I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Rodney Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Venue:

Wednesday, 17 November 2021

3.00pm

via Skype for Business

 

Rodney Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Phelan Pirrie

 

Deputy Chairperson

Beth Houlbrooke

 

Members

Brent Bailey

 

 

Steve Garner

 

 

Danielle Hancock

 

 

Tim Holdgate

 

 

Louise Johnston

 

 

Vicki Kenny

 

 

Colin Smith

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Robyn Joynes

Democracy Advisor

 

11 November 2021

 

Contact Telephone: +64 212447174

Email: robyn.joynes@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

Local Board Member

Organisation

Position

Brent Bailey

Central Shooters Inc

Auckland Shooting Club

Royal NZ Yacht Squadron

President

Member

Member

Steven Garner

Warkworth Tennis and Squash Club

Sandspit Yacht Club

Warkworth Gamefish Club

President

Member

Member

Louise Johnston

Blackbridge Environmental Protection Society

Treasurer

Vicki Kenny

International Working Holidays Ltd

Nannies Abroad Ltd

Director/Owner/CEO

Director/Owner/CEO

Danielle Hancock

Kaukapakapa Residents and Ratepayers Association

Pest Free Kaukapakapa

New Zealand Biosecurity Services Limited

Member

 

Pest Free Coordinator

Operations Manager

Tim Holdgate

Landowners Contractors Protection Association

Agricultural & Pastoral Society - Warkworth

Vice Chairman

 

Committee member

Beth Houlbrooke

Kawau Island Boat Club

Springboard Advisory Board

Matakana Coast Trail Trust

Member

Member

Contractor

Phelan Pirrie

Muriwai Volunteer Fire Brigade

Grow West Ltd

North West Country Incorporated

Officer in Charge

Director

Manager

Colin Smith

 

 

 


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                             5

2          Apologies                                                                                                           5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                   5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                             5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                     5

8.1    Deputation: Restore Rodney East                                      5

8.2    Deputation: Omaha Shorebird Protection Trust               6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                     6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                 6

11        New community lease with provision for sub-licences to occupy to Warkworth Agricultural & Pastoral Society Incorporated for land at Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve, 2 State Highway 1, Warkworth                                                         9

12        Three new roads at Kikorangi Drive, Ara Hills, Stage 2, Orewa                                                                                                        25

13        Road name for private road at Ara Hills, Stage 3A-1, Kikorangi Drive, Orewa                                                                                 33

14        Road name for one new road at 177 Rautawhiri Road, Helensville                                                                                     41

15        One new private road at 180 Whitmore Road, Buckleton Beach                                                                                             49

16        Auckland Transport update November 2021                            57

17        Report on the Recovery from the West and North-West Auckland Floods                                                                          61

18        Draft Contributions Policy 2021                                                 89

19        Detailed Business Case for the Huapai Domain Indoor Multisport Facility                                                                        93

20        Rodney Ward Councillor update                                              121

21        Rodney Local Board workshop records                                 127

22        Governance forward work calendar                                         135

23        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)           confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday 20 October 2021, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Rodney Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation: Restore Rodney East

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      Restore Rodney East have requested a deputation to update the local board on the draft Restore Rodney East Strategic Plan (Attachment A to the agenda report).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      thank representatives from Restore Rodney East for their presentation.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation: Omaha Shorebird Protection Trust

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      The Omaha Shorebird Protection Trust have requested a deputation regarding a change to council's operational plan at Omaha North.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      thank the Omaha Shorebird Protection Trust for their presentation.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

New community lease with provision for sub-licences to occupy to Warkworth Agricultural & Pastoral Society Incorporated for land at Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve, 2 State Highway 1, Warkworth

File No.: CP2021/15298

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek approval to grant a new community lease with provision for sub-licences to occupy to Warkworth Agricultural & Pastoral Society Incorporated for land at Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve, 2 State Highway 1, Warkworth.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Historically, the Warkworth Agricultural & Pastoral Society Incorporated has had a significant presence at Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve. Most of the land comprising the showgrounds is subject to an encumbrance in favour of the Warkworth Agricultural & Pastoral Society Incorporated. The Warkworth Agricultural & Pastoral Society Incorporated own and maintain its four buildings on the showgrounds.

3.      The Warkworth Agricultural & Pastoral Society Incorporated is aware that the Rodney Local Board has indicated that it will not consider the grant of various new lease proposals at several reserves (including the showgrounds) until after the adoption of the Rodney Local Board Local Park Management Plan.

4.      As such, the Warkworth Agricultural & Pastoral Society Incorporated has formally applied to council for a short-term (three years) community lease for land on which its buildings are located and an additional portion of reserve land directly adjacent to and bounded by its cattle stalls and office. The Warkworth Agricultural & Pastoral Society Incorporated intends to enter into sub-licences with a number of entities which already occupy parts of the land that are subject to the proposed lease. The proposed lease and sub-licences will regularise the existing occupancies.

5.      The Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 set out the criteria and standard terms and conditions for community occupancy arrangements. These terms and conditions inform staff recommendations in leasing reports to elected members on which, decisions are made.

6.      These guidelines state that in circumstances where there may be a vacant building, space or land identified as appropriate for development, council will seek applications through:

·        public advertising

·        an expression of interest process

·        direct notification to groups who have registered their interest.

7.      The Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 also provide that local boards may, at their discretion, choose to vary from officers’ recommendations on a case-by-case basis as they deem appropriate.

8.      Council staff in this instance, have recommended that the Rodney Local Board resolve not to call for an expression of interest process relating to leasing the portion of reserve land directly adjacent to and bounded by the society’s cattle stalls and office. Staff have based its recommendations on the following considerations:

·        the encumbrance over the land in favour of the society provides sufficient weight in terms of its occupation rights

·        in recent months, staff workshopped the matter with the Rodney Local Board on two separate occasions. At the conclusion of the second workshop, the local board provided informal positive feedback to consider the grant of a short-term community lease to the Warkworth Agricultural & Pastoral Society Incorporated for land at the showgrounds reserve (the footprint of its four buildings and the portion of reserve land directly adjacent to and bounded by its cattle stalls and office).  

9.      As such, this report recommends that the Rodney Local Board:

·        exercise its prerogative under the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and resolve not to support advertising seeking an expression of interest process for the portion of reserve land located directly adjacent to and bounded by the Warkworth Agricultural & Pastoral Society Incorporated’s cattle stalls and office at Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve

·        grant Warkworth Agricultural & Pastoral Society Incorporated a new short-term community lease for the footprint of its four buildings; additionally, the portion of reserve land located directly adjacent to and bounded by the society’s cattle stalls and office at Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve with provision to enter into sub-licences to occupy.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      direct staff to not seek expressions of interest from community groups and organisations for community leases or licences to occupy approximately 7,500 square metres of reserve land at Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve, 2 State Highway 1, Warkworth (Attachment A to the agenda report)

b)      grant Warkworth Agricultural & Pastoral Society Incorporated a community lease with provision for sub-licences for 9,839 square metres (more or less) of land legally described as Section 1 SO 509338 and Lot 1 Deposited Plan 135480 comprising part of Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve, 2 State Highway 1, Warkworth (Attachment B to the agenda report) subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)     term – three years commencing 18 November 2021 effecting final expiry 17 November 2024

ii)    rent - $1.00 plus GST per annum (if demanded)

iii)    a clause that will be included in the lease agreement requiring Warkworth Agricultural & Pastoral Society Incorporated to seek and obtain council’s approval for any new sub-licensees

iv)   all other terms and conditions will be in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the Reserves Act 1977.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.    This report considers community leasing matters with respect to Warkworth Agricultural & Pastoral Society Incorporated (the society) occupation of and ability to enter into sub-licences on part of the land comprising Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve.

11.    The Rodney Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The land, Warkworth Agricultural & Pastoral Society Incorporated improvements, current occupation arrangement and proposed new community lease agreement with provision for sub-licences

12.    The land on which the society’s cattle stalls, office, former kennel club building and the red shed are located is held by the Department of Conservation on behalf of the Crown and vested in council, in trust. The land parcel comprises 3.6401 hectares, is legally described as Section 1 SO 509338 and is subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977. The parcel is classified as local purpose (community buildings and showgrounds) reserve. This classification legally supports the society’s activities.

13.    The society’s shearing pavilion is located on land held in fee simple by Auckland Council, legally described as Lot 1 Deposited Plan 135480 and subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977. Lot 1 comprises 16.2800 hectares and is classified as recreation reserve. This classification legally supports the physical activities undertaken in the building.

14.    The society’s current occupation arrangement is by way of an encumbrance in its favour over the majority of land comprising the showgrounds. In addition to the society’s benefits in terms of use of the showgrounds to hold its annual show, the encumbrance provides the society with an exclusive licence to occupy four buildings at all times, free of charge.

15.    The encumbrance also provides that the society has the sole right to authorise use of any such building by any person or organisation at any time. Currently, the red shed is occupied by the Warkworth Men’s Shed group and the former kennel club (the green building) is occupied by a local martial arts club.

16.    The documentation setting out the society’s existing occupation rights via the encumbrance needs to be recorded explicitly by way of a community lease. Council staff has been working with the key representatives for the society for several years with the view to formalising a lease agreement.

17.    Similarly, the society wishes to regularise the use of the portion of reserve land directly adjacent to and bounded by its cattle stalls and office. In conjunction with the society, the area is currently used by a number of entities. A new community lease to the society with provision to enter into sub-licences will enable regularisation of the current and any future use. The table below details usage:

Entity

Particulars

Rodney and Districts Miniature Horse Club Incorporated

Current users

Warkworth and Districts Dog Training Club Incorporated

Current users

 

Warkworth Country Market

Entity seeking landowner approval to operate. Its concept is to bring a quality, carnival style, once-a-month market to the showgrounds.

During September 2021 council’s land use team prepared a memorandum for the local board to provide information and seek feedback on the landowner approval application. The local board was generally supportive of the application. The grant of landowner approval is conditional on the society obtaining a community lease with provision to enter into sub-licences to occupy.

18.    A lease to the society for the land on which its improvements are located is in conformity and contemplated in the (operative) Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve Management Plan adopted by the former Rodney District Council on 17 June 2004.

Warkworth Agricultural & Pastoral Society Incorporated

19.    The society has a long and proud history in the Warkworth area. It was founded in 1867 by European settlers with the purpose of holding agricultural and produce shows initially on the Warkworth Village Green and subsequently, at the showgrounds.

20.    The society has operated for a significant period of time; delivering the agricultural and produce shows and other community focussed activities. It has recently held its 154th show.

21.    The society’s committee works closely with council to plan its busier activities such as the annual show, acknowledging the location of the showgrounds adjacent to State Highway 1 and the potential impacts of the show, on already difficult traffic conditions.

22.    The society sees itself as one of the anchor organisations at the showgrounds site and is keen to explore synergies with other current and potential users.

23.    The society is run by a small band of volunteer members. Close to 5,000 people per annum engage with the society either directly through attending the agricultural and pastoral shows or indirectly through the activities of the other organisations it supports.

24.    The Warkworth Agricultural & Pastoral Society was duly incorporated under the Agricultural and Pastoral Societies Act 1908. The society is affiliated with the Royal Agricultural Society of New Zealand. The society has charitable status having registered as a charity on 30 June 2008.

25.    The society’s financial accounts indicate that its funds are sufficient to meet its liabilities and are being managed appropriately.

26.    Council staff did not request that the society enter into a community outcomes plan to evidence the community benefit it provides in return for a community lease at a peppercorn rental. Rationale as follows:

·        proposed lease is short-term (three years)

·        the society collaborates with and provides occupancies for several community groups including the Warkworth Men’s Shed, martial arts club, Rodney and Districts Miniature Horse Club Incorporated and Warkworth and Districts Dog Training Club Incorporated.

Society’s plans for its future

27.    The society’s intention is to apply for a longer-term lease (10 years with one 10 year right of renewal to accord with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012) on expiry of any initial short-term lease. This would be subject to:

·        the local board granting the short-term lease

·        the completion and formal adoption of, and outcomes from the Rodney Local Board Local Parks Management Plan.

28.    Initiatives aimed at growing diverse attendees, members and volunteers will become part of the society’s strategy once long-term tenure is secured.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.    Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan sets out two core goals:

·      to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and 

·      to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change. 

30.    This is an administrative report and the decision from the local board does not have any direct impact on greenhouse gas emissions. The proposal continues an existing activity and does not introduce new sources of emissions.

31.    While a portion of the lease area is located directly within a flood plain of a one-in-100 years rainstorm event by river or surface flooding, affects are mitigated as most of the lease area is green space and will drain naturally and where there are structures, these are located above ground level (Attachment C to the agenda report) shows the proposed lease area in relation to flood plains and flood prone areas).

32.    The site is not subject to other potential climate change impacts and hazards such as coastal inundation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.    Staff sought feedback from relevant council teams about the proposed new community lease with provision for sub-licences to the society. Their feedback is detailed in the table below:

Team

Feedback

Consideration

Service and Asset Planning Specialist, Service Investment and Programming

Warkworth Agricultural & Pastoral Society history of occupation at the showgrounds coupled with the encumbrance in its favour gives weight to progressing its application. The proposed time frame of three years makes sense in terms of the completion of the Rodney Local Parks Management Plan.

 

The team has received previous legal advice regarding the granting of leases or licences while management plans are being reviewed. The advice is that concerns regarding decision-making on reserve management plans may arise if the council grants a lease over park land, while it is developing a new plan. These concerns may relate to pre-determination or fettering the council’s discretion (by not genuinely exercising its independent judgment on the merits of the matter, for example by binding itself to a particular position). Overall, the risk is assessed as low.

 

Additionally, the team has advised that formal adoption of the Rodney Local Parks Management Plan is contingent on submissions and potentially a hearings process once public notification of the draft plan is completed. Based on recent experience with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan pilot, this could be at least six months after notification of a draft. The team anticipates that formal adoption is likely to occur late 2022.

The adoption and implementation of the local parks management plan is likely to be a few years away given that consultation of the draft plan is yet to be notified.

The proposed three-year term allows for the community lease to be formalised during this interim period. Once the plan is adopted and implemented, the society could potentially apply for a new longer term in accordance with its occupancy rights under the encumbrance.

Council’s legal team

The local board’s feedback in 2018 regarding the grant of new leases during the park management plan process was that it would not enter into any new leases for equestrian and pony clubs.

As this was given during a local board workshop, it is not a formal decision that binds council.

The legal advice is that it remains open to council to depart from the approach it has taken since 2018, and to consider granting a new lease at this time over the reserve. However, it will be important to consider the circumstances in which the previous feedback was given and why council is proposing to take a different position at this time.

The Warkworth Agricultural and Pastoral Society is not an equestrian or pony club. In addition, the society has had a longstanding presence at Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve reinforced by the occupancy rights under the encumbrance. As such, there is a sound basis for the departure from the local board’s views back in 2018.

 

However, one area of risk identified is the society’s ability to sub-tenant. In view of the proposed sub-licence to the Rodney and Districts Miniature Horse Club Incorporated, this is likely to create a mechanism to circumvent the 2018 views of the local board.

The risk can be mitigated under lease by requiring that all sub-tenancies be granted only with the express approval of Auckland Council

34.    The proposed new community lease with provision for sub-licences has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the advice in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

35.    The recommendations in this report support the Rodney Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes:

a)      Our communities are resilient and have access to what they need (outcome four).

b)      Our local parks and recreation facilities meet the needs of our growing community (outcome five).

36.    At its workshops of 12 May and 9 June 2021, staff presented the local board with information on the lease and sub-licences proposal by way of memorandum. At the completion of the workshop item on 9 June, the local board provided staff with informal positive feedback to progress the leasing matter.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.    Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi which are outlined in council’s key strategic planning documents; the Auckland Plan, the Long-Term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, and local board plans.

38.    Staff had planned to present the proposal to and seek feedback from mana whenua representatives at the Mana Whenua Forum (North-West) scheduled for 8 August 2021. The forum was cancelled. Staff subsequently emailed iwi groups (who are identified as having an interest in land in the Rodney Local Board area directly with relevant information) directly with relevant information and sought feedback.

39.    The table below contains feedback received:

Iwi group

Feedback

Action taken

Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki

 

Ngāi Tai defer to Ngāti Manuhiri for further comment on these community leases.

 

Te Uri o Hau

Thank you for your email but these properties are outside Te Uri o Hau area of interest.

 

Patukirikiri

We will support Ngāti Manuhiri decision to accept or decline this lease.

 

Manuhiri Kaitiaki Charitable Trust

No objections regarding the lease but would there be a way to recommend that those holding the lease actively engage with Mana Whenua with the first step being a cultural induction? We do this for all Department of Conservation permits and concessions and it would be nice for everyone to become more culturally competent/aware.

Leasing staff has responded to the key representative for Manuhiri Kaitiaki Charitable Trust asking for the opportunity to meet and discuss this option with the view to the potential for making lessee engagement with mana whenua a condition within any future lease agreement.

 

40.    The lease agreement will contain a Te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Treaty of Waitangi) clause to record Crown ownership of Section 1 SO 509338 should the land be required for a treaty settlement in the future.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.    There is no direct cost to council associated with the grant of a new lease. Warkworth Agricultural and Pastoral Society Incorporated will continue to take responsibility for all operational and renewal costs involved with its buildings located on Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve.

42.    Similarly, the society will be responsible for maintaining the reserve land within its lease area. Council currently maintains the portion of reserve land directly adjacent to and bounded by the society’s cattle stalls and office. Should a lease be granted the society will assume responsibility for maintaining the portion of the reserve. This would reduce the cost implications for council in having to maintain this area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

43.    Risks and mitigations are detailed in the table below:

Risks

Mitigations

In accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, the society’s request for a lease for the reserve area adjacent to and bounded by its cattle stalls and office buildings would trigger an expression of interest process.

The Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 provide that the local board may vary staff recommendations on a case-by-case basis as being recommended for this lease.

The local board has previously waived an expression of interest process for a lease to the Motutara-Waimauku Scout Group for reserve land at Blomfield Reserve (resolution number RODTP/2017/7).

There are currently several groups who have expended capital on improvements and are occupying land at the showgrounds. These groups (Warkworth Pony Club Incorporated, Warkworth Dressage Club and Warkworth Rodeo Club Incorporated) have formally applied for new community leases. Subsequently, these groups have been formally advised that the local board will not be granting any new community leases until the outcomes of the Rodney Local Parks Management Plan have been established.

These groups may wish to voice their concerns to council about a perceived inequity in terms of treatment.

By virtue of the deed of encumbrance between the former Rodney District Council and the Warkworth Agricultural and Pastoral Society Incorporated (in favour of the society), the society has an existing occupation right.

A community lease to the society would reflect the occupation right and operationally, ensure that the land is managed in an effective manner.

The three-year term of the proposed lease recognises that the Rodney Local Board Local Parks Management Plan is yet to be formally adopted. However, the plan is unlikely to affect the occupation of the society given that the underlying encumbrance provides for a term of 999 years. There is in essence, a precedent for a new lease to the society, over and above the proposed new local park management plan matters.

Unlike the society, other groups operating on the reserve do not have any certainty of tenure beyond their existing lease terms.

Additionally, a lease to the society (for the footprint of its buildings) is contemplated and in conformity with the operative Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve Management Plan adopted by the Rodney District Council dated 17 June 2004.

 

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.    If the local board resolves to grant a new community lease, council staff will work with Warkworth Agricultural & Pastoral Society Incorporated to finalise the new lease documentation in accordance with the resolution.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

GIS aerial view of a portion of Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve showing area of subject reserve land shown outlined in yellow

19

b

GIS aerial view of a portion of Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve showing lease area outlined in red

21

c

GIS aerial view from Auckland Council's Hazard Viewer showing lease area in relation to flood plains and flood prone areas

23

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Karen Walby - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

Three new roads at Kikorangi Drive, Ara Hills, Stage 2, Orewa

File No.: CP2021/16214

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To approve names for three new public roads within the subdivision being undertaken by A V Jennings, at Kikorangi Drive, Ara Hills, Orewa.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development the applicant A V Jennings shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road names for the local board’s approval. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region.

3.      A V Jennings has proposed the following names for the consideration of the local board:

Preferred Names

Alternative Names

Huanui Drive                           Road No.1

Karera Crescent, Tuatea Road

Kamata Lane                          Road No.2

Pathfinder Place

Tamaota Terrace                    Road No.3

Waoku Way, Tiwai Terrace

 

4.      The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245. The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the guidelines.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve three new road names as follows for the new public roads in the subdivision being undertaken by A V Jennings at Ara Hills, Stage 2, Kikorangi Drive, Orewa in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

i)        Huanui Drive (Road 1)

ii)       Kamata Lane (Road 2)

iii)      Tamaota Terrace (Road 3).

 

Horopaki

Context

5.      The 119-lot subdivision, was approved on 7 August 2017, council reference BUN20441333.

6.      Site and location plans of the subdivision can be found in Attachments A and B to the agenda report.

7.      In accordance with the standards, all public roads and all private roads serving more than five lots require a name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.      The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region. The guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval

9.      The guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Maori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

10.    Theme: A V Jennings has chosen names that they consider appropriate for the locality. In this regard the names and their relevance are detailed as below:

Proposed Names

Meanings

Road 1

Huanui Drive (applicant’s preference)

Huanui is a Māori word meaning ‘road, highway, path, pathway, street’, reflecting that this is a major connecting road in stage 2 and that it connects residents to the nearby bush and environment

Karera Crescent (alternative)

‘Karera’ means ‘light green/pale green’ in Māori, reflecting the nearby native forest and green spaces bisecting the road.

Tuatea Road (alternative)

‘Tuatea’ means ‘breaking waves / foam’ in Māori, reflecting the proximity to the ocean and estuary nearby.

Road 2

Kamata Lane (applicant’s preference)

‘Kamata’ means a ‘branch tip, leaf tip or treetop’ reflecting the proximity to the bush and green spaces.

Pathfinder Place (alternative)

‘Pathfinder Place’ is an evocative, alliterative name reflecting that this lane is a shortcut to the other side of Road 1.

Road 3

Tamaota Terrace (applicant’s preference)

‘Tamatoa’ is a lovely-sounding Māori word that means ‘to be fresh, green, lush’, reflecting the proximity to the bush reserve and the green spaces at the end of the lane.

Waoku Way (alternative)

‘Waoku’ means ‘dense forest’ in Māori, reflecting the close connection to nearby native bush (pronounced wah-oku) while ‘way’ also reflects connection.

Tiwai Terrace (alternative)

‘Tiwai’ is a Māori word for ‘trunk, stem of tree’ – reflecting the proximity to bush and green spaces.

 

11.    Assessment: The proposed name options have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the guidelines and the standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

12.    Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

13.    Road Type: The road types ‘Drive, Crescent, Road, Lane, Place, Way and Terrace’ are acceptable road types for the new roads.

14.    Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.    The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.    The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.    The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.    To aid local board decision making, the guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

19.    On 6 October 2021 mana whenua were contacted by council on behalf A V Jennings through the Resource Consent Unit’s central facilitation process as set out in the guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with a general interest in the area were contacted:

·        Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua

·        Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

·        Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

·        Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki

·        Te Kawerau ā Maki

·        Te Akitai Waiohua

·        Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

·        Ngāti Paoa Trust Board

·        Ngati Paoa Iwi Trust

·        Ngāti Maru

·        Ngāti Whanaunga

·        Ngāti Manuhiri

·        Ngāti Wai.

20.    By the close of the consultation period no responses had been received. 

21.    The level of feedback received from mana whenua is often dependent on the scale of the development and its level of significance.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.    The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

23.    The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new private and public road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.    There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.    Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ara Hills Stage 2 Scheme Plan

29

b

Ara Hills Stage 2 Locality Plan

31

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bruce Angove- Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

Road name for private road at Ara Hills, Stage 3A-1, Kikorangi Drive, Orewa

File No.: CP2021/16585

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To approve a name for new private road being a commonly owned access lot within the new subdivision being undertaken by A V Jennings Pty Limited, at Kikorangi Drive, Ara Hills, Orewa.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development A V Jennings Pty Limited shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road names for the local board’s approval. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region.

3.      A V Jennings Pty Limited has proposed the following names for the consideration of the local board:

Preferred Name

Alternative

Akau Lane                    

Hapara Lane or Pounamu Lane

 

4.      The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245. The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the guidelines.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve the name ‘Akau Lane’ for the new private road in the A V Jennings Pty Limited subdivision at Ara Hills, Kikorangi Drive, Orewa in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.      The 68-lot subdivision, was approved on 29 September 2019 with the council reference BUN20441333.

6.      Site and location plans of the subdivision can be found in Attachments A and B to the agenda report.

7.      In accordance with the standards, any public road or any private way, commonly owned access lot and right of way, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical, and efficient street numbering. In this instance the commonly owned access lot serves more than five lots.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.      The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region. The guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

9.      The guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Maori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

10.    Theme: A V Jennings Pty Limited has chosen names that they consider appropriate for the locality. In this regard the names and their relevance are detailed as below:

Proposed Names

Meaning

Akau Lane (preferred)

Maori word for ‘shore, coast or reef‘ reflecting the nearby shoreline.

Hapara Lane (alternative)

Maori for ‘sapphire’ reflecting the colour of the nearby ocean and Orewa estuary.

Pounamu Lane (alternative)

Maori for ‘dark green’ reflecting the nearby greenway.

 

11.    Assessment: The proposed name options have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the guidelines and the standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

12.    Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

13.    Road Type: The road type ‘Lane’ is an acceptable road type for the new private road.

14.    Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.    The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.    The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.    The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.    To aid local board decision making, the guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

19.    On 13 October 2021 mana whenua were contacted by council on behalf of A V Jennings Pty Limited through the Resource Consent Unit’s central facilitation process as set out in the guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with a general interest in the area were contacted:

·      Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua

·      Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

·      Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

·      Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki

·      Te Kawerau ā Maki

·      Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

·      Ngāti Paoa

·      Ngāti Maru

·      Ngāti Whanaunga

·      Ngāti Manuhiri

·      Ngāti Wai.

20.    By the close of the consultation period no responses had been received. 

21.    The level of feedback received from mana whenua is often dependent on the scale of the development and its level of significance.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.    The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

23.    A V Jennings Pty Limited has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new private and public road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.    There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.    Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ara Hills Stage 3A  1 Locality Plan

37

b

Ara Hills Stage 3A - 1 - Scheme plan

39

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bruce Angove – Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

Road name for one new road at 177 Rautawhiri Road, Helensville

File No.: CP2021/16240

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To approve a name for one new public road within the new subdivision being undertaken by Hormah Developments Limited, at 177 Rautawhiri Road, Helensville.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development the applicant Hormah Developments Limited shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road names for the local board’s approval. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region.

3.      Hormah Developments Limited has proposed the following names for the consideration of the local board:

Preferred Name

Alternative Names

Rongomai Street 

Kui Street, Seoul Street, Gimpo Street and Hankook Street

 

4.      The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245. The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the guidelines.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve the name ‘Rongomai Street’ for the new public road in the subdivision being undertaken by Hormah Development Limited at 177 Rautawhiri Road, Helensville in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.      The 40-lot subdivision was approved on 9 March 2020 with council reference BUN60331022.

6.      Site and location plans of the subdivision can be found in Attachments A and B to the agenda report.

7.      In accordance with the standards, all public roads and all private roads serving more than five lots require a name to ensure safe, logical, and efficient street numbering.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.      The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region. The guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval

9.      The guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

10.    Theme: Hormah Developments Limited has chosen names that they consider appropriate for the locality. In this regard the names and their relevance are detailed as below:

Preferred Names

Meaning

Rongomai Street (preferred)

Leader who helped establish a passive resistance against Pakeha land confiscation.

Kui Street (alternative)

Name of significant Māori family in the Kaipara area

Seoul Street (alternative)

Seoul is the capital of Korea.

Gimpo Street (alternative)

Gimpo is the first airport in Korea.

Hankook Street (alternative)

Hankook literally means ‘Korea’ where the developer comes from.

 

11.    Assessment: In addition to the suggested Māori names Hormah Developments Limited has chosen to include names that reflect their ethnicity and the contribution they are making with the subdivision, recognising the diverse and multi-cultural communities across the Auckland region. Notwithstanding this the names do not strictly accord to the guidelines and so the recommendation is to approve the preferred Māori name. However, the technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

12.    Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

13.    Road Type: The road type ‘Street’ is acceptable road type for the new road.

14.    Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows

 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.    The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.    The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.    The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.    To aid local board decision making, the guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

19.    On 4 August 2021 mana whenua were contacted by council on behalf of Hormah Developments Limited through the Resource Consent Unit’s central facilitation process as set out in the guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with a general interest in the area were contacted:

·        Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua

·        Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

·        Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

·        Te Kawerau ā Maki

·        Te Akitai Waiohua

·        Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

·        Ngāti Maru

·        Ngāti Manuhiri

·        Ngāti Wai.

20.    On 5 August 2021 Ngati Whatua o Kaipara responded stating they did not support the proposed names and requested an extension of time. On 11 August 2021 a ten-day extension was granted until 28 August 2021. Also, on 5 August 2021 Ngati Manuhuri responded stating that they deferred to others. However, by the close of the consultation period no further responses had been received. 

21.    The level of feedback received from mana whenua is often dependent on the scale of the development and its level of significance

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.    The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

23.    Hormah Developments Limited has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new private and public road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.    There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.    Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rautawhiri Road Locality Plan

45

b

Rautawhiri Road Scheme Plan

47

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bruce Angove – Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

One new private road at 180 Whitmore Road, Buckleton Beach

File No.: CP2021/16282

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To approve a name for one new private road within the new subdivision being undertaken by the current landowners, at 180 Whitmore Road, Buckleton Beach

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development the applicant shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road names for the local board’s approval. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region.

3.      The applicant has proposed the following names for the consideration of the local board.

Preferred Name

Alternative

Kereru Lane (preferred)

Kaka Beak Lane Wharanui Lane, Wanns Way,

 

4.      The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245. The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the guidelines.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve the name ‘Kereru Lane’ for the new private road in the subdivision being undertaken by the current landowners at 180 Whitmore Road, Buckleton Beach in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

Horopaki

Context

5.      The 16-lot subdivision was approved on 11 September 2017.  The council reference is BUN60305634.

6.      Site and location plans of the subdivision can be found in Attachments A and B to the agenda report.

7.      In accordance with the standards, all roads and all private roads serving more than five lots require a name to ensure safe, logical, and efficient street numbering. In this instance the private road will serve 13 lots.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.      The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region. The guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval

9.      The guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·      a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area

·      a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature

·      an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

10.    Theme: The applicant has chosen names that they consider appropriate for the locality. In this regard the names and their relevance are detailed as below:

Proposed Names

Meaning

Kereru Lane (preferred)

There have always been many wood pigeons in the bay and surrounding area.

Kaka Beak Lane (second preferred)

The kaka bird being a native of the region 

Wharanui Lane (alternative)

Old maps (1853) show that the peninsular and even Tawharanui was called Te Wharanui many years ago.

Wanns Way (alternative)

Buckleton Beach used to be called ‘Wanns Bay’

 

11.    Assessment: The proposed name options have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the guidelines and the standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

12.    Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

13.    Road Type: The road types ‘Lane, Way and Place’ are acceptable road types for the new private road.

14.    Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.    The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.    The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.    The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.    To aid local board decision making, the guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

19.    On 13 October 2021 mana whenua were contacted by council on behalf of the applicant through the Resource Consent Unit’s central facilitation process as set out in the guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with a general interest in the area were contacted:

 

·        Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua

·        Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

·        Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

·        Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki

·        Te Kawerau ā Maki

·        Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

·        Ngāti Paoa Trust Board

·        Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust

·        Ngāti Maru

·        Ngāti Whanaunga

·        Ngāti Manuhiri

·        Ngāti Wai.

20.    By the close of the consultation period no responses had been received from iwi. 

21.    The level of feedback received from mana whenua is often dependent on the scale of the development and its level of significance.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.    The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

23.    The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new private and public road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.    There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.    Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Whitmore Road Locality Plan

53

b

Whitmore Road Scheme Plan

55

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bruce Angove – Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

Auckland Transport update November 2021

File No.: CP2021/16843

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide an update on transport-related matters in the Rodney Local Board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      This report updates the local board on Auckland Transport projects and operations within the local board area.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport update November 2021

Horopaki

Context

3.      Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways.

4.      This report provides updates on Auckland Transport projects and operations in the Rodney Local Board area.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Auckland Transport projects and operations in the local board area

5.      All of Auckland Transport (AT) projects were put on hold with the announcement by the Government on 17 August 2021 that put the entire country into COVID-19 level 4 lockdown. This required staff and contractors to stay at home.

6.      COVID-19 level 3 was then implemented in the Auckland region on 21 September 2021 however, at this level, severe restrictions remain in place. AT can only deliver essential projects and carry out safety work as necessary.

7.      It is unlikely that AT will get back to full delivery on various projects until the region has dropped into COVID-19 level 2.  There has been minimal change to the status of projects since the October report.

8.      AT provided the local board with an update on our Forward Works Programme on 3 November 2021.  The top three priority areas of discussion were Road Corridor Renewals, Road Safety and Active Modes.

9.      The table below has a general summary of projects of interest to the local board with their status as at November 2021. Please note that all timings are indicative, are subject to change and may been affected by the COVID-19 lockdown.

 

 

 

Name

AT area

Update

Matakana Link Road

Major Projects

Although the project has been faced with relatively bad weather recently, the Matakana Link Road project has continued with the construction of the bridge, wetland and stormwater infrastructure.

The road diversion on Matakana Road is working well, allowing works to proceed on the roundabout without being an inconvenience to road users and the construction team.

A good summer season allowed for the bulk of the earthworks. The next works on site will be the continuation of the bridge, roundabout and the installation of service trenches.

The project is within time and budget.

Huapai Improvements (Huapai Special Housing Area)

 

Major Projects

SH16/Access Road – Detailed design is substantially completed, and most consents are in place.  We have closed out the consultation. We have engaged KiwiRail and Chorus to carry out enabling works at SH16/Access Rd intersection. The work started in August 2021 but was put on hold due to lockdown L4, and work resumed once Auckland moved to L3.  We plan to engage a roading contractor for construction this calendar year, subject to design approvals and procurement.

Station Road - Consultation was carried out with Huapai District School, Station Road property owners and the community surrounding the Station Road intersection at the end of July 2021. Since then, we have worked internally to develop the designs, and several changes have been made based on feedback received.  The detailed design for SH16/Station Rd intersection is underway.  The resource consent application for Station Rd was lodged in August 2021.  Construction is expected to begin in early 2022.

Hill Street intersection Improvement

Major Projects

The pre-implementation phase began this financial year.

Work is underway to procure a Professional Services contractor to carry out the detailed design.  The Advance Notice to market was published on 4 August followed by the release of the Request for Proposal (RFP) on 13 August.  The RFP closed on 15 September.  Tender evaluation has been completed and a preferred supplier identified.  Contract award is imminent, awaiting approval of Tender Evaluation Report this week.

Matakana Road - Melwood Drive to Green Road

Road Safety

AT Safety is currently investigating this corridor for improvements.  This is likely to include improvements to road markings, skid resistance at bends and provide/upgrade guardrail at high-risk locations.

The project is currently programmed for FY21/22 installation, subject to funding availability.

Coatesville Riverhead and Old Railway Intersection

Road Safety

To provide a safer turning facility for vehicles turning from Coatesville-Riverhead Highwway into Old Railway Road, that being the right-turn bay.

Currently finalising responses to external consultation.  The project is programmed for FY21/22 construction.

New bus stop and shelter - 964 Matakana Rd, Matakana

AT Metro

Scheduled for construction in the 2021/22 financial year, timings to be confirmed.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

10.    Auckland Transport engages closely with the council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and council’s priorities.

11.    Auckland Transport’s core role is providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.    The impact of information in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.    The proposed decision of receiving the report has no local, sub-regional or regional impacts.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

14.    By receiving this report, there are no impacts or opportunities for Māori.  Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

15.    There are no financial implications in receiving this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

16.    The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks.  Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for all its projects.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

17.    Auckland Transport will provide another update to the Rodney Local Board at its February 2022 business meeting.

Change author to Emma Petrenas. Authoriser to Paul Thompson

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Emma Petrenas – Elected Member Relationship Partner

Authorisers

Paul Thompson – Head of Community Engagement

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

Report on the Recovery from the West and North-West Auckland Floods

File No.: CP2021/16286

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To present the report on the Recovery from the West and North-West Auckland Floods to support discussion of the recovery, and opportunities to work with local boards in 2022 on arrangements for recovery from such events in future.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      An adverse weather event over 30-31 August 2021 caused flooding of low-lying areas and slips to parts of west and north-west Auckland affecting parts of the Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges and Rodney Local Board areas. 

3.      Auckland Emergency Management activated in response, which transitioned to recovery on 10 September 2021.

4.      The development of a recovery plan was replaced by preparation of the Report on the Recovery from the West and North-West Auckland Floods, in consultation with the National Emergency Management Agency, as:

·        there were only low numbers of requests for assistance

·        significant activities were being managed by their respective organisations within their business-as-usual processes and resources, and without the need for coordination across recovery environments.

5.      The Recovery from the West and North-West Auckland Floods report presents an overall summary of:

·        the storm/rain fall event

·        the response

·        the recovery and completion of activities by their respective Auckland Council business units and organisations

·        opportunities to be incorporated into Auckland Emergency Managements’ work to prepare for recovery from emergency events in the future.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      receive the Report on the Recovery from West and North-West Auckland Floods.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.      A slow-moving rain band within a broadscale rain event passing over Auckland bought thunderstorms and localised downpours on 30-31 August 2021. The affected areas included parts of the Rodney, Waitakere Ranges and Henderson-Massey local boards. Multiple streams and their tributaries drain the Waitakere Ranges and their foothills wind their way to the sea through this area. Low lying land in southern Rodney, to the north of the Waitakere Ranges was most affected by the floods. This included SH 16 south of Helensville and areas around Waimauku, Huapai Kumeū and Riverhead. The commercial area of Kumeū experienced flooding with water entering many businesses.

7.      The Insurance Council New Zealand has advised preliminary figures for insured losses of approximately $56.5m from just over 2,400 claims.

8.      The response to the West and North-West Auckland floods transitioned to recovery on Friday 10 September 2021. This was the second recovery initiated under the national framework after the Papatoetoe Tornado earlier this year.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Recovery

9.      The national framework for civil defence emergency management comprising the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002, the National Disaster Resilience Strategy, National Civil Defence Emergency Management Plan (Order 2015) and relevant director’s guidelines.

10.    The national framework establishes processes to support recovery from an emergency event, informed by Directors Guidelines; DGL 20/17, Strategic Planning for Recovery and DGL 24/20, Recovery Preparedness and Recovery and the local arrangements thereunder.

11.    The recovery was characterised by different local impacts over a broad area with; flood damage to homes and businesses and storm debris deposited on land and in water courses in low lying areas, and slips causing damage to private property and public infrastructure in the Waitakere Ranges.

12.    There were surprisingly low numbers of requests for assistance received through the response or recovery phases. This may result from the level of resilience amongst communities in the affected area, the COVID-19 environment and the arrangements made to support families in this environment.

13.    Development of a recovery plan commenced based on the assessment of impacts. It became apparent through this process that some activities would be completed before a recovery plan could be approved. The remaining significant activities were being managed by their respective organisations within their business-as-usual processes and resources, and without the need for coordination across recovery environments. On this basis, together with the low numbers of requests for assistance the decision was made, in consultation with the National Emergency Management Agency, to prepare a recovery report instead of a recovery plan.

14.    The Recovery from the West and North-West Auckland Floods report (the Report) presents an overall summary of:

·        the storm/rain fall event

·        the response

·        the recovery and completion of activities by their respective Auckland Council business units and organisations

·        opportunities to be incorporated into Auckland Emergency Managements’ work to prepare for recovery from emergency events in the future.

15.    Further particulars of the recovery are outlined in the Report (Attachment A to the agenda report).

Opportunities

16.    Section 9 of the report identified opportunities to pursue enhancements of Auckland Emergency Management’s work programme.

Recovery Preparedness

17.    Business as usual work on recovery is focused on improving arrangements for recovery from future events. Recent experience gained from the Papatoetoe Tornado Recovery and the West and North-West Auckland Flooding Recovery will be incorporated into the recovery work programme outlined in Appendix 2 of the Report.

18.    Arrangements were made earlier in the year, through Local Board Services, to commence workshops with local boards on recovery in October 2021. These workshops have been deferred until 2022, though will benefit from the lessons of recent experience.

Māori Responsiveness Plan

19.    Developing relationships with Māori, iwi and mataawaka is part of Auckland Emergency Management’s broader work programme across the 4 R’s of emergency management - Reduction, Readiness, Response and Recovery, will improve the practice of recovery in Tāmaki Makaurau.

Community Resilience Building

20.    There is an opportunity to Auckland Emergency Management to partner with Auckland Council’s Connected Communities department to help build community connection using a variety of initiatives such as:

·      growing community connection and collaboration to support communities to develop their own community resilience planning.

·      hosting multi-stakeholder workshops/network events to supplement information in the Lifestyle Block Emergency Preparedness Handbook and improve emergency resilience of lifestyle block owners.

·      partnering with the Northwest Country Business Improvement District, to build the businesses community’s resilience to emergency events through the provision of information packs, workshops (online and in person) and follow-up activity (as required).

Early Warning and Operational Responses

21.    This opportunity relates to a specific project of Healthy Waters and its potential for operational improvements through integration with Auckland Emergency Management systems.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.    The Report outlines opportunities identified through the recovery from West and North-West Auckland floods to be better prepared to recover from future emergency events, including intense weather events.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.    The Report incorporates input from business units and organisations across the Auckland Council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.    The Report outlines the impacts on part of the Rodney Local Board resulting from the stalled rain band within the broadscale rain event that passed over West Auckland on 30-31 August 2021.

25.    The Report is presented to the Rodney Local Board to support discussion of the recovery and opportunities to work with local boards in 2022 on future arrangements for the recovery from such events.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.    Emergency events may adversely impact land, water, sites of significance, waahi tapu flora or fauna affecting mana whenua and Māori wellbeing in general. The recovery from such events is of significant interest to Māori.

27.    Building relationships with mana whenua and mataawaka as a part of enhancing Auckland Emergency Management’s work programme is identified as an opportunity in the Report.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.    Auckland Emergency Management’s work programme on recovery preparations is budgeted for, primarily through funding staff resource. If the Rodney Local Board agree to proceed with any of the opportunities identified in section 9 of the Report, Auckland Emergency Management will come back to the local board through its work programme workshops to request for LDI funding.

29.    The work programme for future recovery preparations is subject to council decision-making processes with input from local boards.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.    Section 6 of the Report outlines risks associated with works addressing impacts of the flooding and the rainfall event that caused it. These relate to sourcing construction materials and restrictions associated with COVID-19.

31.    Opportunities to enhance Auckland Emergency Management’s work programme are subject to disruption when Auckland Emergency Management is activated to respond to or recovery from emergencies.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.    Recommencing the business-as-usual recovery work programme includes planning to engage local boards on the practice of recovery in 2022.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Report on the Recovery from the West and North-West Auckland Floods

67

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Wayne Brown - Principal Recovery Advisor

Authorisers

Jennifer Rose - Head of Recovery

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

Draft Contributions Policy 2021

File No.: CP2021/16546

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek feedback from local boards on the draft Contributions Policy 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Development contributions allow for an equitable and proportionate share of the total cost of growth-related capital expenditure to be recovered from the development community.

3.      The Finance and Performance Committee adopted the draft Contributions Policy 2021 for consultation at its meeting on 16 September 2021, FIN/2021/84. 

4.      Local board feedback is being sought to inform the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration of the adoption of the Contribution Policy 2021 in December 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      resolve feedback on the Contributions Policy 2021 on the key consultation topics:

i)        updating policy for capital projects in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031

ii)       inclusion of projects beyond 10-years to the policy in stages starting with Drury

iii)      requiring developers to pay their contributions earlier

iv)      proposal to support Māori development with grants

v)       any other issues.

Horopaki

Context

5.      Auckland’s population is expected to grow by 260,000 in the next ten years on top of the rapid population growth experienced in the last decade, bringing the projected population to approximately 1.9 million by 2031.

6.      Construction of 145,800 new dwellings is forecast in the next ten years. To support the development enabled by the Auckland Unitary Plan, the council is facing immediate demands for infrastructure in key growth areas and in response to construction on upzoned land, plan changes and the impact of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.      Development contributions allow for an equitable and proportionate share of the total cost of growth-related capital expenditure to be recovered from the development community. The Contributions Policy sets out how the council will recover from new development an appropriate and fair share of the cost of infrastructure investment attributable to growth.

8.      There were four key consultation topics:

a)      Updating policy for capital projects in the 10-year Budget

          The draft policy provides for the recovery of $2.4 billion of development contributions revenue from $9.0 billion of projects with a growth component included in the10-year budget.  The draft policy also included updated forecasts of population growth and dwelling construction. The combined impact of these changes is to lower the weighted average Development Contributions price from $23,900 to $21,100.

b)      Inclusion of projects beyond 10-years to the policy in stages starting with Drury

          Extensive work has been undertaken in recent years on the infrastructure requirements to support growth in the investment priority areas. However, further work is required before these costs can be included in the contributions policy. Area specific amendments to the contributions policy will be proposed for consultation as the information becomes available.

          The first step in the Contributions Policy 2021 will be to add a programme of expenditure to fund some of the key infrastructure required to support growth in the Drury area. The impact of this change is to raise the Development Contributions price in Drury to $84,900 from between $11,000 and $18,300.

c)      Requiring developers to pay their contributions earlier

          The council proposed that Development Contributions be paid at the time of building consent for all development (residential and non-residential) except non-commercial development on Māori land (explained further below). This requires Development Contributions due at building consent to be paid 6 to 24 months earlier than under the current policy and reverses the changes made to the policy in 2019. When combined with the other changes proposed this lower the weighted average Development Contributions price to $19,300.

d)      A proposal to support Māori development with grants

          The draft policy proposed continuing the support for marae development and papakāinga and Māori housing[1] on Māori land through grants available through the Cultural Initiatives Fund. These grants can cover payment of development contributions in appropriate circumstances, along with other kinds of development costs.

8.      The proposed changes to the Contributions Policy 2021 were reported to the Finance and Performance Committee at its meeting on 16 September 2021 (Attachment A to the agenda report).

Consultation

9.      Formal public consultation was held in September and October 2021. To support the consultation a number of documents were made available on the Have Your Say website, https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/dc-policy.

10.    Two online Have Your Say events were held to provide opportunities for developers and other interested parties to learn more about the draft policy, ask questions and provide their feedback. A third event was also held to allow interested parties to present their views directly to the Finance and Performance Committee. All comments have been captured and will be reported through to the Finance and Performance Committee to inform decision-making on the final policy.

11.    A summary of the feedback received from submitters is set out in Attachment B to the agenda report: Draft Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement guidance

12.       Recommendations in this report have a neutral climate impact as they relate to the funding of capital investment rather than decisions on the activities to be undertaken.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views guidance

13.       The information presented on the projects included in the draft Contributions Policy 2021 was developed in conjunction with the following council-controlled organisations and council units:

·        Auckland Transport

·        Eke Panuku Development Auckland

·        Healthy Waters

·        Community Facilities

·        Community and Social Policy.

14.        The Chief Economist Unit and Research Investigations and Monitoring Unit worked with us on the impact of higher development contributions on the pace of development and on land and house prices. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.        The development contribution price varies by location depending on the cost of infrastructure required to support development in an area.

16.        Local board feedback is being sought to inform the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration of the adoption of the Contribution Policy 2021 in December 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.        Recent legislative changes require the contributions policy to support the development of Māori land. Feedback from iwi on the draft policy was sought as part of consultation and via engagement with the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum.  All developers, including mana whenua, were provided an opportunity to present their feedback to the Finance and Performance Committee on 12 October 2021.

18.        The Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum have provided their feedback which has been included in Attachment B: Draft Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.    The 10-year budget assumes development contributions revenue of $2.7 billion. After completing the analysis of the cost of investments in the 10-year budget that can be recovered with development contributions and the impact of the proposed policy changes, it is estimated that the revenue will be $2.6 billion. The achievement of this revised revenue forecast requires as a first step the implementation of a contributions policy updated for the capital expenditure decisions in the 10-year budget and the other changes proposed in this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.    The recommendation requesting local boards views does not present any risk. The risks associated with amending the contributions policy are set out in the report to the 16 September 2021 Finance and Performance Committee, Attachment A: Development Contributions Policy 2021 Consultation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.    Feedback from the public consultation will be reported to the Finance and Performance Committee workshop on 10 November 2021.

22.    Potential changes to the draft will be reported at the Finance and Performance Committee workshop on 1 December 2021. Staff will report to Finance and Performance Committee for the final policy adoption on 9 December 2021. Local board feedback will be included in the report.

23.    The Contributions Policy 2021 is proposed to be implemented in January 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Development Contributions Policy 2021 report to the Finance and Performance Committee (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Draft Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Andrew Duncan - Manager Financial Policy

Authorisers

Ross Tucker - General Manager, Financial Strategy and Planning

Glenn Boyd – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

Detailed Business Case for the Huapai Domain Indoor Multisport Facility

File No.: CP2021/11906

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek endorsement of the detailed business case and approval for the concept design from the Rodney Local Board for the Huapai Domain Indoor Multi-sport Facility located within Huapai Recreation Reserve.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      A detailed business case that was undertaken between October 2020 and March 2021 on the viability of the proposed Huapai Domain Indoor Multi-sport Facility, located on Huapai Recreation Reserve, has concluded that the project has a compelling case for investment.

3.      In 2014, the Rodney Local Board consulted with the community regarding the need for a new indoor court facility within the Kumeū-Huapai area and investigated facility options. Currently no full-sized indoor court facilities are available to the public in the area.

4.      Currently, there is a provisional shortfall of two indoor courts, as per recommendations detailed in The Community Facilities Network Plan 2015.

5.      Funding for the project was included within the One Local Initiative 10-year Programme in 2018. In 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this budget was deferred.

6.      The detailed business case was progressed in 2020 for a base facility with two indoor multi-sport courts, with consideration of two location options within Huapai Recreation Reserve.

7.      Option 2, consisting of a base facility with two indoor multi-sport courts and squash courts at Location A within Huapai Recreation Reserve, was identified as the preferred option in the detailed business case.

8.      High level quantity surveying cost estimates have been completed based on the preferred current concept design option. The current total project cost estimates of $24.3 million were provided in March 2020.

9.      There are significant cost risks associated with delayed delivery of the project and cost escalations should be managed through ongoing cost risk reviews based upon the availability of funding and associated timelines to deliver the project.  Based on the timing of project delivery, changes in the design scope and removal of non-essential service provision may be required.

10.    Staff recommend that the local board endorse the detailed business case for the Huapai Domain Indoor Multi-sport Facility located on Huapai Recreation Reserve, approve the concept design Option 2 and provide direction on the preferred next steps.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      endorse the findings of the Detailed Business Case for the Huapai Domain Indoor Multisport Facility located within Huapai Recreation Reserve.

b)      approve the location and levels of provision as illustrated in the concept design (Option 2) for the Huapai Domain Indoor Multi-sport Facility, car park and netball courts as included within the detailed business case summary (Attachment A to the agenda report).

c)       acknowledge that Option 2 is a concept design only and will be refined through the next design phases and ongoing community and local board engagement.

d)      provide direction on the preferred next steps, including the option to investigate alternative funding sources, to progress the Huapai Domain Indoor Multisport Facility.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.    Huapai Recreation Reserve (Huapai Domain) is located to the west of Huapai town centre and borders Main Road / State Highway 16. The reserve is predominantly a sports park with areas of recreational space and open land. The main vehicle entrance to the reserve is from Tapu Road, and the reserve has pedestrian access links with the surrounding residential areas.

12.    The reserve has sports fields that cater for cricket and football, four netball courts, a playground, skate facilities and toilet amenities. Several areas within the park are used for informal recreation and have not been developed specifically for sports use.

13.    There are three sports clubs associated with the park. Norwest United Football Club and Kumeū Cricket Club have individual clubroom facilities located at the park. Western United Netball Club use the netball courts within the park but have no dedicated clubroom space.

14.    Kumeū Racquets Club is located within Huapai and their membership includes squash, badminton and pickleball playing members. The club occupies a dedicated facility on privately owned land. The building is aging and will require significant upgrade work in the near future.

15.    In 2014, the Rodney Local Board consulted with the community regarding the need for a new indoor court facility within the Kumeū-Huapai area and investigated facility options. Over the following six years, options were investigated, and locations explored. Huapai Domain was identified as the preferred site, as it has areas within the park where the facility could be located without adversely affecting the existing outdoor sports areas.

16.    Funding of $22.4 million for the new facility was estimated within the One Local Initiative 10 Year Programme resolved by the Finance and Performance Committee in 2018.

The One Local Initiative 10-year Programme

17.    The One Local Initiative (OLI) 10-year Programme was initiated through the 2018-2028 Long-Term Plan (LTP) to improve local board’s advocacy. Whilst there was no guarantee of funding, the process was designed to give local board projects a better opportunity to be progressed through the provision of more comprehensive advice, robust investigation and business cases.

18.    In 2018, the Finance and Performance Committee resolved to allocate $170 million of funding in the 2018-2028 LTP budget for the funding of One Local Initiatives with a local level of provision. The Rodney Local Board OLI project was identified for funding (resolution number FIN/2018/85).

19.    Options for a new indoor court facility within the Kumeū-Huapai area have been investigated and locations explored over several years. The timeline is summarised below in Table 1:

 

 

 

Table 1: Project timeline

Year

Activity

2016

A Needs Assessment was commissioned by the Rodney Local Board and delivered by Visitor Solutions. The assessment identified the need for a new indoor facility in the Kumeū / Huapai / Helensville / Riverhead area and that the best location would be in the Kumeū-Huapai area.

2017

The Kumeū-Huapai Centre Plan was prepared using a community-led approach. Through several community consultations and public workshops, the community requested a gathering space to encourage community events and a space to play sports and exercise.

The Rodney Local Board commissioned a feasibility study delivered by Visitor Solutions which identified potential sites and layouts for the indoor multi-sport facility. Funding, management, and timeframe details were also considered. The feasibility study identified Huapai Domain as the preferred site location.

2018

The Environment and Community Committee resolved that the provision of one-to-two indoor courts in the Rodney area by 2026 was essential to address the future anticipated gap in recreation and leisure facilities resulting from significant population growth (resolution number ENV/2018/131).

Rodney Local Board approved a local indoor court facility in Huapai Domain as their key advocacy project for the OLI Programme (resolution number RD/2018/25).

The Finance and Performance Committee resolved to allocate $170 million of funding in the 2018-2028 LTP budget for the funding of OLIs with a local level of provision. The Rodney Local Board OLI project met the OLI programme criteria and funding was allocated for it (resolution number FIN/2018/85).

2019

An Indicative Business Case (IBC) was completed for the indoor multi-sport facility and recommended that the Reduced Scope option be assessed in the Detailed Business Case (DBC). The Rodney Local Board endorsed the findings of the IBC (resolution number RD/2019/69).

A Service Requirements Assessment (SRA) was undertaken by Auckland Council to help refine the scope and design of the project (November 2019 – March 2020). The process involved consultation with Kumeū Racquets Club, the local community through workshops and events, and mana whenua through the March 2020 North-West Mana Whenua Forum. The Service Requirements Assessment incorporated the consultation feedback and identified four options for further consideration in the DBC.

2020/2021

Preliminary design work was undertaken, and a quantity surveying assessment of the IBC options was completed by The Value Practice in March 2020.

Work was paused on the development of the DBC due to COVID-19 and the subsequent 2020 Auckland Council Emergency Budget. A hold was placed on all projects in the OLI programme that had not commenced construction.

In response to the funding pause, Rodney Local Board allocated discretionary funds to progress the DBC and concept design for Option 2. The purpose of progressing the DBC was to position the project to be able to request and receive funding if the OLI programme was reinstated in financial year 2021/2022 or thereafter. The work was recommenced in October 2020.

A Project Control Steering Group (PCSG) was formed with representatives from the Rodney Local Board, Kumeū Racquets Club, Kumeū Cricket Club, Norwest United Football, Rodney Basketball, Western United Netball Club, and Auckland Council project staff. During the preparation of the Detailed Business Case, the Project Control Steering Group met three times (29 October 2020, 3 December 2020, and 11 February 2021).

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Indoor court provision shortfall

20.    There is high demand for indoor sport in the Kumeū-Huapai area, which is not currently provided for. At the current population level in 2021, there is a provision shortfall of two indoor courts.

21.    The local benchmark for indoor court provision in Auckland, as cited in The Community Facilities Network Plan 2015, is one indoor court per 9,000 people within a five-kilometre catchment for urban areas, or within a 30-minute drive to a satellite facility for rural areas.

22.    The population in Kumeū-Huapai is projected to reach 17,902 during 2021. Within five- kilometres of the catchment area the population reached 24,204 in 2020.

23.    There are no full-sized indoor court facilities available to the public in the area. Current local court facilities are provided at Kumeū Community Hall, Huapai Reserve and local schools including Kaipara College, Helensville College and Waimauku School.

24.    The Kumeū Racquets Club owns a private three-court squash and badminton facility located within Kumeū township. The building is aging and is likely to require significant upgrade work in the near future. The club has indicated it may be willing to re-locate to the proposed new multisport facility at Huapai Domain and contribute funding of approximately $1.5 million towards the building. In return the club has requested the facility includes provision for four squash courts.

Benefit cost analysis

25.    The project will provide significant value for money with a benefit-cost ratio (BCR) of 1.6. The BCR was conducted on four short-listed options, as defined in the Service Requirements Assessment. The four options were made up of a combination of two locations (Location A and Location D) and two provision levels (Base facility or Base facility with squash courts). Refer Attachment A.

26.    While all four options returned a positive BCR over 1.0, the option which returned the highest BCR was Option 2; a facility at Location A which included the provision of squash courts. Refer Attachment A.

         Table 2: Benefit cost analysis options and summary

 

Option 1

Option 2

(preferred)

Option 3

Option 4

Description

Base facility with two indoor multi-sport courts

Base facility with two indoor multi-sport courts and squash courts

Base facility with two indoor multi-sport courts

Base facility with two indoor multi-sport courts and squash courts

Location

Location A

Location A

Location D

Location D

Total costs[2]

$20.7 million

$21.7 million [3]

$23 million

$24 million

Total benefits over 30 years

$32 million

$32.85 million

$32 million

$32.85 million

Benefit-cost ratio

1.55

1.62

1.39

1.46

 

27.    The main benefits of the project are:

·       physical and mental health benefits through increased physical activity and participation

·       social and community benefits through improved public and community space

·       economic benefit through employment and revenue from facilities

·       environmental benefits through associated landscaping and stormwater management.

Preferred option

28.    The BCR analysis showed Option 2 ranked better than the other options due to the added benefits and amenity of providing squash facilities. Option 2 would provide the social outcomes associated with the other options but also provide more support for local clubs.

29.    Option 2 was among the more cost-effective options as Location A is a more cost-effective site. The cost difference between building at Location A or D is significant, with Location D estimated to cost approximately $2.3 million more. The higher cost of locating the facility at Location D is predominantly due to the increased pavement/asphalt area needed (~3000m2) to connect carpark areas and provide access around the facility.

30.    Option 2 would also attract an estimated $1.5 million financial contribution from the Kumeū Racquets Club through the sale of their current land and buildings within Kumeū.

31.    Further analysis was conducted to evaluate and rank the four options considering the Economic, Environmental, Social and Cultural aspects. The result confirmed Option 2 as the highest scoring and recommended option.  Option 2 scored higher due to cost advantages and social advantages.  Refer Attachment A.

Concept development

32.    Following the identification of the preferred option, the facility concept design was further developed in alignment with Option 2. Specific internal spaces and areas were detailed, along with the outdoor areas including the car park and pavement arrangement (refer to Figure 1 below).

33.    The concept design was developed in consultation with representatives from local clubs; Kumeū Cricket Club, Kumeū Racquets Club, Norwest United Football, Rodney Basketball, and Western United Netball Club and with iwi.

34.    The development of the concept design considered operational advice and design considerations from two council facility managers, from Stanmore Bay Pool and Leisure Centre and the Allan Brewster Centre, which have both indoor multisport courts and squash courts.

Figure 1: Huapai Domain indoor multisport facility overall concept drawing

 

35.    The final concept design features the following amenities, as outlined in Table 3:

   Table 3: Concept design amenities

Floor

Amenities

Ground Floor

(refer to Figure 2)

·    two indoor multi-sport courts

·    male and female changing rooms

·    male and female toilets (separate to the changing rooms)

·    gym (331 m2)

·    kitchen (32m2)

·    reception and foyer

·    referees’ room

·    physio room

·    staff areas and staff storage spaces

·    storage space

·    three core areas for staircases (in three locations), a lift, and building services

·    four squash courts with a seating area facing the courts

First Floor

(refer to Figure 3)

·    function room (148 m2)

·    kitchen (72m2)

·    meeting room (84 m2)

·    gallery/bleachers (overlooking the multisport courts)

·    office (35 m2)

·    shared office area (74 m2)

·    toilets

·    staff area

·    additional storage areas

External

(refer to Figure 1)

·    four new relocated netball courts

·    access walkways (covered and uncovered)

·    a car parking area with 138 bays (eight for disabled)

·    a driveway and vehicle maneuvering suitable for buses (including drop-off zones), and

·    a paved area, over which the building could be extended at a later date, to add indoor cricket facilities (three lanes)

 

Figure 2: Huapai Domain indoor multisport facility concept drawing – ground floor

 

Figure 3: Huapai Domain indoor multisport facility concept drawing – first floor

Project cost estimate

36.    An updated project cost estimate has been completed based on the development of the preferred concept design - Option 2. The cost estimate is $24.3 million in today’s dollars for the facility, including the relocation of the netball courts and skate half pipe, and development of a car park.

Table 4: Updated cost estimate for the preferred option (Option 2)

Item

Cost $M

Indoor court facility (5311 m2 CFA)

$14.4

Car parking

$1.94

Netball courts and skate half pipe relocation

$1.54

Landscaping

$0.35

Design / Construction monitoring

$1.82

Total Indicative Physical Works

$20.05

Council costs

Consenting, project management, development contributions

$1.20

Contingency (15%)

$3.05

Total indicative budget estimate

$24.30

 

37.    While the estimated sum is greater than the original project budget estimate of $22.4 million, the quantity surveyor indicated there are several ways that the estimated project cost could be reduced. The three most significant suggestions that could reduce the project cost would be to:

a)    Commission a geotechnical and land contamination assessment to confirm the ground improvements needed. The current geotechnical report by WSP (February 2020) was a geotechnical desktop appraisal, which indicated that 0-1.3m of non-engineered fill existed across the site. As such, a conservative allowance for earthworks had to be assumed in the cost estimate.

b)    Consider a design and build procurement model, which allows for contractor innovation such as enabling the contractor to select the most cost-effective building materials for the facility and to adjust the building design to achieve a similar outcome but at a lower build cost.

c)    Amend the design scope and make reductions in the scale of the building footprint through removal of non-essential services offered through the facility such as the proposed meeting room and gym.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.    The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·    to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

It is anticipated that there will be an increase in carbon emissions from construction, including contractor emissions. Staff will seek to minimise carbon and contractor emissions as far as possible through the construction phase of the project.

39.    The construction of a multisport facility will require the use of new building materials, some of which have high embodied energy, such as concrete, and emit greenhouse gases during manufacture.

40.    To mitigate the potential negative impact on the climate, the building design will use sustainably sourced materials and other environmentally friendly building material options, where possible.

41.    The building design will also reduce emissions during operation through incorporating efficient building systems and solutions (lighting, heating and cooling).

42.    Mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions will be achieved through sourcing of low-carbon material options (including sourcing materials locally) and the use of products with environmental declarations for embodied carbon reductions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

43.    The provision of an indoor court facility is strongly aligned with local and regional strategic plans and desired outcomes. The project will address provisioning shortages in the Kumeū-Huapai area and establish a facility that caters to multiple sporting codes.

44.    Council specialist staff from the Customer and Community Services Directorate support the development.

45.    Representatives from Community Facilities and Parks, Sport and Recreation teams were members of the PCSG.

46.    Staff consider the facility will provide for a range of sporting codes and community groups within a growing area of the region. The facility will encourage residents to become more physically active and connected to their community.

47.    The Parks, Sport and Recreation team supports the project through the OLI programme and have recommended further investigation and analysis of the facility’s operational sustainability, should the project be progressed on a community-led or partnership basis.

48.    Additionally, the project aligns with the following key plans listed below:

·    Auckland Plan 2050

·    Auckland Council Long-term Plan 2018-2028

·    Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan 2014-2024

·    Auckland Council Sport Investment Plan 2019-2039 

·    Auckland Sport Sector Facilities Priority Plan 2017 

·    Community Facilities Network and Action Plan 2015

·    Kumeū-Huapai Centre Plan 2017

·    Aktive Strategic Framework 2020-2040

·    Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau (2017).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

49.    The provision of an indoor court facility is strongly aligned with local and regional strategic plans and desired outcomes. The project will address provisioning shortages in the Kumeū-Huapai area and establish a facility that caters to multiple sporting codes.

50.    The project aligns with the following Rodney Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives:

Table 5: Rodney Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives

Outcome

Objective

Outcome 3: Infrastructure and development meets the needs of our growing communities

Our facilities and infrastructure meet the needs of our growing communities

Outcome 4: Our communities are resilient and have access to what they need

Council facilities cater to local needs and are well used by their communities

Outcome 5: Our local parks and recreation facilities meet the needs of our growing community

Our communities have great local options for indoor and outdoor sport and recreation that provide opportunities for all ages and abilities

 

51.    The proposed facility will deliver significant benefits to the community. There is high demand for indoor sport in the Kumeū-Huapai area and there are no full-sized indoor court facilities available to the public in the area.  

52.    The concept design includes areas for the wider community to gather through the proposed inclusion of function and meeting rooms within the overall design. This provides opportunities for local community groups to make use of the space as well as sporting groups.

53.    Feedback from representatives of local sports and community groups indicates strong support for a facility in the proposed location. This has been conveyed through the PCSG meetings.

54.    The Rodney Local Board has previously indicated support for the development of a new local indoor court facility in Huapai Domain and identified the project as its key advocacy project for the One Local Initiative programme (resolution number RD/2018/25).

55.    The Rodney Local Board allocated discretionary funds of $150,000 in financial year 2020/2021 from the Locally Driven Initiatives budget to progress the detailed business case.

56.    The project is included in the Rodney Local Board Plan 2020 as a key initiative –

“Support the delivery of the Kumeū-Huapai indoor courts facility and a multi-sport facility in Warkworth”.

57.    The Rodney Local Board Chair is a member of the PCSG and has worked closely with the group on the project.

58.    A memo was circulated to local board members on 19 May 2021 summarising the completion of the detailed business case phase.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

59.    Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the LTP, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework and the Rodney Local Board Plan 2020.

60.    Engagement with mana whenua on this project has been undertaken and iwi have been appreciative of the early engagement process. Fifteen mana whenua groups who had indicated interest in the project at the March 2020 North-West Mana Whenua Forum were contacted. Two mana whenua groups expressed interest in working with council on the project: Ngāti Manuhiri and Ngā Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara.

61.    A site visit with Ngāti Manuhiri was conducted on 9 December 2020. Due to COVID-19 restrictions and internal changes at Ngā Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara, a site visit with Ngā Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara was not able to be successfully organised during the preparation of the DBC.

62.    The groups indicated that they look forward to more active engagement and would invest more time and thought into the project once it had received funding and was progressing through the detailed design phase.

63.    Through engagement in sport and activity, it is expected that the proposed facility will have a positive impact on Māori. Local mana whenua groups have expressed interest in actively participating in the design and implementation of the project.

64.    Five local marae and two mana whenua groups (Ngāti Manuhiri and Ngā Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara) have been identified as potential users and key project delivery partners / stakeholders.

65.    The multisport facility is expected to be well used by Māori, especially by rangitahi (youth). Consultation with mana whenua groups has also identified interest in using space in the new facility to host kapa haka, Rongoā Māori (medicine/massage), and arts.

66.    Following confirmation of funding and the project timeline, mana whenua groups will be contacted again. Mana whenua will be engaged as partners through the detailed design phase to enable them to participate in the creative process and ensure appropriate implementation of Te Aranga design principles into the final design.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

67.    The Finance and Performance Committee resolved to allocate $170 million of funding in the 2018-2028 LTP budget for the funding of OLIs with a local level of provision. The Rodney Local Board OLI project was identified as an advocacy project through the OLI process (resolution number FIN/2018/85).

68.    The local board allocated $1 million of Locally Driven Initiative capital expenditure funding within the Community Facilities work programme to support the delivery of the Kumeū-Huapai indoor multisport facility [RD/2020/35]. 

69.    A high-level indicative cost estimate for the design and construction of the preferred option (Option 2) is $24.3 million.  This figure could increase due to timing of delivery and material cost escalations.

70.    The detailed business case predicts that the facility will require operational costs of $357,400 per annum with estimated revenue generation of $375,500 per annum. Refer Attachment A.

71.    In 2020 Auckland Council reassessed forward work programmes and budgets due to COVID-19 and implemented the 2020/2021 Auckland Council Emergency Budget. A hold was placed on all OLI programme projects that had not commenced construction. This included the Huapai Domain Indoor Multi-sport Facility.

72.    To keep the project progressing, the Rodney Local Board allocated $150,000 of Locally Driven Initiative capital expenditure funding in the Community Facilities 2020/2021 work programme to support the delivery of a detailed business case for the Huapai Domain Indoor Multi-sport Facility.

73.    The Kumeū Racquets Club have indicated a willingness to contribute funding of approximately $1.5 million towards the building, reducing the overall cost to council of delivering the project.

74.    A total budget of $217,995 has been approved by the local board for the project over previous financial years.

75.    Due to the impact of COVID-19 and the implementation of the Auckland Council Emergency Budget, funding to progress the Huapai Multiuse Facility is now dependent upon a phased and prioritised approach to be confirmed after year four of the 2021-2031 LTP.

76.    For the project to progress, the OLI programme funding or equivalent will need to be confirmed or alternative sources of funding will need to be found through the support of a private or corporate investor, funding grants or other initiatives.

77.    Depending on the availability of funding through the OLI programme after year three of the 2021-2031 LTP, local board funding has been provisionally allocated for financial years 2024/2025 and 2025/2026 to contribute to the design and consents phase.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

78.    Risks and mitigation measures are outlined in Table 6.

Table 6: Risks and mitigations

Risks identified

Comments

Mitigation

Budget

Insufficient funding

Funding for the project through the OLI programme of work is uncertain.

Investigate alternative methods of funding for the project, such as partnership models or grants.

Advocate to the Governing Body for the project to be funded in future years.

Project cost may increase over time

Building costs have increased since the COVID-19 pandemic (although this differs by region).

This is due to the large economic stimulus packages introduced by the government to support the construction and primary industries, and low interest rates encouraging land and housing development.

The construction market will be buoyant for many years and building contractors are able to command higher margins.

Supply line disruptions have also seen imported and local building materials increase sharply in cost.

The risk can be managed by maintaining the current contingency of 15% even after some project assumptions have been investigated.

Allowing the building contractor input into the building design and flexibility during construction will also reduce the risk enabling the contractor to specify cost-effective building materials and methods for the project.

 

Funding contribution withdrawn

The Kumeū Racquets Club may choose to investigate alternative options for their club facilities. This may mean the clubs indicative contribution of $1.5m towards the indoor multi-sport facility may be withdrawn.

 

If the club choose to progress with developing their own facilities, the risk could be mitigated by reducing the size and cost of the indoor multisport facility and providing fewer or no squash courts to save on cost.

 

Timeframe

Delay to design and construction due to funding availability

The timeframe for delivering the project is unable to be determined until funding is confirmed.

Establish a timeframe for project phases that aligns with available funding.

 

 

Construction

Unstable ground conditions that require engineered design solutions

The current geotechnical report by WSP (February 2020) was a geotechnical desktop appraisal which indicated that 0-1.3m of non-engineered fill existed across the site.

A conservative allowance for earthworks therefore had to be assumed in the cost estimate.

No detailed geotechnical investigation has been carried out on the site and it is possible that the earthworks required could be less than assumed.

 

Commission a geotechnical and land contamination assessment prior to progressing the project to confirm the ground improvements needed and their anticipated costs.

Disruption to the use of the netball courts, skate park and car park

The concept design proposes re-siting the four netball courts and skate park to enable the new facility and car park to be constructed.

It is proposed to construct the new netball courts on an area of land adjacent to the indoor multi-sport facility prior to decommissioning the existing courts. The current skate pipe will be relocated.

Reputational

Project deferred or cancelled

Funding for the project through the One Local Initiative programme of work is uncertain.

There is reputational risk to council if the project is deferred or cancelled. Consultation with park users, stakeholder and community groups has raised an expectation that the project will be delivered.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

79.    The Huapai Domain Indoor Multi-sport Facility OLI project has been progressed to a stage where the project can enter a procurement phase and a Request for Proposal issued for detailed design and consent work.

80.    As the allocation of funding to progress the project is now dependent upon a phased and regionally prioritised approach, to be confirmed after year three of the current 2021-2031 LTP, potential options have been identified for the local board’s consideration. In most cases, these options would require further investigation to be carried out.

a)   Pause the project until year four of the current LTP and then seek prioritisation through the subsequent LTP planning processes.

b)   Investigate other alternative potential funding opportunities using a facility partnership approach, acknowledging that other than the Kumeū Racquets Club there are no current partners identified and no guarantees of additional funding provision.

c)   Support a community or club lead application for grants such as the Lottery Community Facility Fund.

d)   Investigate other project investors and financial contributors and consider project delivery models, where the facility is not owned by council, acknowledging that there are no current potential investors identified and no guarantees of additional funding provision.

e)   Investigate further funding opportunities from the Auckland Council Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund (SRFIF), which has been included in the 2021-2031 LTP. Applications through the SRFIF are regionally contestable, with no guarantees of funding provision, and applications are considered against criteria, including a facility’s potential contribution to serve a sub-regional catchment, equity, regional need, operational sustainability and financial contribution.

f)    Consider the introduction of a local board area targeted rate levied for the indoor multi-sport facility.

g)   Investigate asset recycling opportunities through decommissioning, selling or engaging in other commercial arrangements of underperforming local assets, and using some of the proceeds or revenue generation to fund new developments.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Huapai Domain Indoor Multisport Facility Detailed Business Case Summary

109

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Roscoe Webb – Senior Programme Manager

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

Rodney Ward Councillor update

File No.: CP2021/01380

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      The Rodney Local Board allocates a period of time for the Ward Councillor, Greg Sayers, to update them on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      receive Cr Sayers’ update on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ward Councillor update October - November 2021

123

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

Rodney Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2021/01637

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      Attached are the Rodney Local Board workshop records for 20 October, 3 and 10 November 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the workshop records for 20 October, 3 and 10 November 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop record 20 October 2021

129

b

Workshop record 3 November 2021

131

c

Workshop record 10 November 2021

133

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

Governance forward work calendar

File No.: CP2021/02934

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To present to the Rodney Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.      This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Rodney Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months until the end of the electoral term. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

2.      The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

· ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

· clarifying what advice is required and when

· clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.      The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the governance forward work calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work calendar

137

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

17 November 2021

 

 

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[1] Māori housing grants are only available for housing developments undertaken in conjunction with an urban marae and must fill the same general purpose as papakāinga

[2] Costs were based on the project costs estimated by The Value Practice March 2020 for the Indicative Business Case.

 

[3] Cost was reduced by $1.5 million as this sum will be contributed by the Kumeū Racquets Club.