I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Rural Advisory Panel will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Venue:

Friday, 5 November 2021

12.30pm

This meeting will be held remotely and a recording of the meeting will be available on: https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/meetings-council-bodies/Pages/webcasts-council-meetings.aspx

 

Ngā Hui a te Rōpū Kaitohutohu Take ā-Taiwhenua/
Rural Advisory Panel

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Deputy Mayor Cr Bill Cashmore

Auckland Council

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Greg Sayers

Auckland Council

Members

Brent Bailey

Rodney Local Board, Auckland Council

 

Alan Cole

Franklin Local Board, Auckland Council

 

Michelle Sands

Horticulture New Zealand

 

Trish Fordyce

New Zealand Forest Owners Association

 

Mike Bramley

Dairy New Zealand

 

Shaun Hazelton

Federated Farmers

 

Annaliese Goettler

Young Farmers

 

Fiona Gower

Rural Women New Zealand

 

Steve Levet

Andrew Olsen

Rural Contractors New Zealand
Rural Contractors New Zealand

 

Craig Maxwell

Federated Farmers

 

Greg McCracken

Fonterra Shareholders Council

 

Andrew McKenzie

Beef and Lamb New Zealand

 

Wayne Scott

Aggregate and Quarry Association

 

Geoff Smith

Equine Industry

 

Peter Spencer

New Zealand Forest Owners Association

 

Ken Turner

Waitākere Ranges Local Board, Auckland Council

 

Keith Vallabh

Pukekohe Vegetable Growers

 

Glenn Wilcox

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

(Quorum 10 members)

 

 

 

Sandra Gordon

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

 

29 October 2021

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 8908150

Email: sandra.gordon@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 


Terms of Reference

 

(Excerpt – full terms of reference available as a separate document)

 

The terms of reference set out the purpose, role and protocols of the Auckland Council Rural Advisory Panel for the 2019-2022 term of the council.  Panel members must abide by the Code of Conduct for Members of Auckland Council Advisory Panels.

 

 

Purpose

 

As one of council’s engagement mechanisms with the rural sector in Auckland, the Rural Advisory Panel provides advice to the council within the remit of the Auckland Plan on the following areas:

 

·       council policies, plans and strategies relevant to rural issues

·       regional and strategic matters relevant to rural issues

·       any matter of particular interest or concern to rural communities.

 

 

Outcomes

 

The panel’s advice will contribute to improving the outcomes of the rural sector as set out in the Auckland Plan.  The panel will provide advice through its agreed work programme.

 

Work programme

 

The panel must develop a work programme for the term.  The agendas should be focused and aligned with the Auckland Plan and the long-term plan.

 

 

Submissions

 

The panel cannot make formal submissions to Auckland Council on council strategies, policies and plans, for example, the annual plan.  However, the panel may be asked for informal feedback during a consultative process.

 

In its advisory role to the council, the panel may have input into submissions made by the council to external organisations but does not make independent submissions, except as agreed with the council.

 

This does not prevent individual members being party to submissions outside their role as panel members.

 

 

Review

 

The form and functioning of the panel may be reviewed prior to or after, the end of the year 2022.

 


Rural Advisory Panel

05 November 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                 5

2          Declaration of Interest                                          5

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         5

4          Extraordinary Business                                       5

5          Chair's update                                                       7

6          Healthy Waters regular update                           9

7          Essential Freshwater update - regulatory instrument consultation and guidance publications                                                         13

8          Update on National Policy Statement - Urban Development                                                       65

9          Draft Lifestyle Block Emergency Preparedness Handbook                                                            67

10        Auckland Transport - public consultation on proposed speed limit changes                          69

11        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Rural Advisory Panel:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Friday, 6 August 2021, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 

 


Rural Advisory Panel

05 November 2021

 

 

Chair's update

File No.: CP2021/15647

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To riro / receive an update from the Chairperson, Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Deputy Mayor will discuss matters of relevance to the rural sector.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rural Advisory Panel:

a)      riro / receive the update from the Chairperson, Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sandra Gordon - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Warren Maclennan – Lead Officer

 


Rural Advisory Panel

05 November 2021

 

 

Healthy Waters regular update

File No.: CP2021/15886

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the panel on Healthy Waters’ current operational work affecting the rural sector.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides updates on current priority issues for Healthy Waters in the rural sector.

3.       A further update report will be provided to the panel at its February 2022 business meeting.

North-west flooding

4.       On 30 and 31 August 2021, an extreme rain event resulted in record rainfall over a 12-hour period. Kumeu Township recorded 208mm of rainfall, and the Kumeu River flow gauging site recorded its highest level and flow in its 43 years of record. Monitoring in Piha also recorded 205mm of rainfall in the same period.

5.       The event significantly affected communities across north-west Auckland.

6.       A total of 210 requests for service for flood issues were received via the council call centre and six habitable floors were reported as flooded across the region. Additional support was sought by residents from emergency services such as the fire service.

7.       In Kumeu much of the commercial or industrial area was flooded, with floodwaters entering many buildings, damaging equipment and vehicles. The majority of the floodplain area was active during this event.

8.       In Bethells Beach the main road was washed out resulting in the beach community being isolated during the event and immediately after the event. During this time the Bethells community activated their community resilience plan and received help from the wider local community.

9.       In Piha, the Piha Stream flooded, with flood waters overtopping Glenesk Road and flooding the campgrounds. The flooding of the campgrounds, including Les Waygood campground, Piha Mill Camp and the Piha Domain, was expected, with management interventions in place prohibiting camping in the known flood areas after the 2019 floods.

10.     The amount of rain which fell during the event far exceeded what stormwater pipes can practically be designed to accommodate. Once rainfall exceeds pipe capacity, flow travels overland. Surface water is mapped for extreme rainfall events resulting in floodplains. The areas flooded in this event match the council’s published floodplains.

11.     Operationally, Healthy Waters initiated inspection of critical structures (such a culvert inlets and bridges) in the days leading up to the event to ensure they were not blocked. Following the event, the teams have inspected numerous issues and clean up works are ongoing. In the medium-term council will look at how the infrastructure and floodplains managed water flow in this event and assess whether any additional work and investment is required. Long-term investment prioritisation will be influenced by the Auckland Water Strategy, Too Much Water policy, and other locally specific plans such as the Kumeu-Huapai Centre Plan.

12.     Flood events, and subsequent damage to public and private property will become more frequent as we continue to see the impacts of climate change and as more land is developed. Auckland Council considers these risks when planning development zones and prioritising infrastructure investment.

13.     Over the next few months, the council will continue to work through our post-event analysis including the accuracy of flood modelling, early warning system options, future infrastructure investment needs, and reviewing operational work following flooding.

Onsite wastewater system compliance programme

14.     Healthy Waters and Regulatory staff are working to deliver the onsite wastewater system compliance programme, funded by the water quality targeted rate. The programme aims to increase monitoring of maintenance of Auckland’s 40,000 onsite wastewater systems. This work includes educating property owners, working with the servicing industry, improving internal data management systems, and undertaking compliance investigations.

15.     Historically, most onsite wastewater systems have not been monitored for maintenance. Without proper maintenance, wastewater is not adequately treated and can harm the natural environment.

16.     Since 2018, this programme has been piloted in the Waiheke, Waitākere Ranges and Rodney local board areas with a focus on  raising awareness of maintenance requirements through education and compliance investigations. This will continue in the Franklin local board area through 2021/2022 with service subsidies, public meetings, and community events.

17.     Staff have investigated maintenance compliance of over 1,000 systems in high-risk catchments, as identified by Safeswim. These investigations involve visiting properties within a catchment, discussing maintenance requirements with residents and property owners, requesting maintenance records, and following up on non-compliant systems. Water quality improvements have been observed in all catchments when 95 per cent of systems within a catchment are maintained.

18.     Staff have also been working closely with the onsite wastewater system servicing companies to standardise maintenance. This has mainly been through the co-development of a standard app-based form for technicians to use when they are servicing a system. The council then processes the information which can be shared with the service company and property owner. Since December 2019, the council has received over 10,200 forms.

19.     As it has not been practical to manually process the maintenance records and compliance processes, the current focus of work is developing a database in SAP to record the status of onsite wastewater systems and manage enforcement actions. This work began in March 2021 to support the Waitākere pump-out service and is expected to be completed in early 2022 to support routine records requests.

20.     From mid-2022, Auckland Council will begin routinely requesting maintenance records to ensure compliance with the rules set by the Auckland Unitary Plan. If an onsite wastewater system is not performing adequately, or if the property owner fails to supply adequate maintenance records, the council will apply a graduated enforcement approach.

21.     Auckland Council is the first in New Zealand to use digital tools in this way. Auckland Council is hoping to provide guidance to other councils seeking to better manage the risks of onsite wastewater systems as water quality continues to be a high priority.

Stormwater Bylaw 2015 amendments

22.     The Stormwater Bylaw 2015 review was completed in 2020 (REG/2020/43), and the Governing Body approved the Statement of Proposal to amend the Stormwater Bylaw for public consultation (GB/2021/102).

23.     The public consultation period was open between 17 September and 27 October 2021. Two online Have Your Say events were held to support engagement during the COVID-19 lockdown. The Rural Advisory Panel can provide formal feedback at its 5 November meeting as a late submission.


 

24.     The main proposals for the amendments include:

·        specifying controls, codes of practice or guidelines for managing the public stormwater network and private stormwater systems

·        considering additional requirements for vesting of public assets and approvals under the bylaw, including the ability to assess the carbon lifecycle associated with the construction and operation of new stormwater network assets, as well as mana whenua values

·        requiring approvals for modifications or new engineered wastewater overflow points into the stormwater network to assist with the protection of public health and safety when the overflow points activate

·        restricting or excluding certain activities for parts of the stormwater network to protect public health and safety from activities such as fishing or kayaking in stormwater treatment devices like ponds and constructed wetlands

·        updating the bylaw wording, format, and definitions.

25.     The proposed amendments are not expected to have significant impacts on rural areas when compared to the current Stormwater Bylaw. This is because there are no additions that are specifically aimed at rural areas, and there are no significant changes to the current rules around ensuring a free flow of water for drains. However, the Stormwater Bylaw could be used to help regulate drainage in rural areas, especially around ensuring drains and channel are not obstructed and have a free flow of water.

26.     All local boards were notified of the Stormwater Bylaw public consultation and interested local boards will have an opportunity to consider feedback from residents in their local board area and provide input to the Bylaw Panel.

27.     Mana whenua provided feedback on the Stormwater Bylaw at the monthly kaitiaki project hui in April 2020 and May 2021. The main feedback related to concerns around infrastructure developments on Māori land, and the enforcement and monitoring of public and private stormwater systems that affect Te Mauri o te Wai. Mana whenua were invited to provide formal submission during the public consultation.

28.     The Bylaw Panel members, Councillor Cooper (chair), Councillor Newman and Independent Māori Statutory Board Member Wilcox, have been appointed to receive and deliberate on the feedback from the public consultation in March 2022. The Governing Body is expected to adopt the amended bylaw in April 2022.

Drought

29.     After consistent rainfall throughout September and October, dam storage is 93.3 per cent (21 October) compared to a historical average of 91 per cent for this time of year.

30.     In rural areas the welfare water tanks remain in place and the additional tank supply points established for the drought will be kept in operation.

31.     Watercare are constantly assessing the municipal water supply situation as the dam levels rise. On 21 October 2021, the Governing Body resolved to lift all current water use restrictions, effective 23 October 2021.

32.     Projects to increase treatment and storage capacity continue as part of Watercare’s programme of works.

33.     Slow recharge aquifers, particularly in Franklin, remain low but generally aquifer levels and soil moisture are improving across the region.

34.     Risks identified early in the drought response have not eventuated. Staff continue to monitor these risks.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rural Advisory Panel:

a)      receive the update on Healthy Waters’ current operational work affecting the rural sector.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Elizabeth Johnson – Senior Specialist, Wai Ora Strategic Programmes

Andrew Chin – Head of Healthy Waters Strategy

Authorisers

Craig Mcilroy – General Manager Healthy WatersBarry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services
Warren Maclennan – Lead Officer

 


Rural Advisory Panel

05 November 2021

 

 

Essential Freshwater update - regulatory instrument consultation and guidance publications

File No.: CP2021/15911

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on the central government Essential Freshwater programme, following the report to the last panel meeting of 6 August 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Central government’s Essential Freshwater programme has several regulatory instruments that came into effect from 3 September 2020. Key regulatory instruments of relevance to this update include:

·    the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 (NPS-FM)

·    the National Environmental Standards for Freshwater Management 2020 (NES-F), and

·    the Resource Management (Stock Exclusion) Regulations 2020.

3.       As previously advised, these regulatory instruments were adopted by central government at pace, and various implementation concerns arose. Central government has been working with various interests to address these concerns since that time.

Central government discussion documents requesting feedback

4.       On 14 July 2021 central government released two discussion documents, firstly to refine some of the settings contained within one of the regulatory instruments, and secondly to advance a proposed new regulatory instrument for farm planning:

·    Stock exclusion regulations – Proposed changes to the low slope map and

·    Freshwater farm plan regulations.

5.       Council staff provided an overview of the two discussion documents to the Rural Advisory Panel on 6 August 2021. In the interests of efficiency, staff elected to provide technical feedback through the regional sector submission (comprised of 16 regional councils and unitary authorities) on 26 August 2021.

6.       Council staff acknowledge freshwater farm plans will be an important tool used to achieve freshwater outcomes, although there are several practical concerns on how council’s regional planning expectations might be given effect through the proposed tool. Similarly, resources will be required to support implementation while third parties help themselves and their sector more directly on the ground. A copy of the regional sector submission to central government is provided as Attachment A.

7.       On 26 August 2021 central government released Managing intensive winter grazing – A discussion document on proposed changes to intensive winter grazing for public consultation. The proposed changes include:

·        amendments to the default conditions (e.g. ‘maximum land slope’ of 10 degrees permitted for this activity without need for consent), to make compliance with the framework more practical, and

·        other key considerations about the distinction between permitted activity status and when a resource consent would be required, for example the need to obtain a certified farm plan if default permitted activity conditions could not be met, and

·        implementation timeframes, with the proposal to defer the effective date until 1 November 2022, such that the provisions would not apply during the 2022 winter.

8.       Public consultation closed on 7 October 2021. Intensive winter grazing is not a common practice in the Auckland region. The regional sector made a submission (Attachment B). Auckland Council technical staff kept abreast of what the regional sector proposed to submit.

9.       On 3 September 2021, central government released Managing our wetlands – A discussion document on proposed changes to the wetland regulations. Proposed wetland regulation amendments in the NPS-FM and the NES-F include changes in natural wetland definition, provisions to better enable restoration, maintenance and biosecurity activities, and to potentially provide additional consenting pathways for activities including quarries, landfills, cleanfills, managed fills, mineral mining, and urban development.

10.     Initial staff views on the complex regulatory proposals were canvassed with the Planning Committee on 30 September 2021 (Attachment C). The Planning Committee resolved to delegate sign-off for the Auckland Council submission to a small group of members before the 27 October submission deadline. Auckland Council’s submission should be available to circulate to Rural Advisory Panel members at or soon after its November 2021 meeting, around the same time as circulation to the full membership of the Planning Committee.

Guidance documents

11.     There are some new technical guidance documents and other items published by both central government and Auckland Council since the last Rural Advisory Panel update in August 2021. These include:

·    Defining ‘natural wetlands’ and ‘natural inland wetlands’. (MFE, September 2021)

·    Freshwater consultation 2021: questions and answers on freshwater farm plans, stock exclusion low slope maps, and intensive winter grazing. (MFE, October 2021)

·    The Government response to the findings of the overseer peer review report (MFE, August 2021)

·    Wetland mapping methods proof of concept (MFE, October 2021)

·    Practice and Guidance note – Managing Natural Wetlands under the National Environmental Standards for Freshwater Regulations 2020 (Auckland Council, October 2021, as the law stands as of today).

12.     In addition to recently published guidance, in mid-October 2021 Research and Evaluation Unit (RIMU) staff coordinated feedback into technical NPS-FM guidance for the mandatory sediment-related attributes of visual clarity and deposited fine sediment, for river environments.

13.     This latest technical guidance will help councils who must set limits on resource use at the catchment scale to achieve their established objectives in regional plans for the two mandatory sediment-related attributes. The technical guidance will also help with monitoring of the attribute states to demonstrate progress towards the objectives. The feedback provided by a range of technical expertise from around the country will be considered by the research provider, NIWA, who is contracted to MFE to complete this guidance document in coming months.

14.     A lot of the work described in this brief report will hopefully better prepare councils and other interested parties with implementation of the component pieces of the Essential Freshwater programme, as there are several statutory obligations that require active consideration. This will become more evident when regulatory instruments are better integrated in their delivery over the next number of years. There is a lot of upskilling involved within council environments where new approaches need to be adopted, let alone other interests.

15.     There are additional guidance documents (e.g. mahinga kai considerations, when implementing the National Objectives Framework of NPS-FM) and other initiatives (e.g. fish passage, Nitrogen cap calculator) that are either underway or due for completion, and these can be reported to the Rural Advisory Panel in the first half of the 2022 calendar year.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rural Advisory Panel:

a)      receive the update on central government’s Essential Freshwater programme including:

i)       council staff technical input to the freshwater farm planning regulatory instrument discussion document through the regional sector, noting the attached copy of the subsequent regional sector submission to central government

ii)       council staff advice provided to the Planning Committee on Auckland Council’s consideration of central government’s discussion document on managing our wetlands, noting that a copy of Auckland Council submission will be made available to the Rural Advisory Panel before end of November 2021.

iii)      advice on recent central government publications and guidance documents to support the implementation of central government’s Essential Freshwater programme, in addition to an Auckland Council Practice and Guidance note on natural wetlands.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

LGNZ Submission Freshwater Farm Plan Regulations 30 September 2021

17

b

LGNZ Submission Intensive Winter Grazing Regulations 7 October 2021

43

c

Planning Committee report, proposed wetland changes, 30 September 2021

51

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Dave Allen - Manager Natural Environment Strategy

Monica Xu - Senior Analyst Natural Environment Strategy

Authorisers

Jacques Victor – General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Warren Maclennan – Lead Officer

 


Rural Advisory Panel

05 November 2021

 

 

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05 November 2021

 

 

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Rural Advisory Panel

05 November 2021

 

 

Update on National Policy Statement - Urban Development

File No.: CP2021/16178

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on the National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS-UD) and Council’s response to its implementation requirements.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The NPS-UD seeks to improve the responsiveness and competitiveness of residential and business land markets. In particular, it requires local authorities to enable more development capacity, so that more homes can be built in response to demand. The NPS-UD provides policy direction to make sure capacity is provided in accessible places, helping homes to be built in the places that are close to jobs, community services, public transport and other public amenities.

3.       The NPS-UD does not require that rural land be rezoned for urban purposes.  It will, however, mean that the townships (such as Warkworth and Pukekohe) that service rural communities will be rezoned to provide for more intensive housing. 

4.       The Council will be informing and engaging with communities in the first half of 2022.  The changes to the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) are required to be publicly notified by August 2022, and public submissions will be called for in August 2022. 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rural Advisory Panel:

a)      receive the update on central government’s National Policy Statement on Urban Development

Horopaki

Context

5.       National Policy Statements are issued under the Resource Management Act 1991 (the RMA). They provide national direction for matters of national significance relevant to sustainable management and allow government to prescribe objectives and policies for matters of national significance.  The NPS-UD is part of the Government’s Urban Growth Agenda. This Agenda states that to support productive and well-functioning cities it is important that regional policy statements and regional and district plans provide adequate opportunity for land development for business and housing to meet community needs. The stated potential benefits of flexible urban policy include higher productivity and wages, shorter commute times, lower housing costs, social inclusion, and more competitive urban land markets. 

6.       The NPS-UD introduces a number of new requirements that Council is required to implement during 2022.  These fall into categories associated with intensifying the “urban environment”, which is mainly the land that is within the AUP Rural Urban Boundary.  It does not require the rezoning of rural land for urban purposes. 

7.       The NPS-UD will also be amended by the forthcoming legislation that has been tabled as a Bill in Parliament.  This amendment to the RMA seeks to simplify some aspects of the analysis required to identify the nature of intensification around centers.  It will also introduce compulsory building heights and dwelling density, along with planning standards that replace existing AUP urban development standards. 

8.       Panel members can expect that the satellite townships (Warkworth and Pukekohe) as well as rural towns such as Wellsford and Helensville that service rural communities will be rezoned to provide more intensive housing. Smaller rural and coastal settlements are unlikely to be included as growth areas.

9.       A PowerPoint presentation will be provided at the meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Warren Maclennan – Lead Officer

 


Rural Advisory Panel

05 November 2021

 

 

Draft Lifestyle Block Emergency Preparedness Handbook

File No.: CP2021/16177

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Rural Advisory Panel with an update on the Lifestyle Block Emergency Preparedness Handbook and request the panel’s feedback on the first draft.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Whilst information for lifestyle block owners is available on numerous websites, there is no single source that lifestyle block owners can reference to get the information they need to prepare for and make well informed decisions to keep themselves, their families, and their animals safe during adverse events or emergencies.

3.       To address this need, Auckland Emergency Management (AEM) has partnered with Fire and Emergency New Zealand (FENZ), Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), and Famers’ Mutual Group (FMG) to develop an emergency preparedness handbook for lifestyle block owners. The handbook includes practical advice, with the aim of guiding the user to complete an emergency plan for their family, animals and lifestyle property.

4.       The topics covered in the handbook include:

·        Understanding the hazards on your property

·        Emergency alerts and warnings

·        Managing water on and off your property

·        Power and phone outages

·        Property access

·        Insurance

·        Making an emergency plan

·        What to do in certain emergencies – severe weather, tornado, flooding, fire, drought, volcanic eruption and earthquake and tsunami

·        Getting to know your neighbours

·        First aid kits

5.       Support for the handbook, and the topics included, was reaffirmed through the results of a survey of 229 lifestyle block owners in 2020.

6.       Once finalised, hard copy distribution of the handbook could be through channels such as lifestyle veterinary clinics, FENZ rural volunteers, real estate agents selling lifestyle block properties and retail outlets in lifestyle block areas. A digital version of the handbook will also be made available on Auckland Emergency Management and partner websites. Lifestyle Block community workshops may also be considered. 

7.       The first draft of the Lifestyle Block Emergency Preparedness Handbook will be available for targeted feedback before the end of the year. A survey monkey form has been developed to assist with the collection and collation of the feedback.

 


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rural Advisory Panel:

a)      receive the request to provide feedback on the draft Lifestyle Block Emergency Preparedness Handbook as part of the targeted feedback process.

b)      indicate what method of feedback would suit them best – the survey monkey form, a workshop or other.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bridget Vercoe – Principal Business Resilience

Authoriser

Warren Maclennan – Lead Officer

 


Rural Advisory Panel

05 November 2021

 

 

Auckland Transport - public consultation on proposed speed limit changes

File No.: CP2021/12184

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To hear from representatives of Auckland Transport on the public consultation on proposed speed limit changes and provide feedback.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Public consultation is now open on proposed speed limit changes on approximately 800 roads around Auckland – predominantly around schools and in South Auckland.  These proposed changes are part of the next phase of speed limit changes (Tranche 2A).

3.       Public consultation closes on 14 November 2021.

4.       Representatives from Auckland Transport will outline the proposed changes which are outlined below and detailed in the attached memorandum:

5.       The roads Auckland are proposing new speed limits on are:

Around schools

Approx. 462 roads near 57 schools around Auckland

Rural roads

Approx. 208 roads in Franklin including 33 with a high-risk of deaths or serious injuries occurring.

Town centre roads

Approx. 10 roads in Ōtara town centre

Residential roads

Approx. 80 roads in Manurewa

Community requests

Approx. 41 roads, mostly, in Freemans Bay and Ponsonby

6.       For more information and to learn which roads Auckland Transport are proposing to change the speed limits of, please click this link.

7.       If these proposed changes go ahead, they will be made by amendment to the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019.

8.       More information on the proposal is available on the Auckland Transport website.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rural Advisory Panel:

a)          mihi / thank representatives of Auckland Transport for their attendance and presentation.

b)      provide feedback on the proposal from Auckland Transport for speed limit changes.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memorandum - Auckland Transport - proposed speed limit changes

71

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sandra Gordon - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Warren Maclennan – Lead Officer

 


Rural Advisory Panel

05 November 2021

 

 

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