I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Planning Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 30 November 2021

10.00am

This meeting will be held remotely and can be

viewed on the Auckland Council website:

https://councillive.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

 

 

Kōmiti Whakarite Mahere / Planning Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Chris Darby

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Josephine Bartley

 

Members

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

Cr Tracy Mulholland

 

Deputy Mayor Cr Bill Cashmore

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Pippa Coom

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Angela Dalton

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Alf Filipaina

Cr John Watson

 

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

IMSB Member Karen Wilson

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

Cr Paul Young

 

IMSB Member Hon Tau Henare

 

 

Cr Shane Henderson

 

 

Cr Richard Hills

 

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

Kalinda Iswar

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

25 November 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 723 228

Email: kalinda.iswar@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 


 


 

Terms of Reference

 

Responsibilities

 

This committee guides the physical development and growth of Auckland through a focus on land use, transport and infrastructure strategies and policies relating to planning, growth, housing and the appropriate provision of enabling infrastructure, as well as programmes and strategic projects associated with these activities. The committee will establish an annual work programme outlining key focus areas in line with its key responsibilities, which include:

 

·       relevant regional strategy and policy

·       transportation

·       infrastructure strategy and policy

·       Unitary Plan, including plan changes (but not any wholesale review of the Plan)

·       Resource Management Act and relevant urban planning legislation framework

·       oversight of Council’s involvement in central government strategies, plans or initiatives that impact on Auckland’s future land use and infrastructure

·       Auckland Plan implementation reporting on priorities and performance measures

·       structure plans and spatial plans

·       housing policy and projects

·       city centre and waterfront development

·       regeneration and redevelopment programmes

·       built and cultural heritage, including public art

·       urban design

·       acquisition of property relating to the committee’s responsibilities and in accordance with the LTP

·       working with and receiving advice from the Heritage Advisory Panel, the Rural Advisory Panel and the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board to give visibility to the issues important to the communities they represent and to help effect change.

 

Powers

 

(i)      All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities, including:

(a)     approval of a submission to an external body

(b)     establishment of working parties or steering groups.

(ii)      The committee has the powers to perform the responsibilities of another committee, where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee.

(iii)     If a policy or project relates primarily to the responsibilities of the Planning Committee, but aspects require additional decisions by the Environment and Climate Change Committee and/or the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee, then the Planning Committee has the powers to make associated decisions on behalf of those other committee(s). For the avoidance of doubt, this means that matters do not need to be taken to more than one of those committees for decisions.

(iii)     The committee does not have:

(a)     the power to establish subcommittees

(b)     powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2).

 

Code of conduct

 

For information relating to Auckland Council’s elected members code of conduct, please refer to this link on the Auckland Council website - https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/elected-members-remuneration-declarations-interest/Pages/elected-members-code-conduct.aspx

Auckland Plan Values

 

The Auckland Plan 2050 outlines a future that all Aucklanders can aspire to. The values of the Auckland Plan 2050 help us to understand what is important in that future:

 

 


 

Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·         Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·         Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·         Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·         In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·         The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·         However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·         All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·         Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·         Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·         All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·         Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·         Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·         Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 


Planning Committee

30 November 2021

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                 9

2          Declaration of Interest                                          9

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         9

4          Petitions                                                                 9  

5          Public Input                                                           9

5.1     Public Input: Herne Bay Residents Association - Residential developments encroaching council sanded beaches      9

5.2     Public Input: Herne Bay Residents Association - Helicopter noise and other matters                                                        10

5.3     Public Input: Elena Keith - Helicopter noise and associated environmental effects                                                         10

6          Local Board Input                                               10

7          Extraordinary Business                                     11

8          City Centre Lead – Implementation of the City Centre Masterplan 2020                                     13

9          The proposed approach to update Auckland's Future Development Strategy                           21

10        Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) - Private Plan Change request: Golding Meadows Developments Ltd and Auckland Trotting Club Inc to rezone land between Station Rd and Golding Rd, Pukekohe (Covering report)                                                29

11        Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) - Making operative Plan Change 52 (Private) 520 Great South Road, Papakura                             33

12        Summary of Planning Committee information items and briefings (including the forward work programme) – 30 November 2021           73

13        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

                        

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Planning Committee:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 4 November 2021 as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

5.1       Public Input: Herne Bay Residents Association - Residential developments encroaching council sanded beaches

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Don Mathieson of the Herne Bay Residents Association will address the committee about residential developments encroaching council sanded beaches. The association says that these activities create a precedent for all other beach properties to extend their buildings on to the public areas on the beach and should not be approved.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning Committee:

a)      receive the public input from the Herne Bay Residents Association regarding residential developments encroaching council sanded beaches and thank
Don Mathieson for attending.

 


 

 

5.2       Public Input: Herne Bay Residents Association - Helicopter noise and other matters

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Dirk Hudig of the Herne Bay Residents Association will address the committee about helicopter noise and other matters including rotor backwash and sea-spray to nearby properties. The association says that these effects aren’t adequately considered when applications for heliports are made despite their non-complying activity status in the Auckland Unitary Plan.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning Committee:

a)      receive the public input from the Herne Bay Residents Association regarding helicopter noise and other matters and thank Dirk Hudig for attending.

 

 

5.3       Public Input: Elena Keith - Helicopter noise and associated environmental effects

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Elena Keith, on behalf of a group of Westmere residents, will address the committee about helicopter noise and associated environmental effects.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning Committee:

a)      receive the public input regarding helicopter noise and the associated environmental effects on the community of Westmere and thank Elena Keith for attending the meeting.

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.


 

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Planning Committee

30 November 2021

 

City Centre Lead – Implementation of the City Centre Masterplan 2020

File No.: CP2021/17025

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report seeks endorsement of Eke Panuku as the lead agency for the implementation of the City Centre Masterplan 2020 by adding the city centre to the Eke Panuku Waterfront Transform location.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The city centre is the region’s largest long term urban regeneration project. Guided by the City Centre Masterplan’s vision ‘to ensure the heart of our city remains a vibrant, bountiful place for everyone’, significant investment has been made, and is planned for, the city centre over many years.

3.       The transformational moves within the City Centre Masterplan direct our substantial capital programme, which is working to make the city centre more accessible, connected, attractive and prosperous while supporting mana whenua presence and Māori identity into the city centre and waterfront.

4.       Despite this, the city centre is currently facing several challenges including ongoing disruption from development and infrastructure projects, the negative impacts of COVID-19 restrictions and common concerns about the experience of the city centre as an attractive and safe place to visit and live.

5.       Additionally, many of the improvement activities occurring in the city centre may appear to be occurring in isolation from one another giving rise to calls from a range of stakeholders for a more integrated approach across the council group and a clear articulation of how the vision for the city centre will be delivered over time.

6.       Staff from across the council group have developed and analysed options for the future leadership and placemaking of the city centre and how implementation of the City Centre Masterplan 2020 might best be led.

7.       Following exploration of options this report proposes that Eke Panuku becomes the lead agency for implementation of the City Centre Masterplan 2020.

8.       This lead agency role for implementation of the masterplan will mean the establishment and leadership of city centre matrix teams drawn from across Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited and Eke Panuku. These teams will be resourced to focus on the city centre, utilising existing skills from across the council group under Eke Panuku established capability and governance. 

9.       This recommendation is consistent with the CCO review which recommended we appoint a single agency to lead and coordinate joint programmes of this nature. The City Centre would effectively be added to the Transform Waterfront location, without negatively impacting on Eke Panuku’s existing work programme.

10.     The Council's 10-year Budget 2021-2031 includes approximately $540 million funding for the city centre over the next 10 years. This excludes funding allocated to the waterfront / Wynyard Quarter programme. If the recommendation is endorsed by the committee, it would mean key infrastructure projects, such as the Wai Horotiu Queen Street Project, Te Hā Noa Linear Park and Wellesley Street bus improvements, will continue to be delivered by the appropriate agency in the Council Group but will be part of a more integrated approach led by Eke Panuku.

11.     If the recommendation is supported, staff will work collaboratively to establish an integrated city centre matrix team led by Eke Panuku. Staff in the matrix will remain in their home roles and the team will work collaboratively to strengthen overall delivery outcomes,

12.     There will be a review of the City Centre Executive Steering Group terms of reference to clarify its role, senior membership and responsibilities.  Communication and engagement will be undertaken with key city centre stakeholders and mana whenua.

13.     Maintaining momentum on key projects will remain a focus to avoid any delivery risk.  The recommendation in this report also represents an opportunity to build on the significant progress we have already made in the city centre and continues the collaborative approach we have taken to date with other collaborative projects such as the Downtown and waterfront programmes, with different partners taking the lead.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Planning Committee:

a)      endorse Eke Panuku as the lead agency for the implementation of the City Centre Masterplan 2020, by adding the city centre to the Eke Panuku Waterfront Transform location.

b)      note that a city centre matrix team will be established, led by Eke Panuku, using primarily existing staff from across the council group.

Horopaki

Context

14.     The City Centre Masterplan 2020 is the vision to ensure the heart of our city remains a vibrant, bountiful place for everyone. It commits Auckland to eight big ideas for change or transformational moves which guide a significant capital investment programme across the council group.

15.     The significant implementation and delivery programme to date has delivered great value and improvement to the city centre. This has included delivery of The Downtown Programme, Te Wananga, Karangahape Rd, the Britomart Precinct, Te Komititanga, Albert St, AC36 infrastructure with a combined investment of about $700 million, excluding City Rail Link and the waterfront / Wynyard programmes.

16.     These transformational programmes are working to make the city centre more accessible, connected, attractive and prosperous while supporting mana whenua presence and Māori identity into the city centre and waterfront.

17.     Various parts of the Auckland Council group deliver on the extensive change programme including the Development Programme Office, Plans and Places, Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku, Auckland Unlimited, Watercare and others. Some projects and programmes, like the Waterfront and Downtown programmes have delivered excellent outcomes through collaboration. There is an opportunity to build on these existing models of collaboration to better deliver on the city centre masterplan.

The City Centre is experiencing tough times and usage is changing

18.     However, these programmes are not occurring without disruption and times are tough for the city centre’s residents, businesses, workers, students and visitors. The ongoing disruption from development and infrastructure projects are compounded by the negative impacts of COVID-19 restrictions and common concerns, about the experience of the city centre as an attractive and safe place to visit and live, continue to rise.


 

19.     The city centre is suffering from the impact of COVID-19, with the loss of so many workers, students and visitors cumulatively. While we do not yet understand what the long run impacts of COVID-19 will be on the city centre it is probable that the pace of change has happened faster than would have been expected prior to COVID-19. For example, it is likely that more office workers will work at home more often than previously, leading to changing business usage over time.  

20.     In parallel over the last few years there have been some important changes and considerations which have informed this review including that:

·   The city centre is home to many residents from a range of socio-economic backgrounds.

·   There has been a decline in tourists, cruise, and international students.

·   Trends, accelerated by COVID-19 such as working from home and online shopping, are leading to further decline in domestic visits and numbers of people working and visiting the city centre.

·   Increasing competition for Midtown from suburban malls, Wynyard Quarter, Commercial Bay and Britomart.

·   Businesses are reporting hardship and low turn over

·   Significant works have been completed but more planned for delivery over short and medium term with associated disruption and ongoing change and uncertainty.

·   Extensive “private sector” development and construction has and is occurring alongside significant public construction projects and real disruption is occurring in what feels like a concentrated period.

·   Stakeholders are seeking better communication, support, and activation of the place.

·   A need to demonstrate care in the delivery of the funded programmes

·   Stakeholders are seeking a better understanding of how the city centre functions – show how the various projects combine to make the city centre work

·   There are increasing issues with antisocial behaviour and safety, traffic congestion and air pollution and there is concern about the experience of the city centre as a place.

·   A strong political commitment to delivery of the adopted vision (the CCMP 2020) but an equal concern about over investment in the centre to the detriment of other parts of the city and heightened funding constraints generally.

·   Strongly held, polarised and vocal views of the future city centre.

·   A view that we could do better as a group in terms of the overall, integrated execution of the plan (CCMP), and a desire for a more comprehensive ‘place based’ approach.

·   Even after last year’s lockdowns there is still strong demand for quality office space in the city, for the city centre offering in terms of dining and the city centre and waterfront experience that will be further bolstered by the return of tourism and cruise ships in time

·   There is an expectation that the learning quarter will come back to life with the return of students and staff to the universities

·   The city centre will recover strongly in due course after the COVID-19 restrictions and as investment and construction projects are completed

·   The city centre has an important and valuable role in a range of areas including business, recreation and tourism, residential, culture and learning. This role will recover, and its success will continue to be critical at both a regional and national level

·   There is an opportunity to build on the significant progress we have already made in the city centre and continue the collaborative approach we have taken to date.


How do we best organise ourselves to help meet the outcomes of the City Centre Masterplan 2020?

21.     Taking into consideration the various factors at play in the city centre and its current state the time is right to consider how we can truly unlock the potential of the city centre and help to meet the outcomes of the City Centre Masterplan 2020.

22.     Senior leaders from the council group including the Development Programme Office (DPO), Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited and Eke Panuku have been considering how the council might apply a more placed-based approach to moving the vision of the City Centre Master Plan forward over the long term. This includes delivering the many plans, projects and initiatives currently underway in this area.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Scope – City Centre Master Plan implementation programme

23.     The geographic area covered by the City Centre Master Plan (CCMP) defines the spatial scope of the City Centre Programme. In physical boundaries terms this covers the area between the motorways and harbour edge.

24.     The scope of works covers the planning, delivery, place and change management associated with delivering the CCMP, combined with the associated activation, communication and engagement. 

25.     Out of scope is operational management such as cleaning, maintenance, renewals, and safety work although it requires close cooperation and an avenue for escalation of issues. Key strategic and statutory planning for the city centre will continue to be led by Council, such as the CCMP itself, Future of the Port, NPS UD and Unitary Plan work.

Problem definition

26.     As outlined in the context section, alongside the current challenges in the city centre, there is a need for strengthened overall leadership to champion the city centre vision across the Auckland Council group.  This will ensure an integrated approach which supports a vibrant, bountiful place for everyone, delivers on the transformational moves within the City Centre Masterplan 2020 and strengthens trust and confidence in the council group.

Options analysis

27.     In addition to the status quo (no change), two broad options were considered to improve the approach to City Centre transformation and place management including an enhanced status quo and establishing Eke Panuku as the lead.   These options are described and analysed in the following paragraphs below.

Additional Option 1: Enhanced status quo

28.     This option builds on the existing arrangement to strengthen the level of coordination across the council teams and CCOs working across the city centre programme.  A small additional resource (to be met from within existing budgets) would work across the council group to support this more strongly integrated approach, ensure all elements of the programme are working well together and all elements are sufficiently resourced from programme and project delivery to place making, communications and engagement. Staff would remain within their respective organisations with an expectation of collaboration on city centre projects and initiatives. 

29.     In this option the mandate and role of the City Centre Executive Steering Group (CCESG) would be enhanced to direct and support cross council group collaboration to achieve joined up planning, delivery and communicating the overall city centre story. The CCESG would have senior managers from council and the CCOs represented. 

30.     This option would see an improvement in leadership, additional resource and capability and achieve a more joined up council group approach, with minimal operational impact. However, as collaboration would be on an informal basis there are some risks in terms of low buy-in and communication. 

Additional Option 2: Eke Panuku lead agency

31.     In this option City Centre leadership would be mandated to Eke Panuku, the City’s regeneration agency, who would be given accountability for leading implementation of the City Centre Masterplan through the establishment of an integrated city centre team, co-located at Eke Panuku offices, where practicable. In this option the city centre will be added to Eke Panuku’s Waterfront Transform location. 

32.     Staff from across the Council group would be accountable to leadership at Eke Panuku in terms of reporting against programmes, communication, and collaboration. This option will not require organisational reporting line changes. Rather an integrated matrix team will be established with matrix reporting lines to the programme led by Eke Panuku. A co-location space will be created, and this integrated team will draw on the current skills and resources across the council group.

33.     City centre governance across the group will be a key element to the success of this programme. To provide senior oversight, achieve integration and issue resolution, a version of the CCESG would be retained with whom the new city centre team would work.

34.     A steering group would guide plans and provide direction for the implementation of the city centre masterplan, convened by Eke Panuku. Decision making for investment and rates follow the existing mechanisms and these decision-making processes do not change:

·   Eke Panuku will follow its governance and decision-making framework through to its Board.

·   Decisions in relation to specific projects such as Auckland Transport (AT) works will follow their governance and decision-making process.

·   Auckland Council projects and programmes and funding will remain the decision making of the governing body and reported as appropriate.

·   However, all council group entities and projects will follow one integrated strategy and plan for the city centre led by Eke Panuku and approved by its Board to give effect to the City Centre Masterplan 2020. 

35.     As is the case currently with Eke Panuku programmes, regular reporting will be provided through to the council’s CCO committee and matters of planning and regeneration significance to the Planning Committee. City centre reporting will also occur through existing council reporting mechanisms, such and Finance and Performance, as required.

Preferred option and benefits

36.     The city centre is a major regeneration location in conjunction with the waterfront. It is clear that while a significant amount of work and effort is going into the various projects, programmes and initiatives in the city centre, greater effort to coordinate connect and communicate these projects and how they deliver on the vision of the City Centre Masterplan is needed.

37.     Additional option one will only get the council group and city centre small gains while additional option two - Eke Panuku as lead agency - formalises an integrated matrix team approach and sets clear expectations for more coordinated delivery and better outcomes for the city centre. In addition, additional option two gives effect to the 2020 CCO review which recommends a clear lead agency with strong cross council group collaboration where there is a major place-based programme involving multiple entities from across the group


 

38.     Additional option two – establishing Eke Panuku as the lead agency for implementation of the City Centre Masterplan 2020 is the recommended option. It will ensure a clear lead agency with mandate and accountability which is focused on town centre regeneration with associated governance, skills and capacity drawing on much of the current skills and resource across the council group.

39.     An integrated team focused on the city centre will have a number of benefits including:

·   Enable greater and more integrated City Centre Masterplan implementation over the longer term

·   An integrated matrix team, properly resourced and focused on the city centre

·   Strong design leadership and place management focus

·   Utilising skill sets across the council group as well as established Eke Panuku processes, skill sets and mandate, and the existing governance (the reconfigured CCESG, Eke Panuku Board)

·   Bring the largest urban regeneration project into the council’s urban regeneration programme led by Eke Panuku, alongside the Waterfront Transform location.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

40.     This proposal has no climate impact beyond supporting the implementation of the City Centre Masterplan 2020 and the relevant actions in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan for the city centre, enabling growth and supporting sustainable building and transport. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

41.     Senior representatives from across the council group including Council, Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku and Auckland Unlimited have worked collaboratively to shape the detail of the options and recommendation.

42.     If the recommendation is adopted senior representatives from the council group will take time to flesh out the detail of this change proposal to ensure we achieve the benefits envisaged and work together to transition to this new approach.   

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

43.     The key change is to establish clear leadership and accountability on behalf of the council group. It does not change the plans, aspirations or funded programme for the city centre.

44.     If the recommendation is adopted engagement with Ward Councillors, the Waitematā Local Board, the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board and key stakeholders will be undertaken jointly by the council group.

45.     The proposal sees a focus on collaboration and enhancing stakeholder relationships as well as community engagement and communications. It provides a clear lead agency and point of contact for the community. Eke Panuku already has strong relationships with a number of the key stakeholders in the city centre, many effectively the same stakeholders as for the waterfront programme and efforts will be made to ensure a joined-up approach.

46.     Delivery of key work programmes and minimising disruption to city centre residents, business and visitors will remain a key focus throughout.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

47.     The options within this report and the recommendation do not change the plans, aspirations or funded programme, projects and initiatives planned for the city centre.

48.     Auckland Council and Eke Panuku both have existing partnership frameworks with Mana Whenua and Māori organisations. As we progress current plans, there will be ongoing engagement with mana whenua on the strategic direction for the city centre and all projects of interest. 

49.     The City Centre Masterplan’s transformational move 1: Māori Outcomes anticipates a range of interventions and systemic changes to bring mana whenua presence, Māori identity and life into the city centre and waterfront.  It confirms the role and function of this area as the traditional gateway and origin point of Auckland/ Tāmaki Makaurau.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

50.     The recommended approach involves the establishment of a small number of new roles at Eke Panuku to assist with strong leadership, better integration and communication across the programmes. This will be met from within existing FTEs and opex budgets from both council and Eke Panuku through prioritisation. This re-prioritisation will not impact on any planned delivery.

51.     The recommended approach will be funded from existing opex, city centre targeted rate and FTEs from within council group budgets. If, once the matrix team is established, it is determined that further additional resource is needed to deliver on the City Centre Masterplan outcomes, any additional budget or FTE requirements will be part of the future annual plan or LTP process.

52.     The LTP budget for the city centre programme is approximately $540 million over the next 10 years. The scope, timing and priorities within the programme may need to be reviewed to be implemented within current funding. Any decision on this would be made by the relevant decision-making entity informed by a Programme business case developed for the city centre.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

53.     Cross council commitment, poor decision-making clarity and a lack of mandate is a risk to the successful leadership of the city centre programme and implementation of the vision of the City Centre Masterplan. Approval by the Planning Committee for the recommended option - for Eke Panuku to be lead agency for the city centre minimises this risk.

54.     There is a risk that this may place pressure on the existing Eke Panuku programme or that it may be at the cost of other priorities. However, the proposal largely reflects a commitment to working together for the city centre under a centralised city centre team using existing staff already focused on the city centre led by Eke Panuku. Eke Panuku will add the city centre to the current waterfront location, will add some additional key resource to lead the city centre programme and have committed to not taking resource from other programmes across the region.

55.     In 2022 the Eke Panuku programme will be reassessed with the council in advance of the next LTP and this will be an opportunity to review urban regeneration priorities and locations.


 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

56.     If the recommendation is accepted, over the next six to nine months, Eke Panuku working with the council group, will flesh out the proposal in more detail, assemble the matrix city centre team and progressively transition to the new role and overall approach. Next steps include:

·   Develop and agree an operational business change case across the Council group to agree the implementation of these changes.

·   Agree any changes to the City Centre Executive Steering Group terms of reference to review role, decision making processes and responsibilities

·   Support and maintain continued momentum on key projects and phase in changes gradually to minimise any impact to delivery milestones

·   Transition reporting and oversight roles for political and stakeholder fora

·   Commence communications and engagement with key city centre stakeholders and mana whenua.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ian Wheeler - Director Portfolio Management

Authorisers

David Rankin - Chief Executive - Eke Panuku

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 


Planning Committee

30 November 2021

 

The proposed approach to update Auckland's Future Development Strategy

File No.: CP2021/18325

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse the approach to update Auckland’s Future Development Strategy, as required by the National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report sets out a proposed work programme for council to update the Future Development Strategy (FDS) for Tāmaki Makaurau, in response to legislative requirements.

3.       The purpose of the FDS is to provide the basis for integrated, strategic and long-term planning. It should assist with the integration of planning with infrastructure planning and funding decisions and set out how Tāmaki Makaurau will:

·   achieve outcomes across the four well-beings

·   achieve a well-functioning urban environment

·   provide sufficient development capacity to meet housing and business land demand over the short, medium, and long-term.

4.       The updated FDS will replace the existing Development Strategy in the Auckland Plan 2050 and will incorporate new requirements in the National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS UD). New information on environmental and social changes such as responses to climate change and the COVID-19 pandemic will be included.

5.       This report seeks delegated authority to establish a Future Development Strategy Steering Group to provide direction to the work. It is proposed that the group includes the following (or equivalent):

·   Chair and Deputy Chair of the Planning Committee

·   Chair and Deputy chair of the Environment and Climate Change Committee

·   Chair of the Regulatory Committee

·   Chair of the Rural Advisory Panel

·   The Mayor

·   Transport Emissions Reference Group member Councillor Dalton

·   an Independent Māori Statutory Board member.

6.       Ongoing engagement with Tāmaki Makaurau Māori and with relevant stakeholders is proposed over the course of the project. Public consultation on the draft FDS is proposed in the first half of 2023.

7.       An updated FDS is needed in time to inform the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 (LTP). To provide strategic direction that will usefully feed into the LTP process the FDS will need to be completed by mid-2023.


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning Committee:

a)      approve the development of an update to Tāmaki Makaurau’s Future Development Strategy

b)      endorse the work programme as set out in Table 1, including a series of workshops in 2022 to establish the scope and content of an update to the Future Development Strategy

c)       delegate authority to a Future Development Strategy Steering Group to develop the Future Development Strategy, with the group consisting of the following (or equivalent):

i)       Chair and Deputy Chair of the Planning Committee

ii)       Chair and Deputy Chair of the Environment and Climate Change Committee

iii)      Chair of the Regulatory Committee

iv)      Chair of the Rural Advisory Panel

v)      The Mayor

vi)      Transport Emissions Reference Group member Councillor Dalton

vii)     an Independent Māori Statutory Board member.

d)      endorse the purpose of the Future Development Strategy Steering Group being to:

i)       provide direction to staff in the development of the Future Development Strategy

ii)       amend the proposed project approach as may be required

iii)      endorse the approach to consultation and engagement

iv)      endorse the draft Future Development Strategy recommended for approval by the Planning Committee.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       This report sets out the background and proposed approach to update Auckland’s FDS as required under the NPS UD. The updated FDS will replace the existing Development Strategy in the Auckland Plan 2050, required under the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 (LGACA).

9.       Much has changed in Tāmaki Makaurau and Aotearoa since the Development Strategy was adopted as part of the Auckland Plan 2050, just over three years ago.

10.     Strategically, council has continued to develop and update strategy documents to implement central government initiatives, particularly under the Urban Growth Agenda, which aims to improve housing affordability, underpinned by affordable urban land. The council’s responses to new national policy statements such as the NPS UD are one aspect of this. In addition, council has led strategy and policy work focused on environmental and social challenges, including responses to climate change and the COVID-19 pandemic.

11.     This changing context, but specifically the requirements of the NPS UD, means Tāmaki Makaurau’s long-term spatial plan has to be updated.

12.     This report follows a 4 February 2021 introductory report to the Planning Committee on the NPS UD work programme (PLA/2021/18). That report outlined that the FDS would be informed by the first phase of NPS UD work currently underway, along with the associated plan changes to the Auckland Unitary Plan. A series of Planning Committee workshops and reports for the wider NPS UD work were held during 2021.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Legislative background

13.     Auckland Council is required by legislation to produce a long-term (30 year) spatial plan for Tāmaki Makaurau.

14.     The first Auckland Plan was adopted in 2012 in response to the LGACA. In line with the legislative requirements, the Plan included a high-level development strategy which visually illustrated how Tāmaki Makaurau was anticipated to develop in the future.

15.     In 2018, the Auckland Plan, including the Development Strategy, was refreshed and adopted as the Auckland Plan 2050. This refresh incorporated changes required by the National Policy Statement on Urban Development Capacity (NPS UDC), published in 2016 under the Resource Management Act. The Development Strategy fulfilled both the NPS UDC requirement for the publication of an FDS, as well as meeting the spatial plan requirements of LGACA.

16.     In 2020, the NPS UDC was replaced by the NPS UD. The NPS UD requires the publication of an FDS for Tāmaki Makaurau in time to inform the LTP 2024-2034. The spatial plan requirements of LGACA also remain, and an updated document must continue to meet two sets of legislative requirements.

17.     Beyond this update of the FDS, the council must prepare and publish an FDS every six years. However, there are also requirements to undertake an interim review every three years to determine whether an update is needed in the shorter term. 

18.     It is also worth noting that the proposed Spatial Planning Act (SPA), which forms part of the resource management system reform, will legislate for Regional Spatial Strategies (RSSs). It is not yet clear what the specific requirements of RSSs will be but based on current available material these are likely to perform similar functions to the FDS but also be wider in their scope. The SPA is currently expected to be introduced in the third quarter of 2022 and be passed in the first half of 2023. This would mean development of RSSs is likely to occur from 2025 onwards, possible in tranches. As the requirements of a RSS have yet to be confirmed it is unclear how useful an FDS will be in informing the development of an RSS, however, these timings mean that it is possible.

NPS UD requirements

19.     The NPS UD is a complex piece of legislation containing directive policies relating to spatial strategy and land use planning.

20.     The intended purpose of the NPS UD is to require councils to plan well for growth and ensure the delivery of a ‘well-functioning urban environment’ for all people, communities, and future generations. In particular, the NPS UD requires local authorities to provide sufficient infrastructure-ready development capacity so that more homes can be built and business land provided, in response to demand.

21.     The NPS UD contains four significant areas of work (illustrated in Figure 1). Each of these areas have both immediate and on-going requirements which will inform each other over the longer-term. The FDS is the main strategic requirement under the NPS UD.

Figure 1: Key areas of work required by the NPS UD

Diagram

Description automatically generated             

Future Development Strategy purpose and content[1]

22.     The purpose of the FDS is to provide the basis for integrated, strategic and long-term planning. It should assist with the integration of planning with infrastructure planning and funding decisions and set out how Tāmaki Makaurau will:

·   achieve outcomes across the four well-beings

·   achieve a well-functioning urban environment

·   provide sufficient development capacity to meet housing and business land demand over the short, medium and long-term.

23.     The FDS will show how the direction and outcomes in the Auckland Plan 2050 will be achieved and it must incorporate a clear statement of hapū and iwi values and aspirations for urban development.

24.     It must spatially identify the existing and future location, timing and sequencing of growth and infrastructure provision and identify constraints on development. As with previous strategic planning projects, assessment of options and scenarios to inform the updated FDS will be on an Auckland-wide basis. Sequencing of development areas within the existing urban areas and future urban areas will be assessed as part of this update.

25.     The FDS is intended to enable coordinated decision making around the future location and timing of critical infrastructure, services, and infrastructure planning and funding decisions.

Auckland Plan 2050 context, linkages and updates

26.     It is now three years since adoption of the Auckland Plan 2050 and Development Strategy in 2018. During this time local, national and international conditions and circumstances have changed and affected Tāmaki Makaurau.

27.     The Auckland Plan 2050 is a 'living plan' that is intended to evolve to address emerging or changing issues, as well as reflect updated data and evidence. New and revised data, links to new government or Auckland-based policy have been added periodically so that it remains up to date and relevant.

28.     Updates to the Auckland Plan, including information from recent Auckland Plan 2050 monitoring reports and research to address strategic gaps, will be used to inform spatial planning at the strategic level (how growth is anticipated to be accommodated over the next 30 years). The updated FDS will replace the existing Development Strategy.

29.     Updates to non-FDS aspects of the Auckland Plan 2050 may be required to ensure alignment throughout the Plan. Committee will be informed in due course should this be the case.

Work programme - timeframes and key milestones

30.     The NPS UD requires publication of the FDS in time to inform the LTP 2024-2034. To provide strategic direction that will usefully feed into the LTP development process, the FDS will need to be completed by mid-2023.

31.     Table 1 sets out the expected timeframes and key milestones to meet this timeline. Staff will develop this further and report back to the proposed steering group for agreement.

32.     It is noted that local body elections will take place in October (Q4) 2022 and the timeframes acknowledge that there will be a break in Planning Committee and local board meetings at this time.

Table 1: Work programme - indicative timeframes to update the Future Development Strategy

Future Development Strategy

Q4 2021

Q1 2022

Q2 2022

Q3 2022

Q4 2022

Q1 2023

Q2 2023

Q3 2023

Q4 2023

Q1 2024

Q2 2024

Establishment of political steering group

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Planning Committee workshops/meetings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Local board engagement

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tāmaki Makaurau Māori engagement

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Key stakeholder engagement

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Draft Future Development Strategy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Public consultation and engagement

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Future Development Strategy adopted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consultation and engagement

33.     In preparing the draft FDS, the council must engage with relevant central government agencies, relevant hapū and iwi, providers of additional infrastructure and nationally significant infrastructure, and the development sector. Other key stakeholders may be identified and included in the drafting stage.

34.     Engagement with relevant central government agencies is proposed through the existing Joint Central Government / Auckland Council working group. Staff will also engage with central government agencies directly/individually on relevant matters as may be required.


 

35.     Staff will engage with the Mana Whenua Forum and understand how the IMSB secretariat wish to be involved in the work programme. An engagement plan for the duration of the project will be developed with Māori and staff working on other relevant council work programmes.

36.     Staff will report back to the proposed steering group with a full list of key external stakeholders and proposed engagement approach for the preparation of the draft FDS. There will be ongoing engagement with relevant key stakeholders over the course of the project. 

37.     Consultation on the proposed FDS must use the special consultative procedure (SCP) set out in the Local Government Act 2002 (section 83). The steps in an SCP are a minimum requirement and include preparing a statement of the proposal and allowing at least one month for submissions.

38.     The proposed approach to consultation and engagement for the FDS will consider the timing of related projects such as plan changes to the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP), as required by the NPS UD, and the need for alignment and messaging.

Proposed governance structure

39.     It is proposed that political guidance for the FDS be led by a Future Development Strategy Steering Group, that will:

·   provide direction to staff in the development of the Future Development Strategy

·   amend the proposed project approach as may be required

·   endorse the approach to consultation and engagement

·   endorse the draft Future Development Strategy recommended for approval by the Planning Committee.

40.     It is recommended that membership of the Steering Group consists of the following (or equivalent):

·   Chair and Deputy Chair of the Planning Committee

·   Chair and Deputy Chair of the Environment and Climate Change Committee

·   Chair of the Regulatory Committee

·   Chair of the Rural Advisory Panel

·   The Mayor

·   Transport Emissions Reference Group member Councillor Dalton

·   an Independent Māori Statutory Board member.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

41.     There is an increasing national focus on climate change through legislation[2] and through initiatives such as declaration of climate emergencies[3] and the report of the Climate Change Commission (June 2021). The council adopted Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan in 2020. The plan provides a long-term approach to climate action, with a target to halve regional emissions by 2030 and transition to net zero emissions by 2050. The built environment is one of the priority areas within the plan and the associated action areas focus on reducing emissions and adapting to the impacts of climate change.


 

42.     The government’s Emissions Reduction Plan and council’s Transport Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) are both being developed over the next 6-8 months. The TERP will provide a pathway for achieving a modelled 64 per cent reduction in transport emissions by 2030 in Auckland. Staff are working to align land use aspects of the TERP and the FDS to 2030, while acknowledging that land use and planning decisions typically see climate impacts over the longer-term. This means that decisions need to be made now to realise the benefits as soon as possible.

43.     Land use and planning decisions, particularly those around urban form, development and infrastructure, are fundamental to climate action. The impacts of different growth scenarios on climate change mitigation and adaptation are essential to the development of the FDS. These decisions influence and lock in our emissions trajectory and our ability to deal with the risks and impacts of a changing climate for decades to come.

44.     For example, in relation to transport emissions, more expansive urban forms generally lead to longer travel distances. Longer trip lengths typically result in higher transport emissions and less propensity for mode shift. Strategic land use decisions consider climate change risks and impacts such as the effects of coastal inundation and sea level rise.

45.     The approach taken in the FDS and the council’s approach to implementation has the potential for significant long-term implications. These aspects will be further researched, developed and brought back to committee over the course of the project.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

46.     The FDS provides Auckland-wide alignment on growth and development approaches and influences council strategies, programmes of work and investment decisions. Involvement, information and support from staff across the council group is a critical aspect needed to achieve alignment.

47.     The next phase of project planning will identify topic areas or workstreams, each of which will include a range of relevant staff from across the organisation, including the Council-Controlled Organisations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

48.     The FDS is the long-term strategic plan for Tāmaki Makaurau. The FDS provides more detailed information on how, when and where growth is anticipated. This is a topic which is of relevance to local boards as growth and development can have significant impacts at a local board level and informs local board plans.

49.     An introductory memo will be sent to local boards following this Planning Committee meeting, outlining the committee resolutions and indicative timeframes for engagement.

50.     Further detail of local board engagement will be confirmed in Q1 2022 and staff will work with Local Board Services to explore options to involve local boards in the work programme.

51.     It is proposed that local board chairs, or alternates, be invited to FDS related Planning Committee workshops for the duration of the project.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

52.     The purpose of the FDS is to provide the basis for integrated, strategic and long-term planning. It will show how the direction and outcomes in the Auckland Plan 2050 will be achieved. The updated FDS will include a clear statement of hapū and iwi values and aspirations for urban development based on engagement with relevant hapū and iwi (as required by the NPS UD).

53.     Council has committed to achieving Māori outcomes through Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, influenced by the Māori Plan and Issues of Significance, and Auckland Plan 2050. These documents provide guidance in understanding the priority areas for Tāmaki Makaurau Māori and a number of these priority areas are relevant to the development and implementation of the FDS, for example:

·   involve Māori early in the decision-making process

·   Māori housing aspirations

·   protection of existing natural resources

·   allowing for kaitiakitanga

·   benefits to Māori, for example, housing, economic opportunities, and improved access

·   impacts of climate change, for example, on marae, whānau, and sites of significance

·   opportunities to showcase Māori identity.

54.     The priority areas already identified, along with feedback from previous engagement will be incorporated in the development of the FDS. This requires a review of past Māori engagement and provides a starting point for engaging with Māori, in a way that supports their capacity to understand and genuinely participate in the development of the FDS.

55.     If the work programme is agreed at this meeting, staff will engage with the Mana Whenua forum, understand how the Independent Māori Statutory Board secretariat want to be involved, and develop a plan for engaging with Māori across Tāmaki Makaurau. This may involve joint engagement with other related council workstreams.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

56.     To support updates to the Auckland Plan (incorporating the FDS) by mid-2023, budget for additional consultancy and engagement costs to begin work in the current financial year will be re-prioritised from other work programmes that have been deferred or delayed.   

57.     Remaining costs which largely fall in FY23, including engagement and consultation aspects of the programme, are currently allowed for in future years of the LTP but will be brought forward to meet this timeframe through the FY23 budget refresh process. This will add to existing cost pressures in FY23, which without additional funding would require re-prioritisation of budget by deferring other work programmes.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

58.     The council faces significant risks (achieving desired development outcomes, financial and reputational) in the absence of a clear, cohesive and strategic approach responding to the FDS requirements of the NPS UD and LGACA. The approach proposed in this report seeks to establish a process to address those risks.


 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

59.     If the work programme is agreed at this meeting, staff will:

·   establish the Future Development Strategy Steering Group, including confirming the date of the first meeting and frequency of subsequent meetings

·   confirm a series of Planning Committee workshops in the first half of 2022

·   work with mana whenua and mataawaka and key stakeholders to establish suitable processes and timeframes for engagement

·   work with local board services to explore options to involve local boards in the work programme and send an introductory memo following this committee meeting

·   identify key workstreams and work across the council family to begin the process of updating the FDS.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Claire Gray - Principal Advisor Growth and Spatial Strat

Dawne Mackay - Manager Growth and Spatial Strategy

Authorisers

Jacques Victor – General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 

 


Planning Committee

30 November 2021

 

Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) - Private Plan Change request: Golding Meadows Developments Ltd and Auckland Trotting Club Inc to rezone land between Station Rd and Golding Rd, Pukekohe (Covering report)

File No.: CP2021/18290

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To consider a private plan change request under clause 25 of Schedule 1 of the Resource Management Act from Golding Meadow Developments Limited and Auckland Trotting Club Incorporated to rezone approximately 82.66 hectares of land at Pukekohe from Future Urban Zone and Special Purpose - Major Recreation Facility Zone (Franklin Trotting Club Precinct) to a combination of Business – Light Industry Zone, Residential – Mixed Housing Urban Zone and Neighbourhood Centre Zone in the Auckland Unitary Plan Operative in Part.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This is a late covering report for the above item. The comprehensive agenda report was not available when the agenda went to print and will be provided prior to the 30 November 2021 Planning Committee meeting.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

The recommendations will be provided in the comprehensive agenda report.


Planning Committee

30 November 2021

 

Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) - Making operative Plan Change 52 (Private) 520 Great South Road, Papakura

File No.: CP2021/16859

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To make operative Plan Change 52 (Private) 520 Great South Road, Papakura to the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Plan Change 52 is a privately initiated plan change by 520 GSR Ltd to rezone 4.63ha of land at 520 and 522 Great South Road and 21 Gatland Road, Papakura from Future Urban zone to Residential – Mixed Housing Urban zone.

3.       The plan change request was accepted by the council and went through the formal notification, hearing and decision-making processes.

4.       The decision on Plan Change 52 was publicly notified on 10 September 2021 and no appeals have been received against the decision.

5.       The relevant parts of the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) (AUP(OP)) can now be amended and made operative in accordance with the independent hearing commissioners’ decision.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning Committee:

a)      approve the proposed amendments to the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) for Plan Change 52 (Private) 520 Great South Road, Papakura under clause 17(2) of Schedule 1 of the Resource Management Act 1991

b)      request staff to undertake the steps in Schedule 1 of the Resource Management Act 1991 to make operative in part Plan Change 52 to the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part).

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Plan Change 52 is a private plan change request lodged by 520 GSR Ltd to rezone 4.63ha of land at 520 and 522 Great South Road and 21 Gatland Road, Papakura from Future Urban zone to Residential – Mixed Housing Urban zone in the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part).


 

7.       The council accepted Plan Change 52 for public notification on 2 July 2020 under delegated authority.  Schedule 1 of the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA) sets out the process for a change to a policy statement or plan. Following Schedule 1 of the RMA, Plan Change 52 was:

·   publicly notified on 27 August 2020

·   open for public submissions until 24 September 2020

·   open for further submissions until 9 October 2020

·   heard by independent commissioners on 15 – 16 April 2021

·   the commissioners’ decision was dated 25 August 2021

·   decision was publicly notified on 10 September 2021.

8.       The decision on Plan Change 52 was to approve the plan change, subject to the application of:

a)   The Stormwater Management Area Flow 1 control to the plan change site; and

b)   Precinct provisions to manage stormwater quality effects and require local transport improvements to be implemented.

9.       The appeal period on Plan Change 52 decision closed on 22 October 2021. No appeals have been received. Therefore, the relevant parts of the AUP(OP) can now be amended and made operative as set out in the decision dated 25 August 2021 (refer to Attachment A).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     Schedule 1 of the RMA sets out the statutory process for plan changes.

11.     Clause 17(2) states that ‘a local authority may approve part of a policy statement or plan, if all submissions or appeals relating to that part have been disposed of’.  Decisions were made on all submissions and no appeals were received. On this basis the plan changes can now be approved under clause 17(2).

12.     Clause 20 of Schedule 1 sets out the process that is required to be undertaken for the notification of the operative date.  Plans and Places staff will notify the operative date as soon as possible following the Planning Committee’s resolution.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     As a procedural step, impacts on climate change are not relevant to the recommendation to approve Plan Change 52.

14.     However, it is worth noting that the plan change will assist in achieving a compact built environment as sought under the AUP(OP) Regional Policy Statement[4], by enabling residential development near to existing and planned public transport networks.  This in turn reduces the demand for private vehicle trips and would result in fewer greenhouse gas emissions, which would assist in meeting Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri, Auckland’s Climate Action Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     As a procedural step, there are no council group impacts associated with the approval of Plan Change 52.

16.     All council groups were notified of the plan change request and had the opportunity to make submissions. Auckland Transport and Veolia made submissions on the plan change.

17.     Auckland Transport’s primary concerns were the upgrade of the site’s frontage to Great South Road to an urban standard (including ensuring that this would not adversely affect the delivery of a future Frequent Transport Network along this corridor), transport connectivity through the plan change area and early release of the plan change land compared with council’s strategies[5] .  These were resolved through expert conferencing between the applicant, council, Auckland Transport and other landowners in the plan change area.

18.     Veolia’s primary concerns were ensuring that the water supply network has sufficient capacity to support the plan change, and that the applicant would at its cost, design and construct the necessary connections to the public water and wastewater networks.  Veolia did not file evidence or attend the hearing.  These concerns were resolved through evidence submitted by the applicant.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     As a procedural step, there are no local impacts associated with the approval of this plan change.

20.     The Papakura Local Board was the only local board to provide feedback on Plan Change 52. The Board’s resolution provided views on infrastructure and cumulative effects, open space, transport connectivity, parking and access, Mana Whenua input and stormwater.   

21.     These matters were included in the planner’s section 42A report and for the most part were addressed in the decision.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     As a procedural step, there are no impacts on Māori associated with the approval of this plan change.

23.     All iwi authorities were sent letters when Plan Change 52 was publicly notified. Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua submitted in opposition, but later advised that they supported Plan Change 52, following the preparation of a Cultural Values Assessment report.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     There are no financial implications arising from this procedural decision. Approving the plan change and amending the AUP(OP) is a statutory requirement and is cost recoverable from the private plan change applicant.

25.     Having noted the procedural nature of the decisions recommended in this report, as stated above, the decision version of the private plan change requires local transport upgrades to be in place before development can proceed. Auckland Transport does not have the budget for these upgrades (and does not carry them out as a matter of course), so for development to proceed, they would need to be funded/provided by the applicant/landowner. The private plan change includes specific precinct provisions requiring the delivery of these upgrades by the applicant/landowner as part of future subdivision and development.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     There are no risks associated with making the private plan change operative.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     The final step in making Plan Change 52 operative is to publicly notify the date on which it will become operative, and to update the AUP(OP).

28.     Plans and Places staff will undertake the actions required under Schedule 1 of the RMA to make Plan Change 52 operative, including the public notice and seals. The update of the AUP(OP) is expected to occur in December 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Private Plan Change 52 - Decision

37

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sanjay Bangs - Senior Policy Planner

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 


Planning Committee

30 November 2021

 

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Planning Committee

30 November 2021

 

Summary of Planning Committee information items and briefings (including the forward work programme) – 30 November 2021

File No.: CP2021/17207

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the progress on the forward work programme included as Attachment A.

2.       To receive a summary and provide a public record of memos or briefing papers that have been held or been distributed to committee members.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This is a regular information-only report which aims to provide greater visibility of information circulated to committee members via memo/briefing or other means, where no decisions are required.

4.       The following memoranda and information items have been sent:

Date

Memoranda, Correspondence, Information Item

November 2021

Auckland Monthly Housing Update – November 2021

12/11/2021

Memo: Resource Management system reform: report of the select committee inquiry on the Natural and Built Environments Bill exposure draft

16/11/2021

Auckland Council submission: Resource Management (Enabling Housing Supply and Other Matters) Amendment Bill

17/11/2021

Memo: Infrastructure Acceleration Fund update on expressions of interest submissions

25/11/2021

Memo: Private Plan Change 42 Auckland Regional Landfill - Wayby Valley: Declined and not appealed


These documents can be found on the Auckland Council website, at the following link:

http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

at the top left of the page, select meeting/Te hui “Planning Committee” from the drop-down tab and click “View”;

under ‘Attachments’, select either the HTML or PDF version of the document entitled ‘Extra Attachments’.

5.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary.  Planning Committee members should direct any questions to the authors.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning Committee:

a)      tuhi / note the progress on the forward work programme included as Attachment A of the agenda report.

b)      tūtohi / receive the Summary of Planning Committee information items and briefings – 30 November 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Planning Committee forward work programme

75

b

Auckland Monthly Housing Update – November 2021 (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Memo: Resource Management system reform: report of the select committee inquiry on the Natural and Built Environments Bill exposure draft (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Auckland Council submission: Resource Management (Enabling Housing Supply and Other Matters) Amendment Bill (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Memo: Infrastructure Acceleration Fund update on expressions of interest submissions (Under Separate Cover)

 

f

Memo: Private Plan Change 42 Auckland Regional Landfill - Wayby Valley: Declined and not appealed (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kalinda Iswar - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 


Planning Committee

30 November 2021

 

 

Kōmiti Whakarite Mahere / Planning Committee

Forward Work Programme 2021

This committee guides the physical development and growth of Auckland through a focus on land use, transport and infrastructure strategies and policies relating to planning, growth, housing and the appropriate provision of enabling infrastructure, as well as programmes and strategic projects associated with these activities. The full terms of reference can be found here.

 

Area of work and Lead Department

Reason for work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Expected timeframes

Highlight the month(s) this is expected to come to committee in 2021

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

2 Sep

30 Sep

4 Nov

30 Nov

Unitary Plan Monitoring including Climate response (led by Plans and Places)

Auckland Unitary Plan Monitoring Report

Plans and Places

Statutory requirement under section 35 of the Resource Management Act to provide a comprehensive monitoring report five years from date the Auckland Unitary Plan became ‘operative in part’ (i.e. by November 2021). This work will consist of interim monitoring reports ahead of November 2021. Examples of monitoring topics include urban growth and form, quality built environment, historic heritage, indigenous biodiversity, Maori economic, social and cultural development, natural hazards (including flooding) and climate change. This work may result in plan changes being recommended ahead of the review of the Auckland Unitary Plan in 2026.

Decisions required: Interim reports seeking committee feedback and decisions on possible plan changes ahead of the review of the Auckland Unitary Plan in 2026. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enabling Rainwater Tanks Plan Change

Plans and Places

Mandating the installation of rainwater tanks in certain situations

Decisions required: committee to consider options and recommendations

Progress to date: Delegated authority to approve notification of the plan change PLA/2020/47

Memo update due October 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Auckland Plan 2050

Auckland Plan Annual Scorecard and Annual Update

APSR

To report annual progress against the 33 measures of the Auckland Plan 2050

Decision required: only on possible changes to measures (if none required, could be a memo)

Progress to date:

The next annual monitoring report is due in July 2022.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resource Management Act framework reform

Resource Management system reform – Natural and Built Environment Bill (exposure draft)

Chief Planning Office

The Natural and Built Environments Act (NBA) to provide for land use and environmental regulation (this would be the primary replacement for the current RMA)

The exposure draft will provide input into the Select Committee Inquiry which will inform the final bill.

 

Decision required: approval of council approach and submission

Progress to date: authority delegated to approve council submission on bill exposure draft PLA/2021/75 July 2021
Memo on select committee report November 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resource Management system reform – Natural and Built Environment Bill

Chief Planning Office

The Natural and Built Environments Act (NBA) to provide for land use and environmental regulation (this would be the primary replacement for the current RMA)

Resource management is a core aspect of Auckland Council’s role. The size and scope of this reform means that these reforms will shape council’s strategic context for at least the next decade.

 

Decision required: approval of council approach and submission

Consultation period will be second half of 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resource Management system reform – Strategic Planning Bill

Chief Planning Office

The Strategic Planning Act (SPA) to integrate with other legislation relevant to development (such as the Local Government Act and Land Transport Management Act) and require long-term regional spatial strategies.

Resource management is a core aspect of Auckland Council’s role. The size and scope of this reform means that these reforms will shape council’s strategic context for at least the next decade.

 

Decision required: approval of council approach and submission

Consultation period will be second half of 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resource Management system reform – Managed Retreat and Climate Change Adaptation Bill

Chief Planning Office

The Managed Retreat and Climate Change Adaptation Act (CAA) to enable and address issues associated with managed retreat and funding and financing adaptation.

Resource management is a core aspect of Auckland Council’s role. The size and scope of this reform means that these reforms will shape council’s strategic context for at least the next decade.

 

Decision required: approval of council approach and submission

Consultation period likely mid-2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Policy Statements

National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 – implementation approach

Chief Planning Office

The NPS-FM was adopted by central government in September 2020. Auckland Council’s implementation approach needs to be reworked to take into account the greater expectations required of councils and other parties to give effect to Te Mana o Te Wai, preceding plan changes required before the end of 2024

Decision required: to receive an updated council implementation approach for the NPS-FM and associated instruments

Progress to date: high-level implementation plan approved, working group formed to provide political oversight PLA/2021/12

Memo update August 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed National Policy Statement on Highly Productive Lands

Chief Planning Office

The finalisation of the proposed NPS-HPL is due to be considered by central government in 2021. If adopted, this will have implications for land use in the Auckland region, and how highly productive lands are recognised and managed.

Decision required: to consider council’s approach to implementation of any finalised NPS-HPL in the Auckland region.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed National Policy Statement on Indigenous Biodiversity

Chief Planning Office

The finalisation of the proposed NPS-IB is due to be considered by central government in 2021. If adopted, this will have implications for how biodiversity outcomes are managed in the Auckland region, particularly through planning frameworks.

Decision required: to consider council’s approach to implementation of any finalised NPS-IB in the Auckland region.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Urban Growth and Housing

National Policy Statement on Urban Development

Chief Planning Office

The NPS UD was gazetted by the government on 20 July 2020 and comes into force on 20 August 2020 with ongoing timeframes for implementation. The purpose of the NPS UD is to require councils to plan well for growth and ensure a well-functioning urban environment for all people, communities and future generations

Decision required: consider the significant policy and implementation issues that are presented by the NPS UD, approve the detailed work programme for Phase 2

Progress to date:

Work programme endorsed PLA/2021/8 and workshops held Feb – Jul 2021.

Housing Development Capacity Assessment findings received PLA/2021/77

Approved development of a plan change to Regional Policy Statement of the Auckland Unitary Plan PLA/2021/78

Endorsed approaches to the intensification provisions relating to walkable catchments, special character areas and qualifying matters PLA/2021/80 and all other locations PLA/2021/97

Endorsed the development of a plan change to address matters arising from the removal of carparking minimums PLA/2021/104

The above decisions will inform the forward work programme for the remainder of 2021 and into 2022.

The 2022 work programme includes workshops in February and March with a report due in March 2022.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Government Policy Statement – Housing and Urban Development

Chief Planning Office

The GPS will communicate the Government’s long-term vision for the housing and urban growth system. It will provide specific direction to Kainga Ora – Homes and Communities and broad expectations on other government agencies

Decision required: approval of council’s submission and consideration regarding implementation

Progress to date:

Authority delegated to approve council submission on the discussion document PLA/2021/70

Consideration of the implementation of the Government Policy Statement following publication - anticipated in October 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Affordable Housing

Chief Planning Office

To progress the resolution (PLA /2019/17) on Auckland Council’s role and position on affordable housing in phases:

Progress report and approach to advice

Decision required: receive Affordable Housing progress update and insights

Progress to date:

Forward work programme approved and political working party formed PLA/2020/65

Update memo sent November 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advocacy Plan

Decision required: receive update on Affordable Housing Advocacy Plan and initial engagement

Progress to date:

Update memo sent November 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research findings

Decision required: consider research and implications

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consider options

Progress to date:

Housing for older people PLA/2020/92,

Inclusionary Zoning PLA/2020/93, PLA/2020/94

Update memo sent November 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kainga Ora

Chief Planning Office

Ongoing Kainga Ora implementation issues and relationship management

Decision required: nature of any decisions to be confirmed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crown Auckland Council Joint Work Programme

Chief Planning Office

Quarterly update on the Crown and Auckland Council Joint Work Programme on Urban Growth and Housing.

Decision required: Generally none.  Receive updates by memorandum on JWP and any proposed changes to the workstreams. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transport Strategy Programme (led by Auckland Plan Strategy & Research, CPO in conjunction with others)

Auckland Transport Alignment Programme (ATAP)

As capacity allows staff from council and ATAP partner agencies will commence work on recommended indicative packages for decades two and three.

Decision required: consider indicative funding packages for decades two and three, potentially in the fourth quarter of 2021 or, more likely, 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Congestion Question

The Transport and Infrastructure Committee is conducting an inquiry into congestion pricing in Auckland.

Decision required: The Select Committee Inquiry will inform next steps on congestion pricing in Auckland. The timeframe for final recommendations from the Inquiry is yet to be confirmed.

Progress to date:

Authority delegated to provide direction and approve submission May 2021 PLA/2021/36 – PLA/2021/37

Memo update on select committee’s recommendations September 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Auckland Light Rail

Cabinet will be making decisions on Auckland Light Rail late 2021.  Auckland Council is represented on the Sponsor’s Group and on the Establishment Unit Board. 

Decision required: to be confirmed

Progress to date:

Guidance for Light Rail Establishment Unit on network integration provided June 2021 PLA/2021/53

Workshops with Establishment Unit held in June and August 2021

Confidential report considered September 2021 PLA/2021/109

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Increasing mobility options & networks (walking, cycling & micro-mobility, & connecting networks)

Status update to be confirmed

Decision required: to be confirmed

Progress to date:

Workshop planned for December 2021. Report due February 2022.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Public Transport Operating Mechanism review

Following direction from the Mayor and Chair, Transport Strategy will be working with MoT and AT as part of the PTOM review process.  Transport Strategy is waiting on public release of the MoT’s PTOM review, anticipated in the near future. Following release, Transport Strategy will prepare a memorandum summarising key points from the review and relating these to advice provided previously (e.g. bus driver contract conditions and vehicle procurement).

Decision required: to be confirmed

Progress to date:

Update memo related to Ministry of Transport’s discussion paper circulated 22 July 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Auckland Transport – update to be provided by Auckland Transport

Northwest Interim Bus Improvements

AT advancing bus improvements and responding to consultation. Strong councillor interest

Receive updates

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Access for Everyone business case

AT progressing business case in line with Council’s CCMP.

Receive updates and provide feedback on draft

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Busway enhancements

AT progressing business case as early part of Additional Waitemata Harbour Connections. High profile project

Receive updates and provide feedback on draft

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional parking strategy review

 

AT has started work on updating some parts of its 2015 parking strategy.  The indicative completion date is late-2020.

Decision required: strategic direction and delegation to approve discussion document

Progress to date: Confidential workshops held June and October 2021.

Endorsement of strategic direction underpinning development of the 2022 Parking Strategy and authority delegated to endorse the Parking Discussion Document November 2021 PLA/2021/125

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Infrastructure

National 30-year Infrastructure Strategy

APSR

This will replace the current national 30-year plan. It will consider how infrastructure might support environmental, social, cultural, and economic wellbeing

Decision required: to be confirmed

Progress to date:

Authority delegated to approve council’s submission on the Infrastructure Commission’s National Infrastructure Strategy 3 June 2021 PLA/2021/54

The draft strategy will be presented to the Minister for Infrastructure in September 2021. The final strategy will be tabled in Parliament by early 2022.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Auckland Unitary Plan oversight

Making Plan Changes Operative

Plans and Places

Statutory Resource Management Act requirement to make council and private plan changes operative once the decision on the plan change is made and any appeals are resolved.

Decision required: Make plan changes operative.

 

As and when required

 

 

 

Private Plan Changes

Plans and Places

Private plan change requests not dealt with under staff delegation. These will be brought to committee as and when required.

Decision required: Accept/adopt/reject/deal with the request as a resource consent application.

 

As and when required


Plan Change – Residential

Plans and Places

Monitoring of the Auckland Unitary Plan has indicated that some improvements can be made to the provisions for residential development.

Decision required: Provide direction on the scope and timing of a potential plan change.

Progress to date: Endorsed the preparation of a plan change for Integrated Residential Development provisions PLA/2020/115

Update memo received in July.

Workshop held October 2021. Further workshop planned for February 2022.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Māori Heritage Sites of Significance

Plans and Places

Second tranche of plan changes to identify Maori Heritage sites and places of significance

Decision required: To approve the plan change 

Progress to date: Frist tranche approved and made operative PLA/2021/6

Second tranche considered September 2021 PLA/2021/108

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Converting Road Reserve, Unformed Legal Roads & Pedestrian Accessways to
Open Space

Plans and Places

Scoping report identifying opportunities to offer unutilised areas of road reserve and unformed legal roads back to Māori former landowners

Decision required: Consider recommended approach.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Auckland Housing Programme – area plans and potential plan changes

Plans and Places

Kainga Ora has prepared a spatial development strategy for the Mt Roskill and Mangere areas. These may need area plans for consultation with the community and local boards. 

Some plan changes may come out of this work for parts of these areas.

Decision required: Endorsement of draft area plans for public consultation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Panuku Priority Location Programme

Wynyard Point Masterplan & Plan Change

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

 

Refreshed Wynyard Point masterplan leading to council led plan change to support future regeneration delivery.

Decision required: Endorsement for the Wynyard Point Final Masterplan for public consultation. Workshop planned February 2022

Endorsement for the Wynyard Point Plan Change for public notification. Report planned June/July 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thriving Town Centres - Town Centre Guidelines for Eke Panuku locations

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

Guidance document to support future urban regeneration delivery and engagement with stakeholders and partners. As an operational document the guidelines will be approved by the Eke Panuku Board.

Direction required: Confirmation of alignment with Council strategies and direction, and support for the guidelines.

October workshop held.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Onehunga Wharf Masterplan & Plan Change

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

Onehunga Wharf masterplan leading to council led plan change to support future regeneration delivery.

Direction required: Support for the Onehunga Wharf Masterplan for public consultation and feedback. February/March 2022 workshop

Endorsement for the Onehunga Wharf Masterplan for public consultation February/March 2022

Decision required: Endorsement for the Onehunga Plan Change for public notification June/ July 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Briefings to be confirmed

Ministry of Education – development programme for Auckland

Chief Planning Office

A briefing is being explored. The committee is interested in hearing from the Ministry of Education on its plans for schools long term, and the current issues and challenges it faces. Including how legislative change affects schools particularly and the impacts of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development.

No decision or direction required from the committee.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Completed

Lead Department

Area of work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Decision

CPO

Kāinga Ora - Homes and Communities second Bill

Approval process for council’s submission

Political working group established to develop and approve submission by Planning Committee 5 December 2019

PLA/2019/92

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research, CPO

Submission on the Land Transport (Rail) Legislation Bill

Review and approve council’s submission

Council’s submission approved by Planning Committee 4 February 2020

PLA/2020/9

CPO

Submission on the Urban Development Bill

Review and approve council’s submission

Council’s submission approved by Planning Committee 4 February 2020

PLA/2020/10

CPO

Submission on the draft National Policy Statement Indigenous Biodiversity

Review and approve council’s submission

Council’s submission approved by Planning Committee 5 March 2020

PLA/2020/15

Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Auckland Plan 2050 Implementation and Monitoring

Receive an update on the Auckland Plan 2050 and the first Auckland Plan 2050 Three Yearly Progress report

Updates received by Planning Committee 5 March 2020

PLA/2020/16

Auckland Design Office

City Centre Masterplan Refresh adoption

Consider and adopt refreshed City Centre Masterplan

City Centre Masterplan Refresh adopted by Planning Committee 5 March 2020

PLA/2020/17, PLA/2020/18, PLA/2020/19

Financial Strategy and Planning

Submission on the Infrastructure Funding and Financing Bill

Review and approve council’s submission

Council’s submission approved by Planning Committee 5 March 2020

PLA/2020/20

DPO

Shovel-ready projects for Central Government

Agreement on list for submission to central government

Process agreed at Emergency Committee 9 April 2020

EME/2020/13

CPO

Submission on the Accessible Streets Regulatory Package

Review and approve council’s submission

Council’s submission approved by Emergency Committee 16 April 2020

EME/2020/23

CPO

Silverdale West Dairy Flat Structure Plan

Consider and approve the final structure plan

Final structure plan approved by Governing Body 30 April 2020

GB/2020/38

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research, CPO

NZTA Innovating Streets Fund

Approval of council approach and submission

Endorsed first round of funding and approved process for developing the second round at Emergency Committee 7 May 2020

EME/2020/55

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research, CPO

NZTA Innovating Streets Fund

Approval of second round funding bids to NZTA

Approved Council and AT proposed list of projects for further development and refining, and authority delegated to approve the final submission, at Planning Committee 4 June 2020

PLA/2020/30

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research, CPO

Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2021-2031, and draft National Rail Plan

Approve council submission on GPS and Draft national rail plan

Council’s submission approved by Emergency Committee 7 May 2020

EME/2020/56

Plans and Places

National Environmental Standards on Air Quality – council submission

Approve council submission

Council’s draft submission endorsed, and authority delegated to approve final submission, Planning Committee 4 June 2020

PLA/2020/31

CPO

Resource Management Act Framework

Fast-track consenting legislative change

Approve council’s submission

Authority delegated to approve council’s submission on the COVID-19 Recovery (Fast-track Consenting) Bill, at Planning Committee 4 June 2020

PLA/2020/32

Plans and Places

Strategic Land Use Frameworks for Dairy Flat and Kumeu Huapai Future Urban Areas

Approval to prepare strategic land use frameworks for Wainui Silverdale Dairy Flat and Kumeu-Huapai.

Approved preparation of spatial land use frameworks, and established a Political Working Party to approve the draft spatial land use frameworks, at Planning Committee 2 July 2020

PLA/2020/37

Plans and Places

Plan Change - Whenuapai

Approve next steps.

Next steps approved in confidential section of Planning Committee 2 July 2020

PLA/2020/44

Plans and Places

Plans Change – Events on Public Space

Enable events on public space that have obtained an event permit to be undertaken more easily.

Endorsement of proposed plan change for notification.

Notification of plan change approved at Planning Committee 3 September 2020

PLA/2020/68

Plans and Places

Review of Schedule 10 Notable Trees Schedule

Consider the timing of a full review of Schedule 10 – Notable Trees in the context of resourcing constraints and priorities

Options for reviewing the schedule in future considered at 5 November Planning Committee.

PLA/2020/95, PLA/2020/96, PLA/2020/97

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research

Additional Harbour Crossing

Consideration of finalised business case.  The business case is a joint piece of work between Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency, Auckland Transport (AT) and Auckland Council. 

Business case considered, findings noted and support given to continue council’s involvement in the project, at 5 November Planning Committee

PLA/2020/100

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research

Congestion Question

Consideration of findings in the Congestion Question project final report.

Noted that phase two of the project is completed, received the report findings, considered scope of phase three and requested approvals and updates to return to the committee

PLA/2020/116

Panuku Development Auckland, Auckland Transport and Auckland Council

Downtown Carpark development outcomes

Establish agreement on the Auckland Council group development outcome requirements for the Downtown Carpark to enable site sale through a contestable market process.

Development outcomes confirmed in confidential section of the December 2020 Planning Committee meeting PLA/2020/120 and strategic transport outcomes agreed in June 2021 PLA/2021/52

Auckland Transport

Auckland Cycling Programme Business Case Review

Agree committee members to participate in an Auckland Transport-led political reference group.

Members delegated to the political reference group

PLA/2021/7

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research

Auckland Transport Alignment Project

Agree funding package.

Approved the recommended ATAP 2021-31 indicative package

PLA/2021/15

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research

Auckland Plan Environment and Cultural Heritage Outcome Measure confirmation

Confirm new Environment and Cultural Heritage Outcome measures

New measures confirmed

PLA/2021/26

Auckland Transport

Regional Land Transport Plan 2021-2031

Agreed funding package for consideration of RLTP committee and AT board

Endorsed Regional Land Transport Plan 2021-2931 for the Auckland Transport board to adopt.  

APSR

Infrastructure Strategy

Provide strategic insights and direction 30 Year Infrastructure Strategy (for subsequent referral to Finance Committee)

Strategy adopted by Finance and Performance Committee in June 2021 (as part of Long-term Plan)

APSR

Auckland Plan 2050 implementation and monitoring

 

To note progress against the measures in the Auckland Plan 2050

 

2021 monitoring report received

PLA/2021/69

Chief Planning Office

Unit Titles Act

To approve council’s submission

Authority delegated to approve submission

PLA/2021/27

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research

Auckland Transport Alignment Programme (ATAP)

To approve the recommended Auckland Transport Alignment Project 2021-31 indicative package.

Auckland Transport Alignment Project 2021-31 indicative package approved

PLA/2021/15

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research

Regional Fuel Tax

To consider components and changes to current status

Regional Fuel Tax Variation Proposal adopted by the Governing Body in May 2021

GB/2021/55

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research

Congestion Question

To approve council’s submission to the select committee on the Inquiry into congestion pricing

Authority delegated to approve submission

PLA/2021/36 – PLA/2021/37

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research

National 30-year Infrastructure Strategy

To approve council’s submission

Authority delegated to approve council’s submission

PLA/2021/54

Plans and Places

Auckland Unitary Plan and Auckland District Plan (Hauraki Gulf Islands Section) – Sites and Places of Significance to Mana Whenua

To approve the plan change and make it operative

Plan Change 22 and Plan Modification 12 (Sites and Places of Significance to Mana Whenua) made operative

PLA/2021/6

Development Programme Office

Infrastructure Acceleration Fund

To approve council’s submission to the Crown’s Infrastructure Acceleration Fund

Endorsed preliminary list of programmes for the Infrastructure Acceleration Fund and authority delegated for approval of final list for submission

PLA/2021/92

Chief Planning Office

Resource Management (Enabling Housing Supply) Amendment Bill

To approve council’s submission on the Bill

Group delegated to approve council’s submission on the bill November 2021

PLA/2021/123

Eke Panuku

Wynyard Quarter Tram

To endorse the Eke Panuku Board decision to cease operated of the tram in 2022.

Endorsed the Eke Panuku Board decision to cease operation of the Wynyard Quarter Tram by late 2022

PLA/2021/126

 



[1] The purpose and content outlined here is derived from both LGACA 2009 and the NPS UD 2020.

[2] Legislation includes Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Act 2019.

[3] Auckland Council declared a climate emergency in June 2019 while central government announced a climate emergency declaration in December 2020.

[4] RPS Objective B2.2.1(1)

[5] Primarily the Future Urban Land Supply Strategy 2017