I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waiheke Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 24 November 2021

5.15pm

This meeting will proceed via Skype-for-Business.  Either a recording or a written summary will be uploaded on the Auckland Council website.

 

Waiheke Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cath Handley

 

Deputy Chairperson

Kylee Matthews

 

Members

Robin Tucker

 

 

Bob Upchurch

 

 

Paul Walden

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Dileeka Senewiratne

Democracy Advisor

 

19 November 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 840 914

Email: dileeka.senewiratne@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Councillor's Update                                                                                                       7

12        Chairperson's report                                                                                                   29

13        Auckland Transport Report - November 2021                                                          35

14        Waiheke Quick Response Grant Round Two 2021/2022 grant allocations           41

15        Development Contributions Policy 2021                                                                  81

16        Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy                               115

17        Waiheke Local Board feedback on the Resource Management Enabling Housing Supply Amendment Bill                                                                                            151

18        Community Forum record of proceedings                                                             159

19        Waiheke Local Board Workshop record of proceedings                                      163

20        List of resource consent applications - 17 October to 7 November 2021           173

21        Local board governance forward work calendar - December 2021 update        177

22        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

Kua uru mai a hau kaha, a hau maia, a hau ora, a hau nui,

Ki runga, ki raro, ki roto, ki waho

Rire, rire hau…pai marire

 

Translation (non-literal) - Rama Ormsby

Let the winds bring us inspiration from beyond,

Invigorate us with determination and courage to achieve our aspirations for abundance and sustainability

Bring the calm, bring all things good, bring peace… good peace.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 27 October 2021 and the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 17 November 2021, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waiheke Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

 

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

Councillor's Update

File No.: CP2021/16699

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Waitemata and Gulf Ward Councillor Pippa Coom with an opportunity to update the Waiheke Local Board on Governing Body issues.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         receive Waitemata and Gulf Ward Councillor, Pippa Coom’s update.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Councillor's Update - November 2021

9

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

Chairperson's report

File No.: CP2021/16702

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Chairperson Cath Handley with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues she has been involved with and to draw the board’s attention to any other matters of interest.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive the Chairperson, Cath Handley’s report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair's Update - November 2021

31

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

Auckland Transport Report - November 2021

File No.: CP2021/16703

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Waiheke Local Board on transport related matters in their area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

This report covers:

2.       A general summary of operational projects and activities of interest to the Waiheke Local Board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport November 2021 update report.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. We report monthly to local boards, as set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan. This reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within the governance of Auckland on behalf of their local communities. 

4.       This report updates the Waiheke Local Board on Auckland Transport (“AT”) projects and operations in the local board area.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

5.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of AT’s work programme.

6.       The current amount of funding proposed in the Regional Land Transport Plan is $400,000 per annum.

7.       The unspent budget of $71,493.50 from 2020/2021 can be carried forward for the board to allocate as they see fit providing a total fund available for 2021/2022 of $471,493.50. Auckland Transport will work with the local board to discuss and advise on the best use of the budget.

Community Safety Fund (CSF)

8.       The CSF is a capital budget established by Auckland Transport for use by local boards to fund local road safety initiatives. The purpose of this fund is to allow elected members to address long-standing local road safety issues that are not regional priorities and are therefore not being addressed by the Auckland Transport programme.

9.       The CSF is funded from Auckland Transport’s safety budget, and funding for the design and construction for the Causeway project has been confirmed for 2021/2022.

Update on Auckland Transport operations:

10.     The table below has a general summary of projects and activities of interest to the local board with their status. Please note that:

·    All timings are indicative and are subject to change.

·    Due to the COVID lockdown period in place since 18 August, this report is reduced in content to include only operational items where there has been any activity or change since the 25 August local board business meeting.

·    The Waiheke Operations Manager will update the local board in the event of any amendments or changes to the summaries provided for below.

Activity

Update

EV chargers

AT is working on establishing a process to approve the installation of kerbside EV infrastructure to support the applications from Vector (on behalf of Electric Island) for new stations planned at 26 Anzac Rd, Orapiu, and 1 Third Ave, Onetangi.

 

Wharves

Matiatia Wharf (main)

The second stage of AT’s wharf renewal project at Matiatia is due to commence soon, with works to be carried out on the main wharf to ensure Waiheke’s ferry infrastructure is maintained for now and into the future.

Several improvements are planned, with the initial stage of work completed at the end of 2020 to the old wharf in preparation for the renewal required at the main wharf.

Once work on the new wharf commences, all ferry services temporarily relocate to the old wharf while the renewal work is carried out.

 

November update:

FPD’s (Fare Payment Devices) have been installed on the old wharf.

 

Three staged berthing trials are occurring with Fullers ferries with a full day of operations from the old wharf planned. Advance notice will be provided to users in the week prior.

 

AT is currently working through programme complications including potential delays to material sourced from overseas, and after further inputs from ferry terminal business owners, Fullers, Local Board previous input, the project team is revisiting whether the works should be pushed out to March 2022.

 

AT is also aware of the Sculpture on the Gulf planned for March 2022 and is investigating various items such as availability of plant and equipment, its contractual obligations with the suppliers, whilst having discussions with other stakeholders to determine whether the best option is to be on site towards the end of the peak busy summer season.

 

AT has appointed marine maintenance contractor, Heron Group, to complete the work required on the main wharf.

Phase one work on the southern berth includes:

·    Pontoon replacement

·    New hydraulic platform

·    New fixed landing platform

·    New upper and lower gangways

·    Works expected to be completed with six to eight weeks.

 

Phase two – to replace the northern berth.

Expected to take place within 12-18 months

Road Maintenance

Programmed works

November works includes routine cyclic maintenance of signs, drains and potholes.

 

Grading

1.   Gordons Rd, Omiha.

2.   Waimangu Rd, Omiha

Road maintenance

1.   Wilma Rd. Surfdale

2.   Onetangi Rd, Onetangi

Preseal repairs

1.   Beach Pde, Oneroa

2.   Oue Rd, Oneroa

3.   Weka Rd, Oneroa

4.   Church Bay Rd, Oneroa

Metro Ferry Services

Ferry Services

COVID restrictions impacted on patronage during October. The change to Alert Level 3 in September saw patronage increase from an average of around 300 a day during Alert Level 4 on passenger services to over 1,000 on the change in alert levels. Numbers since then remain stabilised between approximately 1,000 and 1,300 per day.

 

Currently, there are no plans to increase the level of contracted ferry services provided across the region until there is a change in Alert Level and Auckland enters the new COVID Protection Framework and we move to level ORANGE.

 

Whilst there will be some relaxing of movement control under AL3 stage 2 and also Traffic Light status RED, this is not expected to result in an increase in personal movement requiring the use of PT to significantly increase.

 

AT and all its PT operators will continue to monitor usage and demand and will flex timetables accordingly should patronage increase sufficiently to require a review of capacity provided.

 

Bus Service changes

 

Route 504 Waiheke Rd to Ostend

AT will remove the 504 service on Monday 29 November 2021

AT will extend some peak trips on the route 50A to serve Waiheke Rd. There will be two trips in the AM peak and three in the PM peak. The AM trips will connect to the 7am and 8am ferry sailings from Matiatia, the PM trips will connect with the ferry sailings departing Downtown at 4pm, 5pm and 6pm.

 

Route 501 Kennedy Point to Matiatia

This following change will take effect on Sunday 28 November 2021.

 

The timetable has been amended to reduce the connection time between the bus and ferry at Matiatia. The connection time will now be between five and nine minutes.

 

Route 503 Matiatia to Oneroa

The route 503 is a summer-only service running between Matiatia and Oneroa to ensure sufficient capacity is available on buses during busy times, particularly when there is high tourist demand.

 

Due to reduced visitor numbers as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the 503 did not operate during the summer of 2020-21. Due to the continuing border closures and the absence of cruise ships in Auckland, the 503 will not run during the summer of 2021-22.

 

Should circumstances change to the extent that the existing buses are unable to cope, AT will work with the Waiheke Bus Company to reintroduce the 503 service.

 

 

Community Safety Fund

Project

Approved funding

Update

The Causeway – from Shelley Beach Rd to the Boating Club

Community Safety Fund (CSF)

A resource consent is required for

(a) tree/vegetation pruning/removal,

(b) Working within the marine coastal area. 

The planner and structural engineer have not been able to visit the site due to COVID restrictions. A site visit is planned when Auckland enters the new COVID Protection Framework.

Due to the current delay, there is a risk that only the design and consents can be completed this financial year.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

11.     Auckland Transport engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

12.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     The impact of the information in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the Council group. Any engagement with other parts of the Council group will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no local, sub-regional or regional impacts.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

15.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

16.     There are no financial implications of receiving this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

17.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks. Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for all their projects.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

18.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board at a future business meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Richard La Ville – Operations Manager – Waiheke and Gulf Islands Airfields – Auckland Transport

Authorisers

John Strawbridge – Group Manager Parking Services and Compliance – Auckland Transport

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

Waiheke Quick Response Grant Round Two 2021/2022 grant allocations

File No.: CP2021/17261

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund, or decline applications received for Waiheke Local Board for the Quick Response Grant Round Two 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

 

2.       The Waiheke Local Board adopted the Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 21 April 2021 (refer Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants submitted to the local board.

3.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $89,601 for the 2021/2022 financial year. Sixteen applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke Local Board for the Local and Multiboard Grant Round One 2021/2022, requesting a total of $52,782.00. $31,282 was allocated, leaving a total of $58,319 for one local grant round and three quick response rounds.

4.       The environmental grants budget was set at $41,881. The Environmental Grants Round One 2021/2022 received four applications requesting a total of $30,188.00. $16,438 was allocated, leaving a total of $25,443 for one remaining round.

5.       Fourteen applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke local board for the Quick response grant round one 2021/2022, requesting a total of $26,739.28. $13,032 was allocated, leaving a total of 45,287 remaining for two quick responses and one local grant round.

6.       Five applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke local board for the Quick response grant round two 2021/2022, requesting a total of $7,574.50.

7.       This report presents applications received in Waiheke Quick response round two 2021/2022 (refer to attachment B).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      Agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in the Waiheke Local Board for the Quick Response Grant Round Two 2021/2022 listed in the following table

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table One: Quick Response Grant Round Two 2021/2022

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR2218-201

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards overall Youthline costs from 13 December 2022 to 31 December 2022

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR2218-202

Te Huringa o Te Tai - T.T.T.C.T Trust

Arts and culture

Towards costumes for "Rangitoto" performance at Artworks Theatre from 9 June 2022 to 12 June 2022

$1,600.00

Eligible

QR2218-204

Katherine Bourke

under the umbrella of Waiheke Youth Development Trust

Community, Sport and Recreation

Towards uniforms for the CACTUS programme at Waiheke Island High School from 14 February 2022 to 8 April 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2218-205

Environmental Education for Resource Sustainability Trust

Environment

Towards native trees, wages, courier costs and recycling bins from 1 January 2022 to 31 December 2022

$974.50

Eligible

QR2218-206

Waiheke Adult Literacy Inc

Community

Towards instructor wages, insurance, admin and fuel at The Learning Centre from 1 February 2022 to 16 December 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$7,574.50

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities, and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world-class city.

9.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

10.     The local board grants programme sets out:

·    local board priorities

·    lower priorities for funding

·    exclusions

·    grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·    any additional accountability requirements

11.     The Waiheke Local Board adopted their grants the Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 21 April 2021 and will operate three quick response, two local grants and two environmental rounds for this financial year

12.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

13.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $89,601 for the 2021/2022 financial year and an environmental grants budget of $30,000 for the 2021/2022 financial year.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Local board grants can contribute to climate action through support of projects that address food production and food waste, support alternative transport methods, support community energy efficiency education and behaviour change, build community resilience, and support tree planting.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     According to the main focus of the application, each one has received input from a subject matter expert from the relevant department. The main focuses are identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

17.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Waiheke Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme

19.     The board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states; ‘we will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time’.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

22.     This report presents applications received in Waiheke Quick Response Round One 2021/2022 (refer Attachment B).

23.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $89,601 for the 2021/2022 financial year. Sixteen applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke Local Board for the Local and Multiboard Grant Round One 2021/2022, requesting a total of $52,782.00. $31,282 was allocated, leaving a total of $58,319 for one local grant round and three quick response rounds.

24.     The environmental grants budget for the 2021/2022 financial period was set at $41,881. The Environmental Grants Round One 2021/2022 received four applications requesting a total of $30,188.00. $16,438 was allocated, leaving a total of $25,443 for one remaining round.

25.     Fourteen applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke local board for the Quick response grant round one 2021/2022, requesting a total of $26,739.28. $13,032 was allocated, leaving a total of 45,287 remaining for two quick responses and one local grant round.

26.     Five applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke local board for the Quick response grant round two 2021/2022, requesting a total of $7,574.50.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     Following the Waiheke Local Board allocating funding for the round, the grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke 2021 2022 Local Board Programme

47

b

Waiheke Quick Response round 2 2021 2022 Application Summaries

51

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

James Boyd - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Rhonwen Heath - Head of Rates Valuations & Data Mgmt

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 


Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

Development Contributions Policy 2021

File No.: CP2021/16549

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the draft Contributions Policy 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Development contributions allow for an equitable and proportionate share of the total cost of growth-related capital expenditure to be recovered from the development community.

3.       The Finance and Performance Committee adopted the draft Contributions Policy 2021 for consultation at its meeting on 16 September 2021, FIN/2021/84. 

4.       Local board feedback is being sought to inform the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration of the adoption of the Contribution Policy 2021 in December 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      resolve feedback on the Contributions Policy 2021 on the key consultation topics:

i)        updating policy for capital projects in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031

ii)       inclusion of projects beyond 10-years to the policy in stages starting with Drury

iii)      requiring developers to pay their contributions earlier

iv)      proposal to support Māori development with grants

v)      any other issues.

Horopaki

Context

5.       Auckland’s population is expected to grow by 260,000 in the next ten years on top of the rapid population growth experienced in the last decade, bringing the projected population to approximately 1.9 million by 2031.

6.       Construction of 145,800 new dwellings is forecast in the next ten years. To support the development enabled by the Auckland Unitary Plan, the council is facing immediate demands for infrastructure in key growth areas and in response to construction on upzoned land, plan changes and the impact of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       Development contributions allow for an equitable and proportionate share of the total cost of growth-related capital expenditure to be recovered from the development community. The Contributions Policy sets out how the council will recover from new development an appropriate and fair share of the cost of infrastructure investment attributable to growth. There were four key consultation topics:

i)     Updating policy for capital projects in the 10-year Budget

          The draft policy provides for the recovery of $2.4 billion of development contributions revenue from $9.0 billion of projects with a growth component included in the10-year budget.  The draft policy also included updated forecasts of population growth and dwelling construction. The combined impact of these changes is to lower the weighted average Development Contributions price from $23,900 to $21,100.

ii)  Inclusion of projects beyond 10-years to the policy in stages starting with Drury

          Extensive work has been undertaken in recent years on the infrastructure requirements to support growth in the investment priority areas. However, further work is required before these costs can be included in the contributions policy. Area specific amendments to the contributions policy will be proposed for consultation as the information becomes available.

          The first step in the Contributions Policy 2021 will be to add a programme of expenditure to fund some of the key infrastructure required to support growth in the Drury area. The impact of this change is to raise the Development Contributions price in Drury to $84,900 from between $11,000 and $18,300.

iii) Requiring developers to pay their contributions earlier

          The council proposed that Development Contributions be paid at the time of building consent for all development (residential and non-residential) except non-commercial development on Māori land (explained further below). This requires Development Contributions due at building consent to be paid 6 to 24 months earlier than under the current policy and reverses the changes made to the policy in 2019. When combined with the other changes proposed this lower the weighted average Development Contributions price to $19,300.

iv) A proposal to support Māori development with grants

          The draft policy proposed continuing the support for marae development and papakāinga and Māori housing[1] on Māori land through grants available through the Cultural Initiatives Fund. These grants can cover payment of development contributions in appropriate circumstances, along with other kinds of development costs.

8.       The proposed changes to the Contributions Policy 2021 were reported to the Finance and Performance Committee at its meeting on 16 September- see Attachment A  Development Contributions Policy 2021.

Consultation

9.       Formal public consultation was held in September and October 2021. To support the consultation a number of documents were made available on the Have Your Say website, https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/dc-policy.

10.     Two online Have Your Say events were held to provide opportunities for developers and other interested parties to learn more about the draft policy, ask questions and provide their feedback. A third event was also held to allow interested parties to present their views directly to the Finance and Performance Committee. All comments have been captured and will be reported through to the Finance and Performance Committee to inform decision-making on the final policy.

11.     A summary of the feedback received from submitters is set out in Attachment B: Draft Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement guidance

12.       Recommendations in this report have a neutral climate impact as they relate to the funding of capital investment rather than decisions on the activities to be undertaken.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views guidance

13.       The information presented on the projects included in the draft Contributions Policy 2021 was developed in conjunction with the following council-controlled organisations and council units:

·    Auckland Transport

·    Eke Panuku Development Auckland

·    Healthy Waters

·    Community Facilities

·    Community and Social Policy

14.        The Chief Economist Unit and Research Investigations and Monitoring Unit worked with us on the impact of higher development contributions on the pace of development and on land and house prices. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.        The development contribution price varies by location depending on the cost of infrastructure required to support development in an area.

16.        Local board feedback is being sought to inform the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration of the adoption of the Contribution Policy 2021 in December 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.        Recent legislative changes require the contributions policy to support the development of Māori land. Feedback from iwi on the draft policy was sought as part of consultation and via engagement with the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum.  All developers, including mana whenua, were provided an opportunity to present their feedback to the Finance and Performance Committee on 12 October.

18.        The Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum have provided their feedback which has been included in Attachment B: Draft Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     The 10-year budget assumes development contributions revenue of $2.7 billion. After completing the analysis of the cost of investments in the 10-year budget that can be recovered with development contributions and the impact of the proposed policy changes, it is estimated that the revenue will be $2.6 billion. The achievement of this revised revenue forecast requires as a first step the implementation of a contributions policy updated for the capital expenditure decisions in the 10-year budget and the other changes proposed in this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     The recommendation requesting local boards views does not present any risk. The risks associated with amending the contributions policy are set out in the report to the 16 September Finance and Performance Committee, Attachment A: Development Contributions Policy 2021 Consultation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     Feedback from the public consultation will be reported to the Finance and Performance Committee workshop on 10 November 2021.

22.     Potential changes to the draft will be reported at the Finance and Performance Committee workshop on 1 December 2021. Staff will report to Finance and Performance Committee for the final policy adoption on 9 December 2021. Local board feedback will be included in the report.

23.     The Contributions Policy 2021 is proposed to be implemented in January 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Development Contributions Policy 2021 report to the Finance and Performance Committee

85

b

Draft Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received

101

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Andrew Duncan - Manager Financial Policy

Authorisers

Ross Tucker - General Manager, Financial Strategy and Planning

Glenn Boyd – Acting General Manager – Local Board Services

 


Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy

File No.: CP2021/16868

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek support for the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho/Thriving Communities Strategy 2022-2032.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities was adopted in 2014 as council’s strategy for community and social wellbeing. A review of the plan in 2018 identified it needed to be refreshed to align with the Auckland Plan 2050 outcomes and better address the changes and challenges in Tāmaki Makaurau. 

3.       These challenges include growing socio-economic disparities, population growth and intensification, the impacts of climate change and more recently COVID-19. These impact on communities’ ability to thrive. 

4.       Through the refresh process we heard from diverse communities across the region on what is needed to help them thrive. These insights have shaped the draft strategy. 

5.       The draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities strategy sets out the high-level direction for the next 10 years to respond to these challenges and to what communities told us was important. 

6.       The draft strategy has four main outcome areas which are the building blocks for thriving: 

·    Manaakitanga | Quality of life: 

All Aucklanders enjoy the essentials of a good life and fulfil their potential  

·    Whanaungatanga | Community Connection: 
Aucklanders are connected and feel as though they belong 

·    Kotahitanga | Collective action:  

All Aucklanders can participate and they take collective action to meet common goals 

·    Kaitiakitanga | Sustainable futures:  

Aucklanders are connected to and care for the environment. 

 

7.       The high-level outcomes are supported by objectives that cascade to three key shifts in the way we work:  from “one-size fits all” to targeting our responses, from adhoc and siloed to working in integrated ways, and shifting from council as expert to enabling community leadership. 

8.       Four investment principles focus resources to impact on community challenges. This will ensure there is a strong, intentional link between aspiration, investment and action, and that we focus on communities who experience the greatest inequities.

9.       A key constraint is that there is currently no additional budget attached to the strategy. This means the pace of change will be reliant on future budget and implementation planning to either seek new investment or to refocus existing resources to the strategy’s objectives.

10.     Another limitation is that many of the barriers to people thriving relate to complex socio-economic factors where the council is not the primary deliverer.  

11.     The draft strategy will be reported to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in February 2022 for adoption. 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      support the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Strategy 2022 – 2032 as set out in Attachment A to this report.  

 

Horopaki

Context

12.     The Auckland Plan Participation and Belonging outcome in particular sets the aspiration that ‘All Aucklanders will be part of and contribute to society, access opportunities, and have the chance to develop to their full potential’ 

13.     Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities was adopted in 2014 as council’s community and social wellbeing plan. It is a core plan to deliver the Auckland Plan 2050 which has a strong focus on fostering an inclusive Auckland where everyone has the chance to thrive. 

14.     In 2018 a review of Ngā Hapori Momoho identified several improvement areas. This included refreshing the strategy to better align it the new Auckland Plan 2050 and to address the changes and growing challenges facing Auckland.  

Diverse community voices have shaped the draft strategy approach

 

15.     The refreshed draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities strategy (Attachment A) has been informed by feedback from the diverse communities of Tāmaki Makaurau, key sector stakeholders, partners, and mana whenua. These voices are central to both the content of the strategy and how it will be used.  

16.     During 2019 and 2020 staff looked at feedback from over 50 previous public engagements, and then undertook face to-face interviews, focus groups and online hui. We heard from over 400 community groups and leaders from across the region on what it means to thrive and what council can do to support that.  

17.     Staff presented the findings from this community engagement to local boards in April 2021.  

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Auckland is facing local and international challenges impacting thriving communities  

18.     At the 2018 Census there were nearly 1.6 million usual residents in Auckland, an increase of 11% since the 2013 Census, and this is projected to grow to 2.4 million by 2050[2].

19.     Tāmaki Makaurau is very diverse – it is home to the largest Polynesian population of any city in the world, and 40% of the population were born overseas.  

20.     Whilst many of those living in Auckland can make the most of all this region has to offer, there are still many who have limited capability to access social and economic resources and opportunities compared to the general population.  

21.     Many Aucklanders do not have access to the things they need to thrive. This restricts their ability to fully participate in society and in activities that have meaning and value to them. 

22.     Tāmaki Makaurau’s strong economic growth has not been shared equally, with Māori and Pasifika communities making considerably less each week than the rest of the Auckland population.  

23.     Over a third (38.5%) of Pasifika people and 46% of young people in Auckland are living in overcrowded and unsuitable homes[3].

24.     Only 50% of Aucklanders feel a sense of belonging in their neighbourhoods, and 49% have felt isolated and lonely[4]. 

25.     Tāmaki Makaurau is facing some key challenges over the next 10-20 years that provide the strategic drivers for the refreshed strategy. We need to respond to these if we want to maintain social cohesion and ensure all our people and communities are thriving.   

Challenge 1 

Challenge 2 

Challenge 3 

Growing wealth and income inequality will mean too many whānau cannot thrive. 

The pace and scale of growth and social change could undermine Aucklander’s sense of belonging and connection. 

Our changing climate will make outcomes worse for those communities already struggling. 

 

26.     More recently other significant changes both locally and globally are contributing to why we need a strategy that takes an intentional approach to supporting thriving, inclusive and sustainable communities:  

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Changing the way council works can help address community challenges 

27.     In recognition of the 2018 review findings and from our community and stakeholder engagement, we know there needed to be some key shifts in the underlying thinking and approach of the council. We also need to be explicit in our priorities. Key shifts proposed include the following:  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FROM

TO

WHAT CHANGES WILL WE MAKE?

1

Ad hoc and siloed



Integrated and connected

We will work across the Auckland Council group, with government and across communities and sectors to support Aucklanders to thrive. We will share data, evidence and learning.

We will prioritise interventions which support coordination and collective impact to deliver on the multiple outcomes which impact Aucklander’s wellbeing (social, environmental, cultural and environmental).

2

One-size-fits all



Targeted approaches

We will change our current services, activities and ways of working to better meet the needs of whānau and communities, particularly those experiencing the greatest disparity in outcomes.

We will tailor services and activities to meet local needs and opportunities.

3

Council as expert



Council as enabler

We will support communities (whānau, hapū, iwi, people) to lead their own responses. We will enable them to define, deliver, and monitor the things that enable them to thrive.

We will measure our success based on the outcomes we enable rather than just the services and activities that we deliver.

What we want to achieve – an overview of the draft strategy 

28.     To guide how we respond to these identified challenges and to support the key shifts we need to make, the draft strategy sets out four outcomes and six objectives. The outcomes set out where communities want to be in the future. Objectives identify where to focus to get there.  

Outcomes: Four building blocks for thriving 

29.     The draft strategy has four main outcome areas which if achieved would contribute to thriving communities. 

·    Manaakitanga |Quality of life 
All Aucklanders enjoy the essentials of a good life and fulfil their potential  

 

·    Whanaungatanga | Community connection 
Auckland are connected and feel as though they belong 

 

·    Kotahitanga | Collective action 
All Aucklanders can participate and they take collective action to meet common goals 

 

·    Kaitiakitanga | Sustainable futures 
Aucklanders are connected to and care for the environment. 

 

Objectives: Where should we focus our action 

30.     To help give direction on how we might achieve the intended outcomes, we have identified six objective areas which will provide guidance on what actions could be taken by the organisation to contribute to the outcomes. 

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31.     While we have grouped action areas under each objective many of these will contribute to multiple objectives. Many are focused on addressing complex societal challenges which council does not have all the levers, resource or influence to directly address.  

32.     These objectives do however provide direction on how we can use the levers available to us (such as our procurement power) to affect and influence change, within our control.  

Investment principles will help us to invest in what will make the greatest difference 

33.     The draft strategy proposes we invest in our resource to make the biggest impact, and this will be guided by four key principles:

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34.     Auckland Council also has a range of roles and levers that we can use to effect change in conjunction with partners to help communities thrive.  

35.     Our presence in and understanding of the community is one of our most powerful tools. This can be utilised in several areas: urban form, procurement, community facilities, our workforce, transport, community development and grants.  

Strengths of the draft strategy  

36.     As an outcome focused strategy, it provides focus and direction, but is not prescriptive on processes or actions. It provides scope for creative and innovative responses to achieving the outcomes and objectives.  

37.     The high-level outcomes and objective in the strategy cascade to key shifts, investment principles and to three-year implementation plans. This will ensure there is a strong and intentional link between aspiration, investment and action.   

38.     The draft strategy also presents both council and partners with an opportunity to do things differently, apply new approaches and have the flexibility to respond to local needs in ways that are appropriate and effective.  

39.     This is important as it not only addresses current challenges but allows flexibility to respond to emerging challenges in the future as our intended end outcomes will not change.  

40.     It also presents us with an opportunity to partner with our communities to incorporate existing and emerging approaches from global research as well as those generated in Aotearoa, so that we are using all tools available to collectively to achieve the outcomes.  

Constraints and limitations of the draft strategy 

41.     Nga Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities is a 10-year strategy focused on long-term outcomes. It will take some time to see progress and the impact of actions, especially given the complexity of the challenges. 

42.     A key limitation is that many of the barriers to people thriving relate to complex socio-economic factors that council does not hold the primary levers for. 

43.     Council is, however, well-placed to use all of its resources and levers more effectively and work alongside central government and communities to support change. 

44.     A key constraint is that there is no additional budget to support delivery of the strategy, so the pace of change will be subject to how effectively existing resources and budget can be realigned and directed to the strategy’s new objectives.  

45.     New investment will need to be considered as part of future annual and long-term budget processes. 

46.     There is opportunity, however, for reprioritisation of existing resource and investment to be considered as part of implementation planning. The outcome of this will be reported to the governing body as part of the first three-year implementation plan (FY22-25). 

47.     The draft strategy relies heavily on the significant cooperation and commitment across the council, elected members and community partners for it to be effective.  This in turn relies on visible and active leadership, and ongoing monitoring of progress and impact.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

48.     During engagement, we heard from communities that the environment was a significant contributor to their wellbeing. Climate change and environmental degradation are a threat to the way our communities aspire to live in Tāmaki Makaurau. 

49.     The Kaitiakitanga outcome was created to reflect the voices of mana whenua and community, through prioritising environmental wellbeing and encouraging community action and sustainability. Actions developed in the Thriving Communities three-year implementation plans will need to consider the connection between the wellbeing of our communities and the wellbeing of the environment. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

50.     This is a strategy for the whole council group and will also be used to challenge and guide council teams and CCO’s in their implementation roles.  

51.     Staff and teams from across the council and CCO’s have been involved in the refresh process, including attending a series of workshops to help identify existing and future actions to support what communities told us was important.  

52.     Going forward staff will work closely with the council group on implementation planning and the development of the first three-year implementation plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

53.     Local boards have a strong interest, and play a key role, in creating thriving communities in their areas. All local boards have local board plan outcomes that support thriving communities, and many are already working towards several Thriving Communities objectives.

54.     Community engagement included communities from across all local board areas.  

55.     The findings from the engagement phase were shared with elected members and engagement participants in early 2021. They were also published on the Thriving Communities Have Your Say page. 

56.     Staff attended local board workshops in October 2021 to share the high-level draft strategy. Local boards were broadly supportive of the approach and provided helpful feedback that has helped shape the revised draft.  Common themes in local board feedback include: 

·    concern for isolated communities

·    a strong desire to build the strategy into work plans. Boards could see the benefit of the approach and were eager to turn this into a practical response through their local plans

·    concerns about funding the strategy, and opportunities to leverage existing or additional resource to support their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

57.     The 2018 Census found that over 23% of Aotearoa’s Māori population live in Tāmaki Makaurau, making up 11.5% of Auckland’s population – the highest Māori population in any city in Aotearoa[5].

58.     The average age of Auckland’s Māori population is 24.9 years, compared to Auckland’s average of 34.7 years. As this young population grows and reaches working age, Māori will be a critical part of supporting our economy and ageing population. 

59.     Although Māori make up a large proportion of Tamaki Makaurau’s population, they have not equitably shared in our economic growth. In 2018 the median income for all Aucklanders was $34,000, but for Māori it was $27,000[6]. 

60.     By focusing on achieving equitable outcomes for Māori, this strategy will make a positive impact on the social, cultural and economic wellbeing of tangata, whanau and hapori.  

Engagement to understand the needs of Māori communities 

61.     To ensure the strategy is relevant and effective for Māori, staff undertook individual engagement interviews with 17 mana whenua iwi and two mataawaka organisations.  

62.     Key inputs into the strategy from the engagement process include:

·    an environmental objective to reflect the importance of whenua to wellbeing and thriving

·    focus on achieving equity

·    recognition that whakawhanaungatanga and connection is central to thriving communities.

Delivering Māori outcomes 

63.     The council’s direction for delivering Māori outcomes is set out in Kia Ora Tamaki Makaurau, which reflects the aspirations of Auckland ‘s Māori communities.  

64.     The draft strategy supports the Schedule of Issues of Significance 2021 by addressing the four pou of social, cultural, economic, and environmental wellbeing for Māori in Tamaki Makaurau. 

65.     Mana whenua and Mataawaka will have an opportunity to provide further feedback on the draft plan in November 2021. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

66.     There is currently no additional budget attached to the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho /Thriving Communities strategy. This means in the short term it will need to be delivered within existing budgets and resources of council and CCOs. Where any additional investment is required, this will need to be considered through the long-term plan or annual plan processes.  

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

If <event>: 

Then <impact>: 

Possible mitigations: 

If it is not clear that the draft strategy should drive reprioritisation of existing resources.   

It may create expectations that there will be additional budget to support the implementation of the draft strategy. 

All public-facing communications and guidance about the draft strategy will make it clear it is intended to focus & re-prioritise existing resources.  

Future budget and implementation planning will identify how actions will be funded from existing budgets or through seeking new investment.  

If the draft strategy is viewed as too ‘high level’ and does not provide clear enough direction 

The draft strategy may fail to have any meaningful impact on the way the organisation delivers services and therefore would have no meaningful impact on the desired outcomes.  

Develop a strong implementation plan and ensure there is visible and active senior leadership to drive implementation.  

The objectives will provide appropriate level of direction without being too prescriptive.  

Incorporating a measurement framework in the implementation plan to help understand impact. 

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

67.     Community engagement on the draft strategy will be undertaken in November 2021.

68.     This feedback and local board resolutions will be reported to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in February 2022, when the committee considers the draft strategy for adoption.  

69.     The draft strategy will be supported by a three-year implementation plan with tailored actions, and a monitoring and evaluation framework to track progress and impact. These two items are being developed for consideration in April 2022. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy

123

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Mackenzie Blucher - Graduate Policy Advisor

Dave Jaggs - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - General Manager - Community and Social Policy

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

Waiheke Local Board feedback on the Resource Management Enabling Housing Supply Amendment Bill

File No.: CP2021/17257

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the formal Waiheke Local Board feedback on the Resource Management Enabling Housing Supply Amendment Bill.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waiheke Local Board has provided feedback on the feedback on the Resource Management Enabling Housing Supply Amendment Bill which will be incorporated in the Auckland Council submission on the bill, and is attached in this agenda report as Attachment A.

3.       The Resource Management (Enabling Housing Supply and Other Matters) Amendment Bill (the Bill) was released on 19 October 2021. The stated purpose of the Bill is to improve housing supply in Tier One council areas (i.e. New Zealand’s high growth cities) by speeding up implementation of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS-UD) by at least one year and enabling more medium density homes.

4.       The council is required to implement the NPS-UD through a plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) by August 2022.

5.       The Bill provides for a new Intensification Streamlined Planning Process (ISPP) for this plan change with no Environment Court appeal rights.

6.       The Bill would also require Auckland Council to adopt Medium Density Residential Standards (MDRS) that allow properties across all urban areas to have three dwellings up to three storeys in height without the need for a resource consent, and more than three dwellings per site through a non-notified resource consent process.

7.       The MDRS are based on (but more flexible than) the council’s Mixed Housing Urban Zone. The Mixed Housing Urban Zone is generally located close to local and town centres and in locations with good public transport. The proposed MDRS rules would have legal effect from the time the council notifies the relevant plan change by August 2022 unless:

·    a qualifying matter applies (e.g. heritage, special character, national grid, designations, open space, onsite wastewater management constraints, onsite potable water collection constraints and stormwater disposal impediments)

·    the council has proposed more permissive height standards

·    greenfield land is being re-zoned to residential land.

8.       In these cases, planning provisions would have legal effect once the plan change decisions have been completed after the submissions and hearings period.

9.       Under the Bill, resource consent applications lodged after 20 August 2022 (or sooner if the plan change is notified sooner) would be assessed against these changes.

10.     The Bill also requires the withdrawal in part or full, of relevant proposed plans, plan changes or private plan changes which have been notified but have not completed a hearing by 20 February 2022. Relevant proposed plans or plan changes include those that: implement NPS-UD policies 3 and 4 and/or propose changes to or create new residential zone(s) but do not incorporate the MDRS. This requirement is to ensure that the MDRS becomes the minimum expected density throughout Tier 1 residential areas, and that these plan changes go through the ISPP. The ISPP would be faster than a regular plan change process and have no Environment Court appeal rights.

11.     The Bill also clarifies that financial contributions (under the Resource Management Act) can apply to permitted activities i.e. those that do not require a resource consent. The council currently collects development contributions (under the Local Government Act), not financial contributions.

12.     Lastly, the Bill makes changes to Policy 3(d) of the NPS-UD to clarify this policy and provide less scope for interpretation. Policy 3(d) would be changed to focus solely on enabling height and density adjacent to neighbourhood, local and town centres. At present the NPS-UD links height and density to levels of accessibility to a range of goods and services, and demand for housing.

13.     Due to the limited three-week submission period, local board views on the Bill were required to be provided by midday on 9 November 2021 and therefore the feedback was approved by the chair under the following resolution from the board’s 22 April 2020 business meeting, as the next local board meeting was not scheduled until the 24 November 2021.

 

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13.     The board’s feedback maintains that Waiheke must remain a natural sanctuary in the gulf

and that the need to preserve the character of the island, the lack of area on village sites for

disposal of wastewater and stormwater and constrained roof spaces for collection of potable

water mean that the imposition of MDRS on Waiheke would be impractical and undesirable.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the local board formal feedback given under delegation on the Resource Management Enabling Housing Supply Amendment Bill.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board feedback on the Resource Management Enabling Housing Supply Amendment Bill

155

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Inglis - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

Community Forum record of proceedings

File No.: CP2021/17035

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Providing a record of proceedings from the Community Forum session held 10 November 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Community forums are held monthly on the second Wednesday of the month. They provide opportunity for the public to raise and discuss local issues with board members.

3.       The forum also provides an opportunity to provide feedback on workshop agenda items.

4.       Further information and copies of presentations can be found at the link below:

https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/local-boards/all-local-boards/waiheke-local-board/Pages/waiheke-local-board-public-and-business-meetings.aspx

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the Community Forum record of proceedings dated 10 November 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Community Forum record of proceedings

161

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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PDF Creator


Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

Waiheke Local Board Workshop record of proceedings

File No.: CP2021/16707

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Waiheke Local Board proceedings taken at the workshops held on 20 and 27 October and 3 and 10 November 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under section 12.1 of the current Standing Orders of the Waiheke Local Board, workshops convened by the local board shall be closed to the public. However, the proceedings of every workshop shall record the names of members attending and a statement summarising the nature of the information received, and nature of matters discussed.

3.       The purpose of the local board’s workshops is for the provision of information and local board members discussion.  No resolutions or formal decisions are made during the local board’s workshops.

4.       The record of proceedings for the local board’s workshops held 20 and 27 October and 3 and 10 November 2021 are appended to the report.

5.       These can also be viewed, together with workshop agendas, at this link https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/local-boards/all-local-boards/waiheke-local-board/Pages/waiheke-local-board-public-and-business-meetings.aspx

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the record of proceedings for the local board workshops held on 20 and 27 October and 3 and 10 November 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop Proceedings - 20 October 2021

165

b

Workshop Proceedings - 27 October 2021

167

c

Workshop Proceedings - 3 November 2021

169

d

Workshop Proceedings - 10 November 2021

171

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

List of resource consent applications - 17 October to 7 November 2021

File No.: CP2021/16710

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Attached is the list of resource consent applications related to Waiheke Island received from 17 October to 7 November 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the list of resource consents applications related to Waiheke Island. 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Resource consents applications report

175

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

Local board governance forward work calendar - December 2021 update

File No.: CP2021/16711

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Waiheke Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waiheke Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar is appended to the report as Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff for reference and information only.

3.       The governance forward work calendars are part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·        ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·        clarifying what advice is expected and when

·        clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive its Governance Forward Work Calendar dated December 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar

179

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator 



[1] Māori housing grants are only available for housing developments undertaken in conjunction with an urban marae and must fill the same general purpose as papakāinga

[2] Stats NZ (2020). 2018 Census data – Auckland region. Retrieved from https://www.stats.govt.nz/tools/2018-census-place-summaries/auckland-region

[3] Stats NZ (2020). 2018 Census household crowding. Retrieved from https://www.stats.govt.nz/

[4] Allpress, J. and Reid, A. (2021). Quality of Life survey 2020: results for Auckland. Auckland Council technical report, TR2021/16

[5] Stats NZ (2020). 2018 Census. Retrieved from https://www.stats.govt.nz/

[6] ibid