I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 11 November 2021

10.00 am

This meeting will be held remotely and can be viewed on the Auckland Council website:  https://councillive.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

 

 

Kōmiti Whakarite Pārae, Mahi Toi, Hapori, Kaupapa / Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Alf Filipaina

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

 

Members

Cr Josephine Bartley

IMSB Member Tony Kake

 

Deputy Mayor Cr Bill Cashmore

Cr Tracy Mulholland

 

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Cr Pippa Coom

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Angela Dalton

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Chris Darby

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

Cr John Watson

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

Member Glenn Wilcox

 

Cr Shane Henderson

Cr Paul Young

 

Cr Richard Hills

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

 

Maea Petherick

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

 

8 November 2021

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 890 8136

Email: maea.petherick@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


 

Terms of Reference

 

Responsibilities

 

This committee deals with the development and monitoring of strategy, policy and action plans associated with community, social and cultural activities. The committee will establish an annual work programme outlining key focus areas in line with its key responsibilities, which include:

 

·       The Southern Initiative and The Western Initiative

·       sports and recreation, including parks and reserves

·       community facilities and community services

·       acquisition of property relating to the committee’s responsibilities and in accordance with the LTP

·       grants for regional events, arts and cultural and heritage organisations, indoor sports and leisure and for the regional community development programme

·       economic development

·       arts and culture

·       community safety

·       community engagement

·       community development

·       homelessness

·       working with the six demographic advisory panels to give visibility to the issues important to their communities and help effect change

·       working with the Auckland Domain Committee to give visibility to the issues important to the Domain and to help effect change.

 

Powers

 

(i)         All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities, including:

(a)        approval of a submission to an external body

(b)        establishment of working parties or steering groups.

(ii)        The committee has the powers to perform the responsibilities of another committee, where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee.

(iii)       If a policy or project relates primarily to the responsibilities of the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee, but aspects require additional decisions by the Planning Committee and/or the Environment and Climate Change Committee, then the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee has the powers to make associated decisions on behalf of those other committee(s). For the avoidance of doubt, this means that matters do not need to be taken to more than one of these committees for decisions.

(iv)       The committee does not have:

(a)        the power to establish subcommittees

(b)        powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2).

 

Code of conduct

 

For information relating to Auckland Council’s elected members code of conduct, please refer to this link on the Auckland Council website - https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/elected-members-remuneration-declarations-interest/Pages/elected-members-code-conduct.aspx

 

 

Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·         Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·         Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·         Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·         In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·         The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·         However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·         All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·         Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·         Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·         All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·         Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·         Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·         Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

11 November 2021

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                 7

2          Declaration of Interest                                          7

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         7

4          Petitions                                                                 7  

5          Public Input                                                           7

5.1     Senior Advisory Panel - adoption of the Tāmaki Tauawhi Kaumātua- Age-friendly Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland Action Plan                                                                       7

5.2     Age Concern Auckland Incorporated - adoption of the Tāmaki Tauawhi Kaumātua- Age-friendly Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland Action Plan.            8

6          Local Board Input                                                 8

6.1     Local Board Input: Albert-Eden Local Board - Indicative Business Case: maintaining aquatic provision in Albert-Eden                                                              8

7          Extraordinary Business                                       9

8          Summary of Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee Information - updates, memos and briefings - 11 November 2021      11

9          Proposed land exchange Taniwha Reserve and Maybury Reserve, Glen Innes                           31

10        Dedication of road reserve as road - 173R Browns Road Manurewa                                    51

11        Regional Community Development Grants 2021/2022                                                             59

12        Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan progress report                                          69

13        Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund 2021/2022                                                 107

14        Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2020-2021: Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report 2020-2021                                              117

15        Te Kete Rukuruku site selection - Māori Naming of Regional Parks                               165

16        Progress update: Implementing the recommendations from the Community Occupancy Guidelines review                        183

17        Tāmaki tauawhi kaumātua - Age-friendly Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland Action Plan     195

18        Indicative Business Case: maintaining aquatic provision in Albert-Eden                                  283

19        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


 

1          Apologies

 

An apology from Cr R Hills has been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 9 September 2021, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

5.1       Senior Advisory Panel - adoption of the Tāmaki Tauawhi Kaumātua- Age-friendly Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland Action Plan

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Senior Advisory Panel Co-Chairs, Claire Dale and Gayle Marshall will address the committee supporting the adoption of the Tāmaki Tauawhi Kaumātua- Age-friendly Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland Action Plan.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      receive the public input from Senior Advisory Panel Co-Chairs, Claire Dale and Gayle Marshall and thank them for attending the meeting.

 

 

 


 

 

 

5.2       Age Concern Auckland Incorporated - adoption of the Tāmaki Tauawhi Kaumātua- Age-friendly Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland Action Plan.

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Kevin Lamb, on behalf of Age Concern Auckland Incorporated, will address the committee supporting the adoption of the Tāmaki Tauawhi Kaumātua- Age-friendly Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland Action Plan.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      receive the public input from Age Concern Auckland Incorporated and thank Kevin Lamb for attending the meeting.

 

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

6.1       Local Board Input: Albert-Eden Local Board - Indicative Business Case: maintaining aquatic provision in Albert-Eden

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Albert-Eden Chair, Margi Watson will address the committee regarding the Indicative Business Case: maintaining aquatic provision in Albert-Eden.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      receive the Albert-Eden Local Board Input regarding the Indicative Business Case: maintaining aquatic provision in Albert-Eden.

 

 

 


 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

11 November 2021

 

Summary of Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee Information - updates, memos and briefings - 11 November 2021

File No.: CP2021/10356

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A.

2.       To receive a summary and provide a public record of memoranda, workshop and briefing papers that may have been held or been distributed to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee’s (PACE) since 9 September 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This is regular information-only report which aims to provide public visibility of information circulated to committee members via memo or other means, where no decisions are required.

4.       The following papers/memos were circulated to members:

Date

Subject

07/09/2021

Tāmaki tauawhi kaumātua - Draft Age-friendly Tāmaki Makaurau Action Plan

20/09/2021

Connected Communities Library Service Update at COVID Alert Level 3

21/09/2021

I Am Auckland – Youth Employment

28/10/2021

Click and Collect services for Auckland Libraries at Alert Level 3, Step 1

29/10/2021

Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund

5/11/2021

Connected Communities Service Offering Update

 

5.       The following workshops/briefings have taken place:

Date

Workshop/briefing

15/9/2021

CONFIDENTIAL: Regional Parks Management Plan Review: Land Classification and hot topics

22/9/2021

Draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Strategy

29/9/2021

CONFIDENTIAL: Regional Parks Management Plan Review: Policies

 

6.       These documents can be found on the Auckland Council website, at the following link: http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

·   at the top of the left page, select meeting “Park, Arts, Community and Events Committee” from the drop-down tab and click ‘view’;

·   under ‘attachments’, select either the HTML or PDF version of the document entitled ‘extra attachments’.

7.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary. Committee members should direct any questions to the authors.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A to the agenda report

b)      receive the summary of Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee Information – updates, memos and briefings – 11 November 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Forward Work Programme

13

b

MEMO: Connected Communities Library Service Update at COVID Alert Level 3 (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

MEMO: Tāmaki Tauawhi Kaumātua - Age Friendly Tāmaki makaurau Draft Action Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

MEMO: I Am Auckland - Youth Employment (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

MEMO: Click and Collect services for Auckland Libraries at Alert Level 3, Step 1 (Under Separate Cover)

 

f

MEMO: Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund – funding round (Under Separate Cover)

 

g

MEMO: Connected Communities Service Offering Update (Under Separate Cover)

 

h

WORKSHOP: Draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Strategy (Under Separate Cover)

 

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maea Petherick - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

11 November 2021

 

 

Kōmiti Whakarite Parae, Mahi Toi, Hapori, Kaupapa / Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee
Forward Work Programme 2021

This committee deals with the development and monitoring of strategic policies and action plans associated with regional parks, libraries, arts, communities and events.

The full terms of reference can be found here: Auckland Council Governing Body Terms of Reference

This committee meets bi-monthly commencing in March 2021

 

Area of work and Lead Department

Reason for work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Expected timeframes

Highlight the month(s) this is expected to come to committee in 2021

 

no meeting

Mar

No meeting

May

No meeting

Jul

No meeting

Sept

No meeting

Nov

No meeting

2022

 

Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan and Parks and Open Spaces Strategic Action Plan

 

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Status report on implementation plan

Update: implementation and progress update with the Parks and Open Spaces Strategic Action Plan update

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Sport & Recreation Facility Investment Fund

 

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Purpose of the fund is the allocate $120 million over ten years to support the development of regional and sub-regional sport and recreation facilities across Auckland.

Decision: funding allocation approval for 2021/2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November

 

 

 

 

 

Golf Investment Plan

Community and Social Policy

Council’s strategic approach to outcomes, priorities and investment in golf.

Decision:  a draft investment plan

Workshop next steps

 

 

 

 

 

x

 

 

 

x

 

 

 

Active Recreation Investment and Visitor Experience

 

Community and Social Policy

Councils strategic approach to outcome, priorities and investment for active walking, cycling, waterways and visitor experience on open space, parks, and regional parks

Decision: on scope and phasing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Parks Management Plan Review

 

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships

Statutory review of the omnibus regional parks’ management plan

Reports:

·       Regional Parks Management Plan - approval to notify intent to prepare new plan

Decision: consider and approve scope, phasing and engagement approach

 

Progress to date:

Public notification of discussion paper for consultation 20 August 2020 - link to decision

 

Information Memorandum – Regional Parks Management Plan

15 October 2020 - link to memo

 

Information Memorandum – Regional Parks Management Plan

11 March 2021 - link to memo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November

 

 

 

 

 

Economic Development

Community and Social Innovation update

Community and Social Innovation

 

Provide an update on both the The Southern Initiative and The Western Initiative approach, priorities and achievements.

 

Update will be provided by memo.

Inform: Strategic direction regarding both the Southern Initiative and the Western Initiative approach to social and community innovation in South Auckland and West Auckland.

 

 

 

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Social, Community, Cultural Services and Infrastructure

Facility Partnerships Policy Implementation

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

Update and approval of facility partnership opportunities progressed through the application of the Facility Partnerships Policy

Consider:

 

 

 

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Graffiti Prevention Action Plan

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

(Arts Community & Events)

A regional, integrated approach to preventing graffiti vandalism was confirmed through the 2012 Auckland Graffiti Vandalism Prevention Plan.

This approach has been reviewed and updated in 2019, in the context of a refreshed approach to prevention and enforcement and an acknowledgment of the significant success of the rapid removal methodology.

Decision: on the strategic direction

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Homelessness

 

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

 

Connected Communities

& Community & Social Policy

 

Implementing position and role on homelessness

Reports:

·       Implementing a cross-sectoral approach to homelessness

 

Decision: on council commitment and implementation action.

Progress to date:

June 2020 – deferred to August

 

Endorsement of the Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa (Auckland’s regional cross-sectoral homelessness plan) Strategic Framework

20 August 2020 - link to decision

 

Information Memorandum: Update on COVID19 and post-COVID19 support for people who are homeless

20 August 2020 - link to memo

 

Information Memorandum: A Night Shelter in Auckland

15 October 2020 - link to memo

 

Information Memorandum: Snapshot Homelessness Statistics

13 May 2021 - link to memo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Safe Communities

 

Connected Communities

In February 2019 the Community Development and Safety Committee endorsed the draft application (COM/2019/2), and Auckland became and accredited Safe Community in May 2019. This is now in operation through the Safety Collective Tamaki Makaurau I Auckland of which Auckland Council is a member.

Decision: On strategic direction. The committee will be asked to consider and endorse the work of the Safety Collective since Safe Communities Accreditation was achieved in mid-2019.

Consider: Committee-police regular engagement via this committee.

 

Progress to date:

20 August 2020 deferred to October 2020

 

Information Memorandum: The Safety Collective

20 August 2020 - link to memo

 

Public Input from the Safety Collective Tamaki Makaurau

15 October 2020 - link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Event Fund Grants Allocation

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

(Arts, Community & Events)

 

Regional Events grants

2019/20 Round 2 - 2020/21 Round 1

Two rounds per year

The two annual funding rounds held in recent years have been combined into one round for the 2020/2021 year

Reports:

·       Regional Event Fund Grants Allocation 2019/2020 - Round Two, Strategic Priorities

·       Regional Event Fund Grants Allocation 2020/2021

Decision: Funding allocations for the regional event fund 2019/2020 round two and 2020/2021 round one for approval.

 

Progress to date:

Grant allocations for 2019/2020 Regional Event Fund round two

13 February 2020 - link to decision

 

Report June 2020 – deferred to August

 

Grant allocations for the 2020/2021 Regional Event Grant Programme

20 August 2020 - link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

September

 

ü

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Arts & Culture Grants

 

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships (Arts, Community & Events)

 

Regional Arts & Culture grants

2019/20 Round 2

2020/21 Round 1

Two round per year

Reports:

·       Regional Arts and Culture grant allocation: Round two 2019/2020

·       ACE regional contestable grants priorities FY 20/21

·       Regional Arts and Culture grant allocation 2020/2021

 

 

Decision: Funding allocations for the regional arts and culture fund 2019/2020 round two and 2020/2021 round one for approval.

 

Progress to date:

2019/2020 Regional Arts and Culture grants programme

20 August 2020 -  link to decision

 

2020/2021 Regional Arts and Culture grants programme

10 December 2020 - link to decision

 

Information Memorandum – to provide and update on the outcomes achieved by the Regional Arts and Culture grants programme 2019/2020

13 May 2021 – link to memo

 

Presentation: an overview on outcomes of funding received through the Regional Arts and Culture grants programme round two 2019/2020.

13 May 2021 – link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ü

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Community Development Grants

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

Connected Communities

 

Regional Community Development grants

2019/2020 – one round per year

Reports:

·       Regional Community Development grants 2019/2020

·       Regional Community Development grants 2020/2021

 

Decision: Funding allocations for the regional community development fund for approval.

 

Progress to date:

Allocations for the Regional Community Development grants 2019/2020

13 February 2020 - link to decision

 

Allocations for the Regional Community Development grants 2020/2021

10 December 2020 - link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arts & Culture Work Programme FY22

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

To present the Arts & Culture work programme for approval for FY22.

This will include public art outside the city centre.

Note: public art within the city centre will be considered by the Planning Committee.

Decision: approval of Arts & Culture Work Programme

 

Progress to date

Seek approval of the 2021/2022 Arts and Culture Regional Work Programme

8 July 2021 – link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

ü

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Events Work Programme FY22

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

 

To present the regional events work programme for FY22

July 2021

Regional Events Work Programme FY22

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships

 

 

 

 

 

sept

 

x

 

 

 

 

 

Implementation of improvements resulting from the review of the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012

Community & Social Policy

The committee resolved that staff report back on the implementation of approved improvements resulting from the review of the Community Occupancy Guideline 2012.

Decision: current state review and agree next steps

 

 

 

sept

 

 

 

nov

 

 

 

 

 

Intercultural Cities Network

 

Community & Social Policy

Consideration of a proposal to join the Intercultural Cities Network to support implementation and monitoring of progress on ‘Inclusive Auckland’ actions.

Decision: Consider and decide whether Auckland should be a member of the network

No scope approved

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHO Age Friendly City

 

Community & Social Policy

To develop an Age-friendly plan for Auckland and join the WHO Age-Friendly Cities and Communities Network

Decision: on the Age-friendly plan to join the WHO Age-Friendly Cities and Communities Network

Progress to date:

Update on the Age-friendly Auckland Project, Tāmaki tuawhi kaumatua

15 October 2020 - link to memo

 

 

 

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thriving Communities Plan Refresh

 

Community & Social Policy

To implement the improvements identified in the 2018 Thriving Communities Status report including a refresh of the Thriving Communities Plan

Direction approve draft plan for public consultation

Progress to date:

Update elected members on key findings from community engagement we have undertaken to inform the refresh of the Thriving Communities Plan

8 July 2021 - link to memo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

February 2022

 

 

 

I am Auckland Implementation and Evaluation Plan monitoring

 

Community & Social Policy

Annual implementation and evaluation report

Direction: approve three year status review

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ü

 

 

 

 

 

Grant Policy Monitoring

Community & Social Policy

Audit of the application of the Grants Policy

Decision:  on audit results

2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Toi Whitiki / Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan Strategy?

 

Community and Social Policy

Review of progress made on Toi Whitiki strategy. What has been achieved, what is working well and what needs to change to improve investment and outcomes.

Decision: approve current state review and agree next steps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ü

 

 

 

 

 

Mt Albert Pool Indicative Business Case

 

Community and Social Policy

Indicative Business Case approved for preparation.

Decision: approve preferred option

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

november

 

 

 

 

 

Smokefree Update Report

 

Community and Social Policy

Smokefree report back is due

Decision: approve priorities for 2021/2022

Progress to date:

progress update on the implementation of Auahi Kore Hapori Whānui as part of the Implementation Plan of the Council’s Smokefree Policy 2017 – 2025 and seek approval of the 2021/22 priorities.

9 Sept 2021 – link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

July

 

Sept

 

ü

 

 

 

 

 

Connected Communities

Fines and Charges

Connected Communities

 

Case developed for removing overdue fines from Auckland Libraries

Decision: to move case forward for consideration

Progress to date:

Information Memorandum – Proposal to remove Library Overdue Fines

11 March 2021 – link to memo

Information Memorandum – Library Fines Removal Update

8 July 2021 – link to memo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Libraries

Connected Communities

Work around the integration with customer services

Decision: on matters relating to regional aspects of the proposed integration (local boards will decide on local outcomes)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Investment and 10-Year Budget work programme

Community Facilities Network Plan priorities for Long-term Plan consideration

 

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnership

Indicative business cases for CFNP priority actions to consider as part of the 2021-2031 Auckland Council Long-term Plan

Decision: on indicative business cases relating to CFNP priorities.

 

LTP – have a separate process

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strategic acquisition issues and opportunities

 

Community Facilities

Understanding current acquisition issues and options.

Inform:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OTHER

Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women.

 

In early 2019, council affirmed its commitment to advancing the goals of the Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW).

Inform:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community Engagement

Democracy Services & Communication and Engagement

Community engagement, advance participatory democracy

Inform: progress and issues associated with enhancing community engagement and participation  (Significance and Engagement Policy)

(workshop): Joint workshop with Finance and Performance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Completed

Lead Department

Area of work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Decision

Youth Centres Review

Review councils assistance to youth centres

Decision: on review findings

council’s support to youth centres and non-council youth services 

11 June 2020 - link to decision

Regional Sport and Recreation grants programme 2018/2020

 

Review of previous grants allocation and recommendation for next round

Decision: on sport and recreation grants programme objectives and approach

 

allocation of funding 2020/2021 and approve funding budget of $508,000.

20 August 2020 link to decision

 

Community Facilities Network Plan and Action Plan

 

Update on progress of delivery.

Priority actions will be reflected in 2019/2020 work programmes and draft 2020/2021 work programmes subject to available resources

 

Consider: Annual update on progress of the Community Facilities Network Plan Delivery.

 

Report progress on implementation of the Community Facilities Network Action Plan (2019)

15 October 2020 - link to decision

Public Art Policy

 

 

Review of the Public Arts Policy: what’s working what’s not.

Decision:

 

To seek approval of the 2020/2021 Public Art Regional Work Programme from the PACE (Parks, Arts, Community and Events) Committee.

15 October 2020link to decision

Citizens Advice Bureaux Services

 

Review of the Citizens Advice Bureaux Services

Staff to negotiate new funding and strategic relationship agreements with Auckland Citizens Advice Bureaux Services (ACABx) for the 2019-2021 period. This will also include working with ACABx to develop a regional network service provision framework to be completed by 30 September 2020.

 

Decision: on review

 

Form Citizens Advice Bureaux Service Framework Political Advisory Group

13 February 2020 – link to decision

 

Update about development of the Citizens Advice Bureaux (CAB) regional service provision framework and CAB insights report

15 October 2020 - link to decision

 

Community Access Scheme

 

Review of the Community Access Scheme.

Decision: approve the extension of the current Community Access Scheme funding agreements for one year, from 1 July to 30 June 2021, while a review of the scheme continues.

Extension of the current Community Access Scheme funding agreements for one year 20 August 2020 - link to decision

Approve repurposing the existing Community Access Scheme to a contestable operational grant

10 December 2020 - link to decision

 

 

Investigation in North-west Community Provision

 

 

Investigation to identify any current gaps in services or facilities or in the future

 

Decision: on investigation findings

 

Business case for a destination aquatic facility with leisure components

10 December 2020 - link to decision

Community Facilities Network Plan Sub Action: Central library strategic review

Libraries and Information and Community Social Policy

A strategic review of the Central Library has been commissioned to understand how the current building can meet future need and demand for services, assess the Central Library’s current and potential future role in the region, and guide decision making about future investment and development opportunities

 

Decision: consider the strategic review and decide on the direction of the plan, as well as receive the strategic review

 

 

Approval to develop a indicative business case for the central library / Tāmaki Pātaka Kōreo

10 December 2020 - link to decision

 

Governance of Colin Dale Park

Community and Social Policy

To decide on the governance arrangements for Colin Dale Park. The local board has asked that the committee consider regional governance for the park.

Decision: Agree whether or not Colin Dale Park should be regionally governed.

 

Approve that the decision-making of the 44.3-hectare motorsport precinct (SEC 1 SO 422986) at Colin Dale Park be allocated to the governing body according with section 17(2) of the Local Government Auckland Council Act and be added to Schedule 1 of the Auckland Council Long-term Plan.

11 March 2021 - link to decision

The Demographic 

Advisory Panels

The six demographic panels will engage and report to the committee on a regular basis.

Decision: Endorsement of panel strategic work programmes. Expecting this to be split across two meetings.  Co-chairs to present where possible.

Demographic Advisory Panels work programme

13 May 2021 - Link to decision

Alcohol Strategy three yearly review

Community and Social Policy

Three year review is due

 

Decision: approve refreshed alcohol strategy

 

seek approval to improve the Auckland council whānau approach to minimising alcohol related harm in Auckland communities

13 May 2021 - Link to decision

 

Regional Sport and Recreation Facilities Operational Grant

Allocate $1,023,000 1,063,053 per annum (allowed for in the LTP) following community Access Scheme being repurposed to a contestable grant.

$1,063,053 is available in the new contestable operations grant budget. This is inclusive of both the Community Access Scheme budget and $40,053 that has been transferred from the Regional Transitional Rates Grants, which comes to an end in June 2021.

Decision: funding allocation approval for 2021/2022

 

 

To allocate the 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 Regional Sport and Recreation Facilities Operating Grant

8 July 2021 - link to decision

Aktive and the Auckland Regional Sports Trusts

 

Parks, Sports and Recreation

 

 

 

Approval of $552,000 strategic partnership grant to Aktive Auckland & Sport to deliver on agreed priority initiatives.

 

 

Decision: allocation of strategic partnership grant funding

 

to approve an approach for investment for 2021/2022 of $552,00 allocated for sport and recreation outcomes, budgeted for in the Long-term plan 2021-2031

8 July 2021 - link to decision

Regional Sport and Recreation grants programme

Parks, Sports and Recreation

 

Review of previous grants allocation and recommendation for next round

Decision: funding allocation approval for 2021/2022

 

To allocate funding from the Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme 2021/2022 and to approve the Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme 2022/2023 opening and closing dates and funding budget of $508,000

8 July 2021 – link to decision

Options to expand revenue streams for sport facilities investment

 

 

Community and Social Policy

 

Provide strategic direction to expand revenue streams to fund future sports facilities investment in the draft Sports Facilities Investment Plan

Decision or Update Direction to expand revenue streams to fund future sports facilities investment in the draft Sports Facilities Investment Plan  

 

 

referred this to the LTP/Annual Plan process

 

Takaro – Investing in play discussion document

 

 

Community and Social Policy

 

Development of a play investment plan

Decision: consider and approve for public release - timing to be confirmed

 

 

No approval to start

 

Auckland Paths

 

Parks, Sports and Recreation

 

Report on implementation plan

 

Nothing to update

Inform: note progress (workshop or memo) - Timing to be confirmed

 

No update / this work is on going

 

One Local Initiatives

 

Community and Social Policy, as well as Community Facilities

 

 

 

Status update on non-transport “One Local Initiatives”. 

Inform: update on progress and implementation

 

 

completed

 

Cultural Initiatives Fund /

Marae Programme

Māori Outcomes

Council partners with marae in a number of ways.  A large part of the marae programme across council is in two parts - the Marae Infrastructure Programme, which seeks to deliver safe, healthy and warm marae, and the Cultural Initiatives Fund, which is a contestable grant open to marae and papakāinga.  The interim guidelines for both programmes have been adopted by PACE.  Both are due for review.  .

 

Decision:  adopt revised/updated guidelines for Marae Infrastructure Programme and Cultural Initiatives Fund.  Confirm the grants to be made to marae and papakāinga housing from the CIF contestable grant round for 2021/22

 

Marae Infrastructure Programme – Interim Funding Guideline

13 February 2020 - link to decision

June deferred to August

Cultural Initiatives Fund grants for marae pakāinga/ Māori housing 2020/2021

20 August 2020 - link to decision

Revise out of date resolutions in relation to the development of a marae on Te Atatū Peninsula

15 October 2020 - link to decision

To review and approve the Cultural Initiatives Funding grant for marae development and papakāinga/Maori housing for the 2021/2022 financial year.

8 July 2021 – link to decision

 

Māori Outcomes Framework

 

Nga Matarae

Development of the Māori Outcomes Framework to guide Council’s evolved approach to achieving outcomes for Māori

Decision: July report on the final measures for ‘Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau – a Māori performance measurement framework

November – quarter 1 report on measures

 

Māori outcomes framework - Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau 

20 August 2020 - link to decision

 

To seek approval of Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau - Māori outcomes Performance Measurement Framework

8 July 2021 – link to decision

Community Facilities Regional Work Programmes

 

Community Facilities

Update on proposed growth funding allocation for 2021-2022

Decision: on growth funding allocation

 

Progress to date:

To approve the 2021/2024 Community Facilities Regional Capital Work Programmes

8 July 2021 – link to decision

Investing in Aucklanders (Age Friendly City)

 

Community & Social Policy

Identify issues and opportunities for an inclusive friendly city

The pilots will be designed and implemented over the next 18 months. Regular progress updates will be provided to this Committee.

Direction: on the approach to a friendly, inclusive, diverse city.

A draft Auckland Age-friendly Action Plan will be presented to PACE for approved consultation in early 2021. A final Action Plan is expected to come to PACE for endorsement in late 2021.

Incorporated into WHO Age Friendly programme

 

 

 

 

 


 

Kōmiti Whakarite Parae, Mahi Toi, Hapori, Kaupapa / Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee
Forward Work Programme 2022

This committee deals with the development and monitoring of strategic policies and action plans associated with regional parks, libraries, arts, communities and events.

The full terms of reference can be found here: Auckland Council Governing Body Terms of Reference

This committee meets bi-monthly commencing in February 2022

 

 

Area of work and Lead Department

Reason for work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Expected timeframes

Highlight the month(s) this is expected to come to committee in 2022

No meeting

Feb

No meeting

Apr

No meeting

Jun

No meeting

Aug

Sep

 

 

 

Social, Community, Cultural Services and Infrastructure

Regional Parks Management Plan Review

 

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships

Reserve Act Classification update for Regional Parks

 

Decision:  Reserves Act classifications

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Parks Management Plan Review

 Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships

Statutory review of the omnibus regional parks management plan

 

Reports:

·       Regional Parks Management Plan - approval to release plan for public consultation

·       Decision on hearing panel’s recommendations – August 2022

·       Approve final Regional Parks Management Plan – September 2022

Decision: approve the Regional Parks Management Plan

Progress to date:

Workshops – 25 May 2021, 15 September 2021, 29 September 2021

Information Memorandum – Revised timeline for delivery of the draft Regional Parks Management Plan – 9 July 2021

Local board workshops – January – February 2021

Information Memorandum – Summary of suggestions from the community for the Regional Parks Management Plan – 18 December 2020

Public notification of discussion paper for consultation 20 August 2020
 link to decision

Information Memorandum – Regional Parks Management Plan 15 October 2020
 link to memo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships



Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan is reviewed and updated every 3 years.

Reports:

Consider progress of existing actions and assess potential new actions to approve revised action plan (June 2022)

 

Decision: approve revised Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan 

 

Progress to date:

Report progress on implementation of the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan (2019) November 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan and Parks and Open Spaces Strategic Action Plan

 

Parks, Sports and Recreation

Status report on implementation plan

Update: implementation and progress update with the Parks and Open Spaces Strategic Action Plan update

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Future management of motorised vehicles driving on Muriwai Beach

Parks, Sports and Recreation

To provide an update on management of motorised vehicles driving on Muriwai Beach

(workshop)

Update: implementation and progress update on management of motorised vehicles driving on Muriwai Beach

Progress to date:

Approve implementation measures to manage and control motorised vehicles accessing Muriwai Beach

link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reserve revocation 34R Blanes Road, Weymouth

Eke Panuku

Reserve revocation required to contribute to asset recycling target and development outcomes.

Decision: Approve the recommendation of the revocation of reserve status to Department of Conservation

 

Progress to date: PACE Committee approved commencement of reserve revocation process on 8 July 2021. Consultation undertaken and will be reported back to PACE Committee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reserve revocation 9Z St George Street, Papatoetoe

Eke Panuku

Reserve revocation required to contribute to asset recycling target and development outcomes.

Decision: Approve the recommendation of the revocation of reserve status to Department of Conservation

 

Progress to date: Manukau City Council’s Policy and Activities Committee approved disposal on 6 October 2009. Consultation undertaken and will be reported back to PACE Committee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reserve revocation part 27 George Street, Papatoetoe

Eke Panuku

Reserve revocation required to contribute to asset recycling target and development outcomes.

Decision: Approve the recommendation of the revocation of reserve status to Department of Conservation

Progress to date: The Finance and Performance Committee approved commencement of reserve revocation process on 21 October. Consultation undertaken and will be reported back to PACE Committee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mobile & Access Services Review

Connected Communities

 

Update and endorsement of the new approach for the Mobile and Access service as part of Auckland Libraries Service offering

Endorsement of approach and potential changes to service will be required once review is completed and recommendations decided.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Citizen’s Advice Bureaux Update

Connected Communities

 

To provide the committee with an update on the implementation of the regional network service provision framework.

Information and insights update. No decision required.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Welcoming Communities Accreditation

Connected Communities

 

 

Update expected on the ‘Welcoming Communities’ accreditation sought for Auckland Council.

Information and direction only. To be confirmed when memo is expected

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fines Free Removal & Amnesty Campaign

Connected Communities

 

 

To provide an overview and impact of the removal of library fines from overdue items at Auckland Libraries as part of the Long Term Plan adopted in June 2021.

Information and insights only.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arts & Culture Work Programme FY23

 

Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships 

 

 

To present the Arts & Culture work programme for approval for FY23. 

This will include public art outside the city centre. 

Note: public art within the city centre will be considered by the Planning Committee. 

Decision: approve Arts & Culture Work Programme 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Facility Partnerships Policy Implementation

 

 

 

Update and approval of facility partnership opportunities progressed through the application of the Facility Partnerships Policy (note this item will only be reported if there are partnership opportunities to progress)

 

As required

Regional Funding and Grants

Regional Event Fund Grants Allocation

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships

 

 

Regional Events Grants

Two grant allocation rounds per year enabling payments in financial year quarters one and three.

 

Reports:

·       Regional Event Grant Allocation (June)

·       Regional Event Grant Allocation (February)

Decision: Funding allocations for the Regional Event grants, 2021/2022 round two and 2022/2023 round one, for approval.

 

Progress to date:

2021/2022 Regional Event Grant Allocation – first round completed 9 September 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Arts & Culture Grants

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships

Regional Arts & Culture grants

2022/2023 Round 1

Two rounds per year

Reports:

·       Regional Arts and Culture grant allocation: Round two 2022/2023

 

Decision: Funding allocations for the regional arts and culture grants programme 2022/2023 round one for approval.

Progress to date:

2021/2022 Regional Arts and Culture grants programme round one 9 September 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Community Development Grants

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships

Connected Communities

 

Regional Community Development grants

2022/2023 – one round per year

 

Reports:

·       Regional Community Development grants 2022/2023

 

Decision: Funding allocations for the regional community development fund 2022/2023 for approval

 

Progress to date:

Potential for 2 rounds for FY21 – Decision to be made at Nov 21 meeting by committee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Sport & Recreation Facility Investment Fund

Parks, Sport and Recreation

Purpose of the fund is the allocate $120 million over ten years to support the development of regional and sub-regional sport and recreation facilities across Auckland.

Decision: funding allocation approval for 2021/2022 and 2022/2023

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Sport and Recreation Facilities Operational Grant

 

Parks, Sport and Recreation

Allocate $1,063,053 per annum (allowed for in the LTP) following community Access Scheme being repurposed to a contestable grant.

$1,063,053 is available in the new contestable operations grant budget. This is inclusive of both the Community Access Scheme budget and $40,053 that has been transferred from the Regional Transitional Rates Grants, which comes to an end in June 2021.

Update: progress / information

 

Progress to date:

To allocate the 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 Regional Sport and Recreation Facilities Operating Grant. 8 July 2021
link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Sport and Recreation grants programme

Parks, Sport and Recreation

Review of previous grants allocation and recommendation for next round

Decision: funding allocation approval for 2022/2023

Progress to date:

To allocate the 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 Regional Sport and Recreation programme grant. 8 July 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aktive and the Auckland Regional Sports Trusts

 

 

Parks, Sport and Recreation

Approval of $552,000 strategic partnership grant to Aktive Auckland & Sport to deliver on agreed priority initiatives.

 

 

 

Decision: allocation of strategic partnership grant funding

Progress to date:

to approve an approach for investment for 2021/2022 of $552,000 allocated for sport and recreation outcomes, budgeted for in the Long-term plan 2021-2031 - 8 July 2021
link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Investment and Annual Plan

Community Facilities Network Plan priorities for Annual Plan consideration

Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships



 

 

Indicative business case for Albany Library to consider as part of the 2022 Auckland Council Annual Plan

Early 2022 timing to be confirmed

Decision: on indicative business cases relating to CFNP priorities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community Facilities Regional Work Programmes

 

Community Facilities

Update on proposed growth funding allocation for 2022-2023

 

Decision: on growth funding allocation


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Economic Development

Green New Deal

Community and Social Innovation

A portfolio of economic stimulus missions targeting south and west Auckland and Māori and Pasifika

Note: this report will only proceed if external funding is received for the project

Decision: execution proposal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

11 November 2021

 

Proposed land exchange Taniwha Reserve and Maybury Reserve, Glen Innes

File No.: CP2021/16660

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of a proposed land exchange under the Reserves Act 1977 of approximately 2,779m² of Taniwha Reserve (shown outlined blue in Attachment A) with approximately 10,472m² of the land held by Tāmaki Regeneration Limited (shown outlined red in Attachment A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To enable decision-making on whether to approve the land exchange, staff called for objections in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 (RA).

3.       The public notification process sought feedback on the proposal to exchange approximately 2,779m² of Taniwha Reserve with approximately 10,472m² of the land held by Tāmaki Regeneration Limited.

4.       Council received a total of five submissions. Four submissions were in support of the proposed land exchange and one submission was against it. For a copy of the submissions please refer to Attachment B.

5.       The objection is considered to be outside the scope of the proposed land exchange. However, staff responded to the objection via email and the objector has been invited to express his concerns in front of the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee at its meeting on 11 November 2021.

6.       Subject to the objection being successfully resolved, staff recommend that the committee approve the proposed land exchange. The proposed land exchange is deemed to be a high priority when assessed against council policy. 

7.       There is low risk of a judicial review of council decision-making processes if the council proceeds with the land exchange. This will be mitigated by clear communication by council about the reasons for the land exchange.

8.       The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee supports the proposed land exchange.

9.       If approved, the Finance and Performance Committee will need to approve the disposal of part of Taniwha Reserve to complete the land exchange. The Finance and Performance Committee has the delegations to approve the disposal of assets.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      acknowledges that Mr Patrick O’Meara from Panmure Historical Society Incorporated submitted an objection and wishes to be heard in front of this committee.

b)      approve the land exchange of 2,779m² (subject to survey) of Taniwha Reserve located at 193-195 Taniwha Street, Glen Innes and legally described as Lot 142 DP 42356 for the land held by Tamaki Regeneration Company, totalling approximately 10,472m², located at:


 

 

Adjacent to Maybury Reserve West (Southern Part)

i)          12A, 12B, 12C,12D,12E, 14A, 14B, 14C, 14D, 14E Maybury Street Legally described as Lot 4 DP 184600 Record of Title NA114C/639.

Area of land exchange: 1,286m²

ii)       1/12 Maybury Street

Legally described as Lot 2 DP 184600 Record of NA TitleA114C/637

Estimated area of land exchange: 118.8m² (subject to survey)

iii)        2/12 Maybury Street

Legally described as Lot 3 DP 184600 Record of Title NA114C/638

Area of land exchange: 617m²

iv)        Part 4 Maybury Street

Legally described as Part of Lot 7 DP 187240 Record of Title NA116B/742

Estimated area of land exchange: 70.1m² - subject to survey

v)         Part 8 Maybury Street

Legally described as Lot 1 DP 184600 Record of Title NA114C/636

Estimated area of land exchange: 110.7m² - subject to survey

Adjacent to Maybury Reserve - West

vi)        200A, 202 Taniwha Street

Legally described as Lot 165 DP 43833 Record of Title NA46A/197

Area of land exchange: 1,072m²

vii)       192, 192A, 198A Taniwha Street

Legally described as Lot 166 DP 43833 Record of Title NA46A/198

Area of land exchange: 2,008m²

viii)      184,184A, 184B,190A Taniwha Street

Legally described as Lot 167 DP 43833 Record of Title NA46A/199

Area of land exchange: 2,008m²

ix)        180-182A Taniwha Street

Legally described as Lot 168 DP 43833 Record of Title NA46A/200

Area of land exchange: 1216m²

Adjacent to Taniwha Reserve East

x)         45 Epping Street 

Legally described as Lot 128 DP 39662 Record of Title NA43A/178

Area of land exchange: 751m²

xi)        47 Epping Street

Legally described as Lot 129 DP 39662 Record of Title NA43A/179

Area of land exchange: 771m²

xii)        Part 49 Epping Street

Legally described as Lot 130 DP 39662 Record of Title NA43A/180

Estimated area of land exchange: 774m² - subject to survey

xiii)       Part 179A Taniwha Street (to be taken under the Public Works Act 1981)

Legally described as - Fee Simple 1/7share in 3423 m2, Lot 1-2 Deposited Plan 188991 and Leasehold Flat 7 Deposited Plan 189275 and Garage 7 Deposited Plan 189275 Part NA119B/168

Estimated area of land exchange: 329m² - subject to survey

xiv)       Part 179B Taniwha Street (to be taken under the Public Works Act 1981)

Legally described as Fee Simple 1/7 share in 3423 m², Lot 1-2 Deposited Plan 188991 and Leasehold Flat 5 Deposited Plan 189275 and Garage 5 Deposited Plan 189275 Record of Title NA119B/166

Estimated area of land exchange: 26.7m² - subject to survey

c)          recommend that the Finance and Performance Committee approve the disposal of 2,779m² (subject to survey) of Taniwha Reserve located at 193-195 Taniwha Street, Glen Innes and legally described as Lot 142 DP 42356 to Tamaki Regeneration Company to complete the land exchange.

d)          agree that the General Manager, Community Facilities, under delegation from the Chief Executive, approve the final location, configuration and size of the land exchange as part of the consent processes of the Maybury/Taniwha land exchange.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     Tāmaki Regeneration Limited (TRL) owns the majority of residential land in the Tāmaki area on which it is undertaking a major residential housing development. This development intensifies housing and population density which creates a need for TRL and council to provide sufficient public open space to meet future demand.  

11.     To enable efficient development and use of the space part of Taniwha Reserve (approximately 2,779m²) has been identified as suitable for exchange with land held by TRL (approximately 10,472m²).

12.     The proposed land exchange will be carried out under section 15 of the Reserves Act 1977 (RA) except for the land at 179A and 179B Taniwha Street that will be taken by declaration under section 20 of the Public Works Act 1981 for recreation purposes.

13.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee and PACE approved public notification of the proposed land exchange under section 15(2) of the RA under the resolutions MT/2021/19 and PAC/2021/13. 

14.     Staff publicly notified the proposed land exchange in accordance with section 15 of the Reserves Act 1977.

15.     A total of 5 submissions were received, including 1 objection.

16.     The objector will be heard in front of PACE at its meeting on 11 November 2021.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Public consultation

 

17.     Following public notification under section 15(2) of RA, a total of 5 submissions (including 1 objection) were received during the public notification period between 17 May to 14 June 2021.  

18.     The sole objector raised the following questions:

·           What is the rationale behind the Panmure/Tāmaki area losing reserve and having them rezoned for housing while Glen Innes was gaining reserve?

·           Is the Ruapōtaka Marae land part of a Treaty of Waitangi settlement deal and how does it affect the land exchange in the future?

·           The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board have a direct conflict of interest, as members also sit on the TRC Board and support this Land Exchange.

·           What are the costings for a new Marae and a new community centre?

Staff responded to the above points in email dated 20 July 2021 – Attachment C.

19.     Staff consider that the concerns raised in the objection are out of the scope of the proposed land exchange, because they do not directly address the intent and purpose of the proposed exchange, however the objector’s right to be heard in person under section 120 of the RA remains.

20.     Staff recommend the objector be heard in front of the committee.

Staff recommend the exchange of land at Maybury/Taniwha Reserve

21.     Staff recommend that the committee approve the proposed land exchange as it is deemed to be a high priority when assessed against council’s open space policy.

22.     The proposed land exchange is expected to have positive benefits to the community including:

·      improving access to, and the functionality of, Maybury Reserve and Taniwha Reserve. The reserves would better meet the needs of existing and future residents.

·      improving crime prevention by increasing road frontage, sightlines and visibility into the parks from the surrounding roads.

·      enabling any future development of a shared pathway connection between Maybury and Taniwha reserves to the Glen Innes town centre.

 

·      enabling the development of a destination playground at Maybury Reserve and the extension of Ruapōtaka Marae onto Maybury Reserve West. These actions are listed in the Open Space Network Plan for part of Panmure, Glen Innes and Saint Johns 2019-2034.

23.     The land exchange would result in an approximate loss of 2,779m² and a gain of approximately 10,472m² of land to Auckland Council at no capital cost. The net gain for Auckland Council is approximately 7,693m² of open space.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.     Parks and open spaces serve as ecological corridors. They can promote and protect native plants and animals, enhance biodiversity and increase resilience to environmental change. Vegetation captures carbon from the air, helping slow the accumulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

25.     Vegetated areas, including grass, help reduce maximum temperature ranges in urbanised areas. Parks and open spaces can also help reduce flood risk during rainstorms by buffering peak flows and reducing the volume and velocity of stormwater runoff.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     Staff have engaged with various internal council stakeholders within the Customer & Community Services Directorate who were supportive of the proposed land exchange. No objections were received from other Council group members. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     At its meeting on 28 September 2021, the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board resolved [MT/2021/143] to:

a)    support the recommendation by Auckland Council staff that the sole objector to the proposal is heard in front of an appropriate but yet to be determined forum prior to PACE committee considering the proposed land exchange: and

e)    approve the land exchange of 2,779m² (subject to survey) of Taniwha Reserve located at 193-195 Taniwha Street, Glen Innes and legally described as Lot 142 DP 42356 for the land held by Tamaki Regeneration Company located at:

Adjacent to Maybury Reserve West (Southern Part)

xv. 12A, 12B, 12C,12D,12E, 14A, 14B, 14C, 14D, 14E Maybury Street Legally described as Lot 4 DP 184600 Record of Title NA114C/639.

Area of land exchange: 1,286m²

xvi. 1/12 Maybury Street

Legally described as Lot 2 DP 184600 Record of NA TitleA114C/637

Estimated area of land exchange: 118.8m² (subject to survey)

xvii.  2/12 Maybury Street

Legally described as Lot 3 DP 184600 Record of Title NA114C/638

Area of land exchange: 617m²

xviii. Part 4 Maybury Street

Legally described as Part of Lot 7 DP 187240 Record of Title NA116B/742

Estimated area of land exchange: 70.1m² - subject to survey

xix. Part 8 Maybury Street

Legally described as Lot 1 DP 184600 Record of Title NA114C/636

Estimated area of land exchange: 110.7m² - subject to survey

        Adjacent to Maybury Reserve - West

xx. 200A, 202 Taniwha Street

Legally described as Lot 165 DP 43833 Record of Title NA46A/197

Area of land exchange: 1,072m²

                       

xxi. 192, 192A, 198A Taniwha Street

Legally described as Lot 166 DP 43833 Record of Title NA46A/198

Area of land exchange: 2,008m²

xxii.  184,184A, 184B,190A Taniwha Street

Legally described as Lot 167 DP 43833 Record of Title NA46A/199

Area of land exchange: 2,008m²

xxiii. 180-182A Taniwha Street

Legally described as Lot 168 DP 43833 Record of Title NA46A/200

Area of land exchange: 1216m²

Adjacent to Taniwha Reserve East

xxiv. 45 Epping Street 

Legally described as Lot 128 DP 39662 Record of Title NA43A/178

Area of land exchange: 751m²

xxv.  47 Epping Street

Legally described as Lot 129 DP 39662 Record of Title NA43A/179

Area of land exchange: 771m²

xxvi. Part 49 Epping Street

Legally described as Lot 130 DP 39662 Record of Title NA43A/180

Estimated area of land exchange: 774m² - subject to survey

xxvii. Part 179A Taniwha Street (to be taken under the Public Works Act 1981)

Legally described as - Fee Simple 1/7share in 3423 m2, Lot 1-2 Deposited Plan 188991 and Leasehold Flat 7 Deposited Plan 189275 and Garage 7 Deposited Plan 189275 Part NA119B/168

Estimated area of land exchange: 329m² - subject to survey

xxviii.           Part 179B Taniwha Street (to be taken under the Public Works Act 1981)

Legally described as Fee Simple 1/7 share in 3423 m², Lot 1-2 Deposited Plan 188991 and Leasehold Flat 5 Deposited Plan 189275 and Garage 5 Deposited Plan 189275 Record of Title NA119B/166

Estimated area of land exchange: 26.7m² - subject to survey

                                                                                                                           CARRIED

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     The following iwi were identified as having an interest in land in Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board area and contacted as part of the engagement process:

Ngāti Whanaunga                                     Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

Waikato-Tainui                                          Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei                             Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua

Ngāti Te Ata                                              Te Ākitai Waiohua

Te Ahiwaru - Waiohua                              Ngāti Pāoa

Ngāti Pāoa Trust Board                            Te Kawerau ā Maki

Te Patukirikiri                                            Ngāti Maru

Ngāti Tamaterā

29.     There were no submissions and twelve did not respond to the letter council sent on 17 May 2021 and follow up emails sent on 8 June 2021 and 22 June 2021.

30.     The proposed land exchange was assessed against Council’s open space policy and staff looked at the Unitary Plan management layers to see if the sites contain any significant features or heritage designations. There were none identified.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     The consideration passing from one party to the other under the proposed land exchange is treated as being equivalent in all material respects.

32.     The estimated median ongoing maintenance consequential costs (OPEX costs) for the additional reserves per annum based on the proposed open space plans are as follows:

Maybury Reserve – West (southern part)                                                               

Opex Cost $3,000

Maybury Reserve – West

Opex Cost $6,000

Taniwha Reserve

Opex Cost $2,500

Estimated total additional Opex costs  

$11,500 per annum

 

33.     Please note:

·    The above table only shows operational costs to Community Facilities (CF) for the additional areas. It does not include any required development costs.

·    The maintenance cost will increase year on year as stipulated in the maintenance contract agreements with the contractors for CPI adjustments.

·    The table does not consider 2,779m² of Council’s reserve land that will be transferred to TRL and therefore reducing the overall costs to CF by approximately one third.

·    This land exchange is a part of a major residential housing development in the Tāmaki area and further land exchanges between Auckland Council and TRC may well reduce the maintenance cost to CF. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     There is a low risk of judicial review of council decision-making processes. This will be mitigated by clear communication about the reasons for the decision to proceed with the exchange.

35.     If the land exchange does not proceed, there is a risk of a lost opportunity to acquire land for future public open space, to meet the recreation demands of the population in an intensified urban area.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.     The Finance and Performance Committee will need to approve the disposal of 2,779m² of Taniwha Reserve to complete the land exchange.

37.     Subject to the approval of the Finance and Performance Committee, council staff will work with TRL to undertake the processes required to exchange the land. This will include engaging a surveyor to prepare new land transfer plans, publishing a notice in the New Zealand Gazette and registering a notice with Land Information New Zealand.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Aerial photos of land being exchanged

39

b

Survey Responses

41

c

Response to objection

49

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tamara Zunic - Specialist Technical Statutory Advisor

Authoriser

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

11 November 2021

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

11 November 2021

 

PDF Creator







Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

11 November 2021

 


PDF Creator


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

11 November 2021

 

Dedication of road reserve as road - 173R Browns Road Manurewa

File No.: CP2021/14114

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the dedication of part of a local purpose road reserve as road pursuant to section 111 of the Reserves Act 1977.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The property at 173R Browns Road Manurewa is a local purpose road reserve.

3.       The road has been upgraded by Auckland Transport and part of the reserve needs to be legalised as road.

4.       Pursuant to section 111 of the Reserves Act 1977, where any land is vested for a road reserve and is required for the purposes of a road, the land may be dedicated as road by a resolution of the local authority.  The road will remain vested in Auckland Council.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      approve the dedication of road reserve as road at 173R Browns Road, Manurewa, shown as Section 3 on Survey Office Plan 459102 (attachment A to the agenda report), pursuant to section 111 of the Reserves Act 1977.

Horopaki

Context

5.       In about 2013 Auckland Transport undertook improvements to Browns Road, Manurewa, ahead of a major development of a large block of Ministry of Education land.

6.       173R Browns Road was created and vested in the Crown as a road reserve on subdivision in the 1920s.  Subsequent legislation vested the reserve in Manukau City Council and it was redefined as Lot 1 DP 86437 in 1978 with a new title, and is now subject to the Reserves Act 1977 as a local purpose road reserve.  The land was most likely reserved to provide future road access to the surrounding land still to be developed. 

7.       The Reserves Act 1977 anticipates such reserves being required for road with section 111 authorising that local authorities may dedicate part or all of a road reserve as road by a resolution without undertaking any other statutory processes.

8.       The balance of the road reserve is to be sold to the Ministry of Education for education purposes and legalisation of the road must be completed to ensure legal road frontage to the balance land.  Refer to plan at Attachment B.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       This decision will enable the legalisation of council owned land as road, a decision that would be delegated to an officer if it were not a road reserve.

10.     The road has already been formed and the legalisation is an administrative activity to complete the Auckland Transport project.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

11.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan sets out two core goals:

·    climate mitigation: to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) by 50 per cent by 2030 and achieve net zero emissions by 2050

·    climate adaptation: to be resilient and adapt to the impacts and effects of climate change by ensuring we plan for the projected changes.

12.     Auckland Transport upgraded Browns Road in about 2014 realigning the public footpath within the subject land.  Auckland Transport has confirmed that no further road widening work is funded or forecast for Browns Road and the road is not on any future network map for the Supporting Growth Alliance.

13.     Therefore, Auckland Transport and Auckland Council consider the vesting of Section 3 SO 459102 as road will have no climate impact noting:

·    There will be no net loss of green space in terms of pervious surfaces;

·    There will be no net loss of trees;

·    There will be no net increase in impervious surfaces from the existing environment and therefore no impact in terms of flooding; and

·    The property is not coastal, so there will be no impact on sea level rise.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     The road widening has been undertaken as part of an Auckland Transport project and the decision is necessary to legalise the new road.

15.     As approval has already been given to sell the balance of the land there is will be no impact on any other council groups.

16.     There is no risk attached to this decision.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     At its business meeting on 13 November 2014, the Manurewa Local Board agreed (resolution MR/2014/230) to the dedication of part of the reserve for road purposes (106m2 more or less) to form part of Browns Road, shown as Section 3 SO 459102, and in accordance with section 111 of the Reserves Act 1977

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori.

18.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2012-2022, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework, Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau - Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework and Local Board Plans.

19.     The widening of Browns Road has been completed by Auckland Transport.  The legalisation of the affected land as road is not considered to have an impact on an activity, facility, or location of importance to Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     There are no financial implications related to this decision to dedicate part of a road reserve as road.  As a legal road the land will be under the full control of Auckland Transport in accordance with section 45 of the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     There are no risks associated with a decision to dedicate part of the road reserve as road at 173R Browns Road, Manurewa.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     A resolution to dedicate part of a road reserve to be road will be lodged with the Registrar-General of Land who will change the status to road vested in Auckland Council and amend the land title.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

SO 459102

55

b

Aerial photo of 173R Browns Road and surrounding Education land

57

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Christine Smith - Specialist Technical Statutory Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

11 November 2021

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

11 November 2021

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

11 November 2021

 

Regional Community Development Grants 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/11370

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the allocations for the Regional Community Development grants programme 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Regional Community Development grants programme has been developed in accordance with council’s Community Grants policy as adopted at the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee meeting on 4 December 2014 (REG/2014/134).

3.       The contestable programme has a budget of $295,000 for 2021/2022.

4.       A three-year strategic relationship grant of $30,000 was approved to Belong Aotearoa in the 2019/2020 funding round. The third payment will be made from the 2021/2022 budget.

5.       Eighteen applications requesting $598,494 were received in this funding round. This is significantly fewer than previous years.

6.       The funding round closed on 27 September. Feedback from several regular applicants who did not apply for funding was that organisations were focused on managing COVID-19 related organisational issues rather than contestable funding applications.

7.       Applications have been assessed and recommendations made based on the assessment criteria and the assessment matrix.

8.       Staff recommend approving $201,312 to eight applications that demonstrate organisational and project quality and meet the priorities of the Regional Community Development grants programme.

9.        This leaves a balance of funds of $63,688. Staff recommend the balance of funds be repurposed for Rapid Response COVID-19 Recovery grants. Connected Communities is forming a Community Impact COVID-19 taskforce focusing on community COVID-19 recovery solutions. It is recommended the balance of the Regional Community Development grant budget be used towards community grants to support this work.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      approve the allocation of $201,312 for the Regional Community Development grants programme 2021/2022 for the amounts and projects outlined in the table below; and

b)      approve the balance of funds of $63,688 be repurposed for Rapid Response COVID-19 Recovery grants through the Community Impact COVID-19 taskforce.


 

 

Table: Proposed Regional Community Development grants programme allocations

Group

Project

Recommended Grant

Island Base Trust/Base FM

Youth mentoring Project engaging Māori & Pacific rangatahi in finding their own voice

$26,316

Every Body is a Treasure

Click Happy Auckland - An award-winning youth wellbeing program that is tucked inside a cellphone photography program

$25,000

Sisters United Trust

Crown Yourself - an in-school weekly programme for Pasifika young women

$20,000

CNSST Foundation (Chinese New Settlers Services Trust)

Thriving ethnic communities hub: Community engagement, capability, volunteering and employment

$20,000

The Kindness Institute

Atawhai – a rangatahi-led kaupapa Māori and tikanga driven resilience and mental health program based on Te Whare Tapa Whā framework

$30,000

Aotearoa Resettled Community Coalition

Bridging the Gap – a research project based on lived family experiences of resettled communities

$15,000

Māngere East Family Services Centre Inc. [t/a ME Family Services]

Timebank Auckland - Research through Engagement, Empower through Education, and Activate Communities.

Timebanking sees users exchange services and grow community capacity.

$39,996

Auckland Sexual Abuse HELP Foundation

HELP Auckland ‘Dear Em’ Youth Community Engagement and Mobilisation.

Online community outreach programme ‘Dear Em’, created in collaboration with young women, for young women.

 

$25,000

TOTAL

 

$201,312

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Community Grants policy sets out the policy framework for local board, multi-board and regional grants programmes.

11.     The purpose of the Regional Community Development grants programme is to support the implementation of the Thriving Communities: Social and Community Development Strategic Action Plan and the Empowered Communities Approach by directly supporting community-led projects that have regional impact. 

12.     The contestable Regional Community Development Grants has a budget of $295,000 for 2021/2022. This fund is generally allocated in one annual funding round. This year, grant applications closed on 26 September. Eighteen applications were received, requesting a total of $598,494.

13.     One three-year strategic relationship grant of $30,000 per annum was approved in the 2019/2020 funding round with the third year of payment coming out of this budget.

14.     This leaves a balance of $265,000 for distribution in 2020/2021.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     An assessment panel of staff and advisors from external organisations assessed the applications (Attachment A), based on the assessment matrix (Attachment B) that covers the following factors:

·    Organisational capacity and project attributes.

·    Alignment to the Empowered Communities Approach.

·    Additional priorities from the Community Grants policy.

·    Funding for success (recommending a grant of a level that will allow the group to complete the project, or complete a key aspect of the project).

Consideration of COVID-19

16.     Some projects have the potential to be impacted by alert levels. All applicants were asked to submit a COVID-19 risk management plan with their grant application and will agree to follow all public health guidance while delivering their activity or project.

17.     Significantly fewer applications have been received compared to previous years (57 in 2019/2020, 28 in 2020/2021). Conversations with previous applicants who did not submit applications reported the following:

·       the original closing date of 12 September fell when many organisations were busy dealing with impacts of Auckland being in COVID-19 Alert Level 4. While staff extended the closing date for two weeks to 26 September, several groups reported being too busy to prioritise applying for contestable funding

·       previous project funding had not been fully spent and/or reported on due to dates grants were approved (reporting 6 weeks after the end of a project) and would not be completed until December 2021/January 2022

·       previous projects had not been completed within the initial proposed timeframes due to organisational impacts of COVID-19.

Allocation and budget recommendations

18.     The assessment panel recommends allocating $201,312 to eight projects.

19.     The projects recommended for funding all strongly fit the criteria and priorities of this fund.

20.     Ten projects are not recommended for funding for the following reasons:

·       The projects do not align as well with the priorities and aims of the Regional Community Development grants programme policy.

·       There are other ways for council to support the project and staff will follow up these opportunities with the applicants.

·       The applications and projects require further development and/or the budgets are not clear.

·       The applications are more closely aligned with priorities for other council grant funds (e.g. Local Board grants, Regional Arts and Culture or Regional Events grants) and will be referred to these programmes.

21.     This leaves a remaining budget of $63,688. As this is insufficient funding to run a second round of the grants programme, staff recommend the balance of funds be repurposed for Rapid Response COVID-19 Recovery grants. Connected Communities is forming a Community Impact COVID-19 taskforce focusing on community COVID-19 recovery solutions. It is recommended the balance of the Regional Community Development grant budget be used towards community grants to support this work.

22.     Staff will follow up with applicants where other options are available to progress the project.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     Applications to this fund contribute to building communities abilities to be resilient. Resilience is a measure of adapting and responding to situations which could include climate change. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     Where applications are for projects that fit better with other areas of council delivery (e.g. arts or events), staff work with other council units that may have an interest in projects or administer regional grants. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     The regional grants programme complements local board grants programmes that provide grants for local projects. While some applicants recommended for funding have received local board funding for other aspects of their work, projects recommended for funding at this meeting meet the criteria for regional rather than local board funding.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     The assessment matrix (Attachment B) includes a scoring category as part of the Empowered Communities Approach for ‘responding to Māori aspirations in practical and effective ways.’ There is the also the additional funding priority of ‘supporting Māori outcomes’ that is considered in the applications overall score.

27.     This funding supports both Māori and non-Māori organisations to deliver outcomes for Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     Staff recommend allocating $201,312 in this funding round.

29.     $30,000 was pre-committed for the 2021/2022 financial year through one multiyear strategic relationship grant.

30.     Staff recommend the fund’s balance of $63,688 be repurposed for a Rapid Response COVID-19 Recovery grant for community development organisations.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     Ongoing relationship management with applicants will continue to manage expectations and provide advice on future applications.

32.     Applications are robustly considered through the assessment process, ensuring potential risks are identified and mitigated.

33.     The risk of projects not going ahead due to the current COVID-19 lockdown has been considered. The risk to grants recommended in this funding round will be further mitigated as applicants have included a plan for delivery under alert levels 1-4. For projects impacted by the current lockdown, staff will request a new project timeline from each organisation in the letter advising of the grant, with payment contingent on an updated project timeline that falls within the grant period (12 months from the date of approval), or alternative delivery (e.g. online).

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Once funding allocation decisions have been confirmed, funding agreements will be prepared in line with current Auckland Council standard practice.

35.     Where grants are awarded that do not meet the full amount requested, appropriate outcomes for the level of funding will be negotiated with the recipients and this will be reflected in the funding agreement.

36.     All applicants will be offered the opportunity to discuss their application and be coached on areas for future development.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Grants Summary

65

b

Assessment Matrix

67

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Catherine George - Regional Funding Advisor

Authorisers

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Connected Communities

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

11 November 2021

 



Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

11 November 2021

 

PDF Creator


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

11 November 2021

 

Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan progress report

File No.: CP2021/14748

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To report progress on implementation of the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan (2019).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Delivery of the Community Facilities Network Plan (CFNP) Action Plan ensures a focus on investment priorities and improved planning for provision of community facilities in a constrained resource environment.

3.       The CFNP and its companion Action Plan guide how Auckland Council plans and prioritises community facility provision and the services and locations council invests in. 

4.       The CFNP, approved by the Governing Body in August 2015, provides a road map for council’s investment in the provision of community facilities over the next 20 years. It contains criteria for identifying and prioritising actions to deliver on the strategic direction it provides.

5.       These actions are reflected in the CFNP’s companion Action Plan, which outlines the projects that will be delivered to give effect to the CFNP direction.

6.       Every three years the CFNP Action Plan is reviewed and updated to recognise progress of existing actions and assess potential new actions. In April 2019 the Governing Body approved the revised Action Plan for the CFNP (ENV/2019/47).

7.       Actions are implemented over time within available resource and finances.

8.       To date we have completed or are working on:

·        80 per cent of business improvements

·        86 per cent of strategic improvements

·        69 per cent of area-based (service and location) actions

9.       The most significant shift since progress on the 2019 Action Plan was reported to PACE in 2020 is a ~ 14 per cent increase of completed area-based actions (from 40.7 per cent to 55 per cent).

10.     Our work on business and strategic improvement actions is helps us to enhance the tools and practices we use to achieve the outcomes of CFNP.

11.     Area-based actions are prioritised with a primary focus on ensuring existing assets are fit for service, with the secondary focus being growth and potential gaps in council’s community facility network.

12.     The economic slow-down caused by Covid-19 and Auckland Council’s Long-term Plan 2021-2031 (Recovery Budget) has impacted progress on some actions and five per cent of area-based actions are on hold.

13.     The progress being made on actions demonstrates our commitment to focusing resources on priorities in this constrained environment and on a collectively agreed and mandated programme of work.

14.     The approach for community investment adopted as part of the Recovery Budget supports the direction of the CFNP.

15.     The next revision of the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan is due in 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      receive the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan (2019) progress report.

Horopaki

Context

A strategic approach to investment in community facilities is needed

16.     The council has a network of over 350 community facilities including community centres, venues for hire, galleries and theatres, libraries, swimming pools and leisure centres. This represents a significant ratepayer investment.

17.     The community facility network is variable in distribution and quality due to historic development patterns and investment approaches.

18.     The challenges of maintaining levels of service across the existing network within existing funding envelopes while controlling costs, maximising value and balancing the demands of growth and changing customer behaviour requires a strategic approach to investment in community facilities and services by Auckland Council.

We have a blueprint for our investment in community facilities

19.     The Community Facilities Network Plan (CFNP) adopted in 2015, guides council’s investment in the provision of community facilities for the next 20 years. It provides direction on the development of new facilities, major upgrades of existing facilities, optimisation and potential divestment of facilities no longer meeting community needs.

20.     The scope of the CFNP includes five types of community spaces:

·   arts and culture facilities

·   community centres

·   libraries

·   pools and leisure facilities

·   venues for hire (community or rural halls).

21.     The key drivers of the CFNP are to:

·   ensure existing facilities are fit-for-purpose

·   address gaps or duplication

·   meet future demand.

A mandated set of actions helps to achieve the aim of the Community Facilities Network Plan

22.     The CFNP’s companion Action Plan focuses council’s resources (including staff time) on the implementation of the network plan and sets the priority projects to be delivered over a three-year period.

23.     Priority projects are divided in three categories:

Category

Theme

Explanation

1. Business improvement actions

Approach to community facility provision

 

Actions to improve our understanding of community facilities, to develop tools to complement the implementation of the CFNP or to improve the operation of community facilities.

2. Strategic improvement actions

Planning and operational changes that will improve the way we work to achieve the approach outlined in section 3.3 of the CFNP network plan: Integrate and coordinate planning across all types of community facilities.

3. Area-based actions

What community facilities council invests in

These relate to specific service types and locations and have been assessed as priority or non-priority based on assessment against criteria in section 5.2. of the CFNP. These actions help us understand service investment requirements across the Auckland community facilities network.

24.     Area-based actions are triggered by one or more of four drivers:

i.     Existing facility has significant fit for purpose or performance issues and/or evidence of demand for additional provision

ii.    An area with a gap or duplication of provision (as determined by the provision approach in the CFNP)

iii.    An area with anticipated need arising from population growth (as determined by the approach to identifying gaps in the CFNP)

iv.   An external catalyst or opportunity.

25.     Once identified, actions are prioritised according to 10 criteria across three categories set in section 5.2 of the CFNP, as detailed in the following table.

Category

Sub-category

Weighting

Network

40%

Network contribution

10%

Demand

10%

Catchment size

10%

Optimisation or divestment potential

10%

Community

40%

Local board priority

15%

Impact in the community

10%

Alternative provision

5%

Catalyst/opportunity

10%

Building

20%

Size and layout

10%

Physical condition

10%

Understanding customer needs is the primary focus of investigations 

26.     Investigation of CFNP area-based actions follow a consistent approach with a primary focus on identifying and understanding customer reach and impact, alongside consideration of network provision, growth and demographics. This ensures that any investment in facilities delivers effectively on the service requirements of communities.

27.     Slide 12 in Attachment A shows the bulk of area-based actions are investigations involving strategic and/or needs assessments, this reflects determining customer need as a first step, rather than an assumption that facility provision is required.

Alignment of Action Plan implementation with investment cycles

28.     Actions are progressed to align with investment planning cycles. Evidence-based investigations inform investment requirements and prioritisation across the network for its 10-year Budget (Long-term Plan), which is reviewed every three years.

29.     Actions with capital funding in the first five years of the Long-term Plan are progressed as the first priority, along with network priority actions which fall in spatial priority areas or those actions which present a significant opportunity for optimisation or divestment.

The Action Plan is reviewed every three years

30.     Every three years the CFNP Action Plan is reviewed and updated to recognise progress and review priorities of existing actions and assess potential new actions. In April 2019 the Environment and Community Committee approved the revised Action Plan for the CFNP (ENV/2019/47). The revised Action Plan was the second action plan since adoption of the CFNP.

31.     Staff provide a yearly progress update on the delivery of the Action Plan to PACE.

32.     A revised CFNP Action Plan is due to be presented to PACE in June 2022.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Progress on delivery of actions demonstrates our resources are focused on an agreed work programme

33.     The 2019 CFNP Action Plan contains actions that are implemented over time within available resource and finances.

34.     To date staff have completed or are working on:

·        80 per cent of business improvements

·        86 per cent of strategic improvements

·        69 per cent of area-based actions (priority and non-priority actions combined).

35.     The progress being made on business and strategic improvements and priority area-based actions demonstrates our commitment to focusing resources on a collectively agreed and mandated programme of work.

36.     In addition, we prioritise delivery of area-based actions to ensure focus across the network and ensuring existing assets are fit-for-service (refer Attachment A for further detail).

37.     The status of individual actions in the CFNP Action Plan are detailed in Attachment B. The red text in the attachment indicates a change of status since the 2019 Action Plan was approved.

Business and strategic improvements advance how we carry out our work and the processes we use

Business improvements

38.     Business improvements enhance our portfolio information and tools to implement the outcomes of the CFNP.

39.     An example of a business improvement initiative (Action 117) that is in progress is to improve and streamline research methodologies and processes to provide robust information for planning and monitoring of the effectiveness of community facilities.

40.     Clear evidence and consistent data will improve our understanding of use of resources and service impact, to inform quality advice around decisions and trade-offs.

Strategic improvements

41.     Strategic improvements enable better ways of working to achieve the goals of the network plan.

42.     An example of a strategic improvement initiative (Action 13) that is in progress is to undertake a regional review of Auckland’s aquatic network to understand the impacts of growth, assess future gaps in relation to services and the lifespan of existing facilities.

43.     This work will help us to work out the optimal provision of aquatic services to meet the current and future needs of Aucklanders and provide a framework to guide planning and investment decisions.

Area-based actions

44.     Area-based actions are categorised as either priority or non-priority actions. The following table shows the delivery status across priority and non-priority area-based actions.

Area-based actions

Per cent complete or in-progress

Priority

78

Non-priority

48

45.     The increase in completed area-based actions from 40.7 per cent to 55 per cent is the most significant shift since progress on the 2019 Action Plan was reported to PACE in 2020.

There are five area-based actions that are on hold to align with funding because of resource constraints

46.     Progress has slowed in some areas in response to constraints as we have less delivery resource, and we have delayed work that requires significant capital investment to align with funding.

47.     Area-based actions that are paused (five per cent) are reflected as ‘on hold’ in the graphs in Attachment A and noted in red text in Attachment B.

Action

Facility or area

Local board

Description

Reason for work being paused

54

Flat Bush

Howick

Develop a library and multi-use community facility in Flat Bush.

Work is on hold until budget for this project becomes available in year 3 of the LTP.

55

Flat Bush

Howick

Investigate options for the future provision of pools and leisure space to address population growth, demand and gap in provision.

Work is on hold until budget for this project becomes available in later years of the LTP.

74

Meadowbank Community Centre

Ōrākei

Upgrade of Meadowbank Community Centre.

A detailed business case will begin when the local board has approved fitout concept plans which has been delayed due to delivery capacity.

125

Mt Wellington community facilities

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

Investigate community need in Mt Wellington, including partnership opportunities.

On hold due to organisational delivery/resourcing capacity.

135

Central West aquatic and leisure

Whau

Development of new pool and recreation centre in central West.

Work is on hold until budget for this project becomes available in year 4 of the LTP.

Work on area-based actions is to understand and respond to community need

48.     Understanding the service needs of customers and communities is the primary focus of investigations for area-based actions. The investigation process considers options to respond to identified needs and if required, establish clear and robust evidence to support advice regarding appropriate responses and nature of investment required.

49.     An example of an area-based action responding to community need is Action 81, completed in March 2021, that resulted in the opening of a new community hub in leased premises, Te Paataka Koorero o Takaanini. The service model and the way it was developed offers many learnings for how we might approach community services in the future.

50.     The community was involved in designing the built environment service offering, which is bilingual and based on an aspiration for a place underpinned by tikanga Māori where people feel a sense of belonging and of being valued.

Exploring ways to reduce reliance on capital investment and integration of services is also a focus of our work on area-based actions

51.     An example of an area-based action that looked for ways to ease pressure on capital funding was Action 107, an investigation into provision of library facilities in Ponsonby and Grey Lynn areas that assessed condition and suitability of existing facilities. This work, completed in September 2020, demonstrated the continued need for library and community centre services at Leys Institute, which is closed due to seismic issues.

52.     In response to financial constraints, the recommended option to restore the facility includes looking for alternative sources of funding such as community fundraising, philanthropic donations, targeted rates and service property optimisation.

53.     Work on Action 60 is an example of work that supports integrated service delivery to provide value for money. The investigation, completed in September 2021, looked at requirements for library, community, arts and culture services in Northcote with the aim of supporting the development of combined community services, including a multi-purpose community hub, as part of Eke Panuku’s Unlock Northcote town centre redevelopment programme.

54.     The investigation showed the need for council community services is expected to increase as more housing is developed around the town centre of Northcote and there is an opportunity to realise value from integrated service provision and flexibility for customer responsiveness from non-asset-based service approaches.

The priorities in the CFNP Action Plan are guiding the focus of our resources in a constrained environment

55.     The impact of Covid-19 and the resulting economic slow-down has had a significant impact on the council’s revenue and borrowing capacity. The Long-term Plan 2021-2031 (Recovery Budget), adopted 29 June 2021, highlights:

·    a tight fiscal environment for the immediate future

·    the need to reduce capital expenditure across the council family

·    reprioritisation of projects

·    the unsustainability of maintaining the current community facility network while meeting the needs of growing and changing communities.

56.     The ‘focused investment’ approach for community investment adopted as part of the Recovery Budget involves moving towards renewal of priority assets, reduction of our asset portfolio and expansion of provision of tailored and alternative service delivery such as through integration of services, partnerships, grants and digital channels.

57.     The approach for community investment supports the direction of the CFNP and in this constrained environment the priorities in the CFNP Action Plan are guiding the focus of our resources.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

58.     There are currently no identified climate implications for the delivery of the CFNP Action Plan investigations.

59.     Consideration of climate impacts happens at a project level during the development of detailed business cases. These business cases cover climate impacts such as an allowance for environmental initiatives in early cost estimates and sustainability advisors on procurement evaluation panels.

60.     Future business cases will include application of the Community Facilities – Sustainable Asset Policy adopted in October this year. The regional policy, the first of three phases under the council’s Sustainable Asset Standard (SAS), commits council to:

·        achieve carbon neutrality in operations for new asset development

·        achieve a minimum 5-Star Green Star rating (or equivalent certification) on the development of all new assets with a budget over $10 million

·        incorporate decarbonisation principles into guideline documents for renewals and new asset development of all community assets.

61.     We will improve the approach to assessment of climate impacts in investigations and business cases by applying learnings (from across the organisation) as it matures in its responsiveness to climate change. Staff will also seek to understand the allowances that need to be made to meet climate impact targets for Action Plan projects related to the development of new, or improvement of existing, facilities.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

62.     Delivery of the CFNP Action Plan is resourced by council’s Community and Social Policy and Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships teams, subject to capacity. Individual actions are delivered with participation from other departments and, where relevant, Eke Panuku Development Auckland.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

63.     In-progress area-based actions are reflected in relevant local board work programmes. Local boards provide feedback and input throughout the investigations and have decision making responsibilities.

64.     Decision-making for service provision and location sits with local boards within funding parameters set by the Governing Body.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

65.     Section 2.2 of the CFNP outlines how the CFNP will deliver on Māori outcomes. These include:

·        engage with Māori organisations to understand Māori expectations and investigate the community needs of Māori groups, and factor this into decision-making for community facilities

·        actively engage and consult to ensure the planning, development, and operations of facilities consider Māori needs and aspirations

·        work closely with Māori groups and key stakeholders, including local iwi, to develop appropriate cultural programmes to be delivered through facilities

·        investigate Māori demographic participation and usage trends, identifying opportunities to increase the attendance and use of facilities by Māori and developing appropriate business responses

·        provide visual representations of commitment to Māori to tell stories of their connections to the place (such as signage) and honouring tikanga

·        ensure that, in any exploration of potential future sites for facilities, Māori concerns about wāhi tapu are incorporated.

66.     Engagement with Māori is included as part of investigations and continues through the planning and delivery of responses. Examples include:

·        interviews and hui with mana whenua

·        interviews and hui with mataawaka in local settings to understand community needs

·        workshops and focus groups with local marae

·        intercept surveys with representative samples of the Māori population base

·        kanohi ki te kanohi interviews conducted in Te Reo Māori.

67.     Feedback provided from Māori is specific to the nature of the investigation for which the engagement occurred. This feedback is used to inform the delivery of options and responses.

68.     Staff will work with other relevant parts of the council to ensure effective engagement with Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

69.     There are currently no identified financial implications for the delivery of the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan, as work is delivered utilising existing resources and budgets.

70.     The ability and timeframe to implement the actions in the network plan that result in asset investment is dependent on the level of budget allocated in the LTP for community facilities.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

Strategic

·    implementation of the Action Plan involves understanding service needs and taking a network view, which may not match local board priorities

·    the aim of the CFNP is to create efficiencies and improve service delivery to residents, but it may also require the divestment of poor performing or not-fit-for service spaces in favour of longer-term planning for better integrated or co-located spaces

 

·     continue to socialise and reinforce the strategic objectives of the CFNP to elected members, key staff and through all deliverables 

·     strengthen the evidence base for the CFNP approach based on the Better Business Case model

 

Financial

·    budget allocated in the LTP 2021-2031 may be insufficient to deliver some of the action findings. In many instances, there is no capital or operational budget allocated in the LTP to deliver on any new provision requirements arising from actions 

·    the need for significant new investment identified from actions will be challenging because Covid-19 has had a significant impact on the council’s revenue and borrowing capacity

·    some investigations may require changes to current funding identified in the LTP 2021-2031

 

·     ensure investigations include looking at options for funding other than rates or debt

·     ensure findings of investigations that require new investment are supported by indicative business cases

·     manage expectations by acknowledging Recovery Budget constraints

·     manage expectation by acknowledging the delegation for decision-making on investment in new facilities is held by the Governing Body and is considered as part of long-term planning (decision making for service provision and location sits with local boards within parameters set by the Governing Body)

Timing

·    delivery of actions may take longer because of reduced operational capacity

·    timing for some actions (particularly non-priority actions) may not align with elected members and/or local communities’ expectations

 

·    drive delivery to meet targeted timeframes for priority actions

·    manage expectations based on the principles and direction set by the adopted CFNP

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

71.     Actions that have not yet started will be reflected in future work programmes subject to available resources.

72.     Actions that have arisen since the adoption of the 2019 CFNP Action Plan will be recommended for inclusion in the next revision of the plan which is due in 2022. These include actions to progress findings from completed investigations, as well as those that meet the criteria for inclusion in the Action Plan coming through the LTP 2021-2031, local board direction-setting and input from across the organisation.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

CFNP action plan progress update summary

79

b

CFNP action plan 2019

95

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Williams - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

11 November 2021

 

















Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

11 November 2021

 


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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

11 November 2021

 

Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/15824

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To allocate the 2021/2022 Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund and confirm final project delivery costs for the sports field investment programme funded through the 2020/2021 Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 15 October 2020, the Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) Committee approved $5.7 million from the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund for sports field upgrades.

3.       The investment will increase the provision of floodlit training facilities and reduce weather-related cancellations in the three areas of Auckland with the greatest need of sports field investment [PAC/2020/56].

4.       The allocation of funding was based on the following indicative project delivery estimates.

Table 1: Cost estimates for sports field and lighting upgrades and provisional allocation of the 2020/2021 Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund

Park

Local board

Approved

Māngere Centre Park

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

$2,000,000

Papatoetoe Recreation Ground

Ōtara-Papatoetoe

$1,900,000

Mountfort Park

Manurewa

$1,800,000

Total

$5,700,000

 

5.       Detailed design and final project delivery costs have now been confirmed. Across the $5.7 million sports field investment programme, funded through the Sport & Recreation Facility Investment Fund, there is a mix of projects that have come in over and under budget.

6.       Māngere Centre Park has come in over budget due to a change to the fields selected for renovation. Field selection was informed by stakeholder engagement through the Māngere Centre Park master plan that had not been completed when the funding allocation (Table 1) was approved. This was acknowledged in the resolution at the time.

7.       Papatoetoe Recreation Ground and Mountfort Park have come in under budget after detailed costing.

8.       An opportunity has been identified to add a fourth sports park, Manurewa War Memorial Park, to the programme which would increase floodlit sports field provision through an investment partnership approach with the Manurewa Local Board.

9.       To deliver the upgrade of Māngere Centre Park, Papatoetoe Recreation, Mountfort Park and to include Manurewa War Memorial Park in the programme it would be necessary to:

·        reallocate funding within the programme

·        allocate an additional $300,000 from the 2021/2022 Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund and authorise conversion of the funds from opex to capex.

10.     It is recommended that Manurewa War Memorial Park be added to the sports field investment programme and investment into Māngere Centre Park be increased, as per table two. These changes will not compromise the outcomes of the original resolution [PAC/2020/56].

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)   approve $300,000 from the 2021/2022 Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund to be managed by Community Facilities as part of a targeted sports field investment programme.

b)   endorse the request that the Finance & Performance Committee approve the change in budget to convert $300,000 operational budget to capital budget to properly account for the Māngere Centre Park project.

c)   authorise the General Manager - Community Facilities to oversee allocation of the sports field investment programme funded through the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund into the following parks:

i)    Māngere Centre Park

ii)   Papatoetoe Recreation Ground

iii)  Mountfort Park

iv)  Manurewa War Memorial Park

d)   note the upcoming funding round of the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund opening on 15 November 2021.

Horopaki

Context

11.     The Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund supports the development of sport and recreation facilities to address gaps in provision and allow council to proactively respond to the changing sport and recreation preferences of Aucklanders.

12.     The Long-term Plan (LTP) 2018-2028 allocated $120 million to the fund over ten years.

13.     Investment fund applications are assessed against the four investment principles in council’s Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039.

14.     On 15 October 2020, the PACE committee approved $5.7 million for sports field upgrades to increase the provision of floodlit training facilities and reduce weather-related cancellations in the three areas of Auckland in greatest need of investment [PAC/2020/56]:

·    Māngere Centre Park - $2 million

·    Papatoetoe Recreation Ground - $1.9 million

·    Mountfort Park - $1.8 million

15.     An additional $4.2 million was allocated to community-led projects in that funding round.

16.     Detailed design and final costing have been completed for the sport field upgrades, meaning projected underspend and overspend is confirmed. Overspend is directly linked to a change in the surface area being upgraded at Māngere Centre Park. All projects include a contingency of at least 10 per cent that may not be required.

17.     An additional $300,000 is available to allocate through the 2021/2022 Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund.

 

18.     The remaining 2021/2022 Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund budget ($5,206,060) has been deferred into 2022/2023 to create the $15.3 million contestable grant round, leaving the $300,000 to allow tactical responses to emerging opportunities, such as those described in this paper.

19.     The next contestable round of the investment fund opens on 15 November 2021, with PACE decision on funding allocation to be made in September 2022.

20.     $15.3 million is available for the 2022/2023 funding round. Further information is available on the Auckland Council website.

Māngere Centre Park

21.     The original allocation of $2 million to Māngere Centre Park was subject to completion of the park master plan that would inform park development.

22.     Auckland’s current Covid-19 lockdown has prevented completion of the master plan. The master plan will be completed when in-person stakeholder engagement is permitted.

23.     Stakeholder feedback collated prior to lockdown was aligned in that the upgrade of fields one, four and five should be prioritised to maximise outcomes for winter and summer sport as well as informal use.

24.     The original budget of $2 million was based on the upgrade of fields one, two and three.

25.     Cost escalation (refer to Table 2) is a result of the additional earthworks to level the field (roughly indicated by the dotted red line in Image 1) and increased surface area (fields one, four and five instead of one, two and three) being upgraded, that also includes kilikiti/cricket wickets. Budget is now confirmed to be $2,479,129.

26.     Whilst the Māngere Centre Park master plan has not yet been adopted, it has been confirmed that the proposed sports field upgrades fit within all designs to date, and the adopted master plan will reflect this work (Image 1).

Map

Description automatically generated

Image 1: Māngere Centre Park – proposed sports field layout in the draft master plan that is yet to be adopted by the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

 

 

Papatoetoe Recreation Ground

27.     $1.9 million was tagged to the renovation and lighting of fields one and two, which have significant drainage issues (Image 2).

28.     Final project costs (Table 2) have come in under budget but meet the original brief in full.

Image 2: Papatoetoe Recreation Ground – proposed area for sports field and lighting upgrade

Mountfort Park and Manurewa War Memorial Park

29.     Mountfort Park and Manurewa War Memorial Park are both located within the Manurewa Local Board area.

30.     The original sports field investment programme, funded through the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund, included field and lighting upgrades at Mountfort Park.

31.     The 2021 sports field supply and needs analysis (SANS) confirmed there is a need for increased sports field capacity at both Mountfort Park and Manurewa War Memorial Park.

32.     The Manurewa Local Board has allocated an additional $500,000 from renewals and Locally driven initiatives (LDI) capex budget to invest into lighting at Manurewa War Memorial Park (refer to Table 2).

33.     The Manurewa Local Board has requested that a portion of the $1.8 million currently allocated to Mountfort Park, be reallocated towards sports field upgrades at Manurewa War Memorial Park [MR/2021/176].

Image 3 & 4: Mountfort Park (left) and Manurewa War Memorial Park (right) - proposed areas for sports field and lighting upgrade

   

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

34.     Across the $5.7 million sports field investment programme, funded through the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund, there is a mix of projects that have come in over and under budget in final costing.

35.     The budget shortfall at Māngere Centre Park can be met by reallocating budget surplus from the Papatoetoe Recreation Ground and allocating an additional $300,000 from the 2021/2022 Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund.

36.     Updated costings for Mountfort Park (refer to Table 2) show the project will come in under budget.

37.     An opportunity has been identified to add a fourth sports park, Manurewa War Memorial Park, to the programme which would increase floodlit sports field provision through an investment partnership approach with the Manurewa Local Board, who have allocated $500,000 from renewals and LDI capex budget to invest into lighting at Manurewa War Memorial Park [MR/2021/93].

38.     Reallocating the surplus budget from Mountfort Park to Manurewa War Memorial Park, from within the original $1.8 million budget, will increase sports field capacity and better meet the needs of more sports codes and informal park users.

39.     The proposed areas to be upgraded are fields six and seven at Mountfort Park and the designated training area (DTA) at Manurewa War Memorial Park.

Table 2: Confirmed overspend/underspend across all sports field projects

Project

Budget

Confirmed Delivery Cost

Overspend/ Underspend

Māngere Centre Park

$2,000,000

$2,479,129

-$479,129

Papatoetoe Recreation Ground

$1,900,000

$1,720,871

$179,129

Mountfort Park

$1,800,000

$1,389,671

$410,329

Manurewa War Memorial Park

*$500,000

$910,329

-$410,329

2021/2022 Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund

**$300,000

n/a

**$300,000

Total

$6,500,000

$6,500,000

$0

*Confirmed local board budget
**Funding yet to be allocated

 

 

40.     Due to Covid-19 related delays, for grant administration efficiency and to put in place grant process improvements, $4.5 million from the 2021/2022 Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund was deferred to create one $15.3 million contestable funding round in 2022/2023.

41.     This funding round opens 15 November 2021 and grant allocation decisions are scheduled for September 2022.

42.     $300,000 was retained in the 2020/2021 financial year, anticipating some cost escalation within the sports field investment programme, from a variation in scope at Māngere Centre Park.

43.     No alternative options for allocation of the $300,000 have been considered. If unallocated in 2021/2022, the funding would be allocated in a future year of the fund.

44.     Staff have considered three options:

·    Option one: expand the sports field programme to include Manurewa War Memorial Park, and fund the projects as based on detailed costs received and updated understanding of needs

·    Option two: fund the projects to a greater or lesser extent than recommended

·    Option three: fund the projects as per the original indicative cost estimates.

Option One (recommended)

45.     Allocate $300,000 from the 2021/2022 Sport & Recreation Facility Investment Fund to the sports field investment programme, taking the total budget from $5.7 million to $6 million.

46.     Reallocate the sports field investment programme, funded through the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund, as follows:

Table 3: Proposed funding allocation for each project – recommended option

Park

Local board

Allocation

Māngere Centre Park

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

$2,479,129

Papatoetoe Recreation Ground

Ōtara-Papatoetoe

$1,720,871

Mountfort Park

Manurewa

$1,389,671

Manurewa War Memorial Park

Manurewa

$410,329

Total

$6,000,000

 

47.     Analysis of option one – fund the projects as based on detailed costs received and updated understanding of needs.

Table 4: Option one analysis – recommended option

Positives

Negatives

All field and lighting upgrades will be completed at Māngere Centre Park and Papatoetoe Rec by June 2022

Risk that reduced budget for Papatoetoe and Mountfort will be perceived as reduced outcomes. This risk is considered low likelihood and minor impact. No reduced outcomes are planned at either site – both projects will be delivered in full. 

Lighting will be installed at Mountfort Park and Manurewa War Memorial in summer 2021, with field upgrades starting October 2022

 

Leverages an additional $500,000 from the Manurewa Local Board to achieve field upgrade objectives and more strongly aligns with their priorities

 

Option Two

48.     Analysis of option two - fund the projects to a greater or lesser extent than recommended.

Table 5: Option Two Analysis

Positives

Negatives

Potential small financial saving depending on reduction of funding.

A reduction of $300,000 from the Māngere Centre Park budget would be the equivalent removing the lighting from two fields, thereby reducing the capacity by circa 20 hours per week. The return on investment of lights on upgraded fields should be realised where possible.

Option Three

49.     Analysis of option three - fund the projects as per the original indicative cost estimates.

Table 6: Option Three Analysis

Positives

Negatives

Papatoetoe Rec and Mountfort Park would be delivered as planned.

Māngere Centre Park will not be delivered this financial year. It has been shortlisted as a potential training venue for the FIFA Women’s World Cup, so could miss out if groundworks do not get underway this earthworks season.

 

No field upgrade at Manurewa War Memorial Park. Less aligned to direction from the Manurewa Local Board and would result in upgraded lights with limited field quality, reducing the return on investment.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

50.     Environmental impact is a project delivery consideration for Project Managers leading sports field upgrades.

51.     All projects are upgrading soil-based to sand-based fields that will improve drainage.

52.     LED energy saving lights will be used in all lighting projects.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

53.     The advice in this report has been developed by Parks, Sport and Recreation and Community Facilities staff, with support from Local Board Services and Finance.

54.     The advice in this report regarding the FIFA Women’s World Cup has been developed with input from Auckland Unlimited who will manage the programme of training venue upgrades when FIFA have made their final venue selection.


 

 

55.     FIFA have identified Māngere Centre Park as one of ten shortlisted training venues in Auckland for the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023. FIFA and Auckland Unlimited are in the process of costing all venue upgrades against tournament requirements, which will inform final venue selection and budget allocation from multiple funding sources which may include Auckland Unlimited, Auckland Council, Sport New Zealand and MBIE.

56.     Any FIFA tournament related investment into Māngere Centre Park is likely to be tagged to clubroom upgrades and an increase in the lighting level on field one from 200 Lux (council’s community level lighting standard) to 300 Lux.

57.     The provisional cost of that upgrade is around $66,000 and delivery would tie in with the existing project delivery timetable if Māngere Centre Park is selected by FIFA.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

58.     The Manurewa Local Board consider the upgrade of Manurewa War Memorial Park to be a local board priority, including it as their One Local Initiative project, which is now deferred to 2024/2025.

59.     At its 21 October 2021 business meeting, the Manurewa Local Board approved designs for installation of lighting and sand carpet playing surface for Rugby 6 and Rugby 7 fields at Mountfort Park and the Designated Training Area at Manurewa War Memorial Park.

60.     The Manurewa Local Board also directed staff to seek a reallocation of ‘surplus’ budget from Mountfort Park to Manurewa War Memorial Park [MR/2021/176].

61.     The recommendation to split the existing investment across Mountfort Park and Manurewa War Memorial Park better reflects the local boards position, provides improved training facilities for multiple sports and will ensure a better return on investment from the local boards financial commitment, by upgrading fields as well as lights.

62.     Transferring all budget from Mountfort Park to Manurewa War Memorial is not recommended as both have identified community need, the previous funding decision will have raised some community expectation and there remains an opportunity to revisit the One Local Initiative programme in future years.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

63.     Mana whenua were supportive of the potential for positive Māori sport and recreation outcomes when the field upgrades in Māngere, Papatoetoe and Manurewa were originally proposed.

64.     Sport and Recreation staff have attended mana whenua workshops regarding opportunities around the next contestable round of the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund before it goes live on 15 November 2021. Further mana whenua views will come through in that report cycle.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

65.     The fund is a regional budget allocated through the LTP 2018-2028. The fund is budgeted as follows for the next four years:

·    2021/2022 – $300,000 (confirmed – to be allocated by direct award)

·    2022/2023 – $15.3 million (confirmed – to be allocated through contestable grant round)

·    2023/2024 – $15.4 million (provisional – subject to annual budget confirmation)

·    2024/2025 – $17.6 million (provisional – subject to annual budget confirmation)

66.     The fund is operating expenditure (opex). It is normally grant funded towards community-owned facility projects for which council does not have ongoing operational or renewal cost obligations.

67.     The fund can also be invested into council-owned sport and recreation assets, for which council does carry the burden of ongoing operational and renewal cost.

68.     When council builds new or expanded assets it uses capex budgets which include, through each LTP, provision for ongoing operational and renewal costs (i.e. consequential opex). The amount of consequential opex provided for in the LTP includes provision for council’s own capex investment and an assumption from assets that are delivered by third parties and vested to council. 

69.     Use of the fund (opex budget) to deliver council owned assets means that the normal consequential opex provision for council capex investment does not automatically apply. It is necessary to undertake an opex-to-capex conversion in order to secure the consequential opex. This consequential opex can be sourced, on a case-by-case basis, from the vested asset budget.

70.     The previous PACE report endorsed the request that the Finance & Performance Committee approve the change in budget to convert $5.7 million operational budget to capital budget to properly account for the council-led projects.

71.     It is recommended that an opex-to-capex conversion also be applied to the $300,000 allocated from the 2021/2022 Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund.

72.     Staff have estimated that the consequential opex costs arising from the proposed investment are minimal as it is an improvement in assets rather than a new asset.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

73.     If the recommendations in this report are not approved, there is a risk council will not realise its return on investment at Māngere Centre Park as field upgrades will be completed without lighting which will fail to deliver the intended benefit. The community sport need for midweek floodlit training venues was the driver for investment.

74.     In addition, if groundworks at Māngere Centre Park are not progressed within the current earthworks season (ending May 2022) it will not be suitable as a potential training venue for the FIFA Women’s World Cup.

75.     Covid-19 lockdown restrictions are a noted risk, but construction is a permissible activity within the current Covid Alert Level Three.

76.     Delivery delays for specialised lighting are circa 16 weeks at present, however lighting upgrades can be undertaken at any time of the year upon their arrival.

77.     Sports field upgrades will be managed during the summer earthworks window. There are no foreseen issues in terms of delivery timeframes as all equipment and labour is within the Auckland boundary. Project Managers will work closely with suppliers and orders are ready to be processed when budget is approved.

78.     All project budgets contain a contingency of at least 10 per cent, that may not be required. In a worst-case scenario of unforeseen costs the number of light poles could be reduced. This is however unlikely as the Māngere and Papatoetoe project costs are based on tenders received and the Mountfort and Manurewa War Memorial costs are based on detailed design costs with a larger contingency to mitigate risk.

79.     There is a risk that a reduced budget for Papatoetoe and Mountfort will be perceived as reduced outcomes. This risk can be mitigated by clear communication to stakeholders. The original scope at both Papatoetoe and Mountfort was to upgrade two fields and their lights. Both projects will be delivered in full within the budget allocated. Surplus funds are to be redirected to other sports field upgrades.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

80.     Contracts will be signed with contractors for earthworks to begin and lighting orders to be placed on the following projects in summer 2021:

·    Māngere Centre Park (fields and lighting)

·    Papatoetoe Recreation Ground (fields and lighting)

·    Mountfort Park (lighting)

·    Manurewa War Memorial Park (lighting).

81.     Detailed design will be carried out for field upgrades at Mountfort Park and Manurewa War Memorial Park in early 2022, for field upgrades to start in October 2022.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Nick Harris - Sport & Recreation Team Lead

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

11 November 2021

 

Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2020-2021: Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report 2020-2021

File No.: CP2021/16555

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the annual Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report: Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2020-2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report 2020-2021 shows how the council group is contributing to the 10 mana outcomes of Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, and the LTP 10-year budget priorities.

3.       The council group published its first Māori Outcomes Report in 2019. This third edition flows on from earlier reports and provides information on performance, including how the council group has been supporting a Māori response and recovery from COVID-19. Each report aims to provide a comprehensive picture of annual progress to decision makers across the council group, Māori partners, elected members, leaders in governance, and whānau Māori.

4.       Highlights for the 2020-2021 year include:

·    Approval by PACE Committee of ‘Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau – a Māori outcomes performance measurement framework’

·    Support for Māori led COVID-19 response and recovery initiatives through the Manaaki Fund 2020 which saw a total of $2.9m granted

·    The Māori Outcomes Fund achieving its highest ever annual spend of $17.6 million

·    Toi o Tāmaki / Auckland Art Gallery hosting the Toi Tū Toi Ora exhibition which was the largest exhibition in the 132-year history of the Gallery. Toi Tū Toi Ora received a record number of Māori visitors and showcased several up and coming and established Māori artists.

5.       A key learning for the year is the need to move towards a Māori-led funding approach by partnering with Māori organisations with similar aspirations and outcomes. Work is underway on this through a Māori led initiatives fund.

6.       Separate to the annual Māori outcomes report is the 6-monthly measures report for Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau. The inaugural measures report for the July 2021 – Dec 2021 period will be presented to the PACE committee in the new year.

7.       The Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report: Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2020-2021 will be publicly published with copies distributed to key partners including mana whenua iwi and mataawaka entities.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      receive the annual Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report: Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2020-2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2020-2021: Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report

119

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lou-Ann Ballantyne - Head of Māori Strategic Outcomes

Authoriser

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

11 November 2021

 




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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

11 November 2021

 

Te Kete Rukuruku site selection - Māori Naming of Regional Parks

File No.: CP2021/16102

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To confirm the scope, considerations and recommendations for Māori naming of regional parks using Te Kete Rukuruku (TKR) process, a Māori naming and storytelling programme.

2.       To confirm the intention to invite mana whenua to provide Māori names as dual names for six regional parks and a sole Māori name for Ōmana Regional Park.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       In September 2018 the Environment and Community Committee resolved (ENV/2018/114) to endorse in principle the inclusion of regional parks and cemeteries in the Te Kete Rukuruku (TKR) programme.

4.       This decision was in accordance with policy in the current Regional Parks Management Plan 2010 that identifies the reinstatement of traditional Māori names.

5.       In August 2021 a workshop was held with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) committee to outline the TKR process and provide research on known history of seven existing English park names. Additional information has been identified since the September workshop and a full summary is included as Attachment A.

6.       In addition, mana whenua requested that Ōmana Regional Park be included in the first tranche for renaming as Ōmana is not the full and correct Māori name for that site.

7.       At the workshop PACE supported the inclusion of eight sites, including Ōmana Regional Park, being considered for naming as tranche one and expressed a preference for dual naming where a Māori name is added to the existing English name.

8.       Subsequent to the workshop it has been confirmed that council has a binding agreement to retain the name of Scandrett Regional Park and further discussion is required with both the Scandrett family and mana whenua prior to this site being selected for Māori naming.

9.       Consultation with key park stakeholders indicates support for dual naming.

10.     It is recommended that seven of the eight parks are included as part of the TKR programme for Māori naming in the first tranche, noting that six parks will have dual names and one park will have a sole Māori name.

11.     The Draft Regional Parks Management Plan is due to go out for public consultation in December 2021. Should the committee resolve to adopt dual Māori names and correct sole Māori names this information can be included within the draft plan and the public informed through the management plan process.

12.     A mātauranga agreement is being developed that commits Auckland Council to upholding the correct use of Māori names and to use them only for purposes of community outreach or education.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      endorse the Te Kete Rukuruku programme and process for Māori naming of regional parks, noting that it supports the visibility of te reo Māori and seeks to capture and tell the unique stories of Tāmaki Makaurau

b)      invite mana whenua to provide a Māori name and narrative for the following parks and reserves;

·    Ambury Regional Park

·    Duder Regional Park

·    Glenfern Sanctuary

·    Long Bay Regional Park

·    Ōmana Regional Park

·    Shakespear Regional Park

·    Wenderholm Regional Park

c)       support further discussions with the Scandrett family and mana whenua with a view to including Scandrett Regional Park for dual naming in a subsequent tranche

d)      note that it is expected the Māori names will be adopted by the committee for use as dual names to enrich the stories of our parks and support the Māori language to be visible, heard, spoken and learned, with the exception of Ōmana Regional Park where a sole Māori name will be adopted

e)      acknowledge the intent for Auckland Council to enter a mātauranga agreement that commits to upholding the correct use of Māori names and to use them only for purposes that have a community outreach or educational purpose (non-commercial use).

 

Horopaki

Context

13.     Te Kete Rukuruku is a culture and identity programme that collects and tells the unique Māori stories of Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland. A subset of this programme is the Māori naming of parks and places, which involves the reclamation or identification of Māori names and narratives across Tāmaki Makaurau. It is a partnership between Auckland Council and all 19 mana whenua groups that have interests across the region, led by mana whenua.

14.     A key outcome of the programme is for te reo Māori to be seen, heard, learned and spoken. The programme contributes to reclaiming our Māori identity and strengthening our relationships with mana whenua.

15.     In 2020/2021 a total of 242 Māori names were adopted for local parks in Whau, Manurewa, Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Waitākere Ranges, Henderson-Massey and Ōtara-Papatoetoe local board areas. Work continues with mana whenua on naming in other local board areas currently in the TKR programme.

16.     In September 2018 the Environment and Community Committee resolved (ENV/2018/114) to endorse in principle the inclusion of regional parks and cemeteries in the TKR programme.


 

17.     Mana whenua have the mātauranga and the mana for deciding on appropriate Māori names for the whenua and these names should not be subject to public debate. If the committee do not consider it appropriate for a site to receive a Māori name, then iwi should not be invited to name it.

18.     Once the parks are confirmed by formal resolution and mana whenua are invited to provide Māori names the committee enters a partnership with iwi and commits to adoption of the names as received.

19.     The adoption of dual or sole Māori names supports and delivers on multiple council policies and plans including:

a.   the Auckland Plan outlining council’s commitment to support te Reo to flourish

b.   council’s Long-term Plan 2021-2031 strategic priority of the promotion of te reo Māori

c.   the Māori Language Policy whose actions include increasing bilingual signage and dual naming.

20.     Auckland Council’s Māori Language Policy was adopted by the Governing Body in 2016 (resolution number REG/2016/89). The policy recognises council’s commitment to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi. It notes that the Māori language and culture forms a critical part of a Māori identity. Reclaiming or identifying Māori names for parks provides a significant opportunity to fulfil the policy intent.

21.     The Māori Language Policy acknowledges that te reo Māori is an official language of Aotearoa and should receive equal status to English and NZ Sign Language.

22.     The Māori Plan 2017 and Issues of Significance (IMSB) states for “Greater value to be placed on Māori culture including marae and te reo Māori”. Actions include reviewing policy to rename, co-name and create new names for sites to reflect Māori heritage and history.

23.     The current Regional Parks Management Plan 2010 identifies the reinstatement of traditional Māori names within the following policies:

·    Policy 9.1.1 d) v) reinstating traditional names for a park, part of a park or a park feature in accordance with policy 15.1.8

·    Policy 13.2.5.2 Give priority to providing on-site interpretation where it:

c) increases awareness and understanding of tangata whenua values and their historic connection to the park in accordance with policy 9.1.1

·    Policy 15.1.8 Reinstate traditional names, or rename a park, part of a park or a park feature in accordance with policy 15.1.4 where:

a) the current name has not been formally adopted or a previous decision has overlooked significant occupation history or events associated with the park

·    Policy 15.1.9 Consider dual names for parks, features and facilities.

TKR is a Māori naming programme for council’s parks and places

24.     The scope of the TKR programme, and particularly the Māori naming of parks and places, is defined as the naming, renaming or dual naming of parks and places throughout Tāmaki Makaurau.

25.     The programme recognises there was a rich layer of Māori names that existed across Tāmaki Makaurau. It provides an opportunity for Aucklander’s to learn te Reo, Māori history and Māori values relevant to places throughout Tāmaki Makaurau.

26.     It is expected that, in most cases, Māori naming will be dual naming. Dual naming means that a Māori name is added to the existing name thereby enriching the stories about that place or facility without taking anything away. For the public this means signage will present both names with the English name following the Māori name. This is in accordance with council’s Māori language policy and signage guidelines.

27.     Dual naming also means that a Māori name sits alongside another name that is not related in its meaning. In other words, the two names are not translations of each other but independent and unique.

28.     TKR does not include the physical signage as part of the programme scope. Once names are adopted signage will be replaced, primarily as part of the existing renewal programme.

Overview of naming process

29.     The naming process can be broadly summarised into six steps:

i)       Select parks to be named and undertake any necessary consultation with community groups and stakeholders.

ii)       Committee confirm the list of parks and reserves to be named through formal resolution.

iii)      The confirmed list of sites is provided to iwi who will discuss and agree on who will name each park.

iv)      Iwi undertake their own research and provide a name and a narrative outlining the meaning or story behind the name. The name may be an ancestral name that has been attached to that area prior to European occupation or it could be a contemporary name often relating to historical activities or geographical features.

v)      The names are presented to the committee by mana whenua at a ‘hui tuku ingoa’. This is an opportunity to hear about the names and the stories behind them directly from iwi. This is not a public meeting and is intended to strengthen relationships and understanding between council and mana whenua.

vi)      A report is presented at a committee meeting for formal adoption of the Māori names. The names are entered into Auckland Council’s website and gazetted. Stakeholders are advised of the new names and events to inform and celebrate the names with the community may be held.

Gazettal

30.     The council, as landowner, can name parks and places by resolution through the exercise of its power of general competence under section 12 of the Local Government Act.

31.     Where the land is vested in council and held as reserve under the Reserves Act the council may name or change the name of a reserve by notice in the Gazette (s16(10) Reserves Act).

32.     As part of the TKR process any sites subject to the Reserves Act will be gazetted following adoption.

Communication and consultation

33.     Any decision regarding the naming of a park must be made in accordance with the decision-making requirements in Part 6 of the Local Government Act 2002. Part 6 requires consideration of the views and preferences of people likely to be affected by or have an interest in the decision. There is discretion on how to fulfil this requirement which is likely to be proportional to the significance of the matter under consideration.

34.     Dual naming previously undertaken by TKR has not often involved consultation with the public as nothing is being taken away. Where an existing name is being removed and sole naming considered a more consultative approach is advised.

35.     The regional parks team has contacted key stakeholders and families associated with the eight parks being considered for naming and this feedback is shown in table one.

36.     Further public consultation will not be undertaken by TKR or mana whenua as part of the naming process. It is not appropriate for the Māori names to become the subject of public debate.

37.     A new draft Regional Parks Management Plan is intended to be released for public consultation in December 2021 once endorsed by the PACE committee. This is an opportunity to inform the public about any decision made by the committee to seek the addition of Māori names to regional parks.

38.     Once names are adopted, communications plans are developed to engage Aucklanders in these stories. Through this we:

·    support Aucklanders to possess a greater knowledge of the Māori narrative in Tāmaki Makaurau 

·    increase pride in this unique identity and engender greater understanding and appreciation of the region’s Māori whakapapa.

39.     A key objective is to show how this programme brings to life the council’s broader plan of ensuring more te reo Māori is seen, heard and spoken across the region and to showcase the rich Māori history of Tāmaki Makaurau.

40.     Community events may be organised in liaison with Regional Parks, TKR and Council’s Civic Events team to acknowledge, celebrate and publicise the adoption of the names.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

41.     In August 2021 a workshop was held with PACE to outline the TKR process and provide a list of potential sites with associated research on existing names.

42.     Seven regional parks currently have English only names and these were identified as a logical starting point for introduction of Māori names:

·        Ambury Regional Park - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

·        Duder Regional Park - Franklin

·        Glenfern Sanctuary - Aotea / Great Barrier

·        Long Bay Regional Park - Hibiscus and Bays

·        Scandrett Regional Park - Rodney

·        Shakespear Regional Park - Hibiscus and Bays

·        Wenderholm Regional Park – Rodney

43.     Mana whenua requested that Ōmana Regional Park also be included in the first tranche of sites for naming. Ōmana is an abbreviation of the ancestral name of the pā site that was located here.

44.     Direction provided at this workshop included:

·    support for the progression of Māori naming through the TKR process

·    a preference for dual naming where the English name is retained

·    support for eight regional parks as the proposed scope for the first tranche

·    confirmation that consultation with key park stakeholders, including the families who have historical connections with the existing names, should occur

·    a report be presented to PACE for a decision on the inclusion of these eight parks in the TKR Māori naming programme.

45.     Engagement with key stakeholders has been undertaken by the regional parks team over the last two months and no opposition was received to the addition of Māori names to the existing English names. Feedback is outlined in table one below.

 

 

Table One

Regional Park

Comments

AMBURY

 

Ambury Pony Club

No concerns with dual name.

Friends of the Farm

Generally supportive, written confirmation pending.

Ambury Riding Centre (Riding for the Disabled)

No concerns with name change. Sought confirmation that it wouldn’t impact their name.

DUDER

 

Duder family

Would like the Duder name to be first before the Māori name. Requested the name Whakakaiwhara be considered in reference to the headland pā.

GLENFERN

 

Glenfern Sanctuary Trust and Ngāti Rehua Ngātiwai ki Aotea

There has been a series of hui between mana whenua, Glenfern Sanctuary Trust, Aotea/Great Barrier Local Board and council staff on the draft Regional Parks Management Plan (RPMP). The renaming of the park was discussed during this process.

They all support Māori naming for Glenfern Sanctuary continuing within the draft RPMP process.

ŌMANA

 

Graham Strachan (previous owner)

No concerns with the full Māori name being considered.

LONG BAY

 

Long Bay Okura Great Parks Society

No response received.

Torbay Historical Society

In favour of adoption of a Māori name as a dual name. Would like the English name to come first.

SCANDRETT

 

Joan Scandrett

Supportive of dual naming provided the name “Scandrett” comes first.

Other Scandrett family members

No additional feedback from other family members has been received.

SHAKESPEAR

 

Defence

No response received.

Y Lodge

Favourable response to the addition of a Māori name as a dual name.

Water Care

No response received.

SOSSI

Verbal favourable response at a SOSSI meeting. Raised concern over any additional costs associated with a new name.

WENDERHOLM

 

Friends of Couldrey House

Favourable response from Secretary. Further feedback pending.

 

46.     Consultation with stakeholders indicates that dual naming of the sites is generally supported.

47.     Additional information has been obtained regarding the histories of the existing English names since the workshop (refer to Attachment A).

48.     The Duder family, the Scandrett family and the Torbay Historical Society have requested that the English name precede the Māori name, but this is not supported by council policy or TKR naming guidelines.

49.     Auckland Councils Māori Language Policy 2016 stipulates that the Māori language shall precede English with exceptions generally only being considered for health and safety reasons. 

50.     The sale and purchase agreement for Scandrett Regional Park includes a requirement for council to retain that name.

51.     The Scandrett family’s support of a dual name is subject to their family name appearing before the Māori name. This is not consistent with council policy and TKR are unable to recommend such an exception.

52.     There is no obligation or legal requirement for council to retain the Duder name. Please refer to Attachment A for more details. The wishes of the family are acknowledged, and it is recommended that the family name is retained but it should be consistent with council policy with the Māori name first.

53.     Similarly, for Long Bay Regional Park council policy would be followed for dual naming with the English following the Māori name.

54.     We have not identified any legal requirements to retain the existing English names for any of the regional parks except for Scandrett Regional Park.

55.     Further public feedback on whether the names are adopted as sole names or dual names could be sought as part of the draft management plan consultation process. However, as stakeholder feedback strongly indicates a preference for dual names, it is not recommended to consider removal of the English names at this time.

56.     TKR recommend that:

a)   Māori names be adopted for six regional parks for use as dual Māori/English names to enrich the stories of our parks and support the Māori language to be visible, heard, spoken and learned, with

b)   a sole Māori name being adopted for Ōmana as this park has no existing English name.

57.     We do not recommend the inclusion of Scandrett Regional Park in the first tranche for the following reasons:

·    There is a legal obligation for council to retain the name of Scandrett Regional Park.

·    The Scandrett family’s support of a dual name is conditional on the English name preceding the Māori name which is inconsistent with council policy and TKR guidelines.

·    Robust discussion with mana whenua has not been able to occur prior to this report being written.

58.     It is recommended that further discussion occur with the Scandrett family and mana whenua to consider the inclusion of Scandrett Regional Park in a subsequent tranche.

 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

59.     There are no substantive climate change impacts relating to this project.

60.     The inclusion on signage of Māori names of parks adopted through the TKR programme is planned to align with signage renewal projects, or by re-skinning when necessary. This minimises environmental impacts and unnecessary wastage of resource.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

61.     The Te Kete Rukuruku project is a regional programme that delivers on council’s Māori Language Policy and Kia Ora Te Reo, which is a priority within Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, the organisations’ Māori Outcome Performance Management Framework.  It also delivers on Kia Ora Te Ahurea (the Māori culture and identity outcomes) as the programme helps to reclaim our Māori identity and unique point of difference in the world.

62.     The programme aligns with the aspirations of the Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB) as articulated in the Schedule of Issues of Significance 2017, Māori Plan.

63.     Te Kete Rukuruku facilitates a partnership between council and iwi with the naming and narratives being led by mana whenua. It seeks to bring rigour to the process of naming across the council group over time. 

64.     The programme has also triggered the development of new bilingual signage templates that may be used across the organisation in the future.

65.     Whilst led by the TKR, this naming mahi is supported by the Regional Parks team who have undertaken consultation with regional park stakeholders and have allocated budget for the project’s implementation.

66.     Parks, Sport and Recreation Portfolio Managers provide additional support acting as a conduit between local boards and the project team as required. The naming programme contributes towards multiple cros