I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Upper Harbour Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

 

Thursday, 18 November 2021

9.30am

Via Skype for Business

 

Upper Harbour Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Lisa Whyte

 

Deputy Chairperson

Margaret Miles, QSM, JP

 

Members

Anna Atkinson

 

 

Uzra Casuri Balouch, JP

 

 

Nicholas Mayne

 

 

Brian Neeson, JP

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Max Wilde

Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

 

11 November 2021

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 4142684

Email: Max.Wilde@AucklandCouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Upper Harbour Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                             5

2          Apologies                                                                                                           5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                   5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                             5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                     5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                     5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                 6

11        Minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held Thursday, 21 October 2021                                                           7

12        Approval of concept design for public reserve, 1 Observation Green (Hobsonville)                                                                     21

13        Amendments to Upper Harbour Local Board 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services - Community Facilities work programme                                                                          59

14        Draft Contributions Policy 2021                                                 69

15        Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy                                                                                                      103

16        Approval for a new private road name at 2 Marlborough Crescent, Hobsonville                                                               141

17        Upper Harbour Local Board Input to Auckland Light Rail engagement July / August 2021                                               147

18        Governance forward work calendar                                         151

19        Record of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 14 and 28 October, and 4 November 2021             155

20        Local board members' reports - November 2021                   163

21        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)           confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 21 October 2021, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Upper Harbour Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Upper Harbour Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

Minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held Thursday, 21 October 2021

File No.: CP2021/16290

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      The open unconfirmed minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board ordinary meeting held on Thursday, 21 October 2021, are attached at item 11 of the agenda for the information of the local board only.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      note that the open unconfirmed minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held on Thursday, 21 October 2021, are attached at item 11 of the agenda for the information of the local board only and will be confirmed under item 4 of the agenda.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board open unconfirmed minutes - 21 October 2021

9

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Max Wilde - Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

Approval of concept design for public reserve, 1 Observation Green (Hobsonville)

File No.: CP2021/16753

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To approval the concept design for the development of the public reserve at 1 Observation Green, Hobsonville, and to progress the project to detailed design, procurement, and construction.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      As part of the Upper Harbour Local Board financial year 2021/2022 Community Facilities Work Programme, the local board approved a project Observation Green – develop local park amenities, for the development of a park at 1 Observation Green, Hobsonville.

3.      The local board allocated $20,000 of Locally Driven Initiative funding in financial year 2020/2021 and $740,000 of capital expenditure funding (growth funding) in financial year 2021/2022 for the Observation Green park development.

4.      A draft concept plan for the park was approved by the local board in May 2021 for consultation.

5.      Engagement with the community on the draft concept plan was undertaken in July 2021 through council’s on-line feedback forum Have Your Say and an on-site community day event.

6.      A final concept design has been developed based on community, iwi, and local board feedback. The local board indicated support for the concept design at a workshop in August 2021.

7.      The project will deliver on two Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes:

Outcome 1: Empowered, connected, and resilient Upper Harbour communities

Outcome 3: Healthy and active communities

8.      Risks associated with the project can be mitigated and managed. There may be delays and cost escalations with the sourcing and supply of materials and play equipment due to the Covid-19 pandemic, but it is anticipated that these will be ordered early to minimise any impact.

9.      Staff now seek approval of the final concept design before progressing the project to detailed design, procurement, and construction.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve the concept design for the development of the public reserve at 1 Observation Green, Hobsonville as per Attachment C of the agenda report and request staff to progress the project to detailed design, procurement, and construction.

 

Horopaki

Context

Background

10.    The public reserve is a 4,268 sqm flat site, surrounded by roads on three sides and town houses on the other. A concrete path separates the residential houses from the reserve. At the western corner of the reserve, it connects to a path network leading to Scott Point.
The reserve currently consists of lawn and in its current state provides limited usability for the community (shown in Figure 1).

A picture containing road, outdoor, sky, grass

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Figure 1: View of public reserve, 1 Observation Green, Hobsonville

11.    The park is located approximately 500 metres from Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park. Development of Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park commenced in October 2021 and the park will provide many recreational facilities including, but not limited to, sports fields, a playground, toilet facilities and a walkway network through the park. The facilities provided at 1 Observation Green have been designed to complement those at Scott Point Sustainable Sport Park.

12.    Auckland Council’s Community Facilities Department investigated development options for the public reserve at 1 Observation Green, Hobsonville, as part of the Community Facilities Work Programme 2020/2021 (resolution number UH/2020/86, 20 August 2020).

13.    Further requirements were identified based on a site survey and collaboration with staff from Community Services, Local Board Services, and the Strategic Broker. Initial brainstorming sessions with Scott Point Residents Group (SPRG) were also held on 28 October 2020 and 30 November 2020.

Draft Concept Plan

14.    A draft concept plan was developed and presented to the Upper Harbour Local Board at a workshop on 11 February 2021.

15.    On 20 May 2021 the local board approved the draft concept plan for public consultation (resolution number UH/2021/50).

16.    As a part of the Upper Harbour Local Board financial year 2021/2022 Community Facilities Work Programme, the local board approved a project for a park development at 1 Observation Green, Hobsonville with a budget of $740,000.

Community Engagement

17.    Engagement with the community on the draft concept plan was undertaken through council’s on-line feedback forum Have Your Say between 12 to 30 July 2021. A total of 16 responses were received (refer to Attachment A – Have Your Say July 2021 survey report).

 

 

 

18.    In addition, a consultation event was held at the park on 24 July 2021 and feedback was gathered on the day. A total of 86 responses via post-it notes and children’s drawings were recorded at the event (refer to Attachment B - Feedback Summary, consultation event 24 July 2021).

19.    Overall, the community indicated support of the park development, and the draft concept design received positive feedback. In general, the responses suggested that the community would like to see the number of activities provided at the reserve increased by including more play and recreational activities. There was conflicting feedback about what these activities should be. 

20.    Staff shared the engagement feedback with the local board at a workshop on 12 August 2021 and proposed changes to the draft concept plan based on the community responses. The local board provided feedback at the workshop that has been included in the final concept design.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

21.    The final concept design creates a park that functions as a central place for the neighbouring community to come together and where children can play. The design retains the feeling of open space that the park currently offers (refer to Attachment C – Observation Green Hobsonville, Developed Concept Plan Update October 2021).

22.    A natural theme has been proposed, using materials such as timber, rocks, rope, grass mounds, bark, and plantings. The colour palette is complementary with colour added to play elements within the park.

23.    Low to medium height mounds will be formed to improve shelter within the reserve from the occasional strong winds, without limiting overall visibility. The mounds will be planted with low growing plants.

24.    In the north-western corner of the reserve a communal meeting area will include picnic tables, a drinking fountain, and a shade structure. Additional space has been provided in this area for hard surface free play and activities. Concrete paths through the reserve will improve the reserves connection with the surrounding path networks.

25.    A fitness trail along the main concrete path invites users of all ages to test, improve, and maintain their fitness. Benches will be placed throughout the reserve to allow users to rest and enjoy their surroundings.

26.    As a large play space is included in the development of the Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park, the park at Observation Green will include elements to supplement, rather than duplicate the play opportunities. This reserve will host learn-to-ride paths which run around a small play space, and a pump section with small bumps is included.

27.    The play space will have a natural timber theme, with rope fencing. Water play has not been included as part of the design.

28.    Currently the reserve is used by children to kick-a-ball and a large free space will be maintained in the development to allow for this in future. Playful elements, like wobbly goals, will be included within the reserve’s free space. This free space will also provide an area for communal events.

29.    Cost estimates for the park indicate that the development can be achieved within the proposed budget of $740,000 (including professional services and construction costs).


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

30.    The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·    to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

31.    It is anticipated that there will be an increase in carbon emissions from construction, including contractor emissions. Staff will seek to minimise carbon and contractor emissions as far as possible when delivering the project.

32.    Maximising the upcycling and recycling of existing material will be prioritised to ensure minimum impact. The design aims to minimise earthworks and reduce the quantity of soil removed from site by creating mounds that will be landscaped.

33.    Play equipment is proposed to be constructed from a natural raw material, Robinia acacia wood. The wood is characterised by natural, bright colours, has high weather resistance, does not require impregnation treatment, and can be anchored directly in the ground.

34.    The design includes plantings of native plant species as well as flowering shrubs, specimen and fruit trees to mitigate the impact on the environment by increasing plant diversity and minimising stormwater flow to adjacent areas.

35.    Paths aim to provide links to neighbouring streets to encourage walking throughout the community. This will have a positive climate impact.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.    The concept design was developed in collaboration with staff from, Community Empowerment unit, Community Services and Community Facilities.

37.    Collaboration with staff will be ongoing to ensure that the development of the park is appropriately integrated into the operational maintenance and asset management systems once completed.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.    The project aligns with the following Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives:

Table 1: Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives

Outcome

Objective

Project alignment

Outcome 1: Empowered, connected, and resilient Upper Harbour communities

Our diverse communities feel connected, confident in their ability to face adversity together and are able to influence what happens in their neighbourhoods.

Engagement with the local community and iwi was undertaken and feedback was incorporated into the concept design.

Outcome 3: Healthy and active communities

People of all abilities have access to a wide variety of sports and recreation opportunities and well-maintained parks and community facilities.

Development of the park will provide improved facilities through the construction of a play space, fitness trail, children’s bike track, paths, furniture, and a shaded seating area. The completed development will provide greater opportunities for the community to be more active.

 

39.    Staff worked closely with the Scott Point Residents Group. The Scott Point Residents Group assisted in the development of the draft concept plan by sharing their understanding of the community’s requirements for this reserve.

40.    The draft concept plan was presented to the Upper Harbour Local Board at a workshop on 11 February 2021. The local board provided feedback and indicated support of the draft concept plan.

41.    On 20 May 2021 the local board approved the draft concept plan for public consultation (resolution number UH/2021/50).

42.    Feedback was sought from the community on the design through Have Your Say and a community day event at the park. Overall, the community were in support of the park development and draft concept plan.

43.    A workshop was held with the local board on 12 August 2021 and proposed changes to the draft concept plan were discussed, based on the community responses. Feedback from the local board has been incorporated into the final concept design. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.    Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2012-2022, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework and Local Board Plans.

45.    The draft concept plan was shared at the North-West Mana Whenua Forum in July 2021. Feedback on the design included the sourcing of basalt rock for the project from local quarries, the use of water within the design and a water fountain, consideration of native plant species, and a desire to re-instate the local ecology of the space through re-introducing native plant species. The feedback was taken into consideration along with community and local board views when developing the final concept design.

46.    Further opportunities exist to work with both Te Kawerau a Maki and Ngati Whatua o Kaipara on aspects of the detailed design to align with design features incorporated in the nearby Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park project.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

47.    The project had an operational expenditure budget of $20,000, allocated from the Locally Driven Initiatives Fund in financial year 2020/2021. A total of $18,505 was spent on site investigation, development of the draft concept plan and project management costs.

48.    A total budget of $740,000 of Capital Expenditure growth funding has been approved by the local board for this project in financial year 2021/2022. The budget will fund the engagement phase, final design plans, construction of the park development and project management costs.

49.    The expected consequential operational expenditure to maintain this playground will be approximately $10,000–$15,000 per annum. This is based on the actual maintenance costs of the newly completed playground at Huntington Reserve which is of a comparable scale. This will be varied into the maintenance contract via the variation tracker at the conclusion of the project.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

50.    The risks associated with the project can be mitigated and managed. There may be delays and cost escalations with the sourcing and supply of materials and play equipment due to the Covid-19 pandemic, but it is anticipated that these will be ordered early to minimise any impact.

51.    The construction works will be tendered to experienced contractors and managed to an agreed programme and timeframe. Construction work can continue under Covid-19 lockdown Levels 1-3, however if Auckland is placed in Level 4 in the future this may impact on the ability to deliver the project on time.

52.    Cost estimates for construction based on the concept design indicate the development is achievable within the allocated funding and a contingency has been allowed for unforeseen situations.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

53.    Table 2 below summarises the anticipated next steps and estimated delivery timeframes for the project. The estimated timeframes assume successful and timely completion of each identified project step.

Table 2:  Project phasing and timelines

Project phase

Planned completion timeframe

Iwi engagement

Specific engagement with the two iwi partners involved in the nearby Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park development, to understand possible design synergies between the two park projects.

November 2021

Play equipment ordered

December 2021

Detailed design

January 2022

Preparation of tender documentation

February 2022

Procure physical works contractor/build partner

The work will be tendered and awarded in alignment with procurement guidelines

March 2022

Physical works

Accurate commencement and duration of the physical works is not known at this time and will be confirmed at a later stage. It is envisaged to be between the timeframe specified.

 

April 2022 – June 2022

 


 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Have Your Say_July 2021_survey report

29

b

Feedback summary - Consultation Event 24 July 2021

45

c

Observation Green Developed Concept Plan Update October 21

49

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Angela Level, Senior Project Manager, Community Facilities

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

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18 November 2021

 

 

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18 November 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

Amendments to Upper Harbour Local Board 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services - Community Facilities work programme

File No.: CP2021/16637

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To approve amendments to the Upper Harbour Local Board 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services - Community Facilities work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Upper Harbour Local Board approved the 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services work programme on 17 June 2021 (resolution UH/2021/71).

3.      As projects progress through the design and delivery process, the specific work required and the cost of delivery can change, impacting the approved budget. As a result, variations may be required to the work programme to accommodate updated timeframes and final costs for some projects. 

4.      Staff have identified two projects that require additional renewals funding to the amount that was allocated in financial years 2021/2022 and 2022/2023:

i)          ID 24280 Meadowood House – Refurbish building – an increase of $115,000.

ii)         ID 20471 Fernhill Escarpment – renew walkway and wayfinding signage – an increase of $223,115.

5.      In order to accommodate this budget increase whilst still staying within the overall 3-year budget envelope, staff have identified one project that requires to be deferred to start in financial year 2024/2025:

i)          ID 30457 Upper Harbour – renew reserve roads and carparks – revised financial years 2021/2022 and 2022/2023 budget $0 and 2023/2024 budget $41,885, deferral of funding of $338,115.

6.      The proposed variations are within the Upper Harbour Local Board 2021- 2024 financial year budget envelopes and will not substantially impact the approved projects or the overall work programme.

7.      Staff recommend that the Upper Harbour Local Board approve the variations to the 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services – Community Facilities work programme.

8.      Subject to the local board’s decision, staff will update the work programme and progress updates will be provided to the local board as part of the quarterly reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve the deferral of ABS: Local Renewals Capex funding in financial year 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 to financial year 2024/2025 for project:

i)        ID30457 Upper Harbour – renew reserve roads and carparks - revised financial year 2021/2022 and 2022/2023 total project costs to $0 and 2023/2024 to $41,885.

b)      approve the reallocation of ABS: Local Renewals Capex funding within the work programme 2021-2024 for project:

i)        ID 24280 Meadowood House – Refurbish building - revised financial year   2022/2023 project costs $235,000 an increase of $115,000.

ii)       ID 20471 Fernhill Escarpment – renew walkway and wayfinding signage – revised financial year 2021/2022 project costs of $797,384 an increase of $223,115.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.      The Upper Harbour Local Board approved the Customer and Community Services work programme for financial year 2021/2022 on 17 June 2021. The local board also approved the financial years 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programmes in principle (resolution UH/2021/71).

10.    The budget allocated for all projects in the work programme are best estimates and are subject to change and refinements. As a project progresses, the specific work required and the cost of delivery could either exceed the original estimated budget or the anticipated delivery cost could be less than the approved budget. As a result, variations maybe required to the work programme to accommodate final project costs.

11.    The delivery timeline of a project may change following the completion of the investigation and design phase. This may also require a variation to the programme.

Meadowood House (Project ID 24280)

12.    The full scope of works that are required for the refurbishment of Meadowood House have now been scoped. For the exterior of the building this includes a partial roof renewal, replacement of the old skylight, replacement of the base boards around the building, underfloor insulation, refurbishment of the gate to the playground at the back of the building and full repaint. Work needed inside the building includes renewal of the toilets, a full kitchen replacement, lighting upgrade to LED to parts of the interior, full vinyl flooring replacement, full repaint and new acoustic paneling in the main hall.

13.    A closed tender has been completed with two submissions received and evaluated. In order to get all of the work completed that has been scoped for this refurbishment and taking into account the recent increases in construction costs that we are experiencing nationwide, the total costs will be approximately $435,000. As there was only $320,000 of total budget allocated to this project, it means that an additional $115,000 is required.

Fernhill Escarpment walkway renewal (Project ID 20471)

14.    In September 2021 the local board approved the detailed design for the improvements to the Fernhill Escarpment Reserve path network (UH/2021/115) and requested that staff progress to construction of the project.

15.    Subsequent to this resolution the project was tendered to the market and two submissions were received. The winning tender based on price and not price attributes came in over the currently allocated budget.

16.    Negotiations between the contractor and council were undertaken and a price to complete the full scope was agreed.

17.    As with the majority of projects that are being tendered, recent increases in construction costs that we are experiencing nationwide have impacted on the price to complete the work. The total costs to complete the full scope of the project will be $905,115. As there was only $682,000 of budget allocated to this project, it means that an additional $223,115 is required.

Upper Harbour – renew reserve roads and carparks (Project ID 30457)

18.    The renewal of the carparks at Sanders Reserve, Luckens Reserve and Collins Reserve have not been identified as urgent works. Staff recommend delaying the project starting in financial year 2023/2024. The investigation and design phase will begin in financial year 2023/2024, with prioritisation of car parks renewal and scope to be presented to the local board prior to completing construction in the following years.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

19.    Staff recommend variations to the 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services – Community Facilities work programme for financial year 2021/2022 and 2022/2023 as shown in attachment A and outlined in Table 1 below:

Table 1: Customer and Community Services work programme 2021-2024 variations required:

Project ID

Project Name

Variations 2021/2022

Description

30457

Upper Harbour – renew reserve roads and carparks

Proposed to defer the project to FY2024/2025

Approved ABS: Capex renewal budget in:

2021/2022: $20,000

2022/2023: $170,000

2023/2024: $190,000

Revised ABS: Capex renewal budget in:

2021/2022: $0

2022/2023: $0

2023/2024: $41,885

2024/2025+: $338,115

 

The renewal of these carparks at Sanders Reserve, Luckens Reserve and Collins Park is not urgent and staff recommend to delay this project to start in financial year 2023/2024. Staff will progress the design and investigation in financial year 2023/2024. Once scope and cost of works for each site is known, staff will workshop with the board to determine the priority order to complete the renewals.

Budget allocations to deliver the full scope of works from financial year 2024/2025 will be discussed with the local board as part of the development of next year’s work programme.

24280

Meadowood House – Refurbish building

Proposed increase in funding for FY2022/2023 is $115,000

Approved ABS: Capex renewal budget in:

2021/2022: $174,150

2022/2023:120,000

 

 

 

Revised ABS: Capex renewal budget in:

2021/2022: $174,150

2022/2023: $235,000

Budget increase required to deliver the full scope of the renewal.

The ideal time to get the refurbishment underway is whilst we are in Level three Covid-19 restrictions and the building is closed to the public. If we do go down to level 2, December/January is also a good time to complete the works as over the Christmas holiday period the community doesn’t tend to use the building as much. This timeframe has been communicated with the centre management and all users have been informed.

20471

Fernhill Escarpment - renew walkway and wayfinding signage

Proposed increase in funding for FY2021/2022 is $223,115

Approved ABS: Capex renewal budget in 2021/2022: $574,269

Revised ABS: Capex renewal budget in 2021/2022: $797,384

Budget increase required to deliver the approved scope of the renewal as detailed in paragraph 17.

 

20.    The proposed variations are within the overall budget envelopes for each of the three years of the work programme and will not significantly impact the approved projects or the overall work programme.

21.    Staff recommend that the Upper Harbour Local Board approve the proposed variations to the 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services – Community Facilities work programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.    The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·    to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

23.    The proposed budget variations have no direct effect on climate change.  Each project is considered individually to assess the impacts of climate change and the appropriate approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The types of impact considered includes:

·    maximum upcycling and recycling of old material 

·    installation of energy efficiency measures

·    building design to ensure the maximum lifetime and efficiency of the building is obtained 

·    lifecycle impacts of construction materials (embodied emissions) 

·    exposure of building location to climate change hazards (sea level rise, flooding (floodplains), drought, heat island effect)

·    anticipated increase in carbon emissions from construction, including contractor emissions

·    lifecycle impacts of construction materials.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.    The decision sought for this report has no direct impact on other parts of the council group. The overall 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in an integrated team.

25.    Collaboration with staff will be ongoing throughout the life of the projects to ensure integration into the operational maintenance and asset management systems.  

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.    Community facilities and open spaces provide important community services to the people of the local board area. They contribute to building strong, healthy and vibrant communities by providing spaces where Aucklanders can participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art and recreational activities. These activities improve lifestyles and a sense of belonging and pride amongst residents.

27.    The activities in the work programme align with the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020 outcome.

Table 2: Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020 outcome and objective

Outcome

Objective

Outcome 1: Healthy and Active Communities

Upper Harbour has a range of fit-for-purpose multi-use sports, recreation and community facilities that serve a growing and diverse community.

28.    The proposed variation for Meadowood House was presented to the local board as part of the August/September Community Facilities Local Board update as per the major variation process. The local board expressed support for the variation in principle.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.    Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework and Local Board Plans.

30.    Consideration is given to how the provision of services, facilities and open spaces can support the aspirations of Māori, promote community relationships, connect to the natural environment, and foster holistic wellbeing of whānau, hapu and iwi Māori.

31.    The approved work programme includes activities that will have an impact on a service, facility, location of significance to Māori. In these situations, appropriate and meaningful engagement and consultation will be undertaken.                

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.    The proposed variations are within the local board’s budget envelopes for each year and will not significantly impact the approved projects or the overall work programme.

33.    The proposed budget changes can be achieved by realignment of budget within the work programme as outlined in Table 3 below:

Table 3:  Community Facilities work programme ABS: Renewals Capex 2021-2024 - variations required

Project

Approved budget

Deferral to FY25

Increase in FY22 & FY23

Revised budget total FY22-24

Upper Harbour – renew reserve roads and carparks

$380,000

$338,115

$0

$41,885

Meadowood House – Refurbish building

$320,000

$0

$115,000

$435,000

Fernhill Escarpment -

renew walkway and

wayfinding signage

$682,000

$0

$223,115

$905,115

Total amount

$1,382,000

$338,115

$338,115

$1,382,000

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.    The COVID-19 pandemic could have a further negative impact on the delivery of the work programme if the COVID-19 alert level changes. 

35.    If the proposed variations to the Customer and Community Services work programme are not approved, there is a risk that the projects identified may not be delivered within financial year 2021/2022.

36.    If the proposed work has to be delayed, it will negatively impact the bookable spaces and general users of the Meadowood House as other timeframes for the delivery need to be identified. The facility must be shut down for the majority of time whilst the work is being completed.

37.    If assets are not renewed in a timely way, they may deteriorate further and need to be closed or removed. Staff will continue to monitor the condition of the assets and consider action to be taken in the future.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.    Subject to the local board’s decision, the Upper Harbour Local Board 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services – Community Facilities work programme will be amended to reflect the decision.

39.    Progress and updates on the work programme will be reported to the local board as part of the quarterly reports to the local board.  

40.    If approved, construction will commence on the renewal of Meadowood Community House in November 2021 and Fernhill Escarpment in early 2022 (subject to availability of materials).

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Proposed amendment to the 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services – Community Facilities work programme

67

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sandra May - Programme Manager

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 



Upper Harbour Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

Draft Contributions Policy 2021

File No.: CP2021/16632

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide feedback on the draft Contributions Policy 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Development contributions allow for an equitable and proportionate share of the total cost of growth-related capital expenditure to be recovered from the development community.

3.      The Finance and Performance Committee adopted the draft Contributions Policy 2021 for consultation at its meeting on 16 September 2021, FIN/2021/84. 

4.      Local board feedback is being sought to inform the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration of the adoption of the Contribution Policy 2021 in December 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the Contributions Policy 2021 on the key consultation topics:

i)        updating policy for capital projects in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031

ii)       inclusion of projects beyond 10-years to the policy in stages starting with Drury

iii)      requiring developers to pay their contributions earlier

iv)      proposal to support Māori development with grants

v)       any other issues.

Horopaki

Context

5.      Auckland’s population is expected to grow by 260,000 in the next ten years on top of the rapid population growth experienced in the last decade, bringing the projected population to approximately 1.9 million by 2031.

6.      Construction of 145,800 new dwellings is forecast in the next ten years. To support the development enabled by the Auckland Unitary Plan, the council is facing immediate demands for infrastructure in key growth areas and in response to construction on upzoned land, plan changes and the impact of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.      Development contributions allow for an equitable and proportionate share of the total cost of growth-related capital expenditure to be recovered from the development community. The Contributions Policy sets out how the council will recover from new development an appropriate and fair share of the cost of infrastructure investment attributable to growth. There were four key consultation topics:


 

 

a)    Updating policy for capital projects in the 10-year Budget

          The draft policy provides for the recovery of $2.4 billion of development contributions revenue from $9.0 billion of projects with a growth component included in the10-year budget.  The draft policy also included updated forecasts of population growth and dwelling construction. The combined impact of these changes is to lower the weighted average Development Contributions price from $23,900 to $21,100.

b)    Inclusion of projects beyond 10-years to the policy in stages starting with Drury

          Extensive work has been undertaken in recent years on the infrastructure requirements to support growth in the investment priority areas. However, further work is required before these costs can be included in the contributions policy. Area specific amendments to the contributions policy will be proposed for consultation as the information becomes available.

          The first step in the Contributions Policy 2021 will be to add a programme of expenditure to fund some of the key infrastructure required to support growth in the Drury area. The impact of this change is to raise the Development Contributions price in Drury to $84,900 from between $11,000 and $18,300.

c)    Requiring developers to pay their contributions earlier

          The council proposed that Development Contributions be paid at the time of building consent for all development (residential and non-residential) except non-commercial development on Māori land (explained further below). This requires Development Contributions due at building consent to be paid 6 to 24 months earlier than under the current policy and reverses the changes made to the policy in 2019. When combined with the other changes proposed this lower the weighted average Development Contributions price to $19,300.

d)    A proposal to support Māori development with grants

          The draft policy proposed continuing the support for marae development and papakāinga and Māori housing[1] on Māori land through grants available through the Cultural Initiatives Fund. These grants can cover payment of development contributions in appropriate circumstances, along with other kinds of development costs.

8.      The proposed changes to the Contributions Policy 2021 were reported to the Finance and Performance Committee at its meeting on 16 September- see Attachment A  Draft Contributions Policy 2021.

Consultation

9.      Formal public consultation was held in September and October 2021. To support the consultation a number of documents were made available on the Have Your Say website, https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/dc-policy.

10.    Two online Have Your Say events were held to provide opportunities for developers and other interested parties to learn more about the draft policy, ask questions and provide their feedback. A third event was also held to allow interested parties to present their views directly to the Finance and Performance Committee. All comments have been captured and will be reported through to the Finance and Performance Committee to inform decision-making on the final policy.

11.    A summary of the feedback received from submitters is set out in Attachment B: Draft Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement guidance

12.       Recommendations in this report have a neutral climate impact as they relate to the funding of capital investment rather than decisions on the activities to be undertaken.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views guidance

13.       The information presented on the projects included in the draft Contributions Policy 2021 was developed in conjunction with the following council-controlled organisations and council units:

·        Auckland Transport

·        Eke Panuku Development Auckland

·        Healthy Waters

·        Community Facilities

·        Community and Social Policy.

14.        The Chief Economist Unit and Research Investigations and Monitoring Unit worked with us on the impact of higher development contributions on the pace of development and on land and house prices. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.        The development contribution price varies by location depending on the cost of infrastructure required to support development in an area.

16.        Local board feedback is being sought to inform the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration of the adoption of the Contribution Policy 2021 in December 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.        Recent legislative changes require the contributions policy to support the development of Māori land. Feedback from iwi on the draft policy was sought as part of consultation and via engagement with the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum.  All developers, including mana whenua, were provided an opportunity to present their feedback to the Finance and Performance Committee on 12 October.

18.        The Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum have provided their feedback which has been included in Attachment B: Draft Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.    The 10-year budget assumes development contributions revenue of $2.7 billion. After completing the analysis of the cost of investments in the 10-year budget that can be recovered with development contributions and the impact of the proposed policy changes, it is estimated that the revenue will be $2.6 billion. The achievement of this revised revenue forecast requires as a first step the implementation of a contributions policy updated for the capital expenditure decisions in the 10-year budget and the other changes proposed in this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.    The recommendation requesting local boards views does not present any risk. The risks associated with amending the contributions policy are set out in the report to the 16 September Finance and Performance Committee, Attachment A: Development Contributions Policy 2021 Consultation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.    Feedback from the public consultation will be reported to the Finance and Performance Committee workshop on 10 November 2021.

22.    Potential changes to the draft will be reported at the Finance and Performance Committee workshop on 1 December 2021. Staff will report to Finance and Performance Committee for the final policy adoption on 9 December 2021. Local board feedback will be included in the report.

23.    The Contributions Policy 2021 is proposed to be implemented in January 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Development Contributions Policy 2021 report to the Finance and Performance Committee

73

b

Draft Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received

89

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Andrew Duncan - Manager Financial Policy

Authorisers

Ross Tucker - General Manager, Financial Strategy and Planning

Glenn Boyd – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy

File No.: CP2021/16733

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To support the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho/Thriving Communities Strategy 2022-2032.  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities was adopted in 2014 as council’s strategy for community and social wellbeing. A review of the plan in 2018 identified it needed to be refreshed to align with the Auckland Plan 2050 outcomes and better address the changes and challenges in Tāmaki Makaurau. 

3.      These challenges include growing socio-economic disparities, population growth and intensification, the impacts of climate change and more recently COVID-19. These impact on communities’ ability to thrive. 

4.      Through the refresh process we heard from diverse communities across the region on what is needed to help them thrive. These insights have shaped the draft strategy. 

5.      The draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities strategy sets out the high-level direction for the next 10 years to respond to these challenges and to what communities told us was important. 

6.      The draft strategy has four main outcome areas which are the building blocks for thriving: 

·    Manaakitanga | Quality of life: 

All Aucklanders enjoy the essentials of a good life and fulfil their potential  

·    Whanaungatanga | Community Connection: 
Aucklanders are connected and feel as though they belong 

·    Kotahitanga | Collective action:  

All Aucklanders can participate and they take collective action to meet common goals 

·    Kaitiakitanga | Sustainable futures:  

Aucklanders are connected to and care for the environment. 

 

7.      The high-level outcomes are supported by objectives that cascade to three key shifts in the way we work:  from “one-size fits all” to targeting our responses, from adhoc and siloed to working in integrated ways, and shifting from council as expert to enabling community leadership. 

8.      Four investment principles focus resources to impact on community challenges. This will ensure there is a strong, intentional link between aspiration, investment and action, and that we focus on communities who experience the greatest inequities.

9.      A key constraint is that there is currently no additional budget attached to the strategy. This means the pace of change will be reliant on future budget and implementation planning to either seek new investment or to refocus existing resources to the strategy’s objectives.

10.    Another limitation is that many of the barriers to people thriving relate to complex socio-economic factors where the council is not the primary deliverer.  

11.    The draft strategy will be reported to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in February 2022 for adoption. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      support the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Strategy 2022 – 2032.  

 

Horopaki

Context

12.    The Auckland Plan Participation and Belonging outcome in particular sets the aspiration that ‘All Aucklanders will be part of and contribute to society, access opportunities, and have the chance to develop to their full potential’ 

13.    Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities was adopted in 2014 as council’s community and social wellbeing plan. It is a core plan to deliver the Auckland Plan 2050 which has a strong focus on fostering an inclusive Auckland where everyone has the chance to thrive. 

14.    In 2018 a review of Ngā Hapori Momoho identified several improvement areas. This included refreshing the strategy to better align it the new Auckland Plan 2050 and to address the changes and growing challenges facing Auckland.  

Diverse community voices have shaped the draft strategy approach

 

15.    The refreshed draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving communities strategy (Attachment A) has been informed by feedback from the diverse communities of Tāmaki Makaurau, key sector stakeholders, partners, and mana whenua. These voices are central to both the content of the strategy and how it will be used.  

16.    During 2019 and 2020 staff looked at feedback from over 50 previous public engagements, and then undertook face to-face interviews, focus groups and online hui. We heard from over 400 community groups and leaders from across the region on what it means to thrive and what council can do to support that.  

17.    Staff presented the findings from this community engagement to local boards in April 2021 and can be viewed by the public by following this link: https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/thriving-communities

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Auckland is facing local and international challenges impacting thriving communities  

18.    At the 2018 Census there were nearly 1.6 million usual residents in Auckland, an increase of 11% since the 2013 Census, and this is projected to grow to 2.4 million by 2050[2].

19.    Tāmaki Makaurau is very diverse – it is home to the largest Polynesian population of any city in the world, and 40% of the population were born overseas.  

20.    Whilst many of those living in Auckland can make the most of all this region has to offer, there are still many who have limited capability to access social and economic resources and opportunities compared to the general population.  

21.    Many Aucklanders do not have access to the things they need to thrive. This restricts their ability to fully participate in society and in activities that have meaning and value to them. 

22.    Tāmaki Makaurau’s strong economic growth has not been shared equally, with Māori and Pasifika communities making considerably less each week than the rest of the Auckland population.  

23.    Over a third (38.5%) of Pasifika people and 46% of young people in Auckland are living in overcrowded and unsuitable homes[3].

24.    Only 50% of Aucklanders feel a sense of belonging in their neighbourhoods, and 49% have felt isolated and lonely[4]. 

25.    Tāmaki Makaurau is facing some key challenges over the next 10-20 years that provide the strategic drivers for the refreshed strategy. We need to respond to these if we want to maintain social cohesion and ensure all our people and communities are thriving.   

Challenge 1 

Challenge 2 

Challenge 3 

Growing wealth and income inequality will mean too many whānau cannot thrive. 

The pace and scale of growth and social change could undermine Aucklander’s sense of belonging and connection. 

Our changing climate will make outcomes worse for those communities already struggling. 

 

26.    More recently other significant changes both locally and globally are contributing to why we need a strategy that takes an intentional approach to supporting thriving, inclusive and sustainable communities:  

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Changing the way council works can help address community challenges 

27.    In recognition of the 2018 review findings and from our community and stakeholder engagement, we know there needed to be some key shifts in the underlying thinking and approach of the council. We also need to be explicit in our priorities. Key shifts proposed include the following:  

From

To

Ad hoc and siloed

Working in integrated ways

We will work across the Auckland Council group, with government and across communities and sectors to support Aucklanders to thrive. We will share data, evidence and learning. 

 

We will prioritise interventions which support coordination and collective impact to deliver on the multiple outcomes which impact Aucklander’s wellbeing (social, environmental, cultural and economic).

One size fits all

Targeting our responses

We will change our current services, activities and ways of working to better meet the needs of whānau and communities, particularly those experiencing the greatest disparity in outcomes.  

We will tailor services and activities to meet local needs and opportunities. 

Council as expert

Enabling community leadership

We will support communities (whānau, hapū, iwi, people) to lead their own responses. We will enable them to define, deliver, and monitor the things that enable them to thrive.

 

What we want to achieve – an overview of the strategy 

28.    To guide how we respond to these identified challenges and to support the key shifts we need to make, the draft strategy sets out four outcomes and six objectives. The outcomes set out where communities want to be in the future. Objectives identify where to focus to get there.  

Outcomes: Four building blocks for thriving 

29.    The draft strategy has four main outcome areas which if achieved would contribute to thriving communities. 

·    Manaakitanga |Quality of life 
All Aucklanders enjoy the essentials of a good life and fulfil their potential  

 

·    Whanaungatanga | Community connection 
Auckland are connected and feel as though they belong 

 

·    Kotahitanga | Collective action 
All Aucklanders can participate and they take collective action to meet common goals 

 

·    Kaitiakitanga | Sustainable futures 
Aucklanders are connected to and care for the environment. 

Objectives: Where should we focus our action 

30.    To help give direction on how we might achieve the intended outcomes, we have identified six objective areas which will provide guidance on what actions could be taken by the organisation to contribute to the outcomes. 

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31.    While we have grouped action areas under each objective many of these will contribute to multiple objectives. Many are focused on addressing complex societal challenges which council does not have all the levers, resource or influence to directly address.  

32.    These objectives do however provide direction on how we can use the levers available to us (such as our procurement power) to affect and influence change, within our control.  

Investment principles will help us to invest in what will make the greatest difference 

33.    The draft strategy proposes we invest in our resource to make the biggest impact, and this will be guided by four key principles:

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34.    Auckland Council also has a range of roles and levers that we can use to effect change in conjunction with partners to help communities thrive.  

35.    Our presence in and understanding of the community is one of our most powerful tools. This can be utilised in several areas: urban form, procurement, community facilities, our workforce, transport, community development and grants.  

Strengths of the draft strategy  

36.    As an outcome focused strategy, it provides focus and direction, but is not prescriptive on processes or actions. It provides scope for creative and innovative responses to achieving the outcomes and objectives.  

37.    The high-level outcomes and objective in the strategy cascade to key shifts, investment principles and to three-year implementation plans. This will ensure there is a strong and intentional link between aspiration, investment and action.   

38.    The draft strategy also presents both council and partners with an opportunity to do things differently, apply new approaches and have the flexibility to respond to local needs in ways that are appropriate and effective.  

39.    This is important as it not only addresses current challenges but allows flexibility to respond to emerging challenges in the future as our intended end outcomes will not change.  

40.    It also presents us with an opportunity to partner with our communities to incorporate existing and emerging approaches from global research as well as those generated in Aotearoa, so that we are using all tools available to collectively to achieve the outcomes.  

Constraints and limitations of the draft strategy 

41.    Nga Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities is a 10-year strategy focused on long-term outcomes. It will take some time to see progress and the impact of actions, especially given the complexity of the challenges. 

42.    A key limitation is that many of the barriers to people thriving relate to complex socio-economic factors that council does not hold the primary levers for. 

43.    Council is, however, well-placed to use all of its resources and levers more effectively and work alongside central government and communities to support change. 

44.    A key constraint is that there is no additional budget to support delivery of the draft strategy, so the pace of change will be subject to how effectively existing resources and budget can be realigned and directed to the strategy’s new objectives.  

45.    New investment will need to be considered as part of future annual and long-term budget processes. 

46.    There is opportunity, however, for reprioritisation of existing resource and investment to be considered as part of implementation planning. The outcome of this will be reported to the governing body as part of the first three-year implementation plan (FY22-25). 

47.    The draft strategy relies heavily on the significant cooperation and commitment across the council, elected members and community partners for it to be effective.  This in turn relies on visible and active leadership, and ongoing monitoring of progress and impact.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

48.    During engagement, we heard from communities that the environment was a significant contributor to their wellbeing. Climate change and environmental degradation are a threat to the way our communities aspire to live in Tāmaki Makaurau. 

49.    The Kaitiakitanga outcome was created to reflect the voices of mana whenua and community, through prioritising environmental wellbeing and encouraging community action and sustainability. Actions developed in the Thriving Communities three-year implementation plans will need to consider the connection between the wellbeing of our communities and the wellbeing of the environment. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

50.    This is a strategy for the whole council group and will also be used to challenge and guide council teams and CCO’s in their implementation roles.  

51.    Staff and teams from across the council and CCO’s have been involved in the refresh process, including attending a series of workshops to help identify existing and future actions to support what communities told us was important.  

52.    Going forward staff will work closely with the council group on implementation planning and the development of the first three-year implementation plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

53.    Local boards have a strong interest, and play a key role, in creating thriving communities in their areas. All local boards have local board plan outcomes that support thriving communities, and many are already working towards several Thriving Communities objectives.

54.    Community engagement included communities from across all local board areas.  

55.    The findings from the engagement phase were shared with elected members and engagement participants in early 2021. They were also published on the Thriving Communities Have Your Say page. 

56.    Staff attended local board workshops in October 2021 to share the high-level draft strategy. Local boards were broadly supportive of the approach and provided helpful feedback that has helped shape the revised draft.  Common themes in local board feedback include: 

·    concern for isolated communities

·    a strong desire to build the strategy into work plans. Boards could see the benefit of the approach and were eager to turn this into a practical response through their local plans.

·    concerns about funding the strategy, and opportunities to leverage existing or additional resource to support their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

57.    The 2018 Census found that over 23% of Aotearoa’s Māori population live in Tāmaki Makaurau, making up 11.5% of Auckland’s population – the highest Māori population in any city in Aotearoa[5].

58.    The average age of Auckland’s Māori population is 24.9 years, compared to Auckland’s average of 34.7 years. As this young population grows and reaches working age, Māori will be a critical part of supporting our economy and ageing population. 

59.    Although Māori make up a large proportion of Tamaki Makaurau’s population, they have not equitably shared in our economic growth. In 2018 the median income for all Aucklanders was $34,000, but for Māori it was $27,000[6]. 

60.    By focusing on achieving equitable outcomes for Māori, this strategy will make a positive impact on the social, cultural and economic wellbeing of tangata, whanau and hapori.  

Engagement to understand the needs of Māori communities 

61.    To ensure the strategy is relevant and effective for Māori, staff undertook individual engagement interviews with 17 mana whenua iwi and two mataawaka organisations.  

62.    Key inputs into the strategy from the engagement process include:

·    an environmental objective to reflect the importance of whenua to wellbeing and thriving

·    focus on achieving equity

·    recognition that whakawhanaungatanga and connection is central to thriving communities.

Delivering Māori outcomes 

63.    The council’s direction for delivering Māori outcomes is set out in Kia Ora Tamaki Makaurau, which reflects the aspirations of Auckland ‘s Māori communities.  

64.    The draft strategy supports the Schedule of Issues of Significance 2021 by addressing the four pou of social, cultural, economic, and environmental wellbeing for Māori in Tamaki Makaurau. 

65.    Mana whenua and mataawaka will have an opportunity to provide further feedback on the draft plan in November 2021. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

66.    There is currently no additional budget attached to the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho /Thriving Communities strategy. This means in the short term it will need to be delivered within existing budgets and resources of council and CCOs. Where any additional investment is required, this will need to be considered through the long-term plan or annual plan processes.  

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

If <event>: 

Then <impact>: 

Possible mitigations: 

If it is not clear that the draft strategy should drive reprioritisation of existing resources.   

It may create expectations that there will be additional budget to support the implementation of the strategy. 

All public-facing communications and guidance about the draft strategy will make it clear it is intended to focus & re-prioritise existing resources.  

Future budget and implementation planning will identify how actions will be funded from existing budgets or through seeking new investment.  

If the draft strategy is viewed as too ‘high level’ and does not provide clear enough direction. 

The draft strategy may fail to have any meaningful impact on the way the organisation delivers services and therefore would have no meaningful impact on the desired outcomes.  

Develop a strong implementation plan and ensure there is visible and active senior leadership to drive implementation.  

The objectives will provide appropriate level of direction without being too prescriptive.  

Incorporating a measurement framework in the implementation plan to help understand impact. 

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

67.    Community engagement on the draft strategy will be undertaken in November 2021.

68.    This feedback and local board resolutions will be reported to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in February 2022, when the committee considers the draft strategy for adoption.  

69.    The draft strategy will be supported by a three-year implementation plan with tailored actions, and a monitoring and evaluation framework to track progress and impact. These two items are being developed for consideration in April 2022. 

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy

113

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Mackenzie Blucher - Graduate Policy Advisor

Dave Jaggs - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - General Manager - Community and Social Policy

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

Approval for a new private road name at 2 Marlborough Crescent, Hobsonville

File No.: CP2021/16074

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To approve the name for a new private road, being a commonly owned access lot (COAL), created by way of a subdivision development at 2 Marlborough Crescent, Hobsonville.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The Guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

3.      On behalf of the developer and applicant, Marlborough Precinct Holdings Limited, agent David Osborne of Winton NZ has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the local board.

4.      The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana Whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines.

5.      The proposed names for the new private road at 2 Marlborough Crescent are:

·    Wikner Lane (applicant’s preference)

·    Wicko Lane (alternative)

·    Vought Lane (alternative)

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve the name ‘Wikner Lane’ (applicant’s preference) for the new private road created by way of subdivision at 2 Marlborough Crescent, Hobsonville, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60368150 and SUB60368152, and road naming reference RDN90095677).

Horopaki

Context

6.      Resource consent reference BUN60368150 (subdivision reference number SUB60368152) was issued in June 2021 for the construction of 29 new residential freehold units and one commonly owned access lot (COAL).

7.      Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachment A.

8.      In accordance with the Standards, any public road or any private way, commonly owned access lots (COAL), and right of way, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

9.      In this instance the COAL requires a name because it serves more than five lots. This can be seen in Attachment A, where the COAL is highlighted in yellow.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.    The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval

11.    The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

12.    Theme: All of the proposed road names relate to military aircraft that have been used in New Zealand in keeping with the previous use of the land (Hobsonville Airforce Base) and the road naming theme adopted in the surrounding streets. The applicant’s proposed names and their respective meanings are as follows:

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Wikner Lane

(applicant’s preference)

The Foster Wikner Wicko was a 1930s British two-seat cabin monoplane, built by Geoffrey Wikner. The aircraft was used by the New Zealand Royal Air Force (NZRAF) during World War II.

Wicko Lane

(alternative)

As above but using the last part of the aircraft’s name

Vought Lane

(alternative)

Vought was the name of several related American aerospace firms. Chance Vought produced thousands of planes during World War II. Some of these aircrafts were used by the New Zealand Royal Air Force (NZRAF) during World War II.

 

13.    Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity. It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

14.    Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

15.    Road Type: ‘Lane’ is an acceptable road type for the new private road, suiting the form and layout of the COAL.

16.    Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.


 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.    The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.    The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.    The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.    To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

21.    On 28 September mana whenua were contacted by the council on behalf of the applicant, through the Resource Consent department’s central facilitation process, as set out in the Guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with an interest in the general area were contacted:

·        Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua (Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua)

·        Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara (Ngā Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara Development Trust)

·        Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei (Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Trust)

·        Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki (Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Tribal Trust)

·        Te Kawerau ā Maki (Te Kawerau Iwi Settlement Trust)

·        Te Ākitai Waiohua (Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority)

·        Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua (Te Ara Rangatu o Te Iwi o Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua)

·        Ngāti Maru (Ngāti Maru Rūnanga Trust)

·        Ngāti Pāoa (Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust)

·        Ngāti Pāoa (Ngāti Paoa Trust Board)

·        Ngāti Tamaterā (Ngāti Tamaterā Settlement Trust

·        Ngāti Manuhiri (Ngati Manuhiri Settlement Trust)

 

22.    By the close of the consultation period indicated in the Guidelines, the only response received was from Ngāti Manuhiri who indicated support for mana whenua to take the lead role in this matter.

However no mana whenua have identified an interest or responded to the request for feedback to date and the applicant has signaled a desire to proceed to a decision on the basis of the names supplied.

23.    Noting the scale of the development and that the site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua, it is considered that a suitable period of time has been made available to receive feedback and as such the road naming process can continue.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.    The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

25.    The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.    There are no significant risks to the council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.    Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site & Location Plans

145

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Andrea Muhme - Subdivison Advisor

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

Upper Harbour Local Board Input to Auckland Light Rail engagement July / August 2021

File No.: CP2021/16812

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To receive the Upper Harbour Local Board feedback on Light Rail as provided to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project in September 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      An Establishment Unit was set up by the Cabinet in June 2021 to provide the public face of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project, undertake stakeholder and community engagement, and take forward work to resolve key outstanding questions in relation to project scope and delivery.

3.      The Establishment Unit had until early September 2021 to gather the views of local boards, ward councillors, and the public. Public consultation took place in July and August 2021 and local board feedback was due by 2 September 2021.

4.      At its 17 June business meeting, the Upper Harbour Local Board delegated to member Anna Atkinson to provide feedback on behalf of the local board (Resolution No. UH/2021/76). This delegation ensured that the local board had the opportunity to provide formal feedback to the Establishment Unit Board within the timeframes.

5.      A copy of the Upper Harbour Local Board feedback, provided by Member Atkinson under delegation, is now publicly available under Attachment A of this agenda report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the Upper Harbour Local Board feedback on Light Rail as provided to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project in September 2021.  

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board feedback on Light Rail as provided to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project in September 2021

149

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rita Bento-Allpress - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

Governance forward work calendar

File No.: CP2021/16369

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To present the updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The governance forward work calendar for the Upper Harbour Local Board is in Attachment A to the agenda report. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.      The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·      ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·      clarifying what advice is expected and when

·      clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.      The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the Upper Harbour Local Board governance forward work calendar

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance foward work calander - November 2021 to June  2022

153

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Max Wilde - Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

Record of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 14 and 28 October, and 4 November 2021

File No.: CP2021/16372

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      Upper Harbour Local Board workshops were held on Thursday 14 and 28 October, and 4 November 2021. Copies of the workshop records are attached (refer to Attachments A, B and C).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the records of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 14 and 28 October, and 4 November 2021 (refer to Attachments A, B and C to the agenda report).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 14 October 2021

157

b

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 28 October 2021

159

c

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 4 November 2021

161

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Max Wilde - Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

18 November 2021

 

 

Local board members' reports - November 2021

File No.: CP2021/16377

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      An opportunity for members to provide an update on projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

[Note: This is an information item and if the local board wishes any action to be taken under this item, a written report must be provided for inclusion on the agenda.]

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal and written local board members’ reports.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Max Wilde - Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 



[1] Māori housing grants are only available for housing developments undertaken in conjunction with an urban marae and must fill the same general purpose as papakāinga

[2] Stats NZ (2020). 2018 Census data – Auckland region. Retrieved from https://www.stats.govt.nz/tools/2018-census-place-summaries/auckland-region

[3] Stats NZ (2020). 2018 Census household crowding. Retrieved from https://www.stats.govt.nz/

[4] Allpress, J. and Reid, A. (2021). Quality of Life survey 2020: results for Auckland. Auckland Council technical report, TR2021/16

[5] Stats NZ (2020). 2018 Census. Retrieved from https://www.stats.govt.nz/

[6] ibid