the first three-year implementation plan (FY22-25).

47. The draft strategy relies heavily on the significant cooperation and commitment across the council, elected members and community partners for it to be effective.  This in turn relies on visible and active leadership, and ongoing monitoring of progress and impact.    

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

48. During engagement, we heard from communities that the environment was a significant contributor to their wellbeing. Climate change and environmental degradation are a threat to the way our communities aspire to live in Tāmaki Makaurau.

49. The Kaitiakitanga outcome was created to reflect the voices of mana whenua and community, through prioritising environmental wellbeing and encouraging community action and sustainability. Actions developed in the Thriving Communities three-year implementation plans will need to consider the connection between the wellbeing of our communities and the wellbeing of the environment.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

50. This is a proposed strategy for the whole council group and will also be used to challenge and guide council teams and CCO’s in their implementation roles.

51. Staff and teams from across the council and CCO’s have been involved in the refresh process, including attending a series of workshops to help identify existing and future actions to support what communities told us was important.

52. Going forward staff will work closely with the council group on implementation planning and the development of the first three-year implementation plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

53. Local boards have a strong interest, and play a key role, in creating thriving communities in their areas. All local boards have local board plan outcomes that support thriving communities, and many are already working towards several Thriving Communities objectives.

54. Community engagement included communities from across all local board areas.

55. The findings from the engagement phase were shared with elected members and engagement participants in early 2021. They were also published on the Thriving Communities Have Your Say page.

56. Staff attended local board workshops in October 2021 to share the high-level draft strategy. Local boards were broadly supportive of the approach and provided helpful feedback that has helped shape the revised draft.  Common themes in local board feedback include:

·   concern for isolated communities

·   a strong desire to build the strategy into work plans. Boards could see the benefit of the approach and were eager to turn this into a practical response through their local plans

·   concerns about funding the strategy, and opportunities to leverage existing or additional resource to support their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

57. The 2018 Census found that over 23% of Aotearoa’s Māori population live in Tāmaki Makaurau, making up 11.5% of Auckland’s population – the highest Māori population in any city in Aotearoa.

58. The average age of Auckland’s Māori population is 24.9 years, compared to Auckland’s average of 34.7 years. As this young population grows and reaches working age, Māori will be a critical part of supporting our economy and ageing population.

59. Although Māori make up a large proportion of Tāmaki Makaurau’s population, they have not equitably shared in our economic growth. In 2018 the median income for all Aucklanders was $34,000, but for Māori it was $27,000.

60. By focusing on achieving equitable outcomes for Māori, this strategy will make a positive impact on the social, cultural and economic wellbeing of tangata, whānau and hapori.

Engagement to understand the needs of Māori communities

61. To ensure the strategy is relevant and effective for Māori, staff undertook individual engagement interviews with 17 mana whenua iwi and two mataawaka organisations.

62. Key inputs into the strategy from the engagement process include:

·    an environmental objective to reflect the importance of whenua to wellbeing and thriving

·    focus on achieving equity

·    recognition that whakawhanaungatanga and connection is central to thriving communities.

Delivering Māori outcomes

63. The council’s direction for delivering Māori outcomes is set out in Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, which reflects the aspirations of Auckland ‘s Māori communities.

64. The draft strategy supports the Schedule of Issues of Significance 2021 by addressing the four pou of social, cultural, economic, and environmental wellbeing for Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau.

65. Mana whenua and mataawaka will have an opportunity to provide further feedback on the draft plan in November 2021.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

66. There is currently no additional budget attached to the proposed Ngā Hapori Momoho /Thriving Communities strategy. This means in the short term it will need to be delivered within existing budgets and resources of council and CCOs. Where any additional investment is required, this will need to be considered through the long-term plan or annual plan processes.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

If <event>:

Then <impact>:

Possible mitigations:

If it is not clear that the draft strategy should drive reprioritisation of existing resources. 

It may create expectations that there will be additional budget to support the implementation of the draft strategy.

All public-facing communications and guidance about the draft strategy will make it clear it is intended to focus & re-prioritise existing resources.

Future budget and implementation planning will identify how actions will be funded from existing budgets or through seeking new investment.

If the draft strategy is viewed as too ‘high level’ and does not provide clear enough direction.

The draft strategy may fail to have any meaningful impact on the way the organisation delivers services and therefore would have no meaningful impact on the desired outcomes.

Develop a strong implementation plan and ensure there is visible and active senior leadership to drive implementation.

The objectives will provide appropriate level of direction without being too prescriptive.

Incorporating a measurement framework in the implementation plan to help understand impact.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

67. Community engagement on the draft strategy will be undertaken in November 2021.

68. This feedback and local board resolutions will be reported to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in February 2022, when the committee considers the draft strategy for adoption.

69. The draft strategy will be supported by a three-year implementation plan with tailored actions, and a monitoring and evaluation framework to track progress and impact. These two items are being developed for consideration in April 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy

73

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Mackenzie Blucher - Graduate Policy Advisor

Dave Jaggs - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - General Manager - Community and Social Policy

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

Draft Contributions Policy 2021

File No.: CP2021/16611

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the draft Contributions Policy 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Development contributions allow for an equitable and proportionate share of the total cost of growth-related capital expenditure to be recovered from the development community.

3.       The Finance and Performance Committee adopted the draft Contributions Policy 2021 for consultation at its meeting on 16 September 2021, FIN/2021/84. 

4.       Local board feedback is being sought to inform the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration of the adoption of the Contribution Policy 2021 in December 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      resolve feedback on the Contributions Policy 2021 on the key consultation topics:

i)       updating policy for capital projects in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031

ii)       inclusion of projects beyond 10-years to the policy in stages starting with Drury

iii)      requiring developers to pay their contributions earlier

iv)      proposal to support Māori development with grants

v)      any other issues.

Horopaki

Context

5.       Auckland’s population is expected to grow by 260,000 in the next ten years on top of the rapid population growth experienced in the last decade, bringing the projected population to approximately 1.9 million by 2031.

6.       Construction of 145,800 new dwellings is forecast in the next ten years. To support the development enabled by the Auckland Unitary Plan, the council is facing immediate demands for infrastructure in key growth areas and in response to construction on upzoned land, plan changes and the impact of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       Development contributions allow for an equitable and proportionate share of the total cost of growth-related capital expenditure to be recovered from the development community. The Contributions Policy sets out how the council will recover from new development an appropriate and fair share of the cost of infrastructure investment attributable to growth. There were four key consultation topics:

i)     Updating policy for capital projects in the 10-year Budget

         The draft policy provides for the recovery of $2.4 billion of development contributions revenue from $9.0 billion of projects with a growth component included in the10-year budget.  The draft policy also included updated forecasts of population growth and dwelling construction. The combined impact of these changes is to lower the weighted average Development Contributions price from $23,900 to $21,100.

ii)  Inclusion of projects beyond 10-years to the policy in stages starting with Drury

         Extensive work has been undertaken in recent years on the infrastructure requirements to support growth in the investment priority areas. However, further work is required before these costs can be included in the contributions policy. Area specific amendments to the contributions policy will be proposed for consultation as the information becomes available.

         The first step in the Contributions Policy 2021 will be to add a programme of expenditure to fund some of the key infrastructure required to support growth in the Drury area. The impact of this change is to raise the Development Contributions price in Drury to $84,900 from between $11,000 and $18,300.

iii) Requiring developers to pay their contributions earlier

         The council proposed that Development Contributions be paid at the time of building consent for all development (residential and non-residential) except non-commercial development on Māori land (explained further below). This requires Development Contributions due at building consent to be paid 6 to 24 months earlier than under the current policy and reverses the changes made to the policy in 2019. When combined with the other changes proposed this lower the weighted average Development Contributions price to $19,300.

iv) A proposal to support Māori development with grants

         The draft policy proposed continuing the support for marae development and papakāinga and Māori housing[4] on Māori land through grants available through the Cultural Initiatives Fund. These grants can cover payment of development contributions in appropriate circumstances, along with other kinds of development costs.

8.       The proposed changes to the Contributions Policy 2021 were reported to the Finance and Performance Committee at its meeting on 16 September- see Attachment A  Draft Contributions Policy 2021.

Consultation

9.       Formal public consultation was held in September and October 2021. To support the consultation a number of documents were made available on the Have Your Say website, https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/dc-policy.

10.     Two online Have Your Say events were held to provide opportunities for developers and other interested parties to learn more about the draft policy, ask questions and provide their feedback. A third event was also held to allow interested parties to present their views directly to the Finance and Performance Committee. All comments have been captured and will be reported through to the Finance and Performance Committee to inform decision-making on the final policy.

11.     A summary of the feedback received from submitters is set out in Attachment B: Draft Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement guidance

12.       Recommendations in this report have a neutral climate impact as they relate to the funding of capital investment rather than decisions on the activities to be undertaken.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views guidance

13.       The information presented on the projects included in the draft Contributions Policy 2021 was developed in conjunction with the following council-controlled organisations and council units:

·    Auckland Transport

·    Eke Panuku Development Auckland

·    Healthy Waters

·    Community Facilities

·    Community and Social Policy

14.        The Chief Economist Unit and Research Investigations and Monitoring Unit worked with us on the impact of higher development contributions on the pace of development and on land and house prices. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.        The development contribution price varies by location depending on the cost of infrastructure required to support development in an area.

16.        Local board feedback is being sought to inform the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration of the adoption of the Contribution Policy 2021 in December 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.        Recent legislative changes require the contributions policy to support the development of Māori land. Feedback from iwi on the draft policy was sought as part of consultation and via engagement with the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum.  All developers, including mana whenua, were provided an opportunity to present their feedback to the Finance and Performance Committee on 12 October.

18.        The Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum have provided their feedback which has been included in Attachment B: Draft Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     The 10-year budget assumes development contributions revenue of $2.7 billion. After completing the analysis of the cost of investments in the 10-year budget that can be recovered with development contributions and the impact of the proposed policy changes, it is estimated that the revenue will be $2.6 billion. The achievement of this revised revenue forecast requires as a first step the implementation of a contributions policy updated for the capital expenditure decisions in the 10-year budget and the other changes proposed in this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     The recommendation requesting local boards views does not present any risk. The risks associated with amending the contributions policy are set out in the report to the 16 September Finance and Performance Committee, Attachment A: Development Contributions Policy 2021 Consultation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     Feedback from the public consultation will be reported to the Finance and Performance Committee workshop on 10 November 2021.

22.     Potential changes to the draft will be reported at the Finance and Performance Committee workshop on 1 December 2021. Staff will report to Finance and Performance Committee for the final policy adoption on 9 December 2021. Local board feedback will be included in the report.

23.     The Contributions Policy 2021 is proposed to be implemented in January 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

23 November 2021 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Contributions Policy 2021 report to the Finance and Performance Committee

105

b

23 November 2021 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Draft Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received

121

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Andrew Duncan - Manager Financial Policy

Authorisers

Ross Tucker - General Manager, Financial Strategy and Planning

Glenn Boyd - Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza – Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2021/17451

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the board with the governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is required and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar is updated every month. Each update is reported to business meetings. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the attached Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

23 November 2021 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar

137

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Blair Morrow – Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops

File No.: CP2021/17453

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a summary of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board workshops for 2, 9 and 16 November.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local board workshops are held to give board members an opportunity to receive information and updates or provide direction and have discussion on issues and projects relevant to the local board area. No binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the local board record of workshops held on 2, 9 and 16 November 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

23 November 2021 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Record of Workshops

141

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Blair Morrow – Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 November 2021

 

 

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[1] Stats NZ (2020). 2018 Census data – Auckland region. Retrieved from https://www.stats.govt.nz/tools/2018-census-place-summaries/auckland-region

[2] Stats NZ (2020). 2018 Census household crowding. Retrieved from https://www.stats.govt.nz/

[3] Allpress, J. and Reid, A. (2021). Quality of Life survey 2020: results for Auckland. Auckland Council technical report, TR2021/16

[4] Māori housing grants are only available for housing developments undertaken in conjunction with an urban marae and must fill the same general purpose as papakāinga